Supreme Court & New York Times

A supreme court is the highest court within the hierarchy of many legal jurisdictions. The New York Times is an American daily newspaper founded and continuously published in New York City since 1851. The New York Times has won 106 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any news organization. 5.0/5

Supreme Court New York Times Pentagon Papers United States First Amendment New York David Brooks Daniel Ellsberg Barack Obama Mitt Romney Mark Shields Vietnam War James Risen Chief Justice Voting Rights Act Citizens United President Obama Obama Administration

I see that some people have elevated the New York Times to the level of the Supreme Court, if not the Bible. Hmmm... https:/…
Battle for the Supreme Court: Scrutiny of Merrick Garland Begins - New York Times
Wesner Michel; Scalia to Lie in Repose at Supreme Court, With Funeral on Saturday - New York Times: New York T...
Liberians worry that next week's elections might spread Ebola A mural in Monrovia illustrates health instructions for treating the Ebola virus. Credit: James Giahyue/Reuters The deadly Ebola virus continues to elude control in Liberia, with the outbreak retreating in some regions and popping up in others. And now, with Liberian Senate elections tentatively slated for next week, a debate is raging about whether it is safe to hold a vote. This story is based on a radio interview. Listen to the full interview. "People are going to march into the same polling booth, and touch the same pens, possibly," says New York Times Correspondent Sheri Fink, who has spent much of the last two months in Liberia and neighboring Sierra Leone. "How do you protect people in that case?" Liberia's Senate election was originally slated for October 14, but was moved to December 16. The country's Supreme Court is considering petitions filed by civil society groups who would like to see a further postponement. But most Liberian po ...
Ben Bradlee, former Editor of The Washington Post, died yesterday. He was a hero of mine; a journalist in the true sense of the word. He’s best known for publishing stories that became known as the 1972 political scandal “Watergate,” contributing to the end of the political career of Richard Nixon; the only president in U.S. history to resign. While that series of stories was important and certainly changed the face of American journalism, Bradlee and Katharine Graham (The Post’s publisher) made an even more important decision the year prior: to join the New York Times in printing stories based on the Pentagon Papers; a secret Pentagon history of the Vietnam War. Nixon tried to quash the stories but the U.S. Supreme Court held they could publish them. Those papers uncovered the truth about the US Department of Defense’s history of US political-military involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1967. Against Circus Animal Acts in New Brunswick 2011, the entirity of the Pentagon Papers was declassifi .. ...
New York Times citing my research on Justice Kennedy - As *** Prevail in Supreme Court, Women See Setbacks
What the NYTimes--now screaming about "war on women"--had to say about the Religious Freedom Restoration Act when Democrats passed it in Congress and Clinton signed it into law: "Three years ago the Supreme Court threw away decades of precedent and watered down the religious liberty of all Americans. . . . By radically changing the ground rules for deciding claims of religious liberty, the Court alarmed organized religion, civil liberties organizations of all stripes and Senators as different in outlook as Edward Kennedy of Massachusetts and Orrin Hatch of Utah. . . . The Religious Freedom Restoration Act reasserts a broadly accepted American concept of giving wide latitude to religious practices that many might regard as odd or unconventional. The bill deserves passage. . . . With the Restoration Act, Congress asserts its own interest in protecting religious liberty. It's a welcome antidote to the official insensitivity to religion the Court spawned in 1990."--editorial, New York Times, Oct. 25, 1993
In a Blow to Freedom of the Press, U.S. Supreme Court Refuses to Protect Reporter from Obama Administration Prosecution Over Refusal to Reveal Sources June 05, 2014 WASHINGTON, D.C. — In a severe blow to the First Amendment guarantee of freedom of the press, the U.S. Supreme Court declined earlier this week to hear the case of New York Times reporter James Risen, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who writes about national security issues and is being targeted by the Obama Administration for refusing to reveal a confidential source. By refusing without explanation to hear Risen’s case, the Supreme Court leaves the field open for the Obama Administration to pursue contempt charges against Risen, including potential jail time. Despite repeated declarations championing the importance of a free press and “investigative journalism that holds government accountable,” President Obama’s administration has been unrelenting in its pursuit and persecution of journalists to such an extent that Risen called ...
James Risen's case hits a wall: New York Times reporter James Risen's long legal battle against being forced to reveal the name of a confidential source in legal testimony reached a dead end in the courts this week. The U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear his appeal of a federal ruling agains…
Arlington, Va. – The Newspaper Association of America strongly urges Senate leadership to bring the Free Flow of Information Act (S. 987) to the Senate floor for a vote after the Supreme Court declined to hear New York Times reporter James Risen’s appeal. This case highlights the continued need for…
“Do the United States and its people really want to tell those of us who live in the rest of the world that our lives are not of the same value as yours? That President Obama can sign off on a decision to kill us with less worry about judicial scrutiny than if the target is an American? Would your Supreme Court really want to tell humankind that we, like the slave Dred Scott in the 19th century, are not as human as you are? I cannot believe it. I used to say of apartheid that it dehumanized its perpetrators as much as, if not more than, its victims.” -Archbishop Desmond Tutu, letter to the editor of the New York Times
thanks to the Windsor ruling. Janet Napolitano, Secretary of Homeland Security, has stated that U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will now treat same-sex married couples equally when administering U.S. immigration law. In fact, just two days after the Supreme Court's ruling, one same-sex couple was notified that their green card application (which they had submitted before the ruling, in February), had been approved by USCIS. (Also see the New York Times writeup of their case.) While USCIS has yet to issue guidance on how exactly it will implement the new directive, it will likely do so in July or August of 2013. What is clear is that any same-sex marriage that was officially recognized in a state or country permitting it will now count for immigration purposes. This will be true even if you now live (or plan to live) in a state that does not recognize same-sex marriage.
WASHINGTON – This spring marks the 50th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s decision in New York Times vs. Sullivan, its most important pronouncement on the freedom of the press, but the ruling has not won the acceptance of Justice Antonin Scalia .
