South Carolina & American Civil War

South Carolina is a state in the Southeastern United States. The American Civil War (1861–1865), often referred to as The Civil War in the United States, was a Civil War fought over the secession of the Confederacy. 5.0/5

South Carolina American Civil War Fort Sumter United States Civil War Union Army African American United States Army Confederate States General William Tecumseh Sherman New York General Sherman Frederick Douglass National Historic Landmark Denmark Vesey United States Colored Troops

Fort Sumter - Charleston, South Carolina. The starting place of the American Civil War
February 17, 1865 – American Civil War: Columbia, South Carolina, is burned as Confederate forces flee from advancing U…
Jan 19 1861- American Civil War: Georgia joins South Carolina, Florida, Mississippi, and Alabama in seceding from the United States
Apr 12 1861- American Civil War: The war begins with Confederate forces firing on Fort Sumter, in the harbor of Charleston, South Carolina
Senator Tim Scott of South Carolina tonight became the first African-American elected to the US Senate from the South since the end of the American Civil War in 1865.
Today in the WBTS, September 30th 1861 Operation against Indians from Camp Robledo, the New Mexico Territory 1862: Beginning of a four day Federal operation aimed at destroying Confederate salt works along the Savannah River in Georgia. Skirmishes near Louisville, Ressellville and Glasgow, Kentucky. Federal reconnaissance from Rienzi, Mississippi, to the Hatchie River. Skirmishes near Warrensburg and others in Scotland and Boone Counties, Missouri. Beginning of a month long Federal expedition from Fort Ruby, the Nevada Territory, to Camp Douglas, the Utah Territory. Beginning of a fourteen day Federal expedition from Hilton Head, South Carolina, to Saint John’s Bluff, Florida. Skirmish at Goodlettsville, Tennessee. Skirmish near Glenville, West Virginia. Following the battle of Pea Ridge (March 1862) most Confederate and Union troops withdrew from northwestern Arkansas and southwestern Missouri. By late summer, Confederates returned to the area, unsettling civilians and generals alike in nearby Federall ...
on 1863 American Civil War: Confederate forces evacuate Battery Wagner and Morris Island in South Carolina.
June 2, 1865: American Civil War ends. In an event that is generally regarded as marking the end of the Civil War, Confederate General Edmund Kirby Smith, commander of Confederate forces west of the Mississippi, signs the surrender terms offered by Union negotiators. With Smith's surrender, the last Confederate army ceased to exist, bringing a formal end to the bloodiest four years in U.S. history. The American Civil War began on April 12, 1861, when Confederate shore batteries under General Pierre G.T. Beauregard opened fire on Union-held Fort Sumter in South Carolina's Charleston Bay. During 34 hours, 50 Confederate guns and mortars launched more than 4,000 rounds at the poorly supplied fort, and on April 13 U.S. Major Robert Anderson, commander of the Union garrison, surrendered. Two days later, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued a proclamation calling for 75,000 volunteer soldiers to help quell the Southern "insurrection." Four long Years Later, the Confederacy was defeated at the total cost of 620 ...
American Civil War - Part 5 Secession and war begins _ Resolves and developments Secession of South Carolina South Carolina did more to advance nullification and secession than any other Southern state. South Carolina adopted the "Declaration of the Immediate Causes Which Induce and Justify the Secession of South Carolina from the Federal Union" on December 24, 1860. It argued for states' rights for slave owners in the South, but contained a complaint about states' rights in the North in the form of opposition to the Fugitive Slave Act, claiming that Northern states were not fulfilling their federal obligations under the Constitution. Secession winter Before Lincoln took office, seven states had declared their secession from the Union. They established a Southern government, the Confederate States of America on February 4, 1861. They took control of federal forts and other properties within their boundaries with little resistance from outgoing President James Buchanan, whose term ended on March 4, 1861. B ...
