Vietnam War & Kent State

The Vietnam War was a Cold War-era military conflict that occurred in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955 to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975. This war followed the First Indochina War and was fought between North Vietnam, supported by its communist allies, and the government of South Vietnam, supported by the United States and other anti-communist countries. Kent State University (also known as Kent, Kent State, and KSU) is a public research university located in Kent, Ohio, United States. 5.0/5

Vietnam War Kent State Kent State University Ohio National Guard National Guard United States Jeffrey Miller President Richard Nixon Allison Krause New York City Jackson State Neil Young Urban Outfitters White House John Lennon National Guardsmen Bobby Seale

you may be too young to remember the anti Vietnam War protests. Kent State was truly horrifying. students killed by Natl Guard
This weekend Urban Outfitters briefly made a “Vintage Kent State Sweatshirt” splattered with fake blood available on its website for $130; it's now listed as “Sold Out.” The joke is that in 1970 four Kent State students were shot to death by National Guard soldiers while protesting the Vietnam War..…
Yes, in Kent State, 1970, 4 students protesting the Vietnam War were killed.
a bunch of students who went to Kent State were protesting part of the Vietnam war and the government sent troops in to +
Many people assumed the sweatshirt was connected to the tragic 1970 Vietnam War protest on the Kent State campus in which the National Guard opened fire, killing four students and injuring nine more.
Today marks the 25th Anniversary of the Tienanmen Square massacre. In many ways this single event opened the eyes of the world to what at the time was to most a ghost of a country. At the time I had little clue what was going on in the rest of the world. Beyond trying to raise a young family, grading science papers and building a wrestling program I wasn't aware of much outside my little world. Closed to most westerners, China was a mystery but like the Vietnam War and Neil Armstrong's first steps on the moon we watched the horrid events unfold before us. CNN gave us a glimpse of how closed and rigid China could be. Maybe for those older than me this brought back images of Kent State and Jackson State. Freedom has a price. Weeks following the massacre I was in Warsaw, Poland traveling with a cultural exchange team. The day after the Tienanmen massacre students in Warsaw torched the Chinese embassy in protest. If the drink of freedom is a Molotov cocktail these Polish students threw some down that night. L ...
The killings at Kent State: 4 May 1970 when Ohio National Guard opened fire on students protesting Vietnam War
Recorded on May 21, 1970 and released in June of 1970, this song was written by Neil Young in response to the Kent State shooting by the Ohio National Guard that killed 4 unarmed students that were protesting the expansion of the Vietnam War into Cambodia. Reached number 14 on the Billboard singles chart.
(edited for perfection) 50 years ago today it was January 31st 1964. According to Wikipedia, not much happened that day. It was a Friday, as it is this very day. I'm currently studying this parallel time-frame, trying to pinpoint exactly the flashpoint, event or series of events in the 60s that eventually transformed our culture. It's well-known that the early-to-mid 60s is where the modern world - here in the West, that is - and/or culture as we know it began to emerge. Where the "old world" collided with the "new". By ten years later, early-mid 70s, the landscape had completely changed in a number of ways. America came of age, or at least lost its virginity somewhere amongst this time-frame. Obviously, a series of very profound events, some very sobering and some ecstatic, and one very long and polarizing Vietnam War led to America and her culture becoming the serious (and increasingly ludicrous) world that it is today. This continued into the 1970s and early 80s, as Watergate, Kent State, Nixon's trip ...
Today in History: October 7, 1975, a New York State Supreme Court judge reverses a deportation order for John Lennon, allowing him to remain legally in his adoptive home of New York City. Protests against the Vietnam War had escalated significantly following the announcement of the Cambodia invasion on April 30, 1970, and the shooting deaths of four student protestors at Kent State just four days later. Many such gatherings would feature peaceful demonstrators singing Lennon's 1969 anthem "Give Peace A Chance," but others were more threatening. Newly relocated to New York City, John Lennon began to associate publicly with such radical figures as Abbie Hoffman, Jerry Rubin and Bobby Seale, and the White House reportedly grew concerned, according to the 2006 documentary The U.S. vs. John Lennon, over his potentially powerful influence with a generation of 18-to-20-year-olds who would be allowed, for the very first time, to vote in the 1972 presidential election. "I suppose if you were going to list your ene ...
