Yingluck Shinawatra & Constitutional Court

Yingluck Shinawatra (born 21 June 1967), or nickname Pu (crab ), is a Thai businesswoman and politician, member of the Pheu Thai Party, and the 28th and current Prime Minister of Thailand following the 2011 general election. A constitutional court is a high court that deals primarily with constitutional law. Its main authority is to rule on whether or not laws that are challenged are in fact unconstitutional, i.e. 5.0/5

Yingluck Shinawatra Constitutional Court Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra Prime Minister Pheu Thai National Security Council East Asia Election Commission Pheu Thai Party Security Council Corruption Commission Chiang Mai University Bangkok Post Udon Thani Kwanchai Praipana

Subscribe to ITN News: Thailand's Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra has been forced to step down by the country's Constitutional Court.
New York Times - The Travails of Thailand By MICHAEL J. MONTESANO MAY 9, 2014 Thailand has just suffered its third judicial coup in six years. This week the Constitutional Court ordered the removal of Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra and nine of her cabinet ministers for replacing a National Security adviser held over from a previous administration. In so ruling, the judges read into the Constitution constraints on the government’s powers that have little basis in the document. Ms. Yingluck’s ouster may seem like one more spasm in Thailand’s protracted political crisis. But it is far more ominous than that. The judicial removal of an elected Prime Minister on political grounds is emblematic of the no-holds-barred approach of her opponents, not only in the political arena but also at nominally independent institutions. Antigovernment protesters held a rally in Bangkok on Thursday to celebrate a day after a court removed Yingluck Shinawatra as Prime Minister.Ousted Thai Premier Faces Impeachment Am ...
Thailand - political crisis - a commentary from The Economist Thailand: Everything is broken Long in crisis, Thailand is close to the brink. Without compromises on both sides, it may well collapse LOOK on and despair. A decade ago Thailand was a shining example—rare proof that in South-East Asia a vibrant democracy could go hand-in-hand with a thriving economy. Contrast that with Thailand on May 7th, left in disarray after the Constitutional Court demanded that the Prime Minister, Yingluck Shinawatra (pictured), step down with nine members of her cabinet over her decision to remove the country’s head of National Security in 2011, in favour of a relative. For all the pretence of due legal process and distaste at Ms Yingluck’s nepotism, this was not an offence that merited the ousting of a Prime Minister. Instead, the ruling is a measure of quite how far Thailand has fallen, how deeply it is divided and how badly its institutions are broken Unless Thais step back from the brink, their country risks fa ...
Thailand’s Constitutional Court has dismissed Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra from office, ruling that she acted illegally when she transferred her National Security head in 2011. Yingluck is accused of demoting National Security chief Thawil Pliensri, who was appointed by the opposition-led admi…
Thailand - aftermath of ousting of caretaker PM Yinluck - a commentary Thailand’s Prime Minister Removed, But No One Happy With the Result It hasn’t been a good week for either democracy or the rule of law in Thailand. By Joshua Kurlantzick May 10, 2014 This week, Thailand’s Constitutional Court, the country’s highest court, ruled that caretaker Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra had abused her power and should be removed from office, along with nine other ministers in her cabinet. The charges were related to the removal from his position of a former civil servant three years ago. The New York Times has a summary of the situation here. There is no real precedent for the court’s decision to remove Yingluck and the other ministers, and no real textual basis for the decision in Thailand’s constitution. But the Constitutional Court has in recent years shown time and again that it needs no precedent or constitutional basis, in its mind, to make decisions. The court also repeatedly has demonstrated ...
A Constitutional Court ruling on Yingluck Shinawatra today could imperil an already stuttering peace process.
Thai PM Yingluck Shinawatra dismissed from office by court - (CNN) -- Thailand's Constitutional Court has...
Thai Constitutional Court rules PM Yingluck Shinawatra abused her power & removes her from office.
Coffins with judges' photos burned; mass gathering today Pro-government red shirts in a number of provinces burnt coffins in a symbolic gesture yesterday aimed at Constitutional Court judges who ruled on Wednesday to remove caretaker Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra from office. Red shirts will meet today at Aksa Road in Nakhon Pathom in what is expected to be a mass gathering. Provincial red-shirt leaders said they would resort to all means possible to defend the administration. Udon Thani red-shirt leader Kwanchai Praipana said 1,000 red shirts from Udon Thani with 100 trained red guards from the Democracy Protection Volunteers would come to Aksa Road. The protesters would stay till Wednesday and would not march anywhere. Apichart Inson (aka DJ Uan), a leader of the red shirt's Rak Chiang Mai 51, said red shirts from the North were mobilising in tandem with red shirts in other provinces and had gathered at provincial halls including at Lampang and Kamphaeng Phet to burn coffins. He said letters of pro ...
Burning coffins with photos of judges: mass gathering today in shirts burn a casket to demonstrate their anger at the Constitutional Court after it unanimously ruled to remove Yingluck Shinawatra and nine members of her Cabinet from office after finding them guilty of abusing their power. READ MORE:
Thailand’s Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra has been ordered to step down after constitutional court found her guilty of abusing power. The court has accused Yingluck of misuse of power when she transferred a senior civil servant to another position, shortly after taking office in 2011. Appearing…
Red-shirt, pro-government demonstrators rallied and burned mock coffins and effigies in several provinces on Friday in protest against the Constitutional Court's disqualification of Yingluck Shinawatra as Prime Minister.