After the U.S. Supreme Court issued a 5-4 decision Wednesday that threw out a cap on the total amount wealthy donors can give to federal candidates in an election season, Democrats and self-proclaimed do-gooders cried foul at the prospect of more big money's tainting Washington politics. Federal law continues to cap individual contributions to congressional candidates at $5,200, but the McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission decision eliminated the $48,600 cap on the total individuals can contribute to candidates and the $74,600 cap on donations to political committees. An online New York Times story announced, "The ruling, issued near the start of a campaign season, will change and very likely increase the already large role money plays in American politics." Stop, please. I beg you. The hypocrisy is appalling. The Center for Responsive Politics' OpenSecrets.org estimates that GOP biggie Sheldon Adelson and his wife 'bulldozed' (owww...powerword) $93 million into conservative super PACs in 2012. Does ...
United States Senate Washington, D.C. 20510 Connect with Bill Nelson: MEDIA ADVISORY: April 2, 2014 CONTACT(S): (202) 224-1679; (202) 309-1985 Ryan Brown, press secretary Emily Rogers, deputy press secretary Madeline Joyce, press assistant Dan McLaughlin, deputy chief of staff, communications Sen. Nelson’s reaction to today’s Supreme Court decision on political contributions “The most conservative justices on our nation's High Court have once again sided not with hard-working Americans but this time with the wealthiest of political contributors. As a result, some of our government offices and public policies could end up being bought by the highest bidder.” Following is a New York Times report on the court decision: Supreme Court Strikes Down Aggregate Limits on Federal Campaign Contributions By ADAM LIPTAK APRIL 2, 2014 WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Wednesday issued a major campaign finance decision, striking down some limits on federal campaign contributions for the first time. The rul ...
Letter from President Nicolas Maduro on the New York Times. Venezuela: A Call for Peace By NICOLÁS MADURO APRIL 1, 2014 CARACAS, Venezuela — THE recent protests in Venezuela have made international headlines. Much of the foreign media coverage has distorted the reality of my country and the facts surrounding the events. Venezuelans are proud of our democracy. We have built a participatory democratic movement from the grass roots that has ensured that both power and resources are equitably distributed among our people. According to the United Nations, Venezuela has consistently reduced inequality: It now has the lowest income inequality in the region. We have reduced poverty enormously — to 25.4 percent in 2012, on the World Bank’s data, from 49 percent in 1998; in the same period, according to government statistics, extreme poverty diminished to 6 percent from 21 percent. We have created flagship universal health care and education programs, free to our citizens nationwide. We have achieved these f ...
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In few days the Supreme Court will hand down its decision in “Shaun McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission” – which might use the bizarre logic of the Court's “Citizens United” decision to abandon all limits on what individuals can spend on political campaigns – another huge victory for the Koch Brothers. I’m no conspiracy theorist, but it’s interesting that only months after “Citizens United” was decided, the Koch Brothers' invite to their twice-yearly political retreat noted that previous guests at such meetings had included Supreme Court Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas (according to the New York Times).
This Date in History: 1964, the U.S. Supreme Court, in New York Times Co. v. Sullivan, raised the standard for proving libel, unanimously ruling that public officials who charged they'd been defamed by the press concerning their official duties had to demonstrate "actual malice" on the part of the news organization in order to recover damages.
Justice Antonin Scalia doesn’t have a consistent judicial philosophy (his deference to Congress on the Defense of Marriage Act but not on the Voting Rights Act revealed a remarkable intellectual dexterity and utter lack of principle) but he has a consistent rightwing ideology that has made him the most forceful mouthpiece of regressive conservatism on the Supreme Court. Where does it come from? In a recent interview in New York Magazine (October 14) he said he listens only to conservative talk radio, doesn’t read the New York Times, and subscribes to the Washington Times but not the Washington Post. We know he also attends rightwing confabs organized by the Koch Brothers. In other words, the most powerful conservative in government, whose votes are shaping our lives more directly than the votes of any congressman or senator, and who is unaccountable to no one (barring impeachment), has effectively shut himself off from all critics or opponents or news reports or views other than those of the right (he ...
Retired SCOTUS Justice Sandra Day O'Connor Officiates *** Wedding at Supreme Court via david mixner) Retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor became the second justice (joining Ruth Bader Ginsburg) to marry a *** couple at the Supreme Court when she officiated the marriage on Tuesday of Jeff Trammel and Stuart Serkin. Bloomberg reports: The ceremony took place in the lawyer’s lounge of the court, according to court spokeswoman Kathy Arberg. That is just off the courtroom where the sitting justices delivered a pair of 5-4 decisions in June that stopped short of legalizing *** marriage across the country yet struck down a federal law barring benefits for spouses in same-sex marriages. WKZO adds: It was not the first *** wedding ceremony at the court building. Over the weekend, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg presided over the wedding there of New York couple Ralph Lee Pellecchio and James Carter Wernz, according to a wedding announcement in the New York Times. In August, Ginsburg became the first jus ...
It's hard to find a freedom of the press hero larger in life than James Risen of the New York Times.
"The Affordable Care Act was approved by Congress and sanctioned by the Supreme Court. It is the law of the land. Get over it... and get out of the way so I can help my people." -- Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear (D), writing in the New York Times, in defense of President Obama's health care law.
Top 50 Most Influential Marijuana Users list: 1. Barack Obama “When I was a kid, I inhaled frequently. That was the point.” 2. Oprah Winfrey “[Television show host Andy Cohen] asked the last time Winfrey had smoked marijuana. ‘Uh … 1982,’ Winfrey replied. ‘Let’s hang out after the show,’ Cohen joked. ‘Okay,’ Winfrey laughed. ‘I hear it’s gotten better.’” 3. Bill Clinton “I experimented with marijuana a time or two.” (Source: YouTube) 4. Clarence Thomas “The White House said today that Judge Clarence Thomas, President Bush’s Supreme Court nominee, had smoked marijuana while in college.” (Source: New York Times) 5. Stephen Colbert “First, [in high school], I smoked a lot of pot…and that’s how I got to know the people ‘half in’ the society of my high school and we waved at each other over the bong. Then I got to know people by making jokes.” (Source: San Francisco Chronicle Interview (January 2006)) Continue
When did the word *** become socially unacceptable? It started its decline in 1966 and was totally uncouth by the mid-1980s. The turning point came when Stokely Carmichael coined the phrase Black Power at a 1966 rally in Mississippi. Until then, *** was how most black Americans described themselves. But in Carmichael's speeches and in his landmark 1967 book, Black Power: The Politics of Liberation in America, he persuasively argued that the term implied black inferiority. Among black activists, *** soon became shorthand for a member of the establishment. Prominent black publications like Ebony switched from *** to black at the end of the decade, and the masses soon followed. According to a 1968 Newsweek poll, more than two-thirds of black Americans still preferred *** but black had become the majority preference by 1974. Both the Associated Press and the New York Times abandoned *** in the 1970s, and by the mid-1980s, even the most hidebound institutions, like the U.S. Supreme Court, had larg ...
