South Carolina & African American

South Carolina is a state in the Southeastern United States. African Americans (also referred to as Black Americans or Afro-Americans, and formerly as American Negroes) are citizens or residents of the United States who have at least partial ancestry from any of the native populations of Sub-Saharan Africa. 5.0/5

South Carolina African American African Americans United States New York City Civil War American Civil War North Carolina New York Black History Fort Sumter Union Army Tim Scott Supreme Court Revolutionary War Emancipation Proclamation Fort Wagner Jim Crow

African American descendants from South Carolina are like the Israelites when it comes to the land on the coast of SC and Ga.
Confederate flag’s removal last year in South Carolina drives more African American tourism to the state:
DTN India: Hillary Clinton banks on African American vote in South Carolina: Hillary Clinton banking on the bl...
Why do people say that I sound like I'm from the Caribbean .. I'm African American born and raise in South Carolina lol
Shocking video: South Carolina police officer shoots African-American man in back as he flees from traffic stop |Rare
MARILYN NANCE Visual artist Marilyn Nance has produced exceptional photographs of unique moments in the Cultural History of the United States and the African Diaspora, and possesses an archive of images of late 20th century African American life. "A two-time finalist for the W. Eugene Smith Award in Humanistic Photography for her body of work on African American spiritual culture in America, Nance has photographed the Black Indians of New Orleans, an African village in South Carolina, churches in Brooklyn, and the first Black church in America. She is recognized by the Smithsonian Institution Center for Folklore Programs & Cultural Studies as a community folklore scholar, an individual who has shown a significant contribution to the collection, preservation and presentation of traditional culture in a community or region. Her work can be found in the collections of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and the Library of Congress. Nance's photographs have bee ...
Jordan Young (1852-1921), born in South Carolina Parents: father Hiram Young Sr. (1814- ) mother Adelade (1822-1905) Wife: Louisa Preston Young (1854 - ) Children: John A., William, Maria, Cornelia Young Wysinger, Mary Ellen Young Abernathy, Ben, Viola, Clarence E. Young Family Reunion 2008 "Celebrating History" By: Amanda Perez (KFSN-TV, channel 30, Fresno, CA) One of the valley's first African American farming families is reuniting in Fowler this weekend for the family's [2008] 30th reunion. And this year, the Young's are also celebrating another special milestone. Thelma Wilson Young turned 100 years old this month. "I'm still moving. I'm moving kinda slow, you can see I'm in a wheelchair here." said Wilson Young. Wilson Young graduated from Fowler High School back in 1927. Her father [Simeon] was one of three brothers who moved to Fowler from South Carolina back in 1888, and they became some of the first African Americans to own farming land in the state. Wilson young's cousin, Patrick, was one of ...
Today the church commemorates Justus Falckner, died 1723; Jehu Jones, died 1852; William Passavant, died 1894; pastors in North America. A native of Saxony, Falckner was the son of a Lutheran pastor and, seeing the stresses his father endured, did not plan on becoming a pastor himself, though he studied theology in Halle. Instead, he joined with his brother in the real estate business in Pennsylvania. Through his business he became acquainted with a Swedish pastor in America, and finally he decided to become ordained. He served congregations in New York and New Jersey. Not only was he the first Lutheran ordained in North America, but he published a catechism that was the first Lutheran book published on the continent. Jones was a native of Charleston, South Carolina. Ordained by the New York Ministerium in 1832, he became the Lutheran church's first African American pastor. Upon returning to South Carolina he was arrested under a law prohibiting free blacks from reentering the state, so he was unable to j ...
*Black History FACT* Emancipated African Americans began influencing South Carolina politics when citizens of the state endorsed their Constitutional Convention and selected state delegates on this date in 1867. Records show that 66,418 African Americans and 2,350 whites voted for the convention. Over time the newly enfranchised voters were able to send so many African American representatives to the state assembly that they outnumbered the white representatives. Many of the elected legislators worked to rewrite the state constitution and passed laws ensuring aid to public education and Civil Rights. SiriusXM Radio
Tim Scott: "the first African American ever popularly elected to the Senate from anywhere in the South."
Republican U.S. Sen. Tim Scott cruised to victory Tuesday in a historic win as South Carolina’s first African American elected to the U.S. Senate and the first black elected to statewide office since Reconstruction.
South Carolina has elected the first black senator from the South since Reconstruction, with Republican Tim Scott winning his race to complete a term to the Senate after having been appointed to the seat in 2013. Scott is the first African American popularly elected to the Senate in the old Confeder…
Tim Scott becomes the fifth African American elected to Senate, winning his race in South Carolina, per CNN.
Senator Tim Scott wins in South Carolina - first African American to win in SC since Reconstruction. Congratulations Sena…
Tim Scott, the South Carolina senator, is the first African American from a southern state to be elected by popular vote.
