Supreme Court & Washington Post

A supreme court is the highest court within the hierarchy of many legal jurisdictions. The Washington Post is the most widely circulated newspaper published in Washington, D.C., and oldest extant in the area, founded in 1877. Located in the capital city of the United States, The Post has a particular emphasis on national politics. 5.0/5

Supreme Court Washington Post Voting Rights Act Washington Supreme Court Affordable Care Act Barack Obama United States Hobby Lobby Justice Antonin Scalia New York Times Pat Robertson Jerry Falwell Ezra Klein Justice Kagan Texas Supreme Court President Barack Obama

Washington Post: Justice officials warned the swift disclosure of experience with the Supreme Court gutting key provisions
Are the police tracking you? Push to restrict license plate readers heads to Va. Supreme Court - Washington Post
Supreme Court turns to key constitutional issue in health-care law - Washington Post
Thoughts on the Supreme Court oral argument in US v. Texas - Washington Post
Supreme Court declines to block Texas voter ID law, for now - Washington Post
(Washington Post) keep heat on Grassley as Supreme Court fight..
Washington Post: In 1992, Joe Biden called for an election-year blockade of Supreme Court nominations
Wesner Michel; These are the key cases facing the Supreme Court after Scalia's death - Washington Post: Washin...
Obama takes immigration leniency plan to the Supreme Court - Washington Post
Supreme Court denies requests to halt execution in Georgia - Washington Post
Supreme Court takes up major challenge to abortion restrictions - Washington Post
Roberts’s Supreme Court: More unpopular than ever - The Washington Post Does Not Matter! Never has. Never will.
In a setback for Nixon, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of The New York Times and Washington Post, which had published the Pentagon Papers
Supreme Court to hear battle over Confederate license plates - Washington Post
For those of you who are too young to remember the era, here is a little history lesson for you: Suppose the government told CBS,CNN and the Washington Post that they were prohibited from writing a news story. They even got a judge to issue an injunction preventing it. For a few days this happened, and there was the real possibility that they might do it anyhow or that other papers outside this country would publish it, and then the papers would be snuck into millions of homes (where the residents would face arrest and prosecution)... or even that the papers and networks would do it anyhow. Would the government invade the paper or close down the network? Would jury's refuse to convict them?? That really happened!..Fortunately the Supreme Court realized how close we came, and put a stop to it. Ben Bradlee was part of a small group of journalists who saved the First Amendment in this country... and that was BEFORE Watergate! That's quite an epithet for your tombstone.
Washington Post says- In a surprising twist of fate, the protesters may have the Supreme Court on their side. (Just not in the way you might think.) In Citizens United v. FEC and Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, the court ruled that corporations are covered by the First Amendment and that freedom of religion can be extended to corporations. Cornell Law School professor Lynn Stout has asserted that these rulings solidified the notion that a corporation is an independent entity, similar to a person. She said, “Because of the legal ‘personhood’ of corporations, buying a share in a corporation is like making a contract with the legal ‘person’ that is the company, which is different from buying the company.” In short, the notion that a corporation is simply a giant sole-proprietorship where shareholders have total control is legally untenable. So if shareholders don’t own the company, who does? Market Basket’s employees, customers and suppliers say they do.
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When scientist fudge their numbers to make their points they are not practicing sience, but politics. Be careful believing science. Always be skeptical. It's the scientific way! Even the Washington Post has to debunk lies told to the Supreme Court as government scientists are caught fudging their statistics. It really does take faith to believe a scientist's conclusions. Were they biased? Were they competently reporting "facts". Here's the article: Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia said he thinks it is proper to settle questions early on in class-action suits. “The reason is the enormous pressure to settle once the class is certified,” Justice Scalia said. (Associated Press)By THE Washington TimesMonday, June 23, 2014A fractured Supreme Court on Monday largely upheld the Environmental Protection Agency’s radical rule designed to shut down the power plants that produce the most affordable electricity. The justices continue to accept the EPA’s labeling of carbon dioxide as a “pollutant.” Th . ...
If conservatives are furious about the Taliban prisoner exchange that freed Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, the members of Team Bush are absolutely frothing at the mouth. Writing in the Washington Post, former Bush speechwriters Michael Gerson and Marc Thiessen suggested that at best, President Obama does not have the attitude that "we will fight you as long as you fight us" and, at worst, "is surrendering to the Taliban." Echoing the demands of the likes of Allen West and Fox News regular Jeanine Pirro that Obama be impeached, President Bush's last Attorney General Michael Mukasey declared that the "wholesale release of dangerous people" would merit removal from office. While not surprising from people who have been advocating the impeachment of Barack Obama for five years, the statements are nevertheless more than a little ironic. After all, under President Bush more than 500 detainees were released from Guantanamo Bay. And when the Supreme Court upheld the habeas corpus rights of the U.S prisoners there in June 20 ...