On June 28, 1971, two days before a Supreme Court ruling saying that a federal judge had ruled incorrectly about the right of the New York Times to publish the Pentagon Papers,[6] Ellsberg publicly surrendered to the United States Attorney's Office for the District of Massachusetts in Boston. In adm...
New York Times Supreme Court Columnist Adam Liptak On John Roberts’ Long Game Monday, July 1, 2013 Print This HH: I must tell you, you’ve got to read a story in the New York Times today by Adam Liptak, who is one of the New York Times’ better journalists when it comes to the Supreme Court. He’s of course a graduate of Yale, so we have to overlook that, and Yale Law School. But he’s got a good grasp on the Court. Adam Liptak, welcome, it’s great to have you, congratulations, by the way, on the e-book To Have And Uphold. AL: Thank you very much, good to be here. HH: When did that book come out, the e-book? AL: It’s available for preorder now, and if I finish it, it’ll be ready on July 9th. HH: Okay, that’s it, because I thought I would have not missed that, so I’m glad to know about it. I will go and preorder it. And when it comes out, and people can read it, come back and talk about this. AL: Excellent. HH: You wrote a piece today about the Chief Justice. Now I shared an office with the ...
The Voting Rights Act, the Defense of Marriage Act, Proposition 8...media outlets have been flooded all week with the various decisions made by the Supreme Court. What does it all mean though? Here at the Midwest Asian American Student Union (MAASU) we strive to inform our community about events in our society that affect Asian Pacific Americans (APA), and this weeks Supreme Court rulings will definitely have both positive and negative effects on APAs. We discuss Voting Rights and LGBTQ rights in the same article not just because these decisions were released one after another, but because the two issues are intertwined. The fight against racial discrimination and against LGBTQ discrimination are fights that overlap, and our voices are stronger if we are able to see the links between issues and work together to fight against injustices.  Charles M. Blow does a wonderful job describing this in his op-ed for the New York Times: Rights Act (Shelby County, Alabama vs. Holder) The Voting Rights Act (VRA) was ...
After this week’s 5-4 ruling in Shelby County, Alabama v. Holder by activist conservative justices on the Supreme Court, who substituted their own views over those of Congress in striking down a key provision of the landmark 1965 Voting Rights Act, an editorial in the New York Times asks, “Is the ci...
Very interesting info from the New York Times regarding the Voting Rights Act ruling of the Supreme Court: The Court ruled 5-4 that decades-old data (from the 1970s) could not be used to discriminate against some states and require them to be under federal supervision as they conducted elections. However, Congress may pass a new law based on recent voting data to include states where there is significant disparity in voter registration between whites and blacks. The states that would be affected if such a new law were passed would be Massachusetts, Delaware, Minnesota, Kansas, and Arkansas. Congress could consider other criteria that would include other states. I think it's quite interesting that Joe Biden and Al Franken's home states make the list while no Deep South states do.
Nashville, TN – Fletcher “Keith” Adkinson, a dedicated ambassador to the country music community, serving on multiple boards of directors, acting a legal liaison for celebrity friends and the ultimate client the Estate of Hank Williams, passed away at the age of 69 Mr. Adkinson was actively engaged in the practice of law for over 40 years. He was admitted to practice in Virginia, West Virginia, California, Tennessee and the District of Columbia. He was also a member of the bar of the Supreme Court of the United States of America. Additionally, was admitted pro hac vice in numerous other states to participate in cases of his selection before that state’s judiciary. Mr. Adkinson received his undergraduate degree at the University of Virginia in 1966 and his Juris Doctor degree from the University in 1969. He started practicing law in Beverly Hills, CA with the firm of Wyman, Bautzer, Rothman & Kuchel, and later in their Washington, DC office until 1974. His areas of concentration were litigation, co ...
THE NSA AND THE REST OF US -- PERSPECTIVES ON THE SURVEILLANCE SCANDAL by LAWRENCE DAVIDSON CONTEXT ONE: It is 1971 and the United States is mired in a losing war in Vietnam. Thousands of young American soldiers are coming back to the U.S. in coffins or physically and psychologically maimed. Scenes of war can be witnessed nightly on the evening news. In the midst of this mayhem the American military analyst Daniel Ellsberg gives the New York Times a copy of a classified analysis of the war entitled, “United States – Vietnam Relations, 1945-1967” aka the “Pentagon Papers.” The Nixon administration then sought to prevent the publication of this report through a court injunction. Ultimately the Supreme Court overturned the injunction in a 6-3 ruling that favored the public’s right to know. The government also attempted to prosecute Ellsberg under the 1917 Espionage Act for releasing classified information to the public. That was thrown out of court because in making their case, government agents ...
Shop The Bradford Exchange Online for Patriotic 9/
On June 13 in history, Constantine signs the Edict of Milan granting religious freedom in the Roman Empire (313), Wat Tyler's Rebellion burns Savoy Palace (1381), Martin Luther violates celibacy rules by getting married (1525), Lafayette arrives to help the American Revolution (1777), "Mad King" Ludwig II of Bavaria is (probably) murdered (1886), the Supreme Court establishes the Miranda rule (1966), the Beatles have their last hit with "The Long and Winding Road" (1970), the New York Times begins publishing the Pentagon Papers (1971), Pioneer 10 becomes the first man-made object to leave the Solar System (1983), the Montana Freemen surrender (1996) and Timothy Mcveigh is sentenced to death (1997), Michael Jackson is acquitted of child molestation (2005), and the Japanese spacecraft はやぶさ (Hayabusa) brings asteroid material to Earth. It's the birthday of Roman emperors Charles the Bald and Charles the Fat, "old fuss and feathers" General Winfield Scott, physicist James Clerk Maxwell, poet William B ...