Today is Saturday, April 12, the 102nd day of 2014. There are 263 days left in the year. Today's Highlights in History: On April 12, 1954, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission opened a hearing on whether Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer, scientific director of the Manhattan Project, should have his security clearance reinstated amid questions about his loyalty (it wasn't). Bill Haley and His Comets recorded "Rock Around the Clock" in New York for Decca Records. On this date: In 1606, England's King James I decreed the design of the original Union Flag, which combined the flags of England and Scotland. In 1776, North Carolina's Fourth Provincial Congress authorized the colony's delegates to the Continental Congress to support independence from Britain. In 1861, the American Civil War began as Confederate forces opened fire on Fort Sumter in South Carolina. In 1864, Confederate troops led by Maj. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest took Union-held Fort Pillow in Tennessee; almost half of the Union garrison was made up of bla ...
Martin Robison Delany (May 6, 1812 – January 24, 1885) was an African-American abolitionist, journalist, physician, and writer, arguably the first proponent of black nationalism; Martin Delany is considered to be the grandfather of Black nationalism. He was also one of the first three African Americans admitted to Harvard Medical School. Trained as an assistant and a physician, he treated patients during the cholera epidemics of 1833 and 1854 in Pittsburgh, when many doctors and residents fled the city. Active in recruiting blacks for the United States Colored Troops, he was commissioned as a major, the first African-American field officer in the United States Army during the American Civil War. After the Civil War, he worked for the Freedmen's Bureau in the South, settling in South Carolina, where he became politically active. He ran unsuccessfully for Lieutenant Governor and was appointed a Trial Judge. Later he switched his party loyalty and worked for the campaign of Democrat Wade Hampton III, who w ...
Denmark Vesey, originally Telemaque, (1767 – July 2, 1822) was an African-American man who was most famous for planning a Slave Rebellion in the United States in 1822. He was enslaved in South Carolina. After purchasing his freedom, he planned an extensive Slave Rebellion. Word of the plans was leaked, and authorities arrested the plot's leaders at Charleston, South Carolina, before the uprising could begin. Vesey and others were convicted and executed. Many antislavery activists came to regard Vesey as a hero. During the American Civil War, abolitionist Frederick Douglass used Vesey's name as a Battle Cry to rally African-American regiments, especially the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. Although it was almost certainly not Vesey's actual home, the Denmark Vesey House at Charleston was named a National Historic Landmark in 1976.
Robert Smalls (April 5, 1839 – Feb. 23, 1915) Robert Smalls was an African-American born into slavery in Beaufort, S.C., but during and after the American Civil War, he became a ship’s pilot, sea captain, and politician. He freed himself, his crew and their families from slavery on May 13, 1862, when he led an uprising aboard a Confederate transport ship, the CSS Planter, in Charleston Harbor, and sailed it north to freedom. His feat successfully helped persuade President Abraham Lincoln to accept African-American soldiers into the Union Army. As a politician, Smalls authored state legislation that gave South Carolina the first free and compulsory public school system in the United States.
Hello Class, hope everyone is well, and Happy Birthday if your birthday is this week. I am back from my Paris trip, and finally posting for this week. I will be getting surgery this week and might be out of the loop for up to 10 days as per Doctor. We are just 2 likes away from our 100 milestone!! Thanks for all the support. The then&nows still looking slim, don't make me stalk your pages and choose pics for the album myself.(Lisa if you missed the hint, lol) well take care and God Bless! February 16 Birthday - Entertainer and politician Sonny Bono (1935-1998) was born in Detroit, Michigan. Following a career as a popular singer, he became mayor of Palm Springs, California, then became a Republican congressman, serving until his accidental death from a skiing mishap. February 17 February 17, 1865 - During the American Civil War, Fort Sumter in South Carolina was returned to the Union after nearly a year and a half under Confederate control. The fort had been the scene of the first shots of the war. F ...
Bay Street in Charleston, South Carolina before dawn. The American Civil War started near the first street light on the far left when cadets from The Citadel fired on Fort Sumter with cannons. The location is known as "The Battery".