Eve Of Destruction Now, I'm not one for protesting, but when I was 10-years-old I witnessed one very big protest. The date was Thursday, May 28, 1970. The place was Neyland Stadium in Knoxville, Tennessee. Two of the most admired men in America were there: Billy Graham and President Richard Nixon. The protestors were actually standing next to where my group was. By the time Nixon rose to speak, they were chanting, "One, two, three, four, We don't want your (blank-ing) war!" I remember thinking how disrespectful it was to do that at a Billy Graham Crusade, but Nixon was there and he was the reason the protestors were there. It was during the Vietnam War and the tragic shootings at Kent State had occured just a few days earlier. Nixon had gone into seclusion at the White House and he saw the Graham crusade as a chance to be seen in a more positive light. He did not count on such a major protest occuring. The chants used by the protestors were frequent and loud, but Nixon seemed to draw strength from i ...
Marshall Law representing interests of business stability. One acquaintance said he had his troops add bayonets during the Vietnam War protests in Washington DC and they were prepared to use them. That was the first in recent history that I found I could have been on the wrosng side of US Military force on US civilians. The call to action was not made fortunately. National Guard at Kent State University shot college students protesting during those turbulent times. So yes kids, there are many example where the US military is used against American civilians' uprisings.
On May 15, 1970, 12 students were wounded and two were killed at Jackson State: 21-year-old law student Phillip Lafayette Gibbs and 17-year-old high school student James Earl Green. The police opened fire on a student protest of the U.S. invasion of Cambodia during the Vietnam War. (They also shot passers-by.) This was only 10 days after Kent State Massacre, and does not get the same attention in the press and textbooks. The other less known story is that of Orangeburg massacre, two years earlier, as documented in the film Scarred Justice.
"At Kent State University on May 4, 1970, until a bullet pierced my right wrist, I waved my black flag of despair and anger only 10 days after I attended the funeral of my childhood friend who was killed in the Vietnam War. Somehow I survived the surreal Kent State Massacre when four of my fellow-students were killed and eight others injured when the Ohio National Guard was ordered to "FIRE!" their weapons into our distant anti-war demonstration. I lived to fight another day and to lead our longstanding May 4 Movement for truth and justice in Kent, Ohio, where I remain active today in 2013." "The Kent State shootings have never been thoroughly examined and no person or group has been held accountable for wrongdoing. Forty years later, family members of those killed have initiated the Kent State Truth Tribunal to preserve and honor the stories of those whose lives have been touched by this tragedy." "When Ohio National Guardsmen fired sixty-seven gun shots in thirteen seconds at Kent State University (KSU) ...
On May 4, 1970 members of the Ohio National Guard fired into a crowd of Kent State University demonstrators, killing four and wounding nine Kent State students. The impact of the shootings was dramatic. The event triggered a nationwide student strike that forced hundreds of colleges and universities to close. H. R. Haldeman, a top aide to President Richard Nixon, suggests the shootings had a direct impact on national politics. In The Ends of Power, Haldeman (1978) states that the shootings at Kent State began the slide into Watergate, eventually destroying the Nixon administration. Beyond the direct effects of the May 4th, the shootings have certainly come to symbolize the deep political and social divisions that so sharply divided the country during the Vietnam War era.
"FOUR DEAD IN OHIO . . ." 43 years ago today, Ohio National Guardsmen opened fire on protesting students at Kent State University. When the shooting was over, four students were dead, one student was permanently paralyzed, and eight others were injured. In the wake of the shootings, the attention of the nation was focused on the Ohio campus. The shootings prompted the largest student strike in United States history and a change in public opinion about the Vietnam War. The photo below depicts the four students who were killed at Kent State – Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer and William Schroeder.
If the early 70’s appeared slightly less turbulent on the surface, they really weren’t; Kent State shootings, a ramp-up in the Vietnam War, and the first manifestations of the inflation problem. America continued to undergo sweeping social changes as well. For one thing, our TV selection changed virtually overnight. In 1971, CBS cancelled all of its beloved rural sitcoms and a number of its more “family-oriented” shows in one fell swoop – gone were The Beverly Hillbillies, Green Acres, Mayberry R.F.D. (successor to The Andy Griffith Show), Family Affair, The Ed Sullivan Show and Hogan’s Heroes, among others. Granted, most of these shows were a long way from their peak, but they still drew respectable audiences. In their place would come new, more “ relevant” shows, pushing the new social hot buttons of the country – the initially controversial All in the Family (bigotry and the generation gap), its even more controversial spinoff Maude (women’s’ liberation), The Bob Newhart Show (so ...