On This *** Day (June 10) BTW - Today would have been Judy Garland's 90th birthday. 356 BC - Alexander the Great died at age 36. 1976 - West Virginia is the 16th state to repeal its sodomy laws. 1977 - In Vancouver, the British Columbia Court of Appeal reverses a BC Supreme Court ruling favoring *** Tide in a complaint against Vancouver Sun for refusing to run a classified ad by saying the Sun had "reasonable cause" not to print ad. 1991 - According to the New York Times, while working on an expose for "Outweek" outing of Secretary of Defense *** Cheney) assistant Pete Williams, the magazine's inner circle fires co-founding editor Michelangelo Signorile amidst a battle over financial concerns. As of June 27, the offices are padlocked, and his piece eventually runs in "The Advocate." (Hmmm…nod, nod, wink, wink) 1992 - Jerry Hadley, Madeleine Kahn, Dorothy Loudon, Patti LuPone, Liza Minnelli, Victor Garber, Bernadette Peters, Glenn Close, Betty Buckley, and Mandy Patinkin star in "Sondheim -- a Celebra .. ...
Today's Highlights in History: On May 27, 1933, the Chicago World's Fair, celebrating "A Century of Progress," officially opened. Walt Disney's Academy Award-winning animated short "The Three Little Pigs" was first released. On this date: In 1861, Chief Justice Roger Taney, sitting as a federal circuit court judge in Baltimore, ruled that President Abraham Lincoln lacked the authority to suspend the writ of Habeas Corpus (Lincoln disregarded the ruling). In 1896, 255 people were killed when a tornado struck St. Louis, Mo., and East St. Louis, Ill. In 1929, Charles A. Lindbergh Jr. married Anne Morrow in Englewood, N.J. In 1935, the Supreme Court struck down the National Industrial Recovery Act. In 1936, the Cunard liner RMS Queen Mary left England on its maiden voyage to New York. In 1937, the newly completed Golden Gate Bridge connecting San Francisco and Marin County, Calif., was opened to pedestrians (vehicles began crossing the next day). In 1941, the British Royal Navy sank the German battleship Bism ...
WILL JUSTICES TAKE NOTE OF NEW *** MARRIAGE LAWS? (AP) -- Three U.S. states and three countries have approved same-sex unions just in the two months since the Supreme Court heard arguments over *** marriage, raising questions about how the developments might affect the justices' consideration of the issue. In particular, close observers on both sides of the *** marriage divide are wondering whether Justice Anthony Kennedy's view could be decisive since he often has been the swing vote on the High Court. It is always possible that Justice Kennedy is reading the newspapers and is impressed with the progress," said Michael Klarman, a Harvard University law professor and author of a recent book on the *** marriage fight. In earlier cases on *** rights and the death penalty, Kennedy has cited the importance of changing practices, both nationally and around the world. The court is expected to rule by late June in two cases involving same-sex marriage. One is a challenge to California's voter-approved Propositio ...
FROM THE EDITOR Hi there, Angelina Jolie's decision to have a double preventative mastectomy is a teachable moment in bioethics. But as a columnist in the Financial Times points out, it's hard to know what the lesson is. Jolie said that she made the news public to help other women realise that they have choices. But, given her celebrity status as an international sex symbol, she is in a league of her own. What exactly can women learn from her unique case? Another lesson is political. Her op-ed in the New York Times was clearly aimed at influencing the deliberations of the US Supreme Court on Myriad Genetics' claim that it can patent the BRCA 1 and 2 genes which indicate a susceptibility for cancer. Currently tests for the genes cost about US$3,000. Jolie says that women should be able to access "gene testing and lifesaving preventive treatment, whatever their means and background, wherever they live". The most important lesson, perhaps, was glossed over in the wall-to-wall media coverage: how much fear i ...
Anthony Lewis, Who Transformed Coverage of the Supreme Court, Dies at 85: Mr. Lewis, a former New York Times reporter and columnist, ...
IN THE COURSE of American history the nation has been confronted with wrongful events that went to the core of its existence, and the resolution of those events spoke of who we are as a people. Beyond question, the U.S. Supreme Court's handing the office of the presidency to George W. Bush by its ruling on December 12, 2000, was one of them. And with these epochal events there have been Americans who have stood up and spoken out against these wrongs: for example, Tom Paine against British control of the colonies; Edward R. Murrow against the vicious and false charges made by Joseph McCarthy; Daniel Ellsberg leaking the Pentagon Papers to the New York Times. With his article in the February 5, 2001, Nation magazine titled "None Dare Call It Treason," Vincent Bugliosi takes his place in this special pantheon of patriots with his powerful, brilliant, and Vincent Bugliosi. The Betrayal of America: How the Supreme Court Undermined the Constitution and Chose Our President (Kindle Locations 9-14). Kindle Edition ...
Washington, D.C. — After the New York Times was forced to retract its false claim that former Congresswoman Marilyn Musgrave had signed on to an Anti-Proposition 8 brief to the Supreme Court, Brian Brown, President of the National Organization for Marriage responded:
Richard Charles Cole One of my many brothers posted a photo of a 1950 VW bus, which put me in mind of the VW bus "Urge" in the Last Whole Earth Catalogue, leading me to these recollections: "And, I was born, destined 21 years later both to drive our light green one to D.C. to work at the Pentagon, writing memos on why we needed to leave Vietnam if only due to half returning vets were addicted to heroin. I then drove it to senior year at Cornell to be in charge of New York Times distribution in Thompkins County. During that summer, I had lined up at 7 a.m. in front of the U.S. Supreme Court to hear argument of the Pentagon Papers case, regarding attempt to stifle NYT publication of Daniel Ellsberg's purloined "secret" Vietnam study. I was the first person in line who did not get in to see argument, though I was (two years later, at HLS) on Ellsberg's legal team when the U.S. (also unsuccessfully) went after him in L.A. civil suit. The irony of '71 was working for NYT and Pentagon at the same time, get it? ...