Special Field Orders, No. 15 - were military orders issued during the American Civil War, on January 16, 1865, by General William Tecumseh Sherman, commander of the Military Division of the Mississippi of the United States Army.[1] They provided for the confiscation of 400,000 acres (1,600 km2) of land along the Atlantic coast of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida and the dividing of it into 40 acres (0.16 km2) parcels, on which were to be settled approximately 18,000 freed slave families and other Blacks then living in the area. The orders were issued following Sherman's March to the Sea. They were intended to address the immediate problem of dealing with the tens of thousands of black refugees who had joined Sherman's march in search of protection and sustenance, and "to assure the harmony of action in the area of operations".[2] General Sherman issued his orders after meeting in Savannah, Georgia with twenty ministers of the black community and with U.S. Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton. Brig. Gen. ...
The Hunley: Zeroing in on what caused Civil War submarine's sinking.. Good article, but mistakenly identifies Clive Cussler as the discoverer of the Hunley instead of Dr. Lee Spence the real discoverer... Born and built amid gray-cloaked secrecy during the American Civil War, the H.L. Hunley -- the first submarine to sink an enemy ship -- has held tight to its murky mysteries. The 150th anniversary of the Hunley's daring and dangerous raid will be marked this weekend and Monday, but the overarching question remains: What caused the submarine and its eight-member crew to slip to the bottom of the sea on the moonlit evening of February 17, 1864, after it signaled to shore a success that changed naval warfare. The Hunley, housed at a laboratory in North Charleston, South Carolina, has yielded its secrets slowly and sparingly, even to researchers armed with the latest in technology.
The 26th Regiment United States Colored Troops, also called the 26th Regiment New York Infantry (Colored) was an African American combat unit, one of three colored troop units from the state of New York, that fought in the American Civil War. The unit was organized on Riker's Island in February 1864 by the Union League Club of New York. The commanding officer was Col. William Silliman. After a short deployment at Annapolis, MD, the regiment was sent to the Department of the South and participated in battles at Johns Island, Honey Hill, and Tulifinny, South Carolina. Lt. Col. William B. Guernsey succeeded Col. Silliman on June 18, 1865, and the 26th Regiment was mustered out under his command in South Carolina on August 28, 1865. Notable members include: David Carll, who has a hill in Oyster Bay, NY, named after him; Noah Elliott, the unit's hospital steward, who went on to become the first African American physician in Athens, Ohio; and Benjamin F. Randolph, who as Chaplain was the unit's sole African Ame ...
TΉΣ ШΛΚΣ ЦP CΛŁŁ: What happened on Feb. 04, 1861? The Confederate States of America was founded. Representatives from South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas met to form the CSA, and elected Jefferson Davis as their president. When fighting broke out at Fort Sumter, South Carolina, later the same year, four additional states seceded and the American Civil War began...
The Battle of Gettysburg, fought from July 1 to July 3, 1863, is considered the most important engagement of the American Civil War. After a great victory over Union forces at Chancellorsville, General Robert E. Lee marched his Army of Northern Virginia into Pennsylvania in late June 1863. On July 1, the advancing Confederates clashed with the Union's Army of the Potomac, commanded by General George G. Meade, at the crossroads town of Gettysburg. On July 3, Lee ordered an attack by fewer than 15,000 troops on the enemy's center at Cemetery Ridge. The assault, known as "Pickett's Charge," managed to pierce the Union lines but eventually failed, at the cost of thousands of rebel casualties, and Lee was forced to withdraw his battered army toward Virginia on July 4. James Henry Hammond is perhaps best known as one of the South’s most devoted supporters of slavery. He served in the U.S House of Representatives, the U.S. Senate, and served as governor of South Carolina. He became one of the most famous pro-s ...