There are serious questions about 'Supreme Court of Pakistan' which has probably now proved its 'One Eyed Justice' by reinstating a highly controversial 'Najam Sethi' back as Chairman 'Pakistan Cricket Board' within 18 hours after his removal from the seat by a lower High Court. Army by design is always 'Aristocratic' in nature except that it is not hereditary . What about the worst civil Martial Law of Nawaz Sharif and fully laid Kangaroo Supreme Court of Pakistan? Worry not, it’s somewhat same in most advanced countries like USA. Read this article of Washington Post... "The perception that partisan politics has infected the court’s work may do lasting damage to its prestige and authority and to Americans’ faith in the rule of law." The Polarized Court WASHINGTON — When the Supreme Court issued its latest campaign finance decision last month, the justices lined up in a familiar way. The five appointed by Republican presidents voted for the Republican National Committee, which was a plaintiff. Th ...
May 9, 2014 The Washington Post Editorial Board opines, “It seems like virtually everyone on Capitol Hill is interested in fixing the Voting Rights Act. But who will step up and make something happen? Last year, the Supreme Court hollowed out one of the most powerful parts of the law, a formula prescribing which states and localities had to get before-the-fact federal approval of any changes they wanted to make to their voting rules… House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) should hold hearings and mark up the bill before the next recess. Then Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.) should find floor time for it.” Progressive Point: At the foundation of America is the principle that we the voters choose our leaders, not the other way around. All Virginia voters have an equal opportunity to have our say on Election Day. The Voting Rights Act is our nation's most effective tool for protecting voting rights -- and our country’s reputation as the world’s greatest democracy. From the tim ...
Wednesday, March 26, 2014 To: Friends & Supporters From: Gary L. Bauer The Issue Is Religious Liberty I want to revisit the Supreme Court's Hobby Lobby case today in view of some of the news coverage and punditry from the talking heads. The central issue of this debate is not the legality or availability of contraception. It is religious liberty. The left is trying hard to confuse Americans about that fact. A pro-abortion and fake Catholic group ran a full-page ad in yesterday's Washington Post. It posed the question, "Who in their right mind would want a woman's boss in charge of her birth control?" The ad stated that arguments about religious liberty were "fake" and accused Catholic bishops of trying to "impose their religious views on all Americans." That was the same line of reasoning pursued yesterday by Justice Kagan, who rhetorically asked if employers should be able to exclude vaccines and blood transfusions from insurance policies based on religious objections to those procedures. In Kagan's view ...
Please PRAY for our Supreme Court. Today they are hearing a landmark case that will affect every American. Below is my editorial published by the Washington Post yesterday. Please read it, like it, and share it with everyone today. This is a critical day for your freedom. RELIGIOUS FREEDOM IS AMERICA’S FIRST FREEDOM Does our Constitution guarantee the freedom of religion, or does it merely allow a more limited freedom to worship? The difference is profound. Worship is an event. Religion is a way of life. Specifically, does the First Amendment guarantee believers of all faiths the freedom to practice their ethics, educate their children and operate family businesses based on their religious beliefs, moral convictions and freedom of conscience? Do Americans have the freedom to place our beliefs and ethics at the center of our business practices — or must we ignore them when we form a company? These questions will be brought before the Supreme Court on Tuesday. The outcome of Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby will ...
Fascinating read. "This document called "Attack on Free Enterprise System," and now known as the "Powell Memorandum" was mailed on August 23, 1971 to a representative of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce from Lewis Powell, who would be nominated to the Supreme Court shortly thereafter. The document was leaked in 1972, in a critical Washington Post article. Leftists have argued in recent years that the document was highly influential in the conservative movement." Liberal Progressive Representative Keith Ellison recently wrote a book where he discusses this memo in regard to the rise of the conservative movement. As I'd never heard of it, I looked it up, and its amazing in its prophecy... remember this was written in 1971!
