South Carolina & Civil War

South Carolina is a state in the Southeastern United States. A civil war is a war between organized groups within the same nation state or republic, or, less commonly, between two countries created from a formerly-united nation state. 5.0/5

South Carolina Civil War Fort Sumter United States American Civil War African American Memorial Day Abraham Lincoln Confederate States Union Army Underground Railroad Charleston Harbor New York Tribune Fort Wagner African Americans North Carolina May Day

President Lincoln to the South seconds before South Carolina fired the first shots of the Civil War at Fort Sumter http…
Could Jackson have prevented the Civil War? He almost went to war with South Carolina before Lincoln did.…
: Andrew Jackson did stop the Civil War in 1832 when South Carolina threated to leave the union over tariffs. But later...
Robert Smalls (1839-1915) b. Beauford, South Carolina, went from slavery to Capitol Hill as a Civil War hero.
Hurricane Matthew washes up Civil War-era cannon balls on South Carolina beach
.on Fort Sumter, South Carolina. Sitof start of Civil War!🇺🇸 w…
.on Fort Sumter, South Carolina. of start of Civil War!🇺🇸 w…
.on Fort Sumter, South Carolina. S of start of Civil War!🇺🇸 w…
.on Fort Sumter, South Carolina. Siof start of Civil War!🇺🇸 w…
LIVE on Fort Sumter, South Carolina. Site of start of Civil War!🇺🇸 with Leslie and Nick
April 12th, battle of Fort Sumter Charleston Harbor, South Carolina was the official start of the Civil War.
In 1865, during the Civil War, Union forces led by Gen. William T. Sherman began the Carolinas Campaign as they invaded South Carolina.
"A Scratch with the Rebels" is the first book in my series, Civil War in South Carolina's Low Country. -
1860: US Civil War - South Carolina became the first state to secede from the Union.
Angels of the Battlefield: Catholic sisters as Civil War nurses - Columbia, South Carolina. This is
South Carolina's Confederate flag is gone, but symbols of the Civil War remain | Fox
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Pretty sure I just heard a South Carolina politician say the South wasn't racist in the Civil War and Lincoln wasn't the Great Emancipator.
Congratulations to South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley on finally conceding the Civil War.
South Carolina, where the terrorist rebellion by racist traitors - also known as the Civil War - began in Charleston on April …
Red Herring was a Confederate soldier from South Carolina. See Worthy Grubbs at Amazon for this and other crucial Civil War information.
Charleston South Carolina !! Known as the “Holy City” for the church spires that dot its skyline, Charleston is one of the oldest cities in the U.S., and also one of the most haunted. Victorian mansions line the downtown area known as the Battery, which was a protective artillery installation during the Civil War, and it is here that many of the city’s most haunted houses can be found. Perhaps the most famous is the Battery Carriage House Inn, a hotel where people have reported seeing everything from strange lights, to the gentlemanly ghost of a student who died after leaping off the roof, to a headless torso that appears at guests’ bedsides in the middle of the night. Charleston is also known for a number of ghost stories that originated with the Gullah, a West African culture that populates parts of South Carolina and Georgia. The most famous Gullah horror stories usually center on Boo Hags, a type of blood-red vampire that wears human skin as a mask and feeds on its victim’s energy while they ...
South Carolina voters send Republican Tim Scott to the US Senate, making him the first African-American candidate to win statewide office in the formerly Confederate state since just after the US Civil War. He has served in the Senate since 2013 when he was named to fill an empty seat by Governor Nikki Haley, but this is the first time he had to face voters to keep his job. Nikki Haley kept her job as SC Govornor also!
One of my Beaufort County, South Carolina, ancestors, Samuel R. Ihly, a self-proclaimed Southern loyalist during the U.S. Civil War, made claim to the U.S. Southern Claims Commission for reparations of $9,228 for "horses, cattle, hogs, sheep, poultry, wagons, produce, and provisions" supplied in support of the Union Army.1 His SCC case file, however, is disappointingly brief - basically just a statement that his claim was denied because he appeared on the muster rolls of Company D of the 2nd Regiment of South Carolina State Troops for a 6-month period from 1 August 1863 through 31 January 1864.2 The files of some of his neighbors, however, provide insight into some of my Samuel's missing story - with neighborhood interviews dishing dirt on both the "hot Rebels" and Union supporters, conscription laws, and the effects of the march of Sherman's Army through the community of Pocotaligo, S.C.?in late January/early February 1865. Daily Life in a Rural Farming Community The 1860 and 1870 U.S. census agricultura ...
Richard Theodore Greener was the FIRST . African-American graduate of Harvard College and dean of the Howard University School of Law. ACADEMICALLY, A BEAST . After teaching for two years at the Institute for Colored Youth in Philadelphia and then serving as principal at the Preparatory School for Colored Children in Washington, D.C., Greener accepted the professorship of mental and moral philosophy at the University of South Carolina in October 1873, where he was the university's first African-American faculty member[4] and where he also served as a librarian there helping to "reorganize and catalog the library's holdings which were in disarray after the Civil War".[5] When the university was closed in June 1877 by Wade Hampton III and the newly elected Democratic regime, Greener moved to Washington, D.C., where he took a position as a clerk in the United States Treasury Department and as a professor in the Howard Law School. He served as dean of the Howard University School of Law from 1878 to 1880 and ...
James Longstreet's Corps In honor of the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Fredericksburg, December 11-15, this post is dedicated to one of the major figures in the battle - Confederate General James ‘Old Pete’ Longstreet. James Longstreet was born in South Carolina near the Georgia line and later moved with his family to Augusta, GA. His father had aspirations for him in a military career and worked to get him an appointment to US Military Academy, which finally resulted in admission to the class of 1842. This class was noted for a number of cadets who would later serve as generals on both sides of the Civil War. Longstreet, however, didn’t exactly show a lot of promise among the group, graduating 54th out of 56th in his class. During his initial deployment following his West Point commission in Missouri Lieutenant Longstreet met Ulysees Grant, with whom he would form a life long friendship. It was here that he also met his wife Louisa. The Longstreet’s had ten children over a 40 year marriage. ...
Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II. The Convict Lease System by Frederick Douglass. Taken from the third chapter of "The Reason why the colored American is not in the World's Columbian Exposition," published in 1893. The Convict Lease System and Lynch Law are twin infamies which flourish hand in hand in many of the United States. They are the two great outgrowths and results of the class legislation under which our people suffer to -day. Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Washington claim to be too poor to maintain state convicts within prison walls. Hence the convicts are leased out to work for railway contractors, mining companies and those who farm large plantations. These companies assume charge of the convicts, work them as cheap labor and pay the states a handsome revenue for their labor. Ninetenths of these convicts are Negroes. There are two rea ...
The Ghosts of Raleigh Raleigh, North Carolina Raleigh is a city which has the distinction of avoiding the wrath of General Sherman on his march through North Carolina in the final days of the Civil War. Sherman had already burned his way through Georgia and captured ports in South Carolina before heading north, hoping for the dubious pleasure of sacking Raleigh, the state capital. Just before the troops arrived, two elderly men appeared in Sherman’s camp, wearing top hats and waist coats. They had been sent on an errand of peace, hoping to avoid the burning and looting of the city during the Union occupation. The two old men had endured tremendous odds to get to Sherman, avoiding Union pickets and even getting caught in the middle of a gun battle. Impressed, Sherman agreed that he would not burn Raleigh as long as they met no resistance from the populace. The old men agreed and Sherman kept his word, sparing Raleigh from the destruction that he and his men had spread across the south. And this is not Ra ...
Today In Black History • July 3, 1844 Macon Bolling Allen became the first African American licensed to practice law in the United States after passing the State of Maine bar exam and earning his recommendation. Allen was born Allen Macon Bolling August 4, 1816 in Indiana. He grew up a free man and learned to read and write on his own. In the early 1840s, he moved to Portland, Maine where he earned his license to practice law. However, because White people were unwilling to have a Black man represent them in court, in 1845 Allen moved to Boston, Massachusetts. Allen passed the Massachusetts bar exam that same year and he and Robert Morris, Jr. opened the first Black law office in the U. S. In 1848, Allen passed another exam to become Justice of the Peace for Middlesex County. After the Civil War, Allen moved to Charleston, South Carolina and in 1873 was appointed Judge in the Inferior Court of Charleston. The next year, he was elected Judge Probate for Charleston County. Later, Allen moved to Washington ...
Sampson & Matilda Stephens. He was a Civil War Veteran and survivor of Andersonville Confederate Prison. He was captured by the Confederates at Rogersville, Tennessee, in 1863 and was imprisoned at Belle Isle in Richmond, VA. He was later transferred to Andersonville Prison in Southern Georgia and on to Florence, South Carolina near the end of the war. During the War, Sampson suffered from scurvy, starvation, and "Swamp Fever" from which he never fully recovered and was plagued with poor health the rest of his life. Sampson & Matilda Stephens are buried in the King Cemetery in the Riverton/Beatytown Community.