Thailand’s Constitutional Court yesterday removed on Wednesday the Prime Minister, Yingluck Shinawatra, and almost a third of her cabinet ministers for “abuse of power.” The Pheu Thai Party remains in office, although its hold on power is extremely tenuous. Yingluck’s deputy, Niwatthamrong Boonsongphaisan, a former business associate of Thaksin, has taken over as caretaker Prime Minister. A new election is scheduled for July 20.
Thailand's Constitutional Court orders country's Prime Minister, Yingluck Shinawatra to step down after finding her guilty of abuse of power
In case you haven't heard, the Constitutional Court has removed Yingluck Shinawatra from her position as Prime Minister. I have a story all ready, but the Bangkok Post website seems to have crashed from heavy traffic.
Thailand's Constitutional Court has found caretaker Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra guilty in the illegal transfer of National Security Council secretary Thawil Pliensri and has forced her out of office.
Constitutional Court gives 15-day deadline extension to caretaker PM Yingluck Shinawatra o
Thailand's Constitutional Court on Wednesday gave crisis-mired Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra more time to submit her defence again...
Thailand's Constitutional Court on Wednesday gave Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra until May 2 to... [from VOA]
Thailand's Constitutional Court has given Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra till May 2 to defend herself against charges of abuse of power
Thailand - political unrest - a "judicial coup" ahead? - a commentary in The Nation Critics divided on independent bodies and the extent of their powers Pravit Rojanaphruk The Nation BANGKOK: -- Will there be a "judicial coup" soon? The answer is much more complicated than merely asking if there will be a military coup with tanks rolling down the streets of Bangkok. Opponents of a "judicial coup", like the former dean of Chiang Mai University's Law Faculty Somchai Silpapreechakul, says the exercising of power by the Constitutional Court and the National Anti-Corruption Commission (NACC) against caretaker premier Yingluck Shinawatra is beyond their bounds of power and should be regarded judicial intervention. However, opponents think not. Somchai acknowledges that Thai society is still unfamiliar with the notion of a "judicial coup" and there's no one common Thai translation appropriate to it. Also there's room to debate whether the action of the two organisations in the weeks to come - that could lead to ...
♥ Yingluck Shinawatra : 'Double removal' not possible Wednesday, April 09, 2014 04:28 PM Caretaker Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra insists she cannot be doubly removed from office as she has already been relieved of duty after the Dec 9, 2013 House dissolution. She was referring to the Constitutional Court's acceptance of a petition to consider her position as premier following the court decision over the transfer of Thawil Pliensri, secretary general of the National Security Council. The petition was submitted by 27 senators led by appointed senator Paibul Nititawan. Ms Yingluck cited Section 180(2) of the 2007 constitution, which provides: "Ministers vacate office en masse upon the dissolution of the House of Representatives". With the House dissolution, she said she had returned power to the people. Her status now is simply as caretaker Prime Minister as required under Section 181: "The outgoing Council of Ministers shall remain in office to perform duties until the newly appointed Council of Min ...
We write this letter to explain why millions of people take to streets to demand reforms before the next election, as reported daily on the news. However, many western media sources have been misguided and show a lack of understanding of the Thai political crisis. The peaceful and non-violent protests began in October 2013, whose main goals are the eradication of the Thaksin authoritarian government and the legal and political reform, such as of the election and political party laws, before the free and fair election takes place. On 9th December, 2013 the government was dissolved and an election was scheduled on 2nd February, 2014. The reason for the people to demand reform before election is because if the election were to take place the corrupt Pheu Thai Party, led by Yingluck Shinawatra who is backed by her brother, former PM Thanksin Shinawatra, would win the election again, largely as a result of vote buying and their populist policies. For the past 13 years, the Shinawatra family has done much damag ...
The Nation February 5, 2014 1:00 am The Democrat Party yesterday lodged a complaint with the Constitutional Court against Pheu Thai Party, calling for dissolution of the ruling party for pushing the February 2 election to be held despite an Election Commission recommendation to delay the poll. Party spokesman Chavanond Intarakomalyasut said caretaker premier and Pheu Thai Party-list MP Yingluck Shinawatra had ignored the election agency's key recommendation, an act regarded as a violation of an important charter article. It has requested dissolution of the Pheu Thai Party because executive authority was utilised, via government acts such as the declaring of a state of emergency, which afforded it control of political expression over others in the run-up to the poll. Article 68 of the Constitution stipulates one's right to protect the Constitution. It also prohibits any act that would seek change or to obtain authority through unconstitutional means. The article also permits dissolution of political partie ...
Divided Thailand readies for advance voting on Sunday AP | Jan 25, 2014, 06.48 PM IST BANGKOK: A tense Thailand prepared for Sunday's round of advance voting as the main Feb 2 elections still hang in the balance. The ruling party indicated it wants the vote to go ahead but was willing to delay it if political rivals end months of protests and agree to recognize the legitimacy of a new vote. Yingluck Shinawatra's government is under extreme pressure from the protesters who have occupied key intersections in Bangkok and tried to shut down government offices and prevent civil servants from working. They have vowed to disrupt the elections, want Yingluck to resign and an appointed interim government to implement anti-corruption reforms before a new vote can take place. On Friday, the Constitutional Court ruled that the government, in agreement with the Election Commission, could postpone the polls. But Yingluck's Pheu Thai Party questioned the legal basis for the ruling. One official, Thanin Boonsuwan, sugges ...
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