Hare wrote the “Conceptual Proposal for a Department of Black Studies" and coined the term “ethnic studies” (which was being called “minority studies”) after he was recruited to San Francisco State in February 1968 by the Black Student Union leader Jimmy Garrett and the college’s liberal president, John Summerskill. Hare had just been dismissed from a six-year stint as a sociology professor at Howard University, after he wrote a letter to the campus newspaper, The Hilltop, in which he mocked Howard president James Nabrit’s plan (announced in the Washington Post on September 6, 1966) to make Howard “sixty per cent white by 1970.” James Nabrit had been one of the Civil Rights attorneys who successfully argued the 1954 “Brown vs. Board of Education” case before the U.S. Supreme Court. The “Black Power” cry had been issued just two month’s earlier by one of Hare’s former Howard students, Stokely Carmichael (another of Hare’s students at Howard was Claude Brown, author of Manchi ...
Analysis: Five million in states not expanding Medicaid will fall into “coverage gap.” The Washington Times (12/18, Howell) reports on an analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation that found roughly five million Americans living in states not participating in Medicaid expansion will fall into a “coverage gap.” The Affordable Care Act intended for all states to expand Medicaid eligibility, but the US Supreme Court made it optional. Because of this change, the ACA establishes subsidies for people earning between 100% and 400% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL). The qualifying level for Medicaid is far below 100% FPL in some areas. The five million people have incomes between those two levels. Bloomberg Businessweek (12/17, Tozzi), the Washington Post (12/18, Kliff) “Wonkblog” and CQ (12/18, Adams, Subscription Publication) also report on the gap. Minorities account for more than half of those who fall into “coverage gap.” McClatchy (12/18, Pugh) notes that, according to the Kaiser Family Foun ...
Justice Antonin Scalia doesn’t have a consistent judicial philosophy (his deference to Congress on the Defense of Marriage Act but not on the Voting Rights Act revealed a remarkable intellectual dexterity and utter lack of principle) but he has a consistent rightwing ideology that has made him the most forceful mouthpiece of regressive conservatism on the Supreme Court. Where does it come from? In a recent interview in New York Magazine (October 14) he said he listens only to conservative talk radio, doesn’t read the New York Times, and subscribes to the Washington Times but not the Washington Post. We know he also attends rightwing confabs organized by the Koch brothers. In other words, the most powerful conservative in government, whose votes are shaping our lives more directly than the votes of any congressman or senator, and who is unaccountable to no one (barring impeachment), has effectively shut himself off from all critics or opponents or news reports or views other than those of the right (he ...
"Justice Antonin Scalia doesn't want to 'get upset' in the morning, we learned this week from his refreshingly candid interview in New York Magazine. That's why he limits his newspaper consumption to The Wall Street Journal and The Washington Times -- reliably conservative outlets -- and avoids the 'so shrilly, shrilly liberal' Washington Post. In the car to and from the Supreme Court, he listens mostly to conservative talk radio, including the call-in show of his 'good friend' Bill Bennett, Ronald Reagan's secretary of education. Bennett's producers, Scalia says, 'keep off stupid people'. Now, Justice Scalia has a tough job and deserves all the peace of mind he can muster. It's too bad, though, that he feels it necessary to inhabit a media bubble where his ideological convictions are always confirmed and never challenged. He's hardly alone, of course: Plenty of other people -- maybe even a liberal justice or two -- confine themselves to an opposing media diet of NPR, HuffingtonPost.com, and The New York ...
An Update From the Connecticut Farm Bureau on the Equine Case claiming all horses, by nature, are inherently vicious-- The ruling on the case is expected within the next several months by Connecticut's Supreme Court. Dear Farmers and Equine Enthusiasts: I attended the Connecticut Supreme Court oral argument in the Vendrella v. Astriab Family Limited Partnership case on September 24. The hearing was well-attended and the gallery was full of equine supporters interested in the outcome of this case. Thank you to those who attended! There has been considerable interest in the local and national press about this case which could set national precedent. The Washington Post ran an Associated Press story, and CNN inquired about the story with Connecticut Farm Bureau as well. Although the outcome is still unknown, we are confident that Farm Bureau did the right thing by investing considerable resources to file an Amicus Brief with the court to present our view on this case. If horses become uninsurable because ...
Famed HIV/AIDS activist Peter Staley, writing for the Washington Post: "Given the strength of the marriage movement, though, surely the major *** rights organizations could reappropriate just 10 percent of their budgets to fighting HIV and AIDS. "Contrary to the prevailing skepticism, that battle is not a lost cause. Treating people with antivirals both keeps them alive and prevents them from infecting others. Massachusetts saw its HIV infection rates drop 45 percent between 2000 and 2009, largely because it expanded Medicaid to include people with HIV, not just AIDS; because its universal health-care system got more people onto treatment regimens; and because it launched targeted testing, prevention and treatment programs. With Obamacare, we have the potential to replicate those gains nationally, but only if there’s a concerted push. "On Wednesday morning, when the Supreme Court released its *** marriage opinions, I was attending an HIV working group session at a hotel off Dupont Circle. We took a brea ...