June 2, 1865: American Civil War ends. In an event that is generally regarded as marking the end of the Civil War, Confederate General Edmund Kirby Smith, commander of Confederate forces west of the Mississippi, signs the surrender terms offered by Union negotiators. With Smith's surrender, the last Confederate army ceased to exist, bringing a formal end to the bloodiest four years in U.S. history. The American Civil War began on April 12, 1861, when Confederate shore batteries under General Pierre G.T. Beauregard opened fire on Union-held Fort Sumter in South Carolina's Charleston Bay. During 34 hours, 50 Confederate guns and mortars launched more than 4,000 rounds at the poorly supplied fort, and on April 13 U.S. Major Robert Anderson, commander of the Union garrison, surrendered. Two days later, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued a proclamation calling for 75,000 volunteer soldiers to help quell the Southern "insurrection." Four long Years Later, the Confederacy was defeated at the total cost of 620 ...
*Happy Memorial Day EVERYONE* This is a little knowledge about Memorial Day and Black History! The first widely publicized observance of a Memorial Day-type observance after the Civil War was in Charleston, South Carolina, on May 1, 1865. During the war, Union soldiers who were prisoners of war had been held at the Charleston Race Course; at least 257 Union prisoners died there and were hastily buried in unmarked graves.[13] Together with teachers and missionaries, black residents of Charleston organized a May Day ceremony in 1865, which was covered by the New York Tribune and other national papers. The freedmen cleaned up and landscaped the burial ground, building an enclosure and an arch labeled, "Martyrs of the Race Course." Nearly ten thousand people, mostly freedmen, gathered on May 1 to commemorate the war dead. Involved were about 3,000 school children newly enrolled in freedmen's schools, mutual aid societies, Union troops, black ministers, and white northern missionaries. Most brought flowers to ...
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Back In The Day - May 23 1430 Joan of Arc was captured by the Burgundians and subsequently sold to the English. 1533 Henry VIII's marriage to Catherine of Aragon is declared null and void. 1618 The Thirty Years War begins. 1701 Captain William Kidd, the Scottish pirate, is hanged on the banks of the Thames. 1785 Benjamin Franklin announces his invention of bifocals. 1788 South Carolina becomes the eighth state to ratify U.S. Constitution. 1830 The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad began the first passenger service in the United States. 1861 Pro-Union and pro-Confederate forces clash in western Virginia. 1862 Confederate General "Stonewall" Jackson takes Front Royal, Virginia. 1864 Union General Ulysses Grant attempts to outflank Confederate Robert E. Lee in the Battle of North Anna, Virginia. 1873 The North West Mounted Police force was formed in Canada. It would later be known as the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. 1900 Civil War hero Sgt. William H. Carney becomes the first African American to receive the Meda ...
*Black History FACT* The United States Department of War established the Bureau of Colored Troops to help the Union Army fight the Civil War on this date in 1863. Regiments of Colored Troops from every state were reorganized into what became known as the United States Colored Troops. This was one of the first authorized attempts by the Federal Government to enlist former slaves in the defense of the Union. The policy was innovative, new and controversial with varying degrees of success. By the end of the war, Black recruitment became widely accepted and South Carolina would provide just over 5,000 of the 179,000 Black troops recruited. Black troops suffered more than White troops when it came to diseases such as measles and smallpox in greater numbers. SiriusXM Urban View
Chronology of Emancipation Chronology of Emancipation during Civil War This brief chronology, adapted from the version published in Free at Last: A Documentary History of Slavery, Freedom, and the Civil War, lists important events in the history of emancipation during the Civil War. Unless otherwise specified, all entries pertain to the Union rather than the Confederacy. 1860 November 6 Abraham Lincoln elected president December 20 South Carolina becomes the first Southern state to secede from the Union 1861 February 4 Convention of seceded states (South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana) meets in Montgomery, Alabama, adopts provisional constitution of the Confederate States of America (Feb. 8), and elects Jefferson Davis provisional president (Feb. 9); on March 2, the provisional Congress admits Texas to the Confederacy March 2 U.S. Congress adopts and sends to the states a constitutional amendment (which ultimately failed of ratification) forbidding any subsequent amendment ...
I have not searched yet to find other related stories. Nor have I checked Snopes 14 Governors : Prepare State Militia Defenses, To Be Ready Against Obama’s Rogue Federal Forces Posted on Sunday, December 8th, 2013 at 1:27 am. by: Thomas Jefferson via Before It’s News By Editor | Conspiracy, Obama fearing a revolution against him by the states, has moved swiftly by nationalizing nearly all National Guard Forces in multiple states; Georgia, Alabama, Kansas, Minnesota, Tennessee, Virginia, Louisiana, South Carolina – to name a few. The Governors of the Great States of Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia still have under their Command-and-Control the State Defense Forces to go against U.S. Federal forces should the need arise. Also important to note: There are NO U.S. laws prohibiting National Guard troops from also joining their State’s Defense Forces. This dilemma occurred during the Civil War with many “citizen soldiers” choosing to serve their states ins ...
Today's History Flashback: 1861 - Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard commanded Confederate shore batteries in an attack against the Union forces at Fort Sumter in Charleston Bay in South Carolina, starting the U.S. Civil War. 1914 - The first movie "palace" - the Mark Strand Theatre - opened in New York City. The movie palaces, an early name for theatres, brought in the rise of the theatre and studio systems and the demise of the nickelodeon. The early palaces featured silent films accompanied with a full orchestra. 1945 - President Franklin Delano Roosevelt suffered a fatal stroke while vacationing in Warm Springs, Georgia. FDR had been elected as President for an unprecedented four terms and served over 12 of the 16 years. 1961 - Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin became the first human being to travel into space and to orbit the earth while aboard the spacecraft Vostok 1. 1981 - The Space Shuttle Columbia was launched from Cape Carnavel in Florida, becoming the first reusable manned spacecraft to travel in ...
April 12, 1968-A Michigan Historical Marker commemorating the First Michigan Colored Infantry was installed in Detroit, Michigan. The First Michigan Colored Infantry was formed February 17, 1863. It was organized on a farm with 845 Black men from Detroit, southern Michigan, and Ontario, Canada. Many of the volunteers had escaped slavery via the Underground Railroad and others were fighting to free family members still in slavery. On May 23, 1864, the unit was re-designated the 102nd Regiment United States Colored Troops. The 102nd fought throughout South Carolina, eastern Georgia, and Florida during the Civil War. After the war, they served occupation duty until they were disbanded October 17, 1865.
Conservative activist: Christians, Constitution freed the slaves, not the Federal Government The head of the conservative Heritage Foundation claimed the Constitution and people of conscience freed the American slaves, reported Right Wing Watch, not the Federal Government. Jim DeMint, the former Republican senator from South Carolina, told a religious broadcaster last week that liberals were fundamentally wrong about everything – even demonstrable historical facts. “No liberal is going to win a debate that big government freed the slaves,” DeMint said during an appearance on Vocal Point. In fact, President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation freeing slaves in the rebellious Confederate States of America, and Congress approved the Thirteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which abolished slavery originally permitted by the founding document. These Federal Government policies were enacted during and after federal troops fought and won the Civil War, which began in DeMint’s home ...
April 12, 1861-- Then on the northern states were called the Union and the southern states were called the Confederate. President Abraham Lincoln said he would fight with everything he had to keep the south states as a part of the United States. There then was a argument because there was a Union fort on Confederate land. The Confederate demanded that the Union soldiers leave there forts in Charleston, South Carolina,the fort was called Fort Sumter. The Union refused to leave the fort, and so what the Confederate decided to do was fire cannons at the fort on April 12, 1861. This was the beginning of the Civil War.
Lest we forget. On this day in 1864, the 900-member First Michigan Colored Regiment, which was organized at Camp Ward in Detroit as the 102nd U.S. Colored Troops, leave for Civil War service on the Union side. The African-American men, all volunteers, will battle deep in Dixie-- South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. More than 1,400 will serve in the unit over the next 19 months—10 percent of them will die in battle. Many Years Later, a historic marker, located at 2700 Clinton Street near Joseph Campau on the campus of Duffield School, will commemorate their heroic service.
Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in Columbia was disguised with Catholic iconography during the Civil War to look like a Roman Catholic Church in hopes of preventing General Sherman, a Catholic, from burning it. The plan worked! Shared from South Carolina (Photo by Ralph Mayer.
Confederate Heritage, Glenn McConnell, and the College of Charleston by Brooks Simpson Posted on March 11, 2014 That which is predictable often bores me, and the discussion over whether South Carolina Lieutenant Governor Glenn McConnell should become president of the College of Charleston is a case in point. You see, Mr. McConnell has an affinity for Confederate heritage. He’s a Civil War reenactor and has an interest in history, especially Confederate history. That issue is at the center of opposition to his candidacy to become a college president. People are reading all sorts of things into the current kerfuffle, with media coverage embracing the usual pattern. We have press coverage here, here, and here, with reaction from McConnell and his supporters here and here. Kevin Levin’s discussed the matter here and here. My favorite comment may be that McConnell’s candidacy reflects a commitment to “Confederate affirmative action.” Back in 2011 McConnell offered the following reflections on the s . ...
NAACP opposes proposed president of SC college who was Civil War-re-enactor ... CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) _ Local and South Carolina civil rights leaders say they oppose Lt. Gov. Glenn McConnell, a Civil War re-enactor, for president of the College of Charleston. Leaders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People held a news conference on campus on Monday. The Rev. Nelson B. Rivers, a local minister and the former national Chief Operating Officer for the NAACP, warned that if the college hires McConnell, officials will regret it. McConnell told The Post and Courier of Charleston that he's defined by his record and not the NAACP's rhetoric. He says he has worked to increase diversity among judges, get lottery money for the state's black colleges and get money for training more black male teachers. McConnell is one of three finalists for the president's job.
