Wright Brothers & New York Times

The Wright brothers, Orville (August 19, 1871 – January 30, 1948) and Wilbur (April 16, 1867 – May 30, 1912), were two Americans credited with inventing and building the world's first successful airplane and making the first controlled, powered and sustained heavier-than-air human flight, on December 17, 1903. In the two years afterward, the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. The New York Times is an American daily newspaper founded and continuously published in New York City since 1851. The New York Times has won 106 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any news organization. 3.7/5

Wright Brothers New York Times Kitty Hawk Social Security Kentucky Fried Chicken Walt Disney Mickey Mouse Colonel Sanders Smithsonian Institute North Carolina Warner Brothers Robert Goddard Scientific American

The New York Times and Scientific American at first wrote that the Wright Brothers flights were a hoax.
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(...) Sometimes experts in their own field underestimated what was happening right beneath their noses. In 1927, Harry M.Warner, one of the founders of Warner Brothers, remarked during the era of silent movies, "Who the *** wants to hear actors talk?" And Thomas Watson, chairman of IBM, said in 1943, "I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." This underestimation of the power of scientific discovery even extended to the venerable New York Times. (In 1903, the Times declared that flying machines were a waste of time, just a week before the Wright brothers successfully flew their airplane at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1920, the Times criticized rocket scientist Robert Goddard, declaring his work nonsense because rockets cannot move in a vacuum. Forty-nine years later, when Apollo 11 astronauts landed on the moon, the Times, to its credit, ran the retraction: "It is now definitely established that a rocket can function in a vacuum. The Times regrets the error.") The lesson here is that ...
Do you hear about the Wright brothers? They were the two bicycle mechanics who pioneered the first airplane. But did you also know that Dr. Samuel Langley, a professor of Mathematics and astronomy at the Smithsonian Institute, was expected to do it before them? This brilliant scientist published books on the subject ten years before the Wright brothers even thought of flying their plane. His experiments achievement was such a high level of success, that the U. S War Department even funded. But on October 8, 1903 when Langley tried to fly his first Bi-plane, it finished up in the water, not more than fifty yards from where it had taken off. The New York Times blasted him and called it "A ridiculous fiasco". They wrote, " man might fly one day perhaps one to ten million yeas from now". But Langley was able to ignore their criticism and stay focused. Two months later he tried again, And again he was unsuccessful. This time the wing supports broke as the plane took off, and it plunged upside down into a rive ...
A New York Times editorial on December 10, 1903 questioned the wisdom of the Wright Brothers who were trying to invent a machine, heavier than air, that would fly. One week later, at Kitty Hawk, the Wright Brothers took their first famous flight. Colonel Sanders, at age 65, with a beat up car and a $100 check from Social Security, realised he had to do something. He remembered his mother’s recipe of making chicken and went out selling. It is estimated that he had knocked on more than thousand doors before he got his first order. And that’s how Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) was born. As a young cartoonist, Walt Disney faced many rejections from newspaper editors, who said he had no talent. One day a minister at a church hired him to draw some cartoons. Disney was working out of a small mouse infested shed near the church. After seeing a small mouse, he got inspired. That was the start of Mickey Mouse. Finally, this was a man who failed in business at the age of 21, was defeated in legislative race at ag ...
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