Kent State, May 4, 1970: America Kills Its Children Twenty-five years ago this month, students came out on the Kent State campus and scores of others to protest the bombing of Cambodia-- a decision of President Nixon's that appeared to expand the Vietnam War. Some rocks were thrown, some windows were broken, and an attempt was made to burn the ROTC building. Governor James Rhodes sent in the National Guard. The units that responded were ill-trained and came right from riot duty elsewhere; they hadn't had much sleep. The first day, there was some brutality; the Guard bayonetted two men, one a disabled veteran, who had cursed or yelled at them from cars. The following day, May 4th, the Guard, commanded with an amazing lack of military judgment, marched down a hill, to a field in the middle of angry demonstrators, then back up again. Seconds before they would have passed around the corner of a large building, and out of sight of the crowd, many of the Guardsmen wheeled and fired directly into the students, h ...
Picking out Uncomplicated Advice Of When the Garden Was Eden The late 1960s and early 1970s, in New York City and America at large, were years marked by political tumult, social unrest-and the best professional basketball ever played. Paradise, for better or worse, was a hardwood court in Midtown Manhattan. When the Garden Was Eden is the definitive account of how the New York Knickerbockers won their first and only championships, and in the process provided the nation no small escape from the Vietnam War, the tragedy at Kent State, and the last vestiges of Jim Crow. The Knicks were more than a team; they were a symbol of harmony, the sublimation of individual personalities for the greater collective good. No one is better suited to revive the old chants of “Dee-fense!” that rocked Madison Square Garden or the joy that radiated courtside than Harvey Araton, who has followed the Knicks, old and new, for decades-first as a teenage fan, then as a young sports reporter with the New York Post, and now as a ...
I got a bunch of books for Christmas because I love to read. One is a book by Neil Young. I learned something I never knew or remembered about the Kent State shootings. One of the 4 students that were murdered by our government name was Allison Krause. Victim of the Kent State University shooting. She was a student protestor who was shot and killed during the anti-Vietnam War protest demonstrations. During the mid-1960s to early 1970s, the United States was engaged in the Vietnam War, a conflict that had split the country into two factions: those that opposed the war and those that supported it. By 1968, the country was so badly divided that President Lyndon Johnson (Democrat) decided not to seek a second term, and Republican Richard M. Nixon won the Presidential election with a campaign promise to end the war. Nixon's plan was to slowly disengage the American military from Vietnam, while increasing South Vietnam's participation, but most antiwar factions wanted immediate US withdrawal from Vietnam. On .. ...
When Ohio National Guardsmen opened fire on student protesters at Kent State University, it was a turning point that escalated student opposition to the Vietnam War. Now, more than 40 years after the shooting, the school is finally turning a page in its long struggle with the tragedy.
Thank you, friends, for letting me have my little melt down this afternoon. My generation literally took bullets (Kent State) to fight against the Vietnam War and continued for decades with other issues. We made huge strides in the workplace, women’s rights, minority rights, Consumer Protection, labor and, thanks to the likes of Ralph Nader, safety. Not to mention what we have done to preserve the environment. So I will continue to do my part to take care of mother earth and maybe I will start another political party. What shall we call it?
When people ask me why I like Pres. Barack Obama, this is what I say: I have lived through segregation and integration, the assassination of Pres. John Kennedy, the assassination of Robert Kennedy, the assassination of Martin Luther King, the Vietnam War, the Bay of Pigs, the Cuban missile crisis, and the shooting and murder of innocent student protesters on the campus of Kent State, and in addition to the carcinogenic influence of asbestos, lead, mercury and other compounds poison to the human body. The many years before Roe versus Wade. I've seen firsthand the extinction of marine life and its replacement was water contaminated with chemicals. Various species of animals becoming extinct. I will stop although there are many more examples that I wish I hadn't been aware of. President Obama has not been able to completely clean up the mess that George W. Bush left. But he is working on, and it will take probably at least four more years, most likely longer. This is why I am voting for a winner, Pres. Barac ...