Today in Black History: True Warrior!!! March 4, 1932 Andrew Jackson Smith, Medal of Honor recipient, died. Smith was born enslaved on September 3, 1843 in Kentucky. With the outbreak of the Civil War, Smith’s owner joined the Confederate military with the intention of taking Smith with him. When Smith learned of his intentions, he escaped and joined the Union Army. By November 30, 1864, Smith was serving as a corporal in the 55th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. On that day, he participated in the Battle of Honey Hill in South Carolina and his actions during the battle earned him the medal, America’s highest military decoration. His citation partially reads, “Forced into a narrow gorge crossing a swamp in the face of the enemy position, the 55th’s Color-Sergeant was killed by an exploding shell, and Corporal Smith took the Regimental Colors from his hand and carried them through heavy grape and canister fire. Although half of the officers and a third of the enlisted men engaged in the fight were ...
Reparations for Slavery? Today, even after the success of the civil rights movement, the black American population on average has higher infant-mortality rates, lower life expectancy, higher rates of unemployment, lower income, and higher rates of imprisonment than the white population. Some argue that these problems are the "legacy of slavery" brought on by society's discrimination and racism. Are the conditions really a "legacy of slavery"? If so, what should be done? Some African-Americans argue today for reparations--a sort of compensation for the free labor blacks were forced to render during 250 years of slavery. The Idea of Reparations Reparations for the slavery is not a new idea. Before the Civil War ended, General William Tecumseh Sherman issued an order in South Carolina. He wanted 40 acres and the loan of an Army mule set aside for each former slave family. This order was never carried out. After the war, Radical Republicans in Congress passed laws requiring confiscation of former-Confederate ...
Yesterday in 1864, during the Civil War, the Union ship USS Housatonic was rammed and sunk in the Charleston Harbor, SC, by the Confederate hand-cranked submarine HL Hunley, which also sank. The Hunley Sesquicentennial 150 years ago yesterday in 1864, the Hunley became the world's first successful combat submarine when she attacked and sank the USS Housatonic off the coast of Charleston. The Hunley signaled to shore she had completed the mission and was on the way home, but instead, mysteriously vanished with her crew of eight. Lost at sea for over 130 years, the Confederate vessel was finally located in 1995 by New York Times best-selling author Clive Cussler. After years of planning a recovery effort, the world watched on August 8th, 2000 as the Hunley broke the water's surface for the first time in over a century. She was brought to the Warren Lasch Conservation Center in North Charleston, South Carolina, a state-of-the-art laboratory facility designed to excavate and conserve the Hunley. The submarine ...
The Hunley: Zeroing in on what caused Civil War submarine's sinking.. Good article, but mistakenly identifies Clive Cussler as the discoverer of the Hunley instead of Dr. Lee Spence the real discoverer... Born and built amid gray-cloaked secrecy during the American Civil War, the H.L. Hunley -- the first submarine to sink an enemy ship -- has held tight to its murky mysteries. The 150th anniversary of the Hunley's daring and dangerous raid will be marked this weekend and Monday, but the overarching question remains: What caused the submarine and its eight-member crew to slip to the bottom of the sea on the moonlit evening of February 17, 1864, after it signaled to shore a success that changed naval warfare. The Hunley, housed at a laboratory in North Charleston, South Carolina, has yielded its secrets slowly and sparingly, even to researchers armed with the latest in technology.
Black Christianity Before the Civil War: Christian History Timeline A Christian History timeline A. G. Miller 1619 Twenty slaves of African descent are sold in Jamestown, Virginia—the first Africans sold on American shores. 1701 The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts (SPG) begins missionary work among Native Americans and, later, African slaves. Overall, this Anglican organization is not a success among either group. 1730 John Wesley comes to Georgia with the SPG as a missionary to the Native Americans and African slaves. When his missionary efforts prove ineffective, he returns to England. 1739-41 George Whitefield's preaching tour of the colonies inaugurates the Great Awakening. 1758 The first recorded black congregation organizes on the plantation of William Byrd, near Mecklenburg, Virginia. 1773 Black Baptists found a church on the plantation of George Galphin, at Silver Bluff, South Carolina; 1773 Phillis Wheatley's Poems on Various Subjects Religious and Moral is published ...
Introduction to Quash Stevens, a South Carolina freedman, who lived and worked on Kiawah Island before and after the Civil War
Happy Black History Month. A little Trivia from America's Library!!! Harriet Tubman was a runaway slave from Maryland who became known as the "Moses of her people." Over the course of 10 years, and at great personal risk, she led hundreds of slaves to freedom along the Underground Railroad, a secret network of safe houses where runaway slaves could stay on their journey north to freedom. She later became a leader in the abolitionist movement, and during the Civil War she was a spy for the federal forces in South Carolina as well as a nurse.
A Black History Moment WILLIAM CARNEY Sergeant: Civil War William Carney was born in New Bedford, Massachusetts. He was a member of Company C, 54th Massachusetts Colored Infantry. On July 18, 1863, during the Battle of Fort Wagner, South Carolina, nearly 37 years after the Civil War, he was cited for military valor. During the engagement by the all-Black 54th and 55th Massachusetts Colored Regiments, Commander Robert G. Shaw was shot down. A few feet from where he fell laid Sergeant Carney. Summoning all of his strength, Carney held aloft the colors and continued the charge. Having been shot several times, he kept the colors flying high, and miraculously retreated his regiments. Although he made of his comrades did not. For in the deadly battle, over 1,500 Black troops died. On this day in 1900, Sergeant William H. Carney was issued the Congressional Medal of Honor, making him the first Black to ever win the coveted award. It should be noted that sixteen other Black Sgt. William Carneysoldiers and four Bl ...
This is why I do this..Look at us..its not just this month... But Today In Black History • February 1, 1810 Charles Lenox Redmond, orator, abolitionist and military organizer, was born in Salem, Massachusetts. Redmond began his activism against slavery as an orator while in his twenties. In 1838, the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society chose him as one of its agents and in 1840 he went to the World’s Anti-Slavery Convention in London, England. Redmond had a reputation as an eloquent lecturer and is reported to have been the first Black public speaker on abolition. During the Civil War, Redmond recruited Black soldiers in Massachusetts for the Union Army. After the war, he worked in the Boston Customs House and as a street lamp inspector. Redmond died December 22, 1873. • February 1, 1833 Henry McNeal Turner, bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, was born in Newberry Courthouse, South Carolina. At that time, the law prohibited a Black child to be taught to read or write, therefore Turner t ...
Just revisited Ken Burn's Civil War-ep. 1- South Carolina was defined as to small to be a government and too large to be an insane asylum.
Actions of Marines around this time in the Civil War. January 5, 1861: Forty US Marines from the Washington Navy Yard commanded by Captain Algernon Taylor man Fort Washington on the Maryland side of the Potomac River to protect the capitol. January 9, 1861: First Lt. Andrew Hayes and thirty Marines from the Washington Navy Yard garrisoned Fort Mchenry at Baltimore until relieved by the Army. January 9, 1863: Marines and sailors of the "USS Mahaska" along with Army troops advanced to the Richmond and York River Railroad past West Point, destroyed the bridge, cut telegraph wires and tore down the telegraph poles. January 10, 1863: Marine guard numbering 18 Marines of the "USS Wachusett" took charge of the captured Confederate iron-clad steamer "Virginia" and sailed her from Jajores Island, Yucatan, Mexico to Key West Naval Station. January 1, 1864: Thirty Marines and sailors from the South Atlantic Squadron landed at Murrell’s Inlet, Charleston, South Carolina and sank a Confederate blockade runner.
The carefully constructed box of British-made rifles was intended for the hands of Confederate soldiers. A century and a half later, after a failed blockade run, a fire and years resting in the sandy bottom of Charleston Harbor, the weathered container and its contents are instead a time capsule in the hands of conservators and archaeologists. “The last time somebody looked at those, and put them on crates, was about 150 years ago,” said J. Doug Bailey, a gun collector who has studied the Pattern 1853 Enfield rifle-musket for more than three decades. Twenty Enfields — the second most widely used infantry weapon in the Civil War after the Springfield — are being conserved by the Historic Preservation Division of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, which acquired the guns from South Carolina. The crate carried by the doomed CSS Stono is currently on display at Sweetwater Creek State Park in Douglas County, west of Atlanta, while the preservation lab at Panola Mountain State Park is being ov ...