NBC's Pete Williams sounded the death knell for parts of the Voting Rights Act on Wednesday, telling MSNBC's Alex Wagner that he thinks there are easily enough votes on the Supreme Court to overturn them. The court's conservative justices asked what the New York Times called "deeply skeptical questi...
Greetings, While the New York Times ran an article on Saturday, February 16 about Farmer Bowman, the article failed to include the fact that on the previous day, Friday, February 15, the Supreme Court granted Obama's Solicitor General the opportunity to argue in support of Monsanto's patents for 10 minutes. The oral arguments are now 40 minutes for Monsanto and only 30 minutes for Farmer Bowman. Justice may be blind, but time is of the essence. We hope to see some of you tomorrow morning on the sidewalk outside of the Supreme Court for what has been dubbed the "Be-In for Bowman." Please RSVP and invite your friends! Below are all the court-related documents concerning Bowman v. Monsanto Date Proceedings and Orders Dec 20 2011 Petition for a writ of certiorari filed. (Response due January 23, 2012) Jan 19 2012 Waiver of right of respondent Monsanto Company to respond filed. Jan 25 2012 DISTRIBUTED for Conference of February 17, 2012. Jan 26 2012 Response Requested . (Due February 27, 2012) Feb 27 2012 Brie ...
IF YOU HAVEN’T HEARD ABOUT THIS BOOK – PLEASE DO… AMERITOPIA (A MUST GET AND READ BOOK) THIS WILL REALLY WAKE YOU UP!!! About The Book "I don't have to write another book, because Mark Levin wrote Ameritopia" - Rush Limbaugh In Ameritopia: The Unmaking of America Mark Levin asks, what is this utopian force that both allures a free people and destroys them? In the end, Levin’s message is clear: The American republic is in great peril. The people must now choose between utopianism or liberty. Mark R. Levin, nationally syndicated talk-radio host and president of Landmark Legal Foundation, is the author of Liberty and Tyranny: A Conservative Manifesto, which spent more than three months as a New York Times bestseller and sold more than one million copies. His books Men in Black: How the Supreme Court is Destroying America and Rescuing Sprite: A Dog Lover’s Story of Joy and Anguish were also bestsellers. He has worked as an attorney in the private sector and as a top adviser and administrator to seve ...
Unethical Black Democrats In Congress Corrupt Congressional Black Caucus Michael Berry Calls Out The NAACP “In Black Caucus, a Fund-Raising Powerhouse” by Eric Lipton and Eric Lichtblau of the New York Times exposes how black Democrats in Congress bash corporations, but are not shy about extracting money (to pay off a $4 million mortgage on its foundation’s DC town house headquarters) from labor unions and businesses, including Wal-Mart, AT&T, General Motors, Coca-Cola and Altria, the nation’s largest tobacco company. Gun Control is rooted in Democratic Party Racism "Supreme Court Affirms Racist Origins of Gun Control" by Frances Rice - Comments on the US Supreme Court's June 28th McDonald v. City of Chicago ruling that the Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms applies to state and local governments. This case was filed by a black man, Otis McDonald and highlights that Gun Control laws are rooted in the Democratic Party's racist past when Democrats passed "Black Codes" that prohibited new . ...
I’ll warn you in advance; the next two years, especially, will be a nightmare. 1) Expect absolutely nothing passed by the House of Representatives to pass in the Senate. Obama, Reid and Company now have an iron fisted grip on the upper chamber and can simply ignore the House of Representatives anytime they want. And they will – often, if not always. About the only thing the two will agree on is joint resolutions commending various groups or citizens for achievements totally outside the political sphere. Renaming a post office will suddenly become a political issue. 2) It seems quite reasonable to expect at least one retirement from the Supreme Court and, quite possibly, two within the next two years. If the first one is Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the political makeup of the court would stay the same – 5 to 4 with Obama’s next nominee to be as far left leaning as every other. Mrs. Ginsburg is 79 and not in good health. As the New York Times points out, Justice Ginsburg, a stalwart of t ...
Antiabortion-Rights State Lawmakers Hope To Continue Momentum of Last Two Years Emboldened by new Republican majorities in three states and GOP control of both legislative chambers in 26 states, abortion-rights opponents are working to build on the momentum of the last two years, when 135 state abortion restrictions were enacted, Bloomberg reports. Contraceptive Coverage Debate Will Likely Reach Supreme Court The disparate rulings in the dozens of lawsuits filed against the federal contraceptive coverage rules suggest that the issue ultimately will be resolved by the Supreme Court, the New York Times reports. Visits To Imprisoned Antiabortion Activist Shed Light on Extremist Network A small, radical group of antiabortion-Rights Activists remains steadfast in its support of Scott Roeder, the man convicted and jailed for the 2009 murder of abortion provider George Tiller, the AP/ABC News reports. Blogs Comment on Abortion Providers, Roe v. Wade Anniversary, More We've compiled some of the most thought-provo ...
Laura Ingraham is the most listened-to woman in political talk radio in the United States. "The Laura Ingraham Show" is heard on hundreds of stations nationwide and has been addicting legions of listeners since its launch in 2001. Always smart and entertaining, Laura is a regular Fox News contributor and the principal substitute host on The O'Reilly Factor. She is the New York Times bestselling author of five books: The Hillary Trap, Shut Up & Sing, Power to the People, The Obama Diaries, and new smash hit Of Thee I Zing: America's Cultural Decline from Muffin Tops to Body Shots. A former litigator and Supreme Court law clerk, Laura is a graduate of University of Virginia School of law and Dartmouth College. She is also an avid supporter of our troops and a variety of military organizations. Laura lives in the Washington, D.C. area with her three children.
On Jan. 28, 1988, the Supreme Court of Canada struck down Canada's abortion law, opening access to the procedure across the country. Here's a look at the major moments leading up to that ruling, and the two decades of debate that have followed: 1892: Parliament passes Canada's first Criminal Code. It prohibits abortion as well as the sale, distribution and advertising of contraceptives. A significant number of women continue to seek abortions, according to news reports. 1969: Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau's Liberal government decriminalizes contraception and allows abortion under certain circumstances. Abortions may be performed in a hospital if a committee of doctors decides that continuing the pregnancy may endanger the mother's life or health. Access to abortions varies across the country. 1969: Abortion activist Dr. Henry Morgentaler defies the law and opens an abortion clinic in Montreal. His clinic is raided in 1970 and he is charged with several offences. It marks the beginning of 20 years of legal ...