Pendleton Murrah: A native of South Carolina, Murrah graduated from Brown University in 1848. He moved to Texas and opened a law practice in Marshall. He ran and was defeated for the U.S. Congress before winning the state gubernatorial race in 1863. During the American Civil War, Murrah emphatically supported the Rebel cause, although he ended up in a controversy over the conscription of Texas militia troops into the Confederate army. Still, even after Robert E. Lee surrendered in 1865, he encouraged Texans to continue the revolution. Only when Union occupation forces were en route to Texas did Murrah flee with other Confederate leaders to Mexico. Lt. Governor Stockdale filled the vacant post, acting as governor for three months, until provisional governor Andrew J. Hamilton assumed office in August 1865.[1] The trip was too much for his already fragile health, and in August 1865, he died in Monterrey, Mexico of tuberculosis. His grave is located in the Panteon Municipal of Monterrey, Mexico.
The American Civil War, and it was the first shot fired upon Fort Sumter in South Carolina.
Fort Sumter + 152 YEARS July 2013 by El Blanco Tortuga While visiting South Carolina this past month, I rode the ferry to see Fort Sumter, the first battle of the American Civil War. As I watched the calm waves of the harbor slip past in our wake, I wondered what lead up to that massive destruction of the War between the States. 490 thousand Southern Soldiers and 596 thousand Northern Soldiers gave their last act of devotion for an ideal that could be settled no other way. Men, women blacks, whites and many foreign troops bleed the ground red during those four years. 37 thousand widows and 90 thousand orphans sought to live after the war ceased at Appomattox. I learned that in the decade prior to April 1861, our country seethed with emotion, rage grew to volcanic proportions over the debate of slavery. The South felt the Federal government connived to hem them in to a pre-determined path. The Northern states passed laws and demanded the end to slavery. No compromise existed that could find peace in this c ...
Civil War Matthew 12:25 “ And Jesus knew their thoughts, and said unto them, Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation; and every city or house divided against itself shall not stand.” One of the greatest tragedies found in American History is the American Civil War. Presently following the inauguration of President Abraham Lincoln, shots were fired at Fort Sumter, South Carolina on April 12th 1861, at approximately 4:30 am, command by General P.G.T Beauregard, marking the official beginning of the Civil War. Family fought against family, brother against brother, and “friend against friend.” Four Years Later 600,000 people lay in military graves; the war was over. Many children never saw their fathers again and many wives became widows. Floods of tears were shed, heart was broken forever, and heavy burdens prevailed for years. When a house is divided it is a tragedy! It is time our homes, our marriages, our families, and our country was filled with love and unity. The p ...
Ahem..I was given this lesson on how to BBQ over a pm on here day before yesterday. In the southern United States, barbecue initially revolved around the cooking of pork.[8] During the 19th century, pigs were a low-maintenance food source that could be released to forage for themselves in forests and woodlands. When food or meat supplies were low, these semi-wild pigs could then be caught and eaten.[9] It was the Spanish who first introduced the pig into the Americas and to the American Indians. The Indians, in turn, introduced the Spanish to the concept of true slow cooking with smoke. The Spanish colonists came to South Carolina in the early 16th century and settled at Santa Elena. It was in that early American colony that Europeans first learned to prepare and to eat "real" barbecue.[10] According to estimates, prior to the American Civil War, Southerners ate around five pounds of pork for every one pound of beef they consumed.[11] Because of the poverty of the southern United States at this time, ever ...
How did Memorial Day come to be? As Americans enjoy the holiday weekend, does anyone know how Memorial Day originated? On May 1, 1865, freed slaves gathered in Charleston, South Carolina to commemorate the death of Union soldiers and the end of the American Civil War. Three Years Later, General John Logan issued a special order that May 30, 1868 be observed as Decoration Day, the first Memorial Day -- a day set aside "for the purpose of strewing with flowers or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village, and hamlet church-yard in the land." At the time, the nation was reunited politically, but it remained culturally divided, and so did Memorial Day observations. In the North, the federal government created national cemeteries for men who died in the war, while state governments from New York to Michigan gradually made Decoration Day an official holiday throughout the 1870s. In the South, ...