11-15-2013: Thanks to Mary Neal for this post. Mary's insightful remark: If YOU let Columbus, SC put homeless people in concentration camps without massive protests, which is the Nazi plan, you will reap just what you sow. comment on her post: South Carolina fired the first shot on Fort Sumter, starting the Civil War. General William Tecumseh Sherman, after destroying Georgia military resistance to the Union, embarked on the invasion of South Carolina, appropriately saying, "This is where treason started and this is where it will end." Unfortunately, however, agents of the Confederacy murdered Lincoln and Johnson turned back all the Southern white planters' lands originally given to emancipated black Southern former enslaved people to the white former plantation owners and that opened the road to the eventual defeat by the Ku Klux Klan and Southern white terrorists of the egalitarianism of Radical Reconstruction, and to virtual re-enslavement of black Southern people. This in turn re-made Southern sta ...
reposted this from a comment on raw storys site..- MACV • 7 hours ago As The New York Times ably pointed out, the shutdown was plotted for months and months ago by a coalition of more than 36 conservative groups led by Edwin Meese III. You remember Ed Meese. He was Ronald Reagan’s attorney general and the man who was forced to resign in the Wedtech scandal while under investigation by a special prosecutor. The following is from "Bloomberg-Business" ... "The Tea Party-inspired drive to derail Obamacare is anchored in a place where opposition to the Federal Government is as old as the nation: the American South." In the run-up to the Civil War, Southerners supported the Federal Government in enforcing a law that required slaves who had fled to the North to be returned to their owners. After the election of Lincoln, whose campaign pledged to limit the expansion of slavery, they became more hostile toward the government and eventually joined South Carolina in trying unsuccessfully to secede from the Union ...
Last night I attended the Austin Civil War Roundtable meeting for October 2013. The speaker for the meeting was Dr. James I. Robertson Jr. The noted author and historian gave a wonderful talk on "The Unknown Civil War" a book written by Dr. Robertson and published by National Geographic. I took notes from the talk and here is some highlights from Dr. Robertson's talk. - General James Pettigrew said that "South Carolina was too small to be a nation, but too large to be the insane asylum it became." - What was the main cause of the Civil War? One word, "SLAVERY". The rest were minor causes that led to the Civil War. - Abraham Lincoln's humor was a constant part of him. Why so much humor? Lincoln had the signs of depression and his humor was always self depreciating. - The Civil War also happened because there was NO compromise between the leading political factions, much like today's U.S. Government. - If you don't understand the emotions of the Civil War, then you won't understand the Civil War. - Most reg ...
South Carolina state Sen. Tom Davis a favorite among tea party conservatives has some interesting thoughts about the Civil War, comment brief: "If only Longstreet had employed this flanking maneuver."
The American Civil War's origins can be located at Fort Sumter, in the harbor of Charleston, South Carolina. The battle itself had no casualties, but the con...
The first shots of the Civil War were fired at Fort Sumter, in South Carolina.
Kenny Shivers From the 1830’s until the Civil War, many of the Creek families who remained behind lived lives closely associated with the culture of the times lived by average southerners, many farming some working turpentine, coastal fishing, or subsistence hunting. During this same period large numbers of Cheraw Indians were migrating into the panhandle of Florida from North and South Carolina. Intermarriage between Creeks and Cheraw was common. Over a third of the founding ancestors of the modern Poarch Creek population in South Alabama and Escambia County, Florida were Carolina Cheraw who married into the remnant Creek population. Share · June 19 at 2:18pm
Jul 5, 1861: Union and Rebel forces clash at Carthage, Missouri On this day, the first large-scale engagement of the Civil War is fought in southwestern Missouri, signaling an escalation in the hostilities between the North and South. Missouri was the scene of some of the most bitter partisan fighting during the war, and the state was deeply divided after the clash at Fort Sumter, South Carolina in April 1861. The Missouri State Guardsmen, a force of 6,000 men commanded by Confederate Governor Claiborne Jackson and Colonel Sterling Price, were poorly equipped and outfitted mostly in civilian clothing. Their Union counterpart was a force of 1,100, mostly German-Americans from St. Louis, commanded by General Franz Sigel. Sigel's force occupied Springfield in late June, and then collided with the Confederates at nearby Carthage on July 5. Outnumbered, Sigel eventually withdrew, but was able to hold off several small attacks. By nightfall, the Union troops had retreated through Carthage and escaped a dangerou ...
What really happened at Fort Sumter? Did South Carolina decide to 'fire on bread', and keep the 'starving' garrison of Major Robert Anderson hungry? Did they fire 'unprovokedly' upon the 'American' flag? Did South Carolina 'want' a war? Which side, exactly, was the aggressor in this struggle? What else was at stake in this strife, besides 'preserving' a 'union' of states? We shall explore the published and documented telegraph dispatches among Major Anderson, Governor Pickens, and the Lincoln Administration. Filmed in the Charleston Harbor, at Forts Moultrie and Sumter, this video will shock you as to what really took place during these four uncertain and explosive months leading up to the 600,000 plus deaths of the Civil War, and what really happened at Fort Sumter. In their own words!
THIS DAY IN HISTORY 1863 The Battle of Gettysburg, which marked the turning point in the Civil War, began. 1867 Canada became a self-governing dominion of Great Britain under the British North America Act. 1898 Theodore Roosevelt and his Rough Riders fought the battle of San Juan Hill in the Spanish-American War. 1943 Income tax withholding began in the United States. 1962 Burundi and Rwanda achieved independence. 1963 The U.S. Post Office inaugurated its five-digit ZIP (Zone Improvement Plan) codes. 1968 The United States, Britain, the Soviet Union, and 58 other nations signed the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. 1994 Yasir Arafat returned to Palestinian land after 27 years in exile. 1997 After 156 years of British colonial rule, Hong Kong was returned to China. 2000 Vermont's civil unions law went into effect. 2000 The Confederate flag was removed from the South Carolina statehouse.
Sherrill Family Stories Sherrill (1798 – 1864), my 3rd great grandfather, married Mary A. Branson (1806 – 1880) in 1826. Their marriage produced ten children. One of their sons, Andrew (3/27/1838 – 7/11/1903), was my 2nd great grandfather. He married Nancy Catherine Tollett (May 16, 1854 – 11/1/ 1936) in January 1873 in Burke, Tn. On July 6, 1861, soon after the outbreak of the Civil War, Andrew, along with his brother, Adam, was mustered into the Confederate Army as privates. He is listed under the 4th Battalion, Tennessee Cavalry (Branner's) as well as the 2nd Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry (Ashby's). He was originally with Branner's 4th Regiment until it was consolidated with the 5th Battalion into Ashby's 2nd Regiment. This unit fought engagements at Cumberland Gap, Murfreesborough, and Chickamauga. They were also involved in actions in Alabama, Georgia (including the Atlanta campaign), and South Carolina. He was paroled in Charlotte, NC on May 3, 1865. Andrew later applied for a Confederate Pen ...
CONSERVATION FOR BIG GUNS THAT OPENED THE CIVIL WAR Sullivans Island, S.C. (AP) — Preservationists are using computer sensors and other high-tech methods to protect massive iron Civil War guns at a fort in South Carolina that fired on Fort Sumter to open the war in April 1861. The sensors and modern rust-fighting epoxy coatings are being used to preserve historic siege and garrison guns, some of which were used to lob shells at Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor when the war erupted. Union forces surrendered 34 hours after the bombardment started as the nation plunged into a bloody, four-year war. Ten massive guns from Fort Moultrie on Sullivans Island, which is part of the Fort Sumter National Monument, were recently conserved as part of an ongoing program to protect the historic pieces from the salty, humid air. The guns were cast in foundries both in the North and South a century and a half ago. The last of the guns, a 7-ton Union rifled Parrott gun suspended in a yellow sling held by a crane, was slow ...
The Civil War is Over. Let the Battle Flag Be. By Steven Simpson Over the past several months, the NAACP has launched a campaign against the Confederate Battle Flag by protesting its presence at the South Carolina statehouse. Governor Nikki Haley did not respond to the demands of the NAACP to remove it. In a similar matter, black protesters have called for the removal of the Battle Flag from a Georgian cemetery that happens to have interred the bones of Confederate soldiers. And now, most recently, Republican presidential candidate Governor Rick Perry of Texas has become the newest target of the NAACP over whether the Battle Flag should appear on license plates. In the end, Perry decided against the idea. Facts remain: there was indeed a Civil War, and one cannot just simply wish it -- or its symbols -- away. Yet it seems that the NAACP and their friends wish to delete a symbol that, while controversial and complex in what it does or does not stand for, is still seen by many Southerners as a cultural symb ...
I did not know this about Harriet Tubman. "Shortly after war broke out in 1861, Tubman joined a group of other abolitionists who headed south to assist refuge slaves who has escaped to safety behind Union lines. Working in a series of camps in Union-held portions of South Carolina, Tubman quickly learned the lay of the land and offered her services to the army as a spy, leading a group of scouts who mapped out much of the region. Tubman’s reconnaissance work laid the foundation for one of the more daring raids of the Civil War, when she personally accompanied Union soldiers in their nighttime raid at Combahee Ferry in June 1863. After guiding Union boats along the mine-filled waters and coming ashore, Tubman and her group successful rescued more than 700 slaves working on nearby plantations, while dodging bullets and artillery shells from slave owners and Confederate soldiers rushing to the scene. The success of the raid, which had also included the brave service of African-American soldiers, increased ...
from a friend: FOLKS YOU WOULD NOT BELIEVE THE ANTI SOUTHERN LIE MOVEON.ORG JUST POSTED ON THE FIRST Memorial Day Heres the link: the real story... Southern women decorated the graves of soldiers even before the Civil War's end. Records show that by 1865, Mississippi, Virginia, and South Carolina all had precedents for Memorial Day. Songs in the Duke University collection Historic American Sheet Music, 1850-1920 include hymns published in the South such as these two from 1867: "Kneel Where Our Loves are Sleeping," dedicated to "The Ladies of the South Who are Decorating the Graves of the Confederate Dead " and "Memorial Flowers," dedicated "To the Memory of Our Dead Heroes." When a women's memorial association in Columbus, Mississippi, decorated the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers on April 25, 1866, this act of generosity and reconciliation prompted an editorial piece, published by Horace Greeley's New York Tribune, and a poem by Francis Miles Finch, "The Blue and the Grey," published in the ...
