South Carolina & Revolutionary War

South Carolina is a state in the Southeastern United States. The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), the American War of Independence, or simply the Revolutionary War in America, began as a war between the Kingdom of Great Britain and thirteen British colonies in North America, and ended in a global war between several European great powers, such as conflicts in India and West Africa between Great Britain and France. 5.0/5

South Carolina Revolutionary War Francis Marion Swamp Fox African American American Revolution Continental Army North Carolina United States African Americans Nova Scotia New York City Accepted Masons New Jersey American Revolutionary War Constitutional Convention

Then the Scots fight in the French and Indian War. Later, they form the backbone of the Revolutionary Army in South Carolina.
The worst American defeat of the Revolutionary War occurred at Charleston, South Carolina on May 12, 1780. Via
Ethan Lusted is the first deaf graduate from The Citadel: the Military College of South Carolina, and all military colleges in the United States. Military service has been his family’s tradition going back to the Revolutionary War and the French-Indian War. Ethan is the eldest son of a retired naval officer. His brother graduated from West Point: United States Military Academy as an army officer. Ethan is originally from Atlanta, Georgia and currently resides in the area of Albany, New York. Ethan applied twice for a wavier with the U.S. Army and once with the U.S. Marine Corps as a Military Intelligence officer but failed to meet their hearing qualifications despite the fact he graduated from The Citadel. He will join with Keith Nolan for their march to Washington D.C. rally the support for the bills for the military demonstration program for the deaf and hard of hearing.
And we have a signer from South Carolina, who has a tragic ending to his story.
William Campbell Section 1 – Wives of William Campbell William Campbell had a total of four wives during his lifetime. He had three children by his first wife; seven children by his second wife and no children by his third and fourth wives. A brief sketch of each wife is presented below. Sarah McNary - 1st Wife of William Campbell Sarah McNary was born in Columbia, South Carolina on 5 September 1799. She was the daughter of William McNary and Ann Campbell. William McNary was born in Scotland about the year 1757 and immigrated to America before the Revolutionary War. In 1790, he married Ann Campbell in Fayette County, Virginia (now Kentucky); and in 1812, the couple relocated to Muhlenberg County. [1] Ann Campbell was the daughter of Black David’s brother, Alexander Campbell. Sarah McNary married William Campbell (1793-1885) on 24 September 1816; together they had three children - all daughters. On 10 November 1821, during the birth of their last child (unnamed), Sarah experienced serious complicatio . ...
June 15, 1755-John Marrant, one of the first African American preachers and missionaries, was born in New York City but raised in Charleston, South Carolina. During the Revolutionary War, the British forced him into the navy where he served for seven years. In 1782, Marrant began training as a Methodist minister and was ordained in 1785. That year, he was sent to Nova Scotia to minister to several thousand African Americans who had fled north during the Revolutionary War. In 1788, Marrant became the chaplain of the Prince Hall Grand Lodge Free and Accepted Masons in Boston, Massachusetts. In 1790, Marrant traveled to London, England where he died April 15, 1791. He published his memoir, “A Narrative of the Lord’s Wonderful Dealings with John Marrant, A Black,” in 1785. His memoir was so popular that it was reprinted more than 17 times. A sermon he delivered in 1789 and his journal from 1785 to 1790 were also published.
Today is Monday, May 12, the 132nd day of 2014. There are 233 days left in the year. Today's Highlight in History: On May 12, 1949, the Soviet Union lifted the Berlin Blockade, which the Western powers had succeeded in circumventing with their Berlin Airlift. On this date: In 1780, during the Revolutionary War, the besieged city of Charleston, South Carolina, surrendered to British forces. In 1870, an act creating the Canadian province of Manitoba was given royal assent, to take effect in July. In 1914, author and broadcast journalist Howard K. Smith was born in Ferriday, Louisiana. In 1922, a 20-ton meteor crashed near Blackstone, Virginia. In 1932, the body of Charles Lindbergh Jr., the kidnapped son of Charles and Anne Lindbergh, was found in a wooded area near Hopewell, New Jersey. In 1937, Britain's King George VI was crowned at Westminster Abbey; his wife, Elizabeth, was crowned as queen consort. In 1943, during World War II, Axis forces in North Africa surrendered. The two-week Trident Conference, ...