The practice of decorating soldiers' graves with flowers is an ancient custom.[6] Soldiers' graves were decorated in the U.S. before[7] and during the American Civil War. A claim was made in 1906 that the first Civil War soldier's grave ever decorated was in Warrenton, Virginia on June 3, 1861, implying the first Memorial Day occurred there.[8] There is authentic documentation that women in Savannah, Georgia decorated soldiers' graves in 1862.[9] In 1863, the cemetery dedication at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania was a ceremony of commemoration at the graves of dead soldiers. Local historians in Boalsburg, PA, claim that ladies there decorated soldiers' graves on July 4, 1864.[10] As a result, Boalsburg promotes itself as the birthplace of Memorial Day.[11] Following President Abraham Lincoln's assassination in April 1865, there were a variety of events of commemoration. The first well-known observance of a Memorial Day-type observance after the Civil War was in Charleston, South Carolina on May 1, 1865. During ...
As the American Civil War came to an end, the liberated African-Americans started to migrate from the southern states to the northern states searching for a safe place to live and create a new identity for themselves, this was the start of the Harlem Renaissance. When this took place, the white Americans infatuation with Harlem started to decline and the African-American culture throughout it started to thrive, the Apollo Theater decided to open up to African-Americans in 1934 and thus started the legacy of amateur night where many famous African-American performers were discovered such as the world renowned James Brown. When James was a child he grew up in extreme poverty in South Carolina and as he grew up and was kicked out of school he turned to religion, music as well as, like most of the other poverty-stricken children at that time, crime. At the age of 16 he was sentenced three years for stealing a car, but while in prison he organized and led the prison choir as well became friends with Bobby Byrd ...
Amabutho-Ubuntu On this day in Black History February 1 1810 Charles Lenox Remond, was an American orator, abolitionist and military organizer during the American Civil War. He was the brother of Sarah Parker Remond, also heavily engaged in the cause. Remond recruited Black soldiers in Massachusetts for the Union Army during the Civil War, particularly for the famed 54th and 55th Massachusetts Infantry. He was also active in recruiting for the U.S. Colored Troops. Remond was married to Amy Matilda (Williams) Cassey (1809–56), the daughter of Rev. Peter Williams, Jr. and the widow of wealthy Philadelphia barber Joseph Cassey, to whom she bore eight children. 1834 Henry McNeal Turner was born on what is now Hannah Circuit, near Newberry, which was then in Abbeville County, South Carolina. Young Turner was "bound out" to the hardest king of labor in the cotton fields and the blacksmith's trade in Abbeville until his "manhood" at age 12. He possessed an insatiable craving for knowledge. In some way h ...
And here's the rest of what happened today in history: 1919: The Paris Peace conference opens in Versailles, France 1911: Eugene Ely lands on the deck of the USS Pennsylvania in San Francisco harbor, marking the first time an aircraft has landed on a ship 1903: President Teddy Roosevelt sends a radio message to King Edward VII, marking the first transatlantic radio transmission originating in the US 1896: The X-ray machine is exhibited for the first time 1861: Georgia joins Alabama, South Carolina, Florida, and Mississippi, to become the 5th state to secede from the United States (eventually sparking the American Civil War)
The war begins Main articles: American Civil War and Battle of Fort Sumter portrait Major Anderson, Ft. Sumter commander The commander of Fort Sumter, South Carolina, Major Robert Anderson, sent a request for provisions to Washington, and the execution of Lincoln's order to meet that request was seen by the secessionists as an act of war. On April 12, 1861, Confederate forces fired on Union troops at Fort Sumter, forcing them to surrender, and began the war. Historian Allan Nevins argued that the newly inaugurated Lincoln made three miscalculations: underestimating the gravity of the crisis, exaggerating the strength of Unionist sentiment in the South, and not realizing the Southern Unionists were insisting there be no invasion.[142] William Tecumseh Sherman talked to Lincoln during inauguration week and was "sadly disappointed" at his failure to realize that "the country was sleeping on a volcano" and that the South was preparing for war.[143] Donald concludes that, "His repeated efforts to avoid collisi ...