Happy Memorial Day! In the midst of the ruins in Charleston, South Carolina following the Civil War, freed African Americans built a cemetery for dead Union soldiers inside an old race track. On the day of its dedication, thousands of freed people and Union soldiers paraded around the race track. They sang songs, read scriptures and held picnics. This event marked the beginning of what we have come to know as Memorial Day.
The pre-Civil War political climate in Congress during the 1850's was filled with heated passion as officials from both North and South struggled with complicated issues. In 1856, it got physical.      Senator Charles Sumner was a Republican (later a Radical Republican) from Massachusetts, known as a brilliant orator, an unyielding foe of slavery, and a classic Puritan. A blunt speaker with a sharp tongue, one such speech known as "The Crime Against Kansas" was intensely inflammatory regarding the pro-slavery efforts of Kansas settlers and its endorsement by Southern supporters, particularly Senators Stephen Douglas and Andrew Butler. Within the speech, given over the course of two days, Sumner expressed his opinions by especially criticizing Butler's personal character, and the state he represented, South Carolina.      Although Butler was not present, his cousin and House representative from South Carolina named Preston Brooks took great offense to the tirade against his kinsman and his constitu ...
Epilogue to my Work in Progress -- ANNIE’S WAR: Less than two years had elapsed after John Brown’s now infamous raid and the execution of John Brown and six of his followers when Republican Party candidate for President of the United States , Abraham Lincoln was elected. He had been run as the party’s moderate choice. On December 20th of 1861, responding to the November 1860 election of Lincoln as Commander-in-Chief, before Lincoln officially took office, South Carolina seceded from the Union, stating that as a sovereign state it had dissolved its relationship with the United States of America. The first to take the step, ironically would be the first state to rejoin the Union at the close of the Civil War. But at the time, South Carolina was immediately followed by Mississippi in February, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas. The first shot fired in the newly developing conflict came on April 12, 1861—sixteen months from the day of Brown’s raid at Harpers Ferry. The shot fired on .. ...
7 March 1871, As part of a successful terrorist campaign to undermine Reconstruction (and to partially reverse the after effects of the Civil War) the Ku Klux Klan (the paramilitary arm of the Democratic Party) in South Carolina hangs African-American militia captain Jim Williams, a former slave and Union soldier.
Although the war had officially begun April 12-14, 1861, when Confederate forces open fired upon Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, no bleed was spilt during the battle. It was The Pratt Street Riot in Baltimore, April 19, 1861, where America's first blood was shed in its bloody Civil War.
South Carolina still having problems accepting fact John C. Calhoun is dead and Civil War was lost
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On this day in 1861, the Civil War began as Confederate forces opened fire on Fort Sumter in South Carolina.
Chloe just came home with an A on her 'Root Causes of American Slavery and the Civil War" Test. My little social-justice-oriented historian in the making. Chloe's learning about these important points in our history reminded me of the horrific learning experience I had in my 7th and 8th grade years. Not only did my school have a 'slave auction' but I remember being assigned a social studies project in which I got the state of South Carolina. I presented on this state -- even constructing a plantation with cotton fields -- and never mentioned the state's horrific past in terms of slavery and the exploitation of Blacks. My teacher never discussed these atrocities nor did my text book. I'm so glad that Chloe goes to a public school with a mandated African American history curriculum (as well as lessons on other racial and ethnic groups, religions, and class). She was all about Frederick Douglass and John Brown today!
James Jackson Diamond (1827–1867), secessionist politician and soldier, was born on July 16, 1827, in De Kalb County, Georgia, the eldest of six sons born to James and Nancy Diamond. He attended Maryville College in Tennessee and practiced law in Georgia. He moved to Texas before the Civil War. He raised cotton in the Red River Valley and subsequently settled near Whitesboro in Grayson County. James Jackson Diamond became a leading spokesman for Southern rights and views. He was a delegate from Texas to the 1860 Democratic national convention in Charleston, South Carolina, and, after the nomination of Stephen A. Douglas for president, bolted the convention.   Upon the election of Abraham Lincoln in November 1860, James Jackson Diamond helped call a public meeting of citizens from Cooke and Grayson counties. The gathering convened at Whitesboro on November 23 and named James Jackson Diamond chairman of the committee that offered resolutions calling upon Governor Sam Houston "to ascertain the will of the ...
History will probably record that John Mccain and Lindsey Graham just opened fire on Ft. Sumpter in the first shots of the GOP Civil War. And South Carolina primary voters may be especially sensitive to the issue.
This is the time of the 150-year anniversary of the Civil War. Not much said. It's much different from the 100th in the early 60's when men grew beards and women dressed in antebellum dresses to commemorate. Did you know that Alabama seized several federal installations in January, 1861, before the state had even seceded? Did you know that our secession was mostly a South Alabama matter with almost 40% of the 100 delegates to the convention voting against (including the two DeKalb delegates, John H. Franklin and William Overton Winston)? Did you know that CSA Secretary of War Leroy Pope Walker of Huntsville authorized the bombardment of Fort Sumter, South Carolina, by telegraph from Montgomery on April 11 to "start" the war? The history was complicated and full of intrigue. A good read.
Susie King Taylor Civil War (1861-1865) More than a few African-American women may have served as the Union Army began forming regiments of all black men. However, the details of only one black Army woman's Civil War service is known due to a unique memoir (a diary) she left behind. "Born a slave in Georgia in 1848, Susie Baker (who later became known as Susie King Taylor) gained her freedom in April 1862 at the age of fourteen when her uncle dragged her along with his own family onto a federal gunboat passing near Georgia's Fort Pulaski, captured that same month by Union forces." A number of her family members were enlisted in a newly formed regiment of black soldiers "which the commander of the Union's Department of the South, Major General David Hunter, had organized at Port Royal Island off the South Carolina coast." "Susie Baker was initially appointed laundress of the 33rd U.S. Colored Troops (initially the 1st South Carolina Volunteers), but before long her responsibilities with the regiment b ...
Rev. Francis J. Grimké “Washington is a hard training ground for preachers.” This quote probably remains as accurate today as it was 100 years ago when it was made by famous black pastor Francis James Grimké. Grimké was born to a slave mother in South Carolina in 1850. When his guardian tried to sell him into slavery, he escaped and served as a valet in the Confederate Army. He was taken hostage and almost died, but was nursed back to health by his mother only to be sold into slavery to a Confederate officer, spending the rest of the Civil War as a slave. When emancipation was finally achieved, Francis first attended Lincoln University in Pennsylvania, and then graduated from Princeton Theological Seminary as an ordained Presbyterian minister, becoming pastor of Fifteenth Street Presbyterian Church in Washington, D. C. As famous black historian Carter Woodson reported, his ministry had a definite impact: During the first years of the ministry of Mr. Grimké, which began in the spring of 1878, there ...
This morning we visited a National Monument in Georgia. Fort Pulaski. It was built after the war of 1812 to help Fortify our Eastern Shores. It played a part in the Civil War. Very interesting. Now we are off to Fort Sumter in South Carolina. We just passed into South Carolina through a Fancy brick gateway. It is sunny and 77°. yay!
The John Dunn House, my last painting posted below, has an interesting history attached to it - as do many historic homes. The John Dunn house, on Ft King St in Ocala, FL, is one of the better known structures in the historic district. The Victorian frame, Queen Ann house was built in 1884 by John Dunn, one of Ocala's leading citizens and possibly its richest at the time. Dunn, originally from New York, relocated to South Carolina and eventually to Ocala after the Civil War. He came to Ocala to study law under Col. S. M. G. Gary, one of Ocala's more prominent laywers, but left the practice to pursue more lucrative investments. Dunn helped start the Silver Springs, Ocala and Gulf Railroad in 1879. While involved in the R.R. he saw the need for a bank and was able to successfully secure a charter to start Ocala's first bank - the Bank of Ocala - later reorganized as the Merchants National Bank. Although the railroad venture never took off, Dunn found other avenues to invest in. He founded the lucrative Dunn ...
"Runaway-slave Harriet Tubman was famous in the North before the Civil War for her work on the Underground Railroad, and there was a $40,000 price on her head in the South. About the only people who had not heard of her were the thousands of slaves isolated on the sea islands off the coast of South Carolina. These slaves had been abandoned by fleeing plantation owners and were under the care and supervision of the U.S. Army when Tubman arrived at Beaufort, S.C., in May 1862. Tubman, a short muscular, 42 year old illiterate black woman, had come to work with the freed slaves and the Union forces in scouting operations. For generations the sea island slaves had little contact with the outside would, and they had developed their own language, a mixture of English and African tongues called Gullah that caught Tubman by surprise. 'Why, der language down dar in de far South is jus' as different from our in Maryland, as you can think. Dey laughed when dey heard me talk, an' I could not understand dem, no how,' s ...