Learn Our History Today: On April 25, 1781, during the American Revolution, the Battle of Hobkirk’s Hill was fought near Camden, South Carolina. In this fight, one of many fought in the State of South Carolina during the Revolutionary War, the Patriot Army under General Nathanael Greene entrenched themselves behind a ridge known as Hobkirk’s Hill and defended it against an assault by the British troops of Lord Francis Rawdon. The two sides clashed fiercely for control of the hill, with much of the fighting being decided at the point of a bayonet. However, it was the British who eventually came out the victors and the masters of the hill, paying for it by losing nearly a third of their strength. While the battle was loss for the Americans, it was all a part of General Greene’s overall strategy. Instead of besting them fairly on the Battlefield, Greene fought the redcoats by dividing their armies, forcing them to follow him on long and tiring marches and allowing them to win temporary victories at the ...
Future President Andrew Jackson is born in a backwoods region between North and South Carolina to Irish immigrant parents on this day in 1767. Jackson was essentially an orphan—all but one member of his family were killed during the Revolutionary War--who rose from humble beginnings to become a celebrated soldier and one of the nation's most influential presidents. Jackson was a 13-year-old soldier when he was captured by the British during the American Revolution; he is the only former prisoner of war ever to become president. After the war, Jackson embarked on an impressive military and political career that included stints as a Tennessee lawyer, plantation owner, delegate to the Tennessee Constitutional Convention, Tennessee Supreme Court justice, Tennessee senator (twice), victorious leader of the Battle of New Orleans during the War of 1812, and governor of the Florida Territory. He was defeated by John Quincy Adams in his first presidential campaign in 1823, but turned around and beat Adams four y ...
Did you know ... the Wilcox Female Seminary and Female Institute (shown here) was founded in Camden, Wilcox County, during the mid-nineteenth century? Today the structure houses the Wilcox County Historical Society. Camden was initially called Barboursville, in honor of Virginia Senator Phillip Barbour, the town was renamed in 1842 for Camden, South Carolina, site of an important Revolutionary War battle. Camden is also home to Black Belt Treasures, a non-profit organization to promote the arts and crafts of the Black Belt region of Alabama. (Photo courtesy Ginger Ann Brook) Read more:
Born in Ireland, Pierce Bulter came to the United States as an officer in the British Army. During the Revolutionary War he fought for American independence. After the war, he served in the Continental Congress. Later, he, like Charles Pinckney, served as one of South Carolina's four delegates to the Constitutional Convention. At the Convention, he advocated for a strong, central state that could adequately defend itself. He also defended the institution of slavery, advocating for the Fugitive Slave Clause and encouraging other delegates to accept a provision that would count all slaves in the population when determining how many representatives each state would have (instead, the Convention adopted the 3/5 compromise, counting each slave as 3/5 of a person). He also served in the Senate. Through his time in the Senate, Butler made several abrupt political changes. He begun as a Federalist, split to join the Jeffersonian Republicans in 1795, and ultimately declared himself a political independent in ...
Taking Every Thought Captive Part 3 Sharon Jaynes Today’s Truth “We demolish arguments and every pretension that sets itself up against the knowledge of God, and we take captive every thought to make it obedient to Christ” (2 Corinthians 10:5 NIV). Friend To Friend My neighbor, Michael, was a stand-in for Samuel, the nine-year-old son of Benjamin Martin (Mel Gibson) in the movie The Patriot. For months, Michael wore his long hair with extensions, slipped on Italian knickers and knee-high stockings and acted the part of an American colonial boy. He traveled to rural South Carolina where part of the movie was filmed and received an education in the production of the silver screen. Michael saw how producers and makeup artists made something appear as though it were real. The movie was rated R for violent content, but his parents let nine-year-old Michael watch it upon release. The movie was a bloody realistic reenactment of the horrors of the Revolutionary War. However, during the guts and gore, ...