Nationalized *** marriage is now inevitable. So argued Charles Krauthammer in a Washington Post column assessing the implications of the Supreme Court's ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act. Citing the equal protection rationale, Krauthammer asserted the ruling will nationalize *** marriage the way...
This week in National Healthcare June 27, 2013 “DOMA Ruling Will Have Effect On Healthcare For LGBT Americans. The Supreme Court’s decision to strike down the Defense of Marriage Act is dominating headlines, but a few outlets managed to focus on the impact the ruling will have on healthcare in the United States. For example, as the Washington Post (6/27, Kliff) “Wonkblog” reports, the Affordable Care Act has a “supporting role” in Wednesday’s Supreme Court ruling the overturned the Defense of Marriage Act: “to require the feds to recognize that same-sex marriages now changes how the health law’s insurance expansion works.” For same-sex couples, being counted as “one family unit” can change whether they qualify for various benefits under the law. A Jackson Hewitt analysis says, “For example, same-sex partners who each have an income of $40,000 may be eligible for the premium assistance tax credits under the ACA – but only if they remain single.” Similarly, the NPR (6/27, Neel) ...
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Myriad Genetics shares surge after mixed ruling from Supreme Court on gene ... Washington Post
English News: Argentina Supreme Court rejects law that would put judicial system control up ... - Washington Post
NOW they speak out! Two U.S. Supreme Court "justices" who made the decision to seal valid Florida voters' ballots so they could not be counted and then ruled George H. Bush the winner in the 2000 elections NOW say that the Gore V. Bush ruling was "flawed" ! Former Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens said Thursday night that he’s come to the realization that the rationale behind the court’s Bush v. Gore decision that effectively decided the 2000 presidential election “was really quite unacceptable” because it differentiated between so-called “hanging chads” and “dimpled chads.” That distinction, he told a gala event for the liberal watchdog group Public Citizen in Washington, “violated the Equal Protection Clause of the Constitution.” All votes should have been considered the same way, he explained. But he’s not the only one. Former Justice Sandra Day O’Connor stated last month that she has her own doubts about the decision. From the Huffington Post: “It [the Supreme Court] t ...
Important Facts about this so-called "Monsanto Protection Act." (condensed from WikiPedia & Washington Post) It's actually called the "(Corporate) Farmers' Assurance Provision" and it was Included in this huge Bill that Pres. Obama Had to Sign in March Or Else the Federal Govt. would've had to Shut Down. So he really had No Choice but to sign what he was handed.This had Nothing to do with Labeling of Genetically-Modified (GMO) Food. It was a provision approved by both Republican and Democratic leaders in Congress to Confirm a ruling by our corporate conservative Supreme Court that takes away govt. power to Block the planting of Pre-existing GMO food crops. Most Democratic senators opposed their leadership and voted in March to Stop it from being included in the 'Keep the Govt. Running" bill (not actual name), but the usual 10-15% of conservative Dem senators formed a majority together with all Republicans to please the corporate farmers in their states who are tied to Monsanto. This so-called "Monsanto .. ...
This news really surprises me, given that Virginia's extremely anti *** politicians and legislators include the governor and Attorney General, and that the Commonwealth boasts one of the worst anti *** constitutional amendments in the U.S. (it bans not only marriage for same-sex couples, and not only domestic partnerships and civil unions, but is written so broadly that some legal experts suggest it bans any private contracts between *** partners). And Virginia is home to both Jerry Falwell's Liberty College (and its affiliated right-wing organizations) and Pat Robertson's anti *** organizations. Remember, too, Virginia fought its unconstitutional bans on interracial marriage all the way to the Supreme Court, so it has a history of ugly marriage-related discrimination law. Given all of that, I'd have expected to find only a mere plurality of support still for marriage equality there. But the Washington Post has published a poll suggesting that a clear majority in Virginia overall -- 56% -- now support th ...