28th U.S. President Woodrow Wilson Like Roosevelt before him, Woodrow Wilson regarded himself as the personal representative of the people. "No one but the President," he said, "seems to be expected ... to look out for the general interests of the country." He developed a program of progressive reform and asserted international leadership in building a new world order. In 1917 he proclaimed American entrance into World War I a crusade to make the world "safe for democracy." Wilson had seen the frightfulness of war. He was born in Virginia in 1856, the son of a Presbyterian minister who during the Civil War was a pastor in Augusta, Georgia, and during Reconstruction a professor in the charred city of Columbia, South Carolina. After graduation from Princeton (then the College of New Jersey) and the University of Virginia Law School, Wilson earned his doctorate at Johns Hopkins University and entered upon an academic career. In 1885 he married Ellen Louise Axson. Wilson advanced rapidly as a conservative you ...
Wealthy Negroes of the Slave Era: Some who made fortunes in various ways and ranked with the wealthy Whites in their respective towns were W. Q. Atwood of Saginaw, Michigan, who made a fortune out of lumber and was known as the “Lumber King”. Stephen Smith of Columbia, South Carolina, made an estimated $500,000 out of lumber and real estate. Thony Lafon, of New Orleans, made nearly a million in real estate deals and left $600,000 to charity; Robert Gordon of Cincinnati, who owned several coal-barges was the leading coal merchant of that city. He made a fortune during one very cold winter in the Civil War. Berry Meechum of St Louis, Missouri owned a paddle-wheel steamer on the Mississippi, and Owen Barrett, of Pittsburgh, made $85,000 from the sale of a patent medicine in the 1840’s. John Jones (1816-1879) was one of Chicago’s leading citizens. A County Commissioner, he helped make some of the city’s earliest laws. Starting as a barber, he grew wealthy and owned valuable property. In his building ...
Tubman, Harriet Ross (1822-1913). Born into slavery on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, Tubman gained international acclaim as an Underground Railroad operator, abolitionist, Civil War spy and nurse, suffragist, and humanitarian. After escaping from enslavement in 1849, Tubman dedicated herself to fighting for freedom, equality, and justice for the remainder of her long life, earning her the biblical name "Moses" and a place among the nation's most famous historical figures. In early 1862, Tubman joined Northern abolitionists in support of Union activities at Port Royal, South Carolina. Throughout the Civil War she provided badly needed nursing care to black soldiers and hundreds of newly liberated slaves who crowded Union camps. Tubman's military service expanded to include spying and scouting behind Confederate lines. In early June 1863, she became the first woman to command an armed military raid when she guided Col. James Montgomery and his 2nd South Carolina black regiment up the Combahee River, routin ...
Today in Black History 2/4/2013 • February 4, 1900 John Percial Parker, inventor, Underground Railroad conductor and businessman, died. Parker was born in 1827 in Norfolk, Virginia. At the age of eight, he was sold into slavery. By 1845, he had earned enough money to buy his freedom for $1,800. As a free man, Parker became involved in abolitionist activities and aided in the freeing of over a thousand enslaved people. During the Civil War, Parker served as a recruiter for the Union Army and supplied castings for the war effort. In 1854, Parker established the Ripley Foundry and Machine Company and on September 2, 1884 received patent number 304,552 for the Follower-Screw for Tobacco Presses. On May 19, 1885, he received patent number 318,285 for the Portable Screw Press, popularly known as the Parker Pulverizer. Parker’s foundry employed more than 25 workers and remained in operation until 1918. His home in Ripley, Ohio was designated a National Historic Landmark on February 18, 1997. Parker’s autob ...
To kick off Black History Month on Friday, February 1, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints along with Spartanburg Community College, Spartanburg County Headquarters Library and The Humanities Council of South Carolina will hold a free two-day genealogy workshop. Joseph McGill, field officer at the Southern Office of the National Trust for Historic Preservation in Charleston, is the keynote speaker. He will talk about African-Americans in the Civil War from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Friday in the Barrett Room at the Headquarters Library. He will speak again during the family history workshop scheduled for 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday at the Tyger River Campus of Spartanburg Community College in Duncan. Lunch will be provided. More information:
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As y'all know, I was interviewed for a BBC story on secession. I was told today by the reporter that there is a very long line for the program and it will probably still be a month or so before it's published. She did share with me the transcript and I wanted to share it with y'all: Secession isn’t unheard of in American history. After all, it caused the Civil War. In 1861, South Carolina and six other slave-owning states left the US to form the Confederate States of America. No foreign nation recognized them though. Nor did the newly elected US president, Abraham Lincoln. That April the Confederates fired on Fort Sumter. A structure on the South Carolina coast that still belonged to the US. The Civil War began there. But ended with the South defeated, starved, and disillusioned. In 1865 they rejoined the US, but some Southerners have never accepted defeat. And consider themselves Southern Nationalists. “I view South Carolina as my country,” Michael Cushman told me. We were sitting behind the South ...
Today in 1972 In Columbia, the white and black United Methodist conferences of South Carolina -- separated since the Civil War -- voted in their respective meetings to adopt a plan of union.
From the Oklahoma Mason newsletter: On February 17, 1864, Brother and Lieutenant George E. Dixon, still carrying a bullet in his thigh from the Battle of Shiloh, commanded the CSS H.L. Hunley, a primitive submarine on its maiden and only assault of the Civil War. The Hunley successfully embedded its explosive tipped harpoon in the USS Housatonic, which upon explosion sank within 3 minutes. The Hunley briefly surfaced to signal success before sinking to the bottom, taking the 8 member crew to their death. The Hunley was raised in 2000, and on April 17, 2004, in Charleston, the entire line of both the Grand Lodge of South Carolina and of Alabama, all dressed in white Masonic aprons, along with countless Brethren congregated for the Masonic funeral of Master Mason and Royal Arch Mason, Bro. Dixon.
Contrary to the false assertions by Democrats, the racist “Dixiecrats” did not all migrate to the Republican Party. “Dixiecrats” declared that they would rather vote for a “yellow dog” than vote for a Republican because the Republican Party was know as the party for blacks. Today, some of those “Dixiecrats” continue their political careers as Democrats, including Robert Byrd, who is well known for having been a “Keagle” in the Ku Klux Klan. Another former “Dixiecrat” is former Democrat Sen. Ernest Hollings, who put up the Confederate flag over the state Capitol when he was the governor of South Carolina. There was no public outcry when Democrat Sen. Christopher Dodd praised Byrd as someone who would have been “a great senator for any moment,” including the Civil War. Yet Democrats denounced then-Senate GOP leader Trent Lott for his remarks about Sen. Strom Thurmond (R.-S.C.). Thurmond was never in the Ku Klux Klan and defended blacks against lynching and the discriminatory poll ...
FLORIDA DECLARATION OF CAUSES State Archives of Florida, Series 577, Carton 1, Folder 6, “Gov. Madison Starke Perry – Constitutional Convention 1861" Most serious students of the Civil War are familiar with the four state "declarations of causes" issued by the secession conventions of South Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi and Texas. A fifth such document was prepared by the Florida secession convention but never formally published. It was recently discovered by Dr. Dwight Pitcaithley, former chief historian of the National Park Service and currently professor of history at New Mexico State University. Dr. Pitcaithley enlisted the aid of Dr. Boyd Murphree of the State Archives of Florida to authenticate the find. A casual reading of the document shows that it needs serious editing, but it is presented here precisely as it exists in the Florida Archives. I am deeply indebted to Dr. Pitcaithley for sending this document to me. Madison Starke Perry, Governor of Florida and Colonel, 7th Florida Volunteers T ...
My thoughts on anti-government sentiment: It seems that many of the people I see who hate and fear the government have an unconditional love for the military, which is basically the sword of the government. That said, wouldn't it make more sense to fear or loathe the military the most out of any function of the state? Since the military can be used to quash any hypothetical insurrections against the government? And it has been done; with the nullification of South Carolina, the Utah Wars, John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry, the U.S. Civil War and various Native American rebellions; and those were back in the days in which there was less inequity of firepower between the citizens and the state (before high-explosives, armored vehicles, aircraft, smart-weapons), now, the military has smart-bombs, bunker busters, atomics, tanks, supersonic aircraft, UAVs, elite trained spec-ops, etc. I'm neither condoning nor supporting any talks of insurrection, I'm just stating an observation of popular sentiment of conte ...
Annual Marsh Tacky races coming to Daufuskie After losing sponsorship on Hilton Head Island, SC, in 2012, the Carolina Marsh Tacky Association is pleased to announce the annual “beach race” will be held on Daufuskie Island at noon April 27, 2013. Once common among the islands of South Carolina and Georgia, the Marsh Tacky horse was a mainstay of Gullah and Lowcountry life for two hundred years. “A Tacky brought the midwife to your door,” Hilton Head native Emory Campbell recalls, “and when your time was done, a Tacky carried you to the burying ground.” Meanwhile, Tackies hauled the mail, plowed fields, carried the doctor on his rounds, toted huntsmen afield after deer, quail and wild hogs, served as cavalry mounts in the Revolution, the Civil War and as the “pony patrol” on Lowcountry beaches during WWII. But by the 1970’s, coastal development left little room for horses and the internal combustion engine left little need for them. The “little horse with the big heart” was teeter ...