"NDAA Indefinite Detention Opponents File Supreme Court Emergency Motion” (Hufffington Post 12/12/12) ~~Sandy Conspiracy Archives Opponents of the post-9/11 use of indefinite military detention have filed an emergency motion with the U.S. Supreme Court, seeking to block a law they say allows innocent American citizens to be locked away without trial. The motion, submitted on Wednesday, asks the Supreme Court to reinstate an injunction against a key portion of the National Defense Authorization Act of 2012. Unless the court does so, the motion argues, Americans are “in actual and imminent danger of losing their core First Amendment rights and fundamental Equal Protection liberties.” Since January, former New York Times reporter Chris Hedges, Pentagon Papers whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg and other activists have been waging a legal battle against the U.S. government, arguing that the NDAA gives the military far too much leeway to imprison journalists or activists on vague accusations of supporting ter ...
Justice Alito, Citizens United and the press Last week, Justice Samuel Alito speciously defended the Supreme Court's disastrous ruling in the 2010 Citizens United case by arguing that the ruling, which allowed unlimited independent campaign spending by corporations and unions, was not really groundbreaking at all. In fact, he said, all it did was reaffirm that corporations have free speech rights and that, without such rights, newspapers would have lost the major press freedom rulings that allowed the publication of the Pentagon Papers and made it easier for newspapers to defend themselves against libel suits in New York Times v. Sullivan. "The question is whether speech that goes to the very heart of government should be limited to certain preferred corporations; namely, media corporations," he said in a speech to the Federalist Society, a conservative group. "Surely the idea that the First Amendment protects only certain privileged voices should be disturbing to anybody who believes in free speech." B . ...
A tidbit from a recent newsletter I receive: "Another Supreme Court case of the 2012-13 session has already been decided. It affects you directly... and as far as we can tell, you have no recourse. Flashback: In the 1970s, after the Church Committee found the government had been spying on everyone from Birchers to Black Panthers, Congress passed laws forbidding eavesdropping without a warrant... and punishing companies like AT&T if they cooperated with any illegal eavesdropping. Each violation was punishable by up to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine. Fast-forward to 2001, when Sept. 11 "changed everything." The Bush White House authorized all manner of illegal wiretaps, which was exposed by The New York Times in late 2005. And the National Security Agency recruited the telecom companies to assist. In 2007, a former AT&T technician named Mark Klein described a special room -- Room 641A -- in an office tower at 611 Folsom St. in San Francisco. Its sole purpose: vacuuming up phone calls, emails and w ...
In a recent New York Times article there was a lead article about Affirmative Action. The Supreme Court is about to make a major decision on this issue. Here is a direct quote from the Times piece, “Outright racism certainly exists, and colleges ...
The Republicans are using every trick in the book to try to steal the key swing state of Ohio for Mitt Romney—even asking the Supreme Court to help them stop people from voting. Pitch in $5 right now so Ohio voters know how to fight back. Chip in $5 Whichever polls you're reading, one thing is crystal clear: the race between President Obama and Mitt Romney could not be any closer. While the national polls have fluctuated, the Electoral College math indicates that the race will likely come down to the small set of swing states that the New York Times' Nate Silver refers to as "Obama's firewall." And none of these states will likely be more decisive than Ohio, where President Obama currently has a narrow lead, and which no Republican has ever won the White House without. But there's something insidious happening out of the spotlight in Ohio right now, and it could literally cost President Obama the election. Here's what we know so far: • Anonymous groups have launched a voter-intimidation billboard camp ...
Anyone miss that 'Bama Slamma interview on 60 minutes? Here are SOME of the highlights: “US President Barack Obama says Israel’s call for drawing red line over Iran’s nuclear energy program is just ‘noise’ he tries to ignore.” When asked about the events in Libya resulting in the killing of 4 Americans, our fearless leader described it as "bumps in the road." When asked about his responsibilities, Obama answered, "Oh, I think that, you know, as president I bear responsibility for everything, to some degree, and." Best of all, as we all know by now, the Supreme Court allowed Obama care to sneak through because the Individual Mandate was ruled "A TAX," it was great to see our slithering serpent of a president say, when asked about Obamacare, "I haven't raised taxes." Is anyone looking at the facts out there? If you're watching ABC, CBS, NBC, MSNBC, reading the New York Times or Washington Post, and you actually care at all about the FACTS, you are getting scammed. Mass Media is acting like ...
When voting this November it is IMPORTANT to take into account that our next President will almost certainly be in the position to appoint three or more Supreme Court justices. So, this election is as much about SCOTUS and whether or not you want the scales of supreme justice to maintain an even balance as anything else. Mitt Romney's choice of Robert Bork as his Judicial Advisory Committee chairman should have everyone more than concerned too. Bork, whom The New York Times once called “the most divisive figures in American law,” is a man with a long record of hostility to civil rights for both African-Americans and women. Yet, in spite of this Mitt Romney still said of the rejected right-wing Supreme Court nominee, “I wish he were already on the Supreme Court. He’s the kind of brilliant conservative mind that this court could use.” Romney has shown by choosing Bork as his advisor that his approach to the Constitution is entirely political, partisan and right-wing and that his agenda for the Sup ...
Okay, FB Book Club members, next on the list of good reads is "Next", the final book published of author Michael Crichton before his death in 2008. Though not necessarily my favorite read from Crichton, the underlying message surrounding privatization of biotech, medical and pharmaceutical advances is especially relevant to our times. Since the accomplishments of the human genome project, there have been many developments in the industry law, not only through legislation but also through Supreme Court decisions. Naturally, these developments have been controversial and are, of course, unsettled. I don't know if it appears in the written book, but the e-book includes additional material excerpted from interviews with Crichton by the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, et. al., as well as his own postscript. In the latter, I learned shocking facts and found it an emerging public topic worthy of our attention and education. Thanks to all who have shared their book selections. Tony, I'm off to tackle Madele ...