Did you know.On this day February 12th, in 1733, Georgia became the last and 13th colony. The Thirteen Colonies were: Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts Bay, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina & Virginia. Georgia was founded by James Oglethorpe who was a British General and part of parliament, and his plan for Georgia was agrarian equality. It would be an agricultural economy preserved by family farming. Since 1607 colonists from all around the world, and primarily Europe, have been flocking to the New World with dreams and aspirations. The difference between the New World and Europe was that in the New World a person could do anything, become anyone, and was not restricted to a strict hierarchy. Georgia is named after King George II and was the fourth state to ratify the U.S. constitution. Georgia didn’t play a key role in the Revolutionary War because of its recent formation and small military; however, it sided wi ...
Some ChuckTown Black History..Henry Laurens (1724-1792) Henry Laurens was born in Charleston, South Carolina, in the year 1724. He took an early part in opposing the arbitrary claims of Great Britain, at the commencement of the American Revolution. In 1776 , he was made vice president of South Carolina under the new constitution and elected a delegate to the Continental Congress, later he was elected President of Congress on Nov. 1, 1777. His tenure as president of the Continental Congress was during one of most stormy periods in the Revolutionary War. In 1780, on his way to negotiate a treaty with the United Netherlands, he was captured by a British vessel and sent to Great Britain where he was imprisoned on suspicion of high treason. Freed some 15 months later, he was commissioned by congress as one of the ministers to negotiate peace. He then went to Paris, where, with John Jay and Benjamin Franklin, he signed the preliminaries of the treaty, 30 November 1782. He later retired to his plantation in Char ...
Benjamin Ware Johnson was born 1755 in Greenville District,South Carolina.I have not found wife's name,but until around 1810 Benjamin,his wife and children lived in Greenville District,South Carolina on land granted to him in 1784 for his service in the Revolutionary War,and in 1792 Benjamin purchased 50 acres for 20 pounds,also in Greenville District. 1800 census for Greenville list Benjamin as head of household,married and with 7 children 4 boys and 3 girls. However I only have information on what is believed to be the three youngest boys,William b.1785 S.C.,Joseph b.abt.1787 S.C. and Aaron b.1792 S.C.
This is a series of articles written in 1983 in the four issues of the "County Journal" in it's brief existence. I hope to get them in chronological order, but it maybe a futile effort.. stay tuned. :) THE EARLY YEARS The history of Marion County is filled with rich stories of conquest and betrayal, love and war, and an abundance of hardships mixed with triumph. Marion County is named after Francis Marion, a South Carolina based guerilla leader in the Revolutionary War known as the "Swamp Fox." Marion County RETROSPECT By Roy Weinedel PART I - The Early Years In all fairness, no area has a history without human habitation, so that seems like a good starting point. The land itself has been there since the swirling mists of time began to part. The gently rolling hills slowly emerging from a gradually receding sea, fossilizing millions of tiny creatures in layers of mud. Soon, the footprints of man and animal mixed in the newly formed soil. Slowly, trails began to take shape and the migration of man began. . ...
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Saturday, November 9, 2013, the 313th day of the year. Today is Independence Day in Cambodia, The Day of the Skull in Bolivia, and World Freedom Day in the U.S. Also, The November Nine, the final nine players in the World Series of Poker. On This Date in History: 694: The Council of Toledo in Spain gave Egica, one of the kings of the Visigoths, the excuse to accuse Jews of aiding the Muslims to sentence them into Slavery. 1494: The Medici Family are expelled from Florence. 1620: The Pilgrims aboard the Mayflower sight land at Cape Cod, Mass. 1688: William of Orange captures Exeter in England during the Glorious Revolution. 1780: During the Revolutionary War Patriot forces under Gen. Thomas Sumter defeat a combined British-Loyalist force in the Battle of Fishdam Ford in South Carolina. 1799: Napoleon leads the coup d'etat that ends the Directory Government in France. 1857: "The Atlantic" Magazine is founded in Boston, Mass. 1862: During the Civil War Abraham Lincoln picks Gen. Ambrose Burnsides to ...
Some people have had trouble (like in CA, when a boy was expelled for wearing a cap that said "GO *** ") with the Gamecocks and their marketing. I agree that "Go *** " will be misunderstood outside the deep south, but it is cheaper to monogram on stuff! The actual name of the Gamecocks comes from Revolutionary War hero, Thomas Sumter, whose nickname was "The Fighting Gamecock." Not surprisingly, he was from South Carolina, which is where the USC Columbia football team gets its name, so let's give credit where credit is due!