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The Battle of Fort Sumter (April 12--14, 1861) was the bombardment and surrender of Fort Sumter, near Charleston, South Carolina, that started the American Civil War. Following declarations of secessi... Battle of Fort Sumter - Wiki Article -
October 30,1862- General William Rosecrans replaces Don Carlos Buell in commanding the Dept. of the Cumberland. Ormsby M. Mitchel, astronomer, educator and highly respected Union General, dies over yellow fever at Beaufort, South Carolina. Napolean III of France suggests Russia, Great Britain and France should assist and diplomatically settle the American Civil War.
Jose A. Gonzales, a Cuban revolutionary, served as a Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War and was primarily stationed in South Carolina...
When the American Civil War began, Tubman worked for the Union Army, first as a cook and nurse, and then as an armed scout and spy. The first woman to lead an armed expedition in the war, she guided the Combahee River Raid, which liberated more than 700 slaves in South Carolina. After the war, she retired to the family home in Auburn, New York, where she cared for her aging parents. She became active in the women's suffrage movement in New York until illness overtook her. Near the end of her life, she lived in a home for elderly African Americans that she had helped found years earlier.
States Rights Gist (September 3, 1831 – November 30, 1864) was a lawyer, a militia general in South Carolina, and a Confederate Army Brigadier General who served during the American Civil War. A relative of several prominent South Carolinians, Gist rose to fame during the war but was killed before i...
The Fifteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified in 1870 to protect the suffrage of freedmen after the American Civil War. It prevented any state from denying the right to vote to any male citizen on account of his race. Blacks constituted absolute majorities of the populations in Mississippi, Louisiana and South Carolina, and represented over 40% of the population in four other former Confederate States. Southern whites resisted the freedmen's exercise of political power, fearing black domination. During Reconstruction, blacks controlled a majority of the vote in states such as South Carolina.[1] White supremacist paramilitary organizations allied with the Democratic Party practiced intimidation, violence and assassinations to repress and prevent blacks exercising their civil and voting rights in elections from 1868 through the mid-1870s. In most Southern states, black voting decreased markedly under such pressure, and white Democrats regained political control of Southern legislatu ...
The Port Royal Experiment was a program begun during the American Civil War in which former slaves successfully worked on the land abandoned by plantation owners. In 1861 the Union liberated the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and their main harbor, Port Royal. The white residents fled, ...
Seven Deep South cotton states seceded by February 1861, starting with South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas. These seven states formed the Confederate States of America (February 4, 1861), with Jefferson Davis as president, and a governmental structure closely...
Someone asked me who I think the greatest military mind in history and that's easy...based on military action..would probably be Sun Tzu. American wise it would probably be William Sherman...who was probably mainly responsible for ending the American Civil War. The reason I say that is - it's obvious he studied Sun Tzu. He understood it's not about fighting battles - it's about strategic movement, deception, and eventually reaching a political end.because you can win battles all day and never accomplish anything if you're not reaching for a political end. That's why it's said his military action was "total war". He pillaged and destroyed through Georgia and South Carolina in a march that was made self-sufficient by that same pillaging and foraging. In doing so - it depleted the confederacy of the will to continue fighting...there by reaching a political end and barely fighting any battles through the entire march...60 men from Atlanta to Savannah and back up to Columbia eventually taking Lee's ability to ...
Today is Confederate Memorial Day, an official holiday and/or observance day in parts of the US South as a day to honor those having died fighting for the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. Eight states officially observe this day; Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas.
This is a short blurb on the woman who delivered Eric's dad in 1921. Sad, considering what a trailblazer she was. According to Wikipedia: The College of Medicine began in 1823 with the incorporation of the Medical College of South Carolina, a private institution of the Medical Society of South Carolina. Seven Charleston physicians formed the initial faculty with 30 students enrolled in 1824. The first graduation was on April 4, 1825. With the exception of the American Civil War, the college has served continuously to the present, even when there was a total enrollment of two students. To achieve the financial backing for growth in the twentieth century, the college was transferred to state ownership and incorporated into the state's higher education system in 1913.
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