In a recent New York Times' Opinion Piece written by Benjamin Sachs, a professor at the Harvard Law School, he made the argument that with the Supreme Court's decision of Citizens United, the nation's defined pension plans are now funding corporate political donations in violation of the First Amend...
Briefly: In an interview with Joan Biskupic for' Reuters , Justice Ginsburg revealed that she fractured two ribs after a fall in early June. 'The Justice continued to follow her normal work schedule after the injury, and says she remains committed to staying on the Court for at least three more years. At the' Opinionator 'blog of The New York Times, Linda Greenhouse discusses the Court's role in the success of Title IX and its more recent reluctance to find implied private rights of action in similar statutes. This blog's symposium on the' Supreme Court and the Election 'continues with a contribution from' Nan Aron 'of the Alliance for Justice Action Campaign. At' CNN , Laura Moye of Amnesty International's USA Death Penalty Abolition Campaign responds to Texas's recent execution of Marvin Wilson, whose IQ was sixty-one. (Conor had more coverage of the execution in yesterday's' round-up . ) Over at the' Crime and Consequences 'blog, Kent Scheidegger notes that the Court refused to stay the execution of Da ...
In this episode of Scambook video news, Kevan describes how crooks are using the Supreme Court's decision upholding the Obama Administration's Affordable Healthcare Act to defraud consumers. He explains that fraudsters are taking advantage of all the recent media attention and political confusion to try to exploit you. They may call you on the phone and try to sell you a fake Obama Health Plan, Obamacare Insurance or Healthcare Reform Insurance. In another scheme, the crooks pretend to be US Health Officials who need to verify your private personal information for the new law. They may ask for your Social Security Number or claim that you owe insurance fees to the government. Kevan tells us that according to The New York Times, con artists have been hustling elderly and low-income consumers in Illinois, Alabama, Kansas and Nevada -- but these bogus healthcare-related schemes will probably increase as we approach the 2014 Individual Mandate. Kevan reminds us that the bad guys don't care if you're a Republi ...
Today's news from Sen. Bernie Sanders: Big Money: "Too many Democratic voters [are] ... not nearly outraged enough about Big Money's undue influence ...," Charles Blow said in a New York Times Column. He cited a report by Sen. Bernard Sanders that 26 billionaires have donated more than $61 million to super PACs this year. ''What the Supreme Court did in Citizens United," Sanders said, "is to say to these same billionaires and the corporations they control: 'You own and control the economy; you own Wall Street; you own the coal companies; you own the oil companies. Now, for a very small percentage of your wealth, we're going to give you the opportunity to own the United States government.' ''
If Chief Justice John Roberts thought that coming up with any excuse to let Obamacare stand would make Americans think more highly of the Supreme Court, boy, was he wrong. A new Rasmussen survey found that the High Court’s approval rating plunged after the decision was released. Oh, Democrats now rate the Court 15 points higher. But the Republicans view swung from a net positive of 28 points to a net negative of 23 points. Overall, the number who rate the court’s performance as “good” or “excellent” fell three points to 33 percent, while the number who say they’re doing a bad job rose 11 point 28. Together, that’s a 14 point drop in the Court’s approval rating in one week. The message Americans are sending the Court is: stop caring what the editorial page of the New York Times says and start caring about what the Constitution says. For more of the Huckabee Report visit MikeHuckabee.com.
When he appeared before the Supreme Court to challenge Obamacare last March, Paul Clement, the man who has argued more cases before the High Court than anyone else since 2000, was according to NPR’s Nina Totenberg, “a walking superlative” and “a wunderkind.” In his New York Times blogging, David Br...
A new beginning... After Thursday's Supreme Court victory on health care, Democrats are feeling a lot better about President Obama's chances in November. The New York Times takes a look at how the Obama campaign's relentless attack on Mitt Romney's record at Bain Capital is doing …
CBC.ca Next Battleground of Health Care Debate New York Times - 38 minutes ago WASHINGTON - Shortly after the US Supreme Court's historic health care decision, Barack Obama and Mitt Romney appeared before the cameras to offer their spin.
June 30-1997, in Hong Kong, the Union Jack was lowered for the last time over Government House as Britain prepared to hand the colony back to China after ruling it for 156 years./1971 U.S. Supreme Court ruled 6-3 that the government could not prevent The New York Times or the Washington Post from publishing the Pentagon Papers./1994 The U.S. Figure Skating Association stripped Tonya Harding of the national championship and banned her from the organization for life for an attack on rival Nancy Kerrigan.
I know everyone is glued to the Katie Holmes and Tom Cruise break up (so sad) but in 1913 all the country's major newspapers were filled with news of the split of James P Drouillards from Ada Sorg. James P Drouillard was a hero in the Spanish American War and the son of Captain James Pierre Drouillard of Civil War fame. His wife was the daughter of Paul J Sorg a U.S. congressman and wealthy tobacco baron. Below is a headline from the front page of the New York Times... SUIT AGAINST DROUILLARDS.; $9,850 Asked for Alleged Damage to House They Rented. Capt. James Pierre Drouillard, U.S. A., retired, and Mrs. Ada Sorg Drouillard, who recently began suit against him for divorce, were named as defendants in a $9,830 damage suit began in the Supreme Court yesterday by Sarah J.A. Hall, who owns the house at 1,008 Fifth Avenue in which the Drouillards formerly lived.
I'm back to blow your mind in Newmarket Race 3 ►15:00◄ Experiment: This is an Upset Opportunity Code, I've been sharing here for a few months. But, the Sharpies who follow me want to know which horse? Dictionary: Polygon-Closed plane 3 or more sides, with 5 sides it's a Pentagon ►6•30◄ History: 1971-Supreme Court rules (6-3 vote) New York Times can publish Pentagon Papers. If you can't see a direct connection between the 33/1 longshot Polygon at New-market and New York Times-Pentagon, you might be a Zombie. lol ►Quantum Almanac◄
In 1971 - The U.S. Supreme Court allowed the New York Times to continue publishing the Pentagon Papers.