Jasper is named for William Jasper, a Revolutionary War hero from South Carolina.[5] Jasper was formed from land leased for $1 from Cherokee Indian legend Elizabeth aka "Betsy" Pack, daughter of Chief John Lowery and beloved Cherokee Woman Nannie Watts. [6] Her descendants and friends of the family gather on a semi-annual basis to place flowers at the courthouse marker.
The Book of *** Someone Knows My Name. Abducted as an 11-year-old child from her village in West Africa and forced to walk for months to the sea in a coffle—a string of slaves—Aminata Diallo is sent to live as a slave in South Carolina. Years later, she forges her way to freedom, serving the British in the Revolutionary War and registering her name in the historic “Book of Negroes.” This book, an actual document, provides a short but immensely revealing record of some 3,000 Black Loyalists who left the United States for resettlement in Nova Scotia. A trained bookkeeper, Aminata is enlisted to record the names of these African-Americans travelling to Nova Scotia in pursuit of land and a new way of life. But when the Loyalists arrive in Canada in 1783, they find that the haven they’d been seeking is steeped in an oppression all its own. Aminata is among the pioneers of Nova Scotia to settle Shelburne and the neighbouring Black community of Birchtown. Her journey from slavery to liberation, and ...
In early 1781, Revolutionary War militia leader Francis Marion and his men were camping on Snow's Island, South Carolina, when a British officer arrived to discuss a prisoner exchange. As one militiaman recalled years later, a breakfast of sweet potatoes was roasting in the fire, and after the negotiations Marion, known as the "Swamp Fox," invited the British soldier to share breakfast. According to a legend that grew out of the much-repeated anecdote, the British officer was so inspired by the Americans' resourcefulness and dedication to the cause—despite their lack of adequate provisions, supplies or proper uniforms—that he promptly switched sides and supported American independence. Around 1820, John Blake White depicted the scene in an oil painting that now hangs in the United States Capitol. In his version, the primly attired Redcoat seems uncomfortable with Marion's ragtag band, who glare at him suspiciously from the shadows of a South Carolina swamp. The 2000 movie The Patriot exaggerated the S ...
For Immediate Release – April 27, 2013 Contact -- Musgrove Mill State Historic Site, (864) 938-0100 , mgmillsp Noted SC Author Unveils New Book at Musgrove Mill Event CLINTON – Noted South Carolina author and historian Christine R. Swager will be speaking at Musgrove Mill State Historic Site during the Revolutionary Encampment Weekend May 4-5. About her new book entitled Musgrove Mill Historic Site which relates the story of the site from prehistoric time to the present, with comprehensive coverage of the Revolutionary battle which occurred in August of 1780. Dr. Swager is an educator and taught in public schools and in the College of Education at the University of South Carolina. Since retirement, Dr. Swager has written 6 books about the Southern Campaign of the Revolutionary War. Dr. Swager will offer presentations at 10:30 AM on Saturday, May 4 and at 2:30 PM on Sunday, May 5. Musgrove Mill Historic Site will be available for sale in the Visitor Center at the park. The Revolutionary Encampment ...
Charles Cotesworth "C. C." Pinckney (February 25, 1746 – August 16, 1825), was an early American statesman of South Carolina, Revolutionary War veteran, and delegate to the Constitutional Convention. He was twice nominated by the Federalist Party as their presidential candidate, but he did not win e...
Henry Laurens (March 6, 1724 [O.S. February 24, 1723] – December 8, 1792) was an American merchant and rice planter from South Carolina who became a political leader during the Revolutionary War. A delegate to the Second Continental Congress, Laurens succeeded John Hancock as President of the Congress. He was a signatory to the Articles of Confederation and President when the constitution was passed on November 15, 1777. Laurens had earned great wealth as a partner in the largest slave-trading house in North America (Austin and Laurens). In the 1750s alone, this Charleston firm oversaw the sale of more than 8,000 enslaved Africans. He was for a time Vice-President of South Carolina and a diplomat to the Netherlands during the Revolutionary War. He was captured at sea and imprisoned for some time by the British in the Tower of London. His son John Laurens, a colonel in the Continental Army and officer on Washington's staff, believed that Americans could not fight for their own freedom while holding slave ...