Great Lakes Historical Tidbit of the Week: Part of the Navy’s Boot Camp at Recruit Training Command is named for Civil War hero, Robert Smalls. Smalls was a slave serving as a pilot of the Confederate ship Planter in Charleston, South Carolina when he seized the ship during the night. After picking up his family and several other slaves, Smalls escaped past the Confederate forts to the Union blockade where he turned the ship over to the Navy. Check back again next week for another fun fact about Naval Station Great Lakes!
Episode four looks at Civil War and Reconstruction through the experiences of South Carolina slave Robert Smalls. It chronicles Smalls' daring escape to free...
THE LONG TERM NEED FOR THE LEAGUE OF THE SOUTH ~ The League of the South (LS) has had a strong influence on a number of Southern organizations reminding us of "who we are" in the midst of a constant barrage of soul destroying Marxism that has redefined the character and politics of both major American political parties. The LS is doing what the Sons of Confederate Veterans did not dare do, but should have been doing since it was formed in 1896. The Sons of Confederate Veterans (SCV) carried the banner of the South, but they have been afraid to unfurl its meaning for all the world to understand why so many of our family members died in resisting American tyranny. Instead we had the National SCV Heritage Chairman Colin Pulley go on the largest talk radio show in the State of Virginia on WNIS in downtown Norfolk, Virginia and tell them that it was the position of NATIONAL SCV that 1) "Gen. Robert E. Lee was a murderer of Americans" and that 2) "The USA is better off that the South lost the Civil War." Nation ...
Civil War in the United States Karl Marx "Let him go, he is not worth thine ire!" Again and again English statesmanship cries--recently through the mouth of Lord John Russell--to the North of the United States this advice of Leporello to Don Juan's deserted love. If the North lets the South go, it then frees itself from any admixture of slavery, from its historical original sin, and creates the basis of a new and higher development. In reality, if North and South formed two autonomous countries, like, for example, England and Hanover, their separation would be no more difficult than was the separation of England and Hanover. "The South," however, is neither a territory closely sealed off from the North geographically, nor a moral unity. It is not a country at all, but a battle slogan. The advice of an amicable separation presupposes that the Southern Confederacy, although it assumed the offensive in the Civil War, at least wages it for defensive purposes. It is believed that the issue for the slaveholders ...
hopes everyone enjoyed their Thanksgiving and wants to welcome you to week thirteen of Skinny's Picks on FB. Coming into rivalry weekend, Skinny currently stands at 42-30 overall after going 4-2 in week twelve. With that said, here are the picks: Ohio State over (19) Michigan in The Game, (5) Oregon over (15) Oregon State in the Civil War, (10) Florida State over (4) Florida, (13) Oklahoma over (21) Oklahoma State in Bedlam, (1) Notre Dame over USC and in the biggest game in the history of our great state, (12) South Carolina over (11) Clemson in the Battle of the Palmetto State (Skinny hopes to high heaven that he misses this one, but after unsuccessfully picking his Tigers to win the past three years, he's hoping for a reversal of fortune this time around). Enjoy your day, peeps. Oh, before he forgets: go Tigers! Beat those ***
Residents In All 50 States File Petitions To Secede From United States. As you may have heard, these United States have used the "We The People" online petition tool to file requests to secede from country in the wake of the Presidential Election, because it is apparent not everybody got what they wanted out of America's traditional participatory democracy. "Didn't we try that once before?" asked South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley. Indeed, yes, it was tried before, by South Carolina in December of 1860. Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley released a long statement through a spokeswoman in which he re-stated his belief in "one nation under God" and that "states can be great laboratories of change." The only Governor that has a problem with this is Texas Gov. Rick Perry saying that he "believes in the greatness of our Union and nothing should be done to change it." My own thoughts.Nice work Obama you got what you wanted a divided U.S. which will cause another Civil War. Think about this. Each everyone that reads thi . ...
Making policy in America. If Washington State can legalize Marijuana, while it is against Federal law, can Texas block enforcement of Obamacare? Fact or fiction: The Texas Legislature has the authority to nullify federal laws it dislikes. FICTION. Like secession, nullification is one of those extra-legal concepts that was hotly debated during the decades leading up to the Civil War. South Carolina provoked a constitutional crisis in 1832 by adopting an “Ordinance of Nullification” to protest a protective tariff enacted by Congress. Federal lawmakers responded with a Force Bill empowering President Andrew Jackson to use military power against South Carolina, which in turn repealed its Ordinance of Nullification on March 11, 1833. Nullification threats have occurred sporadically in the past 180 years, including states opposed to enforcing the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850. Today, some states are effectively nullifying federal drug laws by legalizing marijuana for medicinal or recreational purposes. And Rep ...
I wanted to share with y'all (for those who are interested) a bit of the work I'm putting together for a book project. The following is essentially the argument I intend to put forth in it. It will undoubtedly be controversial, especially with 'respectable conservatives' and some libertarians. Actually, I think US Leftists will probably be more receptive to this argument. Anyhow, as you can see, this is a Golden Circle perspective of Southern nationalism. This is nowhere near a finished project; I'm just beginning it. But I thought I would share this bit with y'all: _ _ There are at least three possible starting points for American history and each is associated with a particular region and socio-political perspective. One may begin at Plymouth Rock, Massachusetts in 1620, Jamestown, Virginia in 1607 or Charleston, South Carolina in 1670. The first is undoubtedly the most popular with US historians. It fits the New England-centric, US civic-nationalist narrative best. This perspective leads immediately ba ...
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Update from the road, currently at Judy Johnson house in Georgia...surrounded by the cats and dogs.what a crew! SO: where else but in Arkansas would you have Toad Suck Park? Nearly got lost in Mississippi but wound up where we were supposed to be in Alabama. Political sign in Alabama: "Eli Nuf said." that was it. Couple of chilly nights, but hey, it's November! No problem, we are professionals. Wildlife refuges have been pretty cool, though VERY dry.one of them in Kansas (Quivira, if you are tracking us.) was virtually bone dry. Drove through one in Mississippi called White River NWR and saw baldcypress trees.LOTS of turtles, and some new birds. Taking a short breather in Georgia and gonna go see a Civil War battlefield park today, probably take off tomorrow for South Carolina. Julie Prescott Burgess there was a town called Burgess in one of these states.should have gotten a picture of it just for you!
Short & sweet; I'm on the run (not from the law...), hope to see you tonight at 7 (5 points) - According to Governor Nikki Haley, what was celebrated October 29th, 2012 in the state of South Carolina? 2. (5 points) - This father & son duo did not intend to become a writing team, but after the father passed away the son finished the final two books in the Civil War trilogy the father started. 3. (1 point each) The many loves of George - Give me the first names of the following George Costanza girlfriends or potential girlfriends; - She broke up with George after noticing his shrinkage. - She died unexpectedly after licking cheap envelopes to send out their wedding invitations. - As it turns out, this Hollywood starlet likes stocky, bald men. - She worked in the camera shop, where George tried to engage in the timeless art of seduction. - This antique shop employee had a rendezvous with George in his parents bed. See you tonight at Toucans!
Black History: OCTOBER 26 October 26 1749 - The British parliament legalizes slavery in the American colony that would become known as Georgia. 1806 - Benjamin Banneker dies at 74. He had become a recognized inventor and scientist. He also completed the design and layout of Washington, D.C. after L’Enfant returned to France. 1868 – B. F. Randolph, a prominent black politician in South Carolina after the Civil War, is assassinated. He was believed to have been killed by former Confederate soldiers seeking to re-establish white racist rule in the state via terrorist organizations such as the Ku Klux Klan. 1872 – Inventor Thomas J. Martin patents the fire extinguisher. Mahalia Jackson 1911 – Famed gospel singer Mahalia Jackson is born in New Orleans. She is considered the greatest gospel singer who ever lived.
October 17, 1871 President Ulysses S. Grant, a Republican, engaged in his own “war on terror” against the Ku Klux Klan by suspending the writ of Habeas Corpus to ensure clansmen arrested and imprisoned would not be sprung from captivity by sympathetic legislators. Grant’s proclamation was brief and affected just South Carolina, making it relatively tame compared to an earlier series of suspension by President Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War to help the Union Army operate among Confederate loyalists in the north. Lincoln’s precedent was also cited by President George W. Bush in his suspension of the writ in trying suspected terrorists.
^ The discussion in Adler cites Lincoln's explication of the preamble that "common welfare" meant those things the people could not provide themselves. In 1830, Senator Haynes of South Carolina had made a speech for "Liberty first, and Union afterwards". Daniel Webster of Massachusetts made a "Reply to Haynes" speech for "Union and Liberty, now and forever, one and inseparable".[21] ^ The Judiciary Act of 1789 established six Supreme Court justices. The number was periodically increased until 10 in 1863, allowing Lincoln additional appointments. After the Civil War, vacancies reduced the number to 7. Congress finally fixed the number at 9. ^ Judicial Review is explained in Hamilton's Federalist No. 78. It also has roots in Natural Law expressions in the Declaration of Independence. The Supreme Court first ruled an act of Congress unconstitutional in Marbury v. Madison, the second was Dred Scott.[28] ^ For instance, ‘collateral estoppel’ directs that when a litigant wins in a state court, they cannot s ...