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Former President Bill Clinton, who in 1996 signed into law an act defining marriage as between a man and woman, said on Thursday the measure was unconstitutional and should be overturned by the Supreme Court. In an opinion piece in the Washington Post, Clinton, a Democrat who…
President Bill Clinton: It’s time to overturn DOMA via Washington Post: The writer is the 42nd president of the United States. In 1996, I signed the Defense of Marriage Act. Although that was only 17 years ago, it was a very different time. In no state in the union was same-sex marriage recognized, much less available as a legal right, but some were moving in that direction. Washington, as a result, was swirling with all manner of possible responses, some quite draconian. As a bipartisan group of former senators stated in their March 1 amicus brief to the Supreme Court, many supporters of the bill known as DOMA believed that its passage “would defuse a movement to enact a constitutional amendment banning *** marriage, which would have ended the debate for a generation or more.” It was under these circumstances that DOMA came to my desk, opposed by only 81 of the 535 members of Congress. On March 27, DOMA will come before the Supreme Court, and the justices must decide whether it is consistent with t ...
Is Antonin Scalia the Vilest Person in Washington? March 4, 2013 | A day after Justice Antonin Scalia caused gasps [3] in the Supreme Court gallery by saying the 1965 Voting Rights Act had become a “racial entitlement” no congressperson could vote against, Rachel Maddow told [4] The Daily Show she was in the courtroom and Scalia clearly enjoyed tormenting people. “I think he does know how that sounds,” she said. “He’s a troll. He’s saying this for effect. He knows it’s offensive.” There’s no shortage of badly behaving Republicans in Washington. There’s the take-or-leave-it congressional leadership, who constantly show they value rightwing ideology more than its impact on people. There are intransigent obstructionists, like the NRA’s Wayne LaPierre, who believes the answer to gun violence is more guns. But Scalia isn’t simply another Republican bully; he may be the most venal and fascist Republican of all. It’s one thing to be a political bully and enjoy it, as Scalia does. But ...
Hobbs' Sunday Conversation Concerning the Voting Rights Act (VRA), conservative writer George Will writes in today's Washington Post, "The question concerning which the Supreme Court heard oral arguments Wednesday was whether Section 5 of the (Voting Rights) act is still constitutional, given the disappearance of the conditions that once made it acceptable as a temporary and emergency truncation of states’ sovereignty under federalism. In 2008, two years after the fourth renewal of the act, Barack Obama won a higher percentage of the white vote than did Al Gore and John Kerry in 2000 and 2004, respectively. Today Mississippi has more black elected officials — not more per capita, more — than any other state. Yet defenders of the continuing necessity of Section 5 merely shrug about the fact that race is no longer a barrier to either the nation’s highest office or to state and local offices in what once was the state most emblematic of resistance to racial equality." While the racial progress that W ...
Washington Post: John Lewis : Why we still need the Voting Rights Act : "John Lewis, a Democrat, represents Georgia’s 5th District in the U.S. House. On “Bloody Sunday,” nearly 50 years ago, Hosea Williams and I led 600 peaceful, nonviolent protesters attempting to march from Selma to Montgomery to dramatize the need for voting rights protection in Alabama. As we crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, we were attacked by state troopers who tear-gassed, clubbed and whipped us and trampled us with horses. I was hit in the head with a nightstick and suffered a concussion on the bridge. Seventeen marchers were hospitalized that day. In response, President Lyndon Johnson introduced the Voting Rights Act and later signed it into law. We have come a great distance since then, in large part thanks to the act, but efforts to undermine the voting power of minorities did not end after 1965. They still persist today. This week the Supreme Court will hear one of the most important cases in our generation, Shelby Coun ...
THE PROBABILITIES OF GUN CONTROL If we had the same Congress that jammed Obamacare down our throats, gun control would be a slam dunk. Fortunately, the balance of power in the House is back in Republican hands which can provide a wall of resistance if we aren’t betrayed in the end like we were by Justice Roberts when Obamacare was challenged at the Supreme Court. I estimate that the establishment has dirt on about 75% of Congress and can jerk their chain at will. While the manufactured crime at Newtown, CT gave the anti-gun media the rallying cry they have been looking for, it is far less clear how many voters have been swayed into thinking that gun control is the answer to wanton massacres. What we can say for sure is that the nation is much more polarized than before and will get even more so as this debate progresses. Fortunately on the propaganda front, the more time Congress is delayed in taking up gun control, the less the Sandy Hook shooting becomes a burning issue. But this establishment is goin ...