On this day in 1776, the newly established Continental Navy was at sea on its first operation, an expedition to the Bahamas to capture some badly needed munitions. The flagship of the little fleet flew a new ensign presented by Christopher Gadsden of South Carolina: a yellow banner emblazoned with a coiled rattlesnake and the legend “Don’t Tread on Me.” The rattlesnake was a favorite emblem during the Revolutionary War. In December 1775, Benjamin Franklin published an essay in the Pennsylvania Journal under the pseudonym “An American Guesser” in which he ruminated on the symbol. “I observed on one of the drums belonging to the marines now raising, there was painted a Rattle-Snake, with this modest motto under it, ‘Don’t tread on me,’ ” Franklin wrote. He noted that the rattlesnake’s “eye excelled in brightness that of any other animal, and that she has no eye-lids. She may therefore be esteemed an emblem of vigilance. She never begins an attack, nor, when once engaged, ever surrend ...
What fun it was last week at the SCIRA conference at Myrtle Beach! A lovely eight-year-old interviewed me. She had finished my book and asked me some excellent questions about the writing process, as well as Kate's story. Her next school project will be a portrayal of Kate, dressed in colonial attire. Teachers were most kind about using my books in their classrooms, and I appreciate your support for teaching about South Carolina's Revolutionary War hope to see all of you again! As Abigail Adams said, "Learning is not attained by chance, it must be sought for with ardor and diligence." Abigail Adams
Rob Stevens wrote: On Oct. 15, 1773, Greenbury Lee, from South Carolina, was granted 100 acres at head of branch of Brier Creek called Beaver Dam, half a mile above the Indian Trading Path. Greenbury Lee married Elizabeth Few, a daughter of William and Mary (Wheeler) Few. GREENBURY LEE was commissioned as a colonel during the outbreak of the Revolutionary War. His Militia fought in the battle of Brier Creek, Ga 3rd day of March 1779 and was involved in several other expeditions of guerrilla fighting against the British. Thanks Rob for your info.
Francis Marion (c. 1732 – February 27, 1795[1]) was a military officer who served in the American Revolutionary War. Acting with Continental Army and South Carolina militia commissions, he was a persistent adversary of the British in their occupation of South Carolina in 1780 and 1781, even after the Continental Army was driven out of the state in the Battle of Camden. Due to his irregular methods of warfare, he is considered one of the fathers of modern guerrilla warfare, and is credited in the lineage of the United States Army Rangers. He is known as the Swamp Fox.
Hallie Brown's parents were former slaves who married about 1840. Her father, who bought his freedom and that of family members, was the son of a Scottish plantation owner and her African American overseer; her mother was the granddaughter of a white planter who had fought in the Revolutionary War, and she was freed by this grandfather. Hallie Brown's birthdate is uncertain. It is given as early as 1845 and as late as 1855. Hallie Brown grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Chatham, Ontario. She graduated from Wilberforce University in Ohio and taught in schools in Mississippi and South Carolina. In 1885 she became dean of Allen University in South Carolina, and studied at the Chautauqua Lecture School. She taught public school in Dayton, Ohio, for four yeasr, and then was appointed lady principal (dean of women) of Tuskegee Institute, Alabama, working with Booker T. Washington. From 1893 to 1903, Hallie Brown served as professor of elocution at Wilberforce University, though on a limited basis as she ...
Why British Gun Control Failed during the Revolutionary War and why it will certainly fail again when We the People stand up to defend the U.S. Constitution. Furious at the December 1773 Boston Tea Party, Parliament in 1774 passed the Coercive Acts. The particular provisions of the Coercive Acts were offensive to Americans, but it was the possibility that the British might deploy the army to enforce them that primed many colonists for armed resistance. The Patriots of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, resolved: “That in the event of Great Britain attempting to force unjust laws upon us by the strength of arms, our cause we leave to heaven and our rifles.” A South Carolina newspaper essay, reprinted in Virginia, urged that any law that had to be enforced by the military was necessarily illegitimate. (entire article below)   The Royal Governor of Massachusetts, General Thomas Gage, had forbidden town meetings from taking place more than once a year. When he dispatched the Redcoats to break ...