A Dear & Loving friend of Mine whom I dated for a little while~AMAZING Family. they were Ukranian~ So Beautiful their Collection of Master piece egg's, and wreath's of flower's the Ladies & little ones wore around their heads, w/Beautiful soft colored Ribbions ,that would flow through the air as they danced softly throughout the Celebration of their Wedding's. So lovely Ukranian they are. Example:Would Wear what hippies would back in the day, Soft puer sheer white lowing dresses...barefoot in the grass.Think of Forrest Gump's Wedding in the movie~Robin Wright Penn.Had to share the Beauty! Plus their Parent's~Their Meals~ Ok, I'm rushing!) brother was asked to Speak to Everyone are All of this~He trucked immediately to Kent State from Maryland
The 60s was the era that a teenage boy became a man and a U. S. Marine, fighting in the Vietnam War. It was the era of Elvis Presley, Petula Clark, The Association, The Who, The Beetles, and many, many more, including the 5th Dimension, the Mama's and Papas. It was the era also of beginning to sound off against the United States government and the Vietnam War.  Kent State and the National Guard would be on the horizon. It was the beginning of civil unrest, disobedience and many great songs
Read Vietnam Diaries Page 1 through Page 5 Posted about what almost happen in the Vietnam War the utter mistakes made by both sides, the unfortunate incidents like Kent State prompted President Nixon to abandon the idea of a purely military Victory.
Newsweek magazine once said that "the last year that things were any good in America was 1967." I wonder. On June 5, 1968, Sen. Robert F. Kennedy was shot and mortally wounded just after claiming victory in California's Democratic presidential primary. Gunman Sirhan Bishara Sirhan was immediately arrested. We had an awful few years with the Vietnam War, political assassinations, LSD, Kent State Rebellions, college closures and on and on. Don't mean to be negative here, just thinking. TODAY is a great day--let the main things be the main things in your life.
1970: Nixon expands the Vietnam war into Cambodia. Protesters are shot at Kent State - but this is the Cambodian story, about a young refugee named 'Lucky'
KENT STATE REVISITED The killing of four students on the campus of Kent State, Ohio, on May 4, 1970, during a demonstration against the Vietnam War.
Some have speculated that the song's lyrics are referencing the Vietnam War, with the "rain" being a metaphor for bombs falling from the sky. Events such as the the Kent State shooting- Fogerty is saying that the same issues of the '60s still existed in the 1970s but that people were no longer fighting for them. Fogerty himself has said in interviews and prior to playing the song in concert that the song is about rising tension within CCR and the imminent departure of his brother Tom from the band.
1970 -- US: Five days after the Kent State killings, 100,000 march in Washington, DC against the Vietnam War. About 600 Canadian protesters deface the Peace Arch at the US-Canadian border at Blaine, Washington.
Hamilton Collection
May 7, 2012 To the International Criminal Court at the Hague, On May 4, 1970, Allison Krause, my sister, was shot dead by an Ohio National Guard bullet as she protested the Vietnam War, the America...
In 1970, in response to Nixon's widening of the Vietnam War into Cambodia, students throughout the US protested. Nixon sent the National Guard to restore ord...
In memory of my beloved brother Mark Goodman: May 5, 1939 - May 2, 2012. Today is May 4, 2012 - the 42nd Anniversary of the incident involving the killing of 4 Kent State students by National Guard troops. This was in response to student protests on campus to then President Richard Nixon's decision to escalate the Vietnam War and was part of the larger nationwide protests by students all over the country at that time . On this day, 42 years ago, my brother Mark and family, including newborn Elizabeth Goodman, were visiting my parents, Jason and Louise Goodman in Bath, Ohio. My brother and I went into the town of Kent, where I had attended college from 1967 to 1970. As we reached the edge of Kent, we found town under martial law with millitary jeeps at the entrance, complete with mounted weaponry. Mark was working for Time Warner at the time, and we were able to get into town via his press card. I took him around to interview several friends of mine who were witness to the event. He flew home to N ...
May 4, 1970 – Vietnam War: Kent State shootings: the Ohio National Guard, sent to Kent State University after disturbances in the city of Kent the weekend before, opens fire killing four unarmed students and wounding nine others. The students were protesting the United States' invasion of Cambodia.
Kent State University shootings in May of 1970 during the Vietnam War.
OK, you win. Brown ended segregation in ’54, Kent State ended Vietnam War in ’70, Jim Crow is spelled with an "e."
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