The New Jim Crow Wisconsin voters were not required to show photo IDs at the polls last week in spite of a recently passed law. In September, as the Washington Post reported at the time, the State Supreme Court declined to expedite appeals of two Madison judges enjoining the law. But officials in ultraliberal Madison aren't against ID requirements for everything, as the Associated Press reports: Riders who have an unlimited pass on Madison Metro buses will now have to show identification. University of Wisconsin students and employees have unlimited ride passes. There are concerns the bus passes are being used fraudulently. So, beginning Monday, an employment or school photo ID will be required. UW-Madison employee and student bus passes are non-transferable. So, if the users don't have their IDs, the passes will be confiscated and a 1-day pass will be offered. To reformulate a question we asked last year: If voter ID laws are racist, the equivalent of Jim Crow measures like poll taxes and literacy tests, ...
On the Washington Post site in the "Other Ads and Headlines" part, there is this question: Which Supreme Court Justice was Turned Down by 14 Law Firms? The answer is Ruth Bader Ginsberg. Good job Democrats... abortion over ability.
References • ^ a b c d e Charles Lane - Lane, Charles (January 16, 2005). "Why Japan Still Has the Death Penalty". Washington Post. Retrieved June 7, 2006. • ^ Petra Schmidt (2001). Capital punishment in Japan. Brill. pp. 9–24. • ^ Prof. Norio Takahashi. "Death Penalty for Hikari City Mother-Child Murder Case". Daily Yomiuri Online. Retrieved December 19, 2010. In the judicial system of Japan, the postwar constitution guarantees that "all judges shall be independent in the exercise of their conscience and shall be bound only by this constitution and the Laws" (Article 76). They cannot be removed from the bench "unless judicially declared mentally or physically incompetent to perform official duties," and they cannot be disciplined by executive agencies (Article 78). A Supreme Court judge, however, may be removed by a majority of voters in a referendum that occurs at the first general election following the judge's appointment and every ten years thereafter. As of 2005, no judge has ever been vo ...
September 24, 2012 | Dan Rodricks Soon after President Barack Obama's inauguration, "I want my country back!" became the shrill battle cry of the tea party. Garrett Epps, a legal scholar based at the University of Baltimore, has a battle cry of his own: "I want my Constitution back!" Epps believes the tea party and the politicians it supports are among the collaborators in extravagant myth-making about the law of the land, and the movement has gone from the fringe to the conservative mainstream to the Supreme Court. Right-wing "patriots," libertarian think tanks, members of Congress and Fox News are all engaged in using twisted and false interpretations of the Constitution to advance an anti-government, even anti-electorate agenda. It's wrong and it's dangerous, Epps says. Thus the title of his book: "Wrong and Dangerous: Ten Right-Wing Myths About Our Constitution," just published by Rowland & Littlefield. Epps, a former Washington Post reporter, teaches Constitutional Law and writing at the UB law schoo ...
Anyone miss that 'Bama Slamma interview on 60 minutes? Here are SOME of the highlights: “US President Barack Obama says Israel’s call for drawing red line over Iran’s nuclear energy program is just ‘noise’ he tries to ignore.” When asked about the events in Libya resulting in the killing of 4 Americans, our fearless leader described it as "bumps in the road." When asked about his responsibilities, Obama answered, "Oh, I think that, you know, as president I bear responsibility for everything, to some degree, and." Best of all, as we all know by now, the Supreme Court allowed Obama care to sneak through because the individual mandate was ruled "A TAX," it was great to see our slithering serpent of a president say, when asked about Obamacare, "I haven't raised taxes." Is anyone looking at the facts out there? If you're watching ABC, CBS, NBC, MSNBC, reading the New York Times or Washington Post, and you actually care at all about the FACTS, you are getting scammed. Mass Media is acting like ...
Justice Kagan describes inner workings of Supreme Court to University of ... - Washington Post
We all know Jerry Falwell and Pat Robertson as Christian right-wing fanatics who have a stranglehold over the Republican Party. But Barry Goldwater never ever subscribed to their thirst to combine God and government. He considered such a movement an abomination and despised both Falwell and Robertson to the core. In a 1994 interview with the Washington Post the retired senator said, “When you say “radical right” today, I think of these moneymaking ventures by fellows like Pat Robertson and others who are trying to take the Republican Party and make a religious organization out of it. If that ever happens, kiss politics goodbye.” In response to Moral Majority founder Jerry Falwell’s opposition to the nomination of Sandra Day O’Connor to the Supreme Court, of which Falwell had said, “Every good Christian should be concerned”, Goldwater retorted: “Every good Christian ought to kick Falwell right in the *** ”
Thursday night on “The Rachel Maddow Show,” host Rachel Maddow welcomed Washington Post writer E. J. Dionne for a discussion about difficulties facing the campaign of Republican nominee for president, Gov. Mitt Romney (R-MA). Since the announcement by the Supreme Court that the individual mandate a...