In February of 1776 Solomon entered the service of the State of Virginia in the Revolutionary War, ten miles west of Ingles Ferry on the New River, in what is now Montgomery County, Virginia. Ingles Ferry (Radford) was an important station on the Great Road down the Shenandoah Valley, which was bringing numerous immigrants from Pennsylvania and Virginia into Tennessee, and on to Kentucky. As a 21 year old he was probably pioneering on his own, his family having remained in Frederick County. Virginia. He entered the 8th Virginia Regiment under Captain James Knox for a period of two years. They marched to Williamsburg, Virginia, to join Captain Henry Lee (known as "Light Horse Harry", and father of the Civil War General Robert E. Lee). Lee marched the troops through Halifax, North Carolina, and Charleston, South Carolina, to Savannah, Georgia. There being a necessity for troops in the north* they were taken to Philadelphia, then marched to Middlebrook, New Jersey, to join the main army. Solomon was there se ...
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Marion County Ohio lies about 50 miles north of Columbus, the state capital. The county was named after General Francis Marion of the Revolutionary War. Marion is more often remembered by his nickname Swamp Fox, because of his guerilla style warfare against the British in the swamps of South Carolina. There are about 66,000 residents in this quiet little county in central Ohio, and like the rest of the state, a number of those residents have been trying to vote early in the presidential election. But when Marion County resident Joan Stevens tried to vote on Monday she ran into a problem that caused her some alarm. When she touched the screen to vote for Mitt Romney, the machine lit up the name of Barack Obama. Joan tried a second time and again the machine lit up Barack Obama when she selected Mitt Romney. Knowing she did not want to cast her vote for Obama, she tried a third time and finally, the name Mitt Romney lit up. After leaving the voting machine, Joan reported the malfunction to board of ele ...
I have something on my brain and want to get it off, now dont get me wrong I am a Carolina fan and love the Gamecocks...I feel deeply for Marcus Lattimore's hard times and wish him a speedy recovery, But he will recover.and They named a day Marcus Lattimore day in his honor. I think thats not right, what about a day for Gen. Francis Marion, some know him as the "Swamp Fox". A man who turned the tides of the Revolutionary War...Or what about a day for 1st LT. Ryan Davis Rawl, Spc. John Meador, and Sgt. 1st Class Matthew Bradford Thomas, all from South Carolina and all were lost in a suicide bombing a few months ago, or any other of the SC killed in Action. See most of you dont know these names, and I understand the news doesnt show alot anymore on the war because America is to a point where its ashamed of its war and turns its eyes on most stuff...but a Football player gets hurt, he gets thousands gathering to support him and his own day on the calender...a SC soldier dies and he gets a flag and thats it. ...
Britton Williams probably fled Georgia with his young family during the Indian uprising of 1773-1774. In December 1771 Indians murdered a settler named John Cary and the Treaty of 1763 was broken. Between Christmas Day 1773 and January 1774 two parties of Lower Creek Indians attacked St. George Parish, killing 13 settlers in the backcountry. The Georgia militia who had set out in pursuit was repulsed by the Indians which killed 2 or 3 men on 23 Jan 1774. The frontier settlements were at once thrown into a panic and the alarmed populace fled from Georgia to the safety of South Carolina. It was not until after the Revolutionary War, did settlers feel safe to return. Washington County was formed in 1784 from lands west of St. George Parish and many settlers from North and South Carolina moved there, including Britton Williams’ son Wilson and perhaps brother Joshua Williams.
The final and sixth square of the original plan. Oglethorpe Square Upper New Square was laid out in 1742 and was later renamed in honor of Georgia founder General James Oglethorpe. The modest home of Georgia's first Royal Governor, John Reynolds, was located on the southeast Trust Lot (now a parking lot of The Presidents' Quarters Inn) overlooking Oglethorpe Square. Reynolds arrived in Savannah October 29, 1754. The residences of the Royal Surveyors of Georgia and South Carolina were located on the northeast Trust Lots, the site of today's Owens-Thomas House. The Presidents' Quarters Inn, a 16-room historic bed and breakfast, is located on the southeast Trust Lots. The square contains a pedestal honoring Moravian missionaries who arrived at the same time as John Wesley and settled in Savannah from 1735 to 1740, before resettling in Pennsylvania. A Savannah veterans’ group had unsuccessfully proposed erecting a memorial to veterans of World War II in Oglethorpe Square (which was installed on River Street ...