A debate over the Supreme Court's decision to call the fine on not having insurance a tax today got heated on Piers Morgan Tonight when author Katie Pavlich tried to respond to New York Times Columnist Charles Blow on whether the fine was, in fact, a tax-- a claim Blow said he never made. After a se...
Wolf Blitzer who is supposed to be a big deal at CNN prematurely and wrongly reported the outcome of the Supreme Court decision on the Health Care Bill. as noted by The New York Times: "Shortly after 10 a.m., senior administration officials said, Mr. Obama stopped before a bank of four television screens in the office next to the Oval Office, which were carrying live coverage from the Supreme Court. Two of the four networks, CNN and Fox News, reported prematurely that the court had struck down the Individual Mandate as unconstitutional." I have always thought that this little dweeb is so annoying... how is it that he holds so much power up there. Can we please get rid of him CNN? Ship him off to Fox where his compadres are!
This week's online Q&A between New York Times Columnists Gail Collins and David Brooks was a little edgier than the usual moderate muddle, thanks to a sharp focus on the Supreme Court's imminent decision on Obama-Care.
SyndicatEd Columnist Mark Shields and New York Times Columnist David Brooks discuss the week's top political news with Jeffrey Brown, including the fallout over the president's new immigration policy and the implications of upcoming Supreme Court decisions.
June 13 1893 Grover Cleveland undergoes secret, successful surgery to remove a large, cancerous portion of his jaw 1935 The 10 to 1 underdog James J. Braddock defeats Max Baer in Long Island City, New York, and becomes the heavyweight champion of the world 1966 The United States Supreme Court rules in ''Miranda v. Arizona'' 1970 "The Long and Winding Road" becomes the Beatles' last song 1971 ''The New York Times'' begins publication of the Pentagon Papers 1996 The Montana Freemen surrender after an 81-day standoff with the FBI 2005 A jury in Santa Maria, California acquits pop singer Michael Jackson of molesting 13-year-old Gavin Arvizo at his Neverland Ranch
On this day: Events 2005 Michael Jackson The King of Pop is acquitted of all charges of child molestation in the Gavin Arviso case. 1993 First woman prime minister of Canada 46-year-old Defense Minister Kim Campbell wins the party race to succeed Brian Mulroney after he resigned. 1981 A 17-year-old shoots blanks at Queen Elizabeth II as she was horseback riding in London. 1980 Friday the 13th Camp Crystal Lake is reopened, and the mayhem begins - according to the 1980 film Friday the 13th. 1977 First U.S. policewoman to shoot and kill someone in the line of duty, Janice Gray. 1971 Pentagon Papers The New York Times begins publishing of the classified papers on U.S. involvement in Vietnam. 1971 Mrs. Geraldine Brodrick delivers nine babies tie for the highest number medically recorded for a single birth, Sydney, Australia. 1967 James Bond You Only Live Twice premiers in the U.S., 5th in the James Bond series, it starred Sean Connery as 007. 1967 First Black U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall is a ...
On this day in History---in 1966 the Supreme Court established the Miranda rights for all prisoners.in 1971 the New York Times published the Pentagon Papers, secret documents leaked to them by a disgruntled employee on the Vietnam War...and in 1973 a peace accord was signed by the United States and North Vietnam
Daniel H. Wilson, author of Robopocalypse has now chosen to write a novel about the consequences of human augmentation —the technology makes people superhuman. The New York Times bestselling author of Amped creates a stunning, near-future world where technology and humanity clash in surprising ways. The result? The perfect summer blockbuster. As he did in Robopocalypse, Daniel Wilson masterfully envisions a frightening near-future world. In Amped, people are implanted with a device that makes them capable of superhuman feats. The powerful technology has profound consequences for society, and soon a set of laws is passed that restricts the abilities—and rights—of "amplified" humans. On the day that the Supreme Court passes the first of these laws, twenty-nine-year-old Owen Gray joins the ranks of a new persecuted underclass known as "amps." Owen is forced to go on the run, desperate to reach an outpost in Oklahoma where, it is rumoured, a group of the most enhanced amps may be about to change the wo ...
Bill Keller, writing in the New York Times, opines that the Supreme Court's Justice Anthony Kennedy, thought by...
It seems that the neocons are looking to bring Jerimiah Wright back in their race based campaign against our current president. First of all do some home work and find out that this minister to a mostly white congregation is a decorated war hero and he has served his country which is more than Karl Rove, *** Cheney and many more can say. But also he has every right to speak his mind, he at least put his life on the line to protect that right for us and for himself. But if you want to hear the love of God through a white mans eyes listen to the rev Steven Anderson and his trilobite attack on Barrack Obama and his prayers for all kinds of evil on out President. I fear that because the bought and paid for Supreme Court has decided that corporations are the same as people this is going to be one of the worse elections this country ever saw. But today it became public and was eventually squashed for now that the right was going to bring up the rev Wright in another attack on Obama. is the source and as l ...
www.FeetToTheFire.Blog.com. "WAKE-UP, AMERICA" Well, we're "off-to-the-races", and the 2012 Presidential Campaign is about to go "full-throttle", with "mud", thicker than the Mekong Delta. And how one billionaire can distort the Democratic voting process, and manipulate an uneducated, ill-informed, and often racist electorate, and swing an election towards their candidate. We will see the dangers of the Supreme Court-backed Super-Pacs, as a candidate can distance himself from distortions, lies, smears, and the like, by saying that he can't control what the Pacs air. We all know better, as there is total coordination between a campaign's strategists, and the Super-Pac "henchmen". We also know that "money talks", and the Koch Brothers, as well as the guy in the New York Times article below, Joe Ricketts, billionaire founder of TD Ameritrade, and owner of the Chicago Cubs, are fueling a "hate-mongering" campaign against Obama. Ricketts will use a new round of advertising to resurrect the Reverend Jeremiah Wr ...
New York Times v. US. Supreme Court shot down an AG request for an injunction against NYT for publishing Pentagon Papers.
My post today on the New York Times' editorial page and Bobby Knight 'Sliming the Supreme Court' via
The Supreme Court and the National Conversation on Health Care Reform - New York Times Blogs: Uwe E. Reinhardt i...
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