Now that the Supreme Court has ruled in favor of the Affordable Care Act and declared it Constitutional, both the GOP and the Democrats are defending their positions on health care. The Morning Joe panel – including MSNBC's Alex Wagner, Time's Mark Halperin, Donny Deutsch, and the Washington Post's Jonathan Capehart -- discusses.
June 30-1997, in Hong Kong, the Union Jack was lowered for the last time over Government House as Britain prepared to hand the colony back to China after ruling it for 156 years./1971 U.S. Supreme Court ruled 6-3 that the government could not prevent The New York Times or the Washington Post from publishing the Pentagon Papers./1994 The U.S. Figure Skating Association stripped Tonya Harding of the national championship and banned her from the organization for life for an attack on rival Nancy Kerrigan.
These are parts of an article that former New Jersey Court Judge Andrew P. Napolitano (senior judicial analyst for Fox News Channel) penned for the Washington Post. In reference to the Supreme Court's decision on Obamacare. "...Perhaps Justice Roberts really means what he wrote - that congressional power to tax is without constitutional limit - and his opinion is a faithful reflection of that view, without a political, legal or intracourt agenda. But that view finds no support in the Constitution or our history." "Under the Constitution, a tax must originate in the House (of Representatives), which this law did not, and it must be applied for doing something, like earning income or purchasing tobacco or fuel, not for doing nothing. In all the history of the court, it has never held that a penalty imposed for violating a Federal Law was really a tax." "II wonder if the chief justice realized what he and the progressive wing of the court were doing to our freedom. If the feds can tax us for not doing as th ...
Interesting clip from the Washington Post's story about the confirmation of Chief Justice John Roberts back in 2005. All 55 Senate Republicans voted for him. Roberts Confirmed as 17th Chief Justice By Charles Babington and Peter Baker Washington Post Staff Writers Friday, September 30, 2005 John Glover Roberts Jr. was sworn in yesterday as the 17th chief justice of the United States, enabling President Bush to put his stamp on the Supreme Court for decades to come, even as he prepares to name a second nominee to the nine-member court. The White House swearing-in ceremony took place three hours after the Senate voted 78 to 22 to confirm Roberts. All 55 Republicans, half the 44 Democrats and independent Sen. James M. Jeffords (Vt.) voted yes. When the Supreme Court opens its new session Monday, Roberts, 50, will take the court's center seat that his mentor, the late William H. Rehnquist, occupied for 19 years. "The Senate has confirmed a man with an astute mind and a kind heart," Bush said at the swearing- ...
Chris Matthews states multiple times on national TV that Ezra Klein, a 28 year old blogger for the Washington Post, should be named to the Supreme Court. Chris, firstly, there has to be an opening to name someone to the Supreme Court. Secondly, he is not even a lawyer. Thirdly, are you off of your medicine?
How will the Supreme Court rule this Thursday on the president's Affordable Care Act? What will it mean for the president and the 2012 election? NBC News' Tom Brokaw, the Washington Post's Eugene Robinson and the Daily Beast's Tina Brown join a conversation on the Supreme Court's big two weeks.
Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and Washington Post columnist Michael Gerson discuss the week's top political news with Judy Woodruff, including "the worst day of Mitt Romney's life," President Obama's new immigration policy, Super PACs and the 40th anniversary of Watergate.
On this day in history... W. Mark Felt’s family ends 30 years of speculation, identifying Felt, the former FBI assistant director, as “Deep Throat,” the secret source who helped unravel the Watergate scandal. The Felt family’s admission, made in an article in Vanity Fair magazine, took legendary reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, who had promised to keep their source’s identity a secret until his death, by surprise. Tapes show that Nixon himself had speculated that Felt was the secret informant as early as 1973. The question “Who was Deep Throat?” had been investigated relentlessly in the ensuing years since Watergate in movies, books, televisions shows, and on the Internet. America was obsessed with the shadowy figure who went to great lengths to conceal his involvement with the Washington Post reporters. Although his name was often mentioned as a possibility, Felt consistently denied being Deep Throat, even writing in his 1979 memoir, “I never leaked information to Woodward and B ...