Today, while staffing the TSLA/THS booth at the Southern Shindig of Books, Ann and I learned that 1) Shiloh is a national treasure and everyone should visit the battlefield, 2) a person could volunteer to be a Brigadier General during the Revolutionary War, and 3) Andrew Jackson was born in South Carolina. Who knew?
This is from a friend of mine who is trying to update his PE license. He must do this, but people don't who need to vote?Attached are the required cover sheet and a scan of my US passport and Florida drivers license. ( jpg format) Please inform me if this is adequate. When I was much younger I was also in the US Merchant Marine and still have those US Coast Guard documents available. Many Thanks, Arthur W. Camp, P.E. P.S. On my deceased Father's side, I am a descendant of the the Jamestown Virginia colonists from England circa early 1600's !! My forebears fought on BOTH SIDES of the Revolutionary War - - some for the British & some for the Colonists. Our ancestral home (1700's) is in the Buffalo Creek area, a little West and slightly South of present day Charlotte N.C. and encompassed land and farms in both North and South Carolina. Am I a United States CITIZEN, or what ?
I love watching Revolutionary war documentaries. especially when they point out how without South Carolina, the United States of America would not exist. See, without the guts of Thomas "The Carolina Gamecock" Sumter and Francis Marion leading the Carolina militiamen to fight in skirmishes against the British to help keep them in South Carolina for almost a year until the turning point battle victory at Cowpens, SC, Cornwallis and the British would have been unstoppable, and would have just kept marching to a clean sweep of South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia, and there would be nothing stopping him from crushing what was left of General Washington's continentals, and hence the seige of Yorktown would never have taken place, the French would have never arrived in time to come to our aid, and essentially the Americans would never have won the war. Your welcome, America- South Carolina.
Grace and Rachel Martin were two important women in the Revolutionary War. They were also from South Carolina!
Since I will be gone for about a week beginning September 25, I have decided to post the Trivia Previews for October 1 and October 2. Here we go: Monday October 1: 1. This famous South Carolina senator once spent 24 hours and 17 minutes talking on the floor of the US senate. That was a long fillibuster. Name him. 2. The Red Vineyard is the only painting that this great artist sold while he was alive. Name him? Tuesday October 2: 1. These two Revolutionary War leaders were the leaders of the Green Mountain Boys and were instrumental in winning the Battle of Fort Ticonderoga. Name both? 2. Jermaine Paul was last season's winner (the second season) of what TV reality show? Halftime on both nights will have to do with the ambiguous theme of "Black and White!" Now, doesn't that just tantalize you! Remember that I will be doing the game tonight (September 24) and Nick will be doing the game on September 25 while I am gone. See you all soon.
Johnson Square was the first of Savannah's squares and remains the largest of the 24. It was named for Robert Johnson, colonial governor of South Carolina and a friend of General Oglethorpe. Interred in the square is Revolutionary War hero General Nathanael Greene, the namesake of nearby Greene Square. Greene died in 1786 and was buried in Savannah's Colonial Park Cemetery. His son, George Washington Greene, was buried beside him after drowning in the Savannah River in 1793. Following vandalism of the cemetery by occupying Union forces during the Civil War the location of Greene's burial was lost. After the remains were re-identified Greene and his son were moved to Johnson Square. An obelisk in the center of the square now serves as a memorial to Gen. Greene. The cornerstone of the monument was laid by the marquis de La Fayette in 1825. At that time the obelisk did not yet commemorate any specific individual or event. In fact, due to financial restrictions the unmarked obelisk served for several years as ...