Jose A. Gonzales, a Cuban revolutionary, served as a Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War and was primarily stationed in South Carolina...
Five myths about why the South seceded By James W. Loewen Sunday, January 9, 2011; 12:00 AM One hundred and fifty years after the Civil War began, we're still fighting it -- or at least fighting over its history. I've polled thousands of high school history teachers and spoken about the war to audiences across the country, and there is little agreement even on why the South seceded. Was it over slavery? States' rights? Tariffs and taxes? As the nation begins to commemorate the anniversaries of the war's various battles -- from Fort Sumter to Appomattox -- let's first dispense with some of the more prevalent myths about why it all began. 1. The South seceded over states' rights. Confederate States did claim the right to secede, but no state claimed to be seceding for that right. In fact, Confederates opposed states' rights -- that is, the right of Northern states not to support slavery. On Dec. 24, 1860, delegates at South Carolina's secession convention adopted a "Declaration of the Immediate Causes Which ...
On August 7, 2012, The Washington Times ran an editorial entitled, "The Civil War of 2016." It begins, "Imagine Tea Party extremists seizing control of a South Carolina town and the Army being sent in to crush the rebellion. This farcical vision is now part of the discussion in professional military circles. "At issue is an article in the respected Small Wars Journal titled 'Full Spectrum Operations in the Homeland: A "Vision" of the Future.' It was written by retired Army Col. Kevin Benson of the Army's University of Foreign Military and Cultural Studies at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., and Jennifer Weber, a Civil War expert at the University of Kansas. It posits an 'extremist militia motivated by the goals of the "tea party" movement' seizing control of Darlington, S.C., in 2016, 'occupying City Hall, disbanding the city council and placing the mayor under house arrest.' The rebels set up checkpoints on Interstate 95 and Interstate 20 looking for illegal aliens. It's a cartoonish and needlessly provocative sc ...
The Democratic Party was formed in 1792, when supporters of Thomas Jefferson began using the name Republicans, or Jeffersonian Republicans, to emphasize its anti-aristocratic policies. It adopted its present name during the Presidency of Andrew Jackson in the 1830s. In the 1840s and '50s, the party was in conflict over extending slavery to the Western territories. Southern Democrats insisted on protecting slavery in all the territories while many Northern Democrats resisted. The party split over the slavery issue in 1860 at its Presidential convention in Charleston, South Carolina. Northern Democrats nominated Stephen Douglas as their candidate, and Southern Democrats adopted a pro-slavery platform and nominated John C. Breckinridge in an election campaign that would be won by Abraham Lincoln and the newly formed Republican Party. After the Civil War, most white Southerners opposed Radical Reconstruction and the Republican Party's support of black civil and political rights. The Democratic Party identifie ...
Do States Have The Right To Secede? After President Obama took office, many Republican legislators and governors, particularly in the South, began threatening secession. They say secession is a right but is it really? The answer is absolutely not. Not only did the Civil War settle this dispute, James Madison and Andrew Jackson (both Southerners) also rejected this claim. Nowhere in the Constitution will you find the right to secede. The Constitution was created by the people “in order to form a more perfect union” and by seceding, a state breaks up the nation, thus breaking a legally binding contract. And Andrew Jackson once threatened to march an army to South Carolina after that state threatened to secede. In fact, Jackson felt that secession was treason. The Supreme Court has also weighed in on this issue. In Texas v White, the court held that the Constitution did not permit states to secede from the United States, and that the ordinances of secession, and all the acts of the legislatures within se ...
Johnson Square was the first of Savannah's squares and remains the largest of the 24. It was named for Robert Johnson, colonial governor of South Carolina and a friend of General Oglethorpe. Interred in the square is Revolutionary War hero General Nathanael Greene, the namesake of nearby Greene Square. Greene died in 1786 and was buried in Savannah's Colonial Park Cemetery. His son, George Washington Greene, was buried beside him after drowning in the Savannah River in 1793. Following vandalism of the cemetery by occupying Union forces during the Civil War the location of Greene's burial was lost. After the remains were re-identified Greene and his son were moved to Johnson Square. An obelisk in the center of the square now serves as a memorial to Gen. Greene. The cornerstone of the monument was laid by the marquis de La Fayette in 1825. At that time the obelisk did not yet commemorate any specific individual or event. In fact, due to financial restrictions the unmarked obelisk served for several years as ...
Great work by our friends at the University of South Carolina studying Civil War remains in Charleston Harbor
With the exception of Civil War reenactors, at least up North where I live. Reenacting works on many levels, but the highest is to honor the brave men who fought on BOTH sides for what they thought was right. In the Confederate Army there were blacks who fought alongside their white couterparts and for the same reasons, defending their homeland. In the North, blacks were segregated until after WWII. And I know several African Americans who reenact as Confederates. And reenacting wouldn't be much of ashow without BOTH sides. That is not to say there are not those who do harbor the old feelings of racism. Some are state officials and have even threatened another Civil War. And Romney is pandering to that segment of the white population cause he KNOWS he doesn't have the Latino nad the African-American vote.
The Fifteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified in 1870 to protect the suffrage of freedmen after the American Civil War. It prevented any state from denying the right to vote to any male citizen on account of his race. Blacks constituted absolute majorities of the populations in Mississippi, Louisiana and South Carolina, and represented over 40% of the population in four other former Confederate States. Southern whites resisted the freedmen's exercise of political power, fearing black domination. During Reconstruction, blacks controlled a majority of the vote in states such as South Carolina.[1] White supremacist paramilitary organizations allied with the Democratic Party practiced intimidation, violence and assassinations to repress and prevent blacks exercising their civil and voting rights in elections from 1868 through the mid-1870s. In most Southern states, black voting decreased markedly under such pressure, and white Democrats regained political control of Southern legislatu ...
Born a slave in 1850s South Carolina and elected to Congress in the 1890s, George W. Murray appeared to be the antithesis of the African American male in the Jim Crow South and served as a beacon for African Americans who saw their hopes crushed in the aftermath of the Civil War. Early in the twe...
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Spent yesterday touring Midway, Georgia in Liberty county. The Dorchester group that settled this area in 1754 were from South Carolina. From this group was a signer of the Declaration of Independence, great grandfather of Oliver Wendell Holmes, grandfather of the first wife of President Woodrow Wilson, great grandfather of President Theodore Roosevelt and the father of Samuel Morse. After the Civil War, most of the famlies moved to Southeast Georgia. Completion of I-95 completed the demise of this town.
The Wisdom of Benjamin Shoff: "As it turns out we're in Massachusetts not New Hampshire. That's very key because the Civil War started in South Carolina. So you gotta remember to keep that in perspective when you go to these states. They typically don't like the fact that penguins are only in the South Pole and not the North Pole. That's why the bicycle was invented by the Wright Brothers. Just something to keep in mind."
As dusk fell on the evening of July 18, 1863, about 600 men of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry assembled on a beach near Charleston, South Carolina. At the shout “Forward, Fifty-fourth!” they began to move across a narrow spit of sand toward Fort Wagner, a massive sand-and-wood Confederate stronghold with walls that rose thirty feet high. As they neared the fort, a storm of cannonballs and bullets tore into the blue-coated line. The 54th Massachusetts was a Northern black regiment organized shortly after Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation. Its ranks were full of young men who volunteered to fight because they knew that if blacks helped win the Civil War, no one could ever think of them as slaves again. Twenty-three-year-old Sergeant William Carney helped lead the assault on Fort Wagner. At his side ran Sergeant John Wall, carrying the American flag. When enemy fire struck Wall down, Carney threw his rifle aside and grasped the colors before they hit the ground. As he presse ...
Staying in Hilton Head, a South Carolina island where black Union soldiers would heal from wounds in the Civil War, looked after by Tubman!
In 1861 the Civil War commenced when Confederate troops fired on Fort Sumter in South Carolina.
Robert Smalls - an enslaved African American, a Union hero of the Civil War, and a US Congressman representing South Carolina. From Charleston, special guest host, Judge Alex Sanders discusses this South Carolinian's life and the impact he had on our state's history with various guests.
Today is Confederate Memorial Day in South Carolina, in honor of veterans of the Civil War. A state holiday, celebrated on Stonewall Jackson's birthday. Let's remember our veterans !
General Lighthorse Harry Lee. Revolutionary War General, Governor of Virginia, Congressman from Virginia, Personal friend of Geroge Washington. Father to General Robert E. Lee of Confederate Army fame. Harry Lee spent time in Debtors prison. Exhiled himself off the coast of South Carolina. General R.E.Lee, married the great-granddaughter of George Washington, and a forturne. His house was confuscated by the Union Army during Civil War, it is now Arlington National Cemetery, JFK buried there.
This is a short blurb on the woman who delivered Eric's dad in 1921. Sad, considering what a trailblazer she was. According to Wikipedia: The College of Medicine began in 1823 with the incorporation of the Medical College of South Carolina, a private institution of the Medical Society of South Carolina. Seven Charleston physicians formed the initial faculty with 30 students enrolled in 1824. The first graduation was on April 4, 1825. With the exception of the American Civil War, the college has served continuously to the present, even when there was a total enrollment of two students. To achieve the financial backing for growth in the twentieth century, the college was transferred to state ownership and incorporated into the state's higher education system in 1913.
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