KLEIN: The filibuster may be unconstitutional. "According to Best Lawyers -- 'the oldest and most respected peer-review publication in the legal profession' -- Emmet Bondurant 'is the go-to lawyer when a business person just can’t afford to lose a lawsuit.' He was its 2010 Lawyer of the Year for Antitrust and Bet-the-Company Litigation. But now, he’s bitten off something even bigger: bet-the-country litigation. Bondurant thinks the filibuster is unconstitutional. And, alongside Common Cause, where he serves on the board of directors, he’s suing to have the Supreme Court abolish it...At the core of Bondurant’s argument is a very simple claim: This isn’t what the Founders intended. The historical record is clear on that fact. The framers debated requiring a supermajority in Congress to pass anything. But they rejected that idea." Ezra Klein in The Washington Post.
In 1998, the Washington Post reported that “Federal judges are attending expenses-paid, five-day seminars on property rights and the environment at resorts in Montana, sessions underwritten by conservative foundations that are also funding a wave of litigation on those issues in the federal courts.” Funding for the seminars, run by a group called the Foundation for Research on Economics and the Environment (FREE), also comes from foundations run by companies with a significant interest in property rights and environmental law issues. One of the group's funders was the John M. Olin Foundation, which invested millions of dollars in the law and economic movement – endowing university chairs, funding think-tanks and providing early support for the Federalist Society, which was founded in 1982 by former Attorney General Ed Meese, controversial Supreme Court nominee Robert Bork and Ted Olsen—who years later would win the infamous Bush v. Gore case before the Supreme Court in 2000 and then go on to serve ...
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Very well spoken!: Divider in Chief by Charles Krauthammer...Washington Post. May 3, 2012 Poor Solicitor General Donald Verrilli.Once again he’s been pilloried for fumbling a historic Supreme Court case. First shredded for his “train wreck” defense of Obamacare’s individual mandate, he is now blamed for the defenestration in oral argument of Obama’s challenge to the Arizona immigration law. The law allows police to check the immigration status of someone stopped for other reasons. Verrilli claimed that constitutes an intrusion on the federal monopoly on immigration enforcement. He was pummeled. Why shouldn’t a state help the Federal Government enforce the law? “You can see it’s not selling very well,” said Justice Sonia Sotomayor. But Verrilli never had a chance. This was never a serious legal challenge in the first place. It was confected (and timed) purely for political effect, to highlight immigration as a campaign issue with which to portray Republicans as anti-Hispanic. Hispanics, ...
What would Obama do in a second term? Mitt Romney tells people that in a second tern Barack Obama will be unrestrained by the demands of a second election. But when asked what he means his only prediction is that Obama will remake the Supreme Court. But in earlier speeches Obama has said what his priorities would be in a second term. On March 30th, he stated he wanted to reform immigration and the energy policy so they both address long term challenges. Do more to ensure people who don't have work can find work. Try to create a housing system that works for everybody. Help to push forward education reform and execute an effective transition out of Afghanistan. But according to Ezra Klien in today's Washington Post, that is not what he will do. It is only a list of what he hopes to do. " In 2008, the Obama campaign often seemed to believe that as President , Obama would be able to personally inaugurate a new era of cooperation in Washington. But over the last three years , which has been filled wi ...
"No one should presume to predict how the Supreme Court will rule on Obamacare, but few argue that it will cease to be a political albatross for the president. As early as last September, a panel of liberal journalists on NBC News consisting of MSNBC’s Chris Matthews, the Huffington Post’s Howard Fineman, and David Ignatius of the Washington Post all agreed that Obama’s 'biggest political mistake' was devoting so much time and attention to health care. 'The idea of launching a major change in social legislation without having a consensus in the country and in Congress about what that should look like was a mistake,' Ignatius summed up. 'That’s just not how a president makes good policy.'" -John Fund
Date: Mon, 1917-04-09 Irene Morgan Kirkaldy was born on this date in 1917. She was an African-American educator and Civil Rights Activist. Kirkaldy, born Irene Morgan in Baltimore, lived on Long Island and ran a child-care center in Queens with her second husband, Stanley Kirkaldy for many years. Yet Kirkaldy is best known as the Black woman whose refusal to give up her bus seat to white passengers more than a decade before Rosa Parks gained recognition for doing the same. Kirkaldy was arrested in 1944 for refusing to give up her seat on a Greyhound bus heading from Gloucester, VA, to Baltimore, and for resisting arrest. Her case was appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court by (then) NAACP lawyer Thurgood Marshall, who later became the first Black justice on the Supreme Court. The High Court held in June 1946 that Virginia law requiring the races to be separated on interstate buses even making passengers change seats during their journey to maintain separation if the number of passengers changed was an invalid ...
John Payton, a lawyer who argued bias cases before Supreme Court, dies at 65 - Washington Post
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