This Day in History: Revolutionary War hero John Paul Jones dies in Paris after an illustrious career, including his famous victory despite long odds with his ship Bonhomme Richard against the HMS Serapis, where he famously shouted "I have not yet begun to fight!!", winning the the battle and becoming the Father of the American Navy, 1792; the assault on Confederate-held Battery Wagner in South Carolina rages, killing hundreds of courageous black troops and their brave commander, Robert Gould Shaw, highlighted in the popular and gripping movie "Glory", 1863; the Spanish Civil War begins, a brutal conflict of the Communists against the fascists, later made into a best-selling novel titled "For Whom the Bell Tolls" by Ernest Hemingway, 1936
July 12th Jane Thomas’s Ride In the summer of 1775, as the Revolutionary War got underway, Patriots in the foothills of western South Carolina organized to fight for independence. The frontiersmen called themselves the Spartan Regiment after the ancient Greek city-state famous for its warriors, and they chose as their leader Col. John Thomas, a sturdy Welch pioneer. Even after the British captured Charleston, overran much of the state, and threw Colonel Thomas in prison, the Spartan Regiment refused to give in. In July 1780, John Thomas’s wife, Jane, was visiting her husband at the settlement of Ninety- Six, where he was confined, when a conversation between several Loyalist women caught her ear. One of them mentioned that Loyalist forces were planning a surprise raid for the next night against a Patriot camp at Cedar Springs. The information startled Jane. It was the place where her son, John Thomas Jr., now in command of the Spartan Regiment, was organizing his men. Realizing there was no time to lo ...
Wow! Been watching the military channel about the Revolutionary War. The battle shown at the end of the movie The Patriot actually took place as depicted in the movie at the battle of Cowpen in northern South Carolina. The strategy used at this battle was brilliant! THANKS TO ALL VETERANS AND ALL WHO ARE CURRENTLY SERVING TO PROTECT OUR FREEDOMS! That includes the Border Patrol and any person fighting terrorism and fighting politically to protect all of us!
Remember, remember the 28th of June 1776 when the South Carolina Militia and Conteniental Regulars DEFEATED the British Invasion of the South Carolina at the Battle of Sullivan's Island! The first major victory for Colonial Forces in the Revolutionary War. Traditionally known as CAROLINA DAY. Help celebrate by flying our South Carolina Flag on Thursday at your home and office or place of business!!! SC Flags are available at the Curiosity Shop if you need one. Thanks for sharing John Heaton
Ironically, the Swamp Fox and the other South Carolina guerillas eventually worked themselves out of a job. The Continental Army returned and Colonel Francis Marion, much to his dismay, found himself back in the regular army. Marion despised the rules and politics of professional soldiering and found himself constantly at odds with his commanding officers. When the British surrendered in Charleston (1783), he returned to civilian life, though retaining the commission of Brigadier General in the South Carolina militia. Nevertheless, Francis Marion can share some of the credit for American independence. Due to Marion’s and others’ guerilla bands, the British could never secure South Carolina permanently; their entire Southern offensive was stymied. Indeed, factoring in the North Carolina militia’s subsequent victory at King’s Mountain (1780), historians have rightly credited the Southern militia with expediting the American victory in the Revolutionary War. It was setbacks in Carolina, after all, th ...
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The State Flag of South Carolina was officially adopted in 1861. It has a white crescent and a white palmetto tree on a blue ground. Three white crescents (on a blue background) were first used on a South Carolina banner protesting the Stamp Act in 1765. In 1775, Colonel William Moultrie designed a banner for South Carolina troops; it had a white crescent on a blue field. When South Carolina seceded from the Union, the palmetto tree was added to the flag. The palmetto tree was chosen because this tree had helped South Carolinians defeat the British in a battle at Sullivan's Island (during the Revolutionary War). The South Carolinians built a fort out of palmetto wood, and when the British fired cannonballs at the fort, instead of knocking the fort down, the soft palmetto wood just absorbed the cannonballs.
Born in Montreal, P.Quebec, Canada on April 8th.,1947, Kenn studied Marine Sciences at both McGill and Concordia Universities in Montreal. In 1974, Kenn was awarded an M.H.D. (Doctor of Marine History) by the College of Marine Arts in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, for his research and discoveries beneath historic Lake Champlain, pertaining to the Revolutionary War naval battles of 1776 and to the Battle of Plattsburgh on September 11th., 1814 (War of 1812).Kenn's photos and magazine articles have appeared in prestigious journals world-wide;his films and videos have been viewed globally and Kenn has appeared as a guest-speaker internationally including aboard cruise ships. Kenn has been intimately involved with underseas research habitats, including "SUBLIMNOS" and "SeaBase 1"..
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