I'm African American because I see the parallels in how my great grandmother from South Carolina cooked and how West Africans…
NHL Stanley Cup Memorabilia from The Bradford Exchange Online
Today in OUR Story - September 3 * "1783 - Richard Allen, founder of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, purchases his freedom with his earnings as a self-employed teamster. 1838 - Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, disguised as a sailor, escapes from slavery in Baltimore, Maryland to New Bedford, Massachusetts via New York City. He will take the name Douglass, after the hero of Sir Walter Scott's poem "Lady of the Lake". 1865 - The Union Army commander in South Carolina orders the Freedmen's Bureau personnel to stop seizing land. 1868 - Henry McNeal Turner delivers a speech before the Georgia legislature defending African Americans' rights to hold state office. The lower house of the Georgia legislature, rules that African Americans were ineligible to hold office, and expels twenty-eight representatives. Ten days later the senate expels three African Americans. Congress will refuse to re-admit the state to the Union until the legislature seats the African American representatives. 1891 - John St . ...
African American museum will be built at South Carolina harbor where many slaves first set foot in America
Today In Black History • July 3, 1844 Macon Bolling Allen became the first African American licensed to practice law in the United States after passing the State of Maine bar exam and earning his recommendation. Allen was born Allen Macon Bolling August 4, 1816 in Indiana. He grew up a free man and learned to read and write on his own. In the early 1840s, he moved to Portland, Maine where he earned his license to practice law. However, because White people were unwilling to have a Black man represent them in court, in 1845 Allen moved to Boston, Massachusetts. Allen passed the Massachusetts bar exam that same year and he and Robert Morris, Jr. opened the first Black law office in the U. S. In 1848, Allen passed another exam to become Justice of the Peace for Middlesex County. After the Civil War, Allen moved to Charleston, South Carolina and in 1873 was appointed Judge in the Inferior Court of Charleston. The next year, he was elected Judge Probate for Charleston County. Later, Allen moved to Washington ...
June 15, 1755-John Marrant, one of the first African American preachers and missionaries, was born in New York City but raised in Charleston, South Carolina. During the Revolutionary War, the British forced him into the navy where he served for seven years. In 1782, Marrant began training as a Methodist minister and was ordained in 1785. That year, he was sent to Nova Scotia to minister to several thousand African Americans who had fled north during the Revolutionary War. In 1788, Marrant became the chaplain of the Prince Hall Grand Lodge Free and Accepted Masons in Boston, Massachusetts. In 1790, Marrant traveled to London, England where he died April 15, 1791. He published his memoir, “A Narrative of the Lord’s Wonderful Dealings with John Marrant, A Black,” in 1785. His memoir was so popular that it was reprinted more than 17 times. A sermon he delivered in 1789 and his journal from 1785 to 1790 were also published.
James L. Farmer Sr. was born on this date in1886. He was an African American educator, administrator, minister and historian. From Kingstree, South Carolina, James Leonard Farmer’s parents, former slaves, were Carolina and Lorena (Wilson) Farmer. The grade school he attended was in Pearson, Ga.; there was no high school for blacks. However Farmer was able to acquire a working scholarship from Mary McCloud Bethune to the Cookman Institute in Daytona Beach, Fla. A straight-A student, Farmer was accepted into Boston University in 1909. He received four $100 scholarships to the university. Farmer walked to Boston; there was no money for transportation and nothing to hitch a ride with except an occasional horse and wagon. He slept en route in the barns of kind farmers. Farmer earned his Bachelors in 1913, his Bachelor of Sacred Theology in 1916 and his Ph.D. in 1918. He worked full time as a valet and carriage boy for a wealthy white woman, sending money home to support his parents. Because Boston University ...
Robert Franklin Williams (1925-1996) was an African-American leader who became famous for advocating “armed self-defense” and inspiring groups such as the Black Panthers. Born in Monroe, North Carolina, in Union County on the South Carolina border, Williams worked in Detroit in the 1940s and served in the Marine Corps. Returning to Monroe, Williams helped revive the Union County chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Williams recruited members who did not fit the generally middle-class mold of the NAACP.Like Civil Rights Activists throughout the South, Williams and the members of his chapter challenged Jim Crow segregation. For instance, the public swimming pool was operated on a whites-only basis, and Williams’s NAACP chapter organized demonstrations in protest. Williams also formed an African American self-defense association under the auspices of the National Rifle Association, and he claimed credit for resisting the local Ku Klux Klan. In his newslett ...
Bro. James E. Clyburn (Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.), the highest ranking African American in the U.S. Congress Book Release "Blessed Experiences: Genuinely Southern, Proudly Black" The University of South Carolina Press is proud to announce the forthcoming publication of a new memoir by James E. Clyburn entitled, Blessed Experiences: Genuinely Southern, Proudly Black. In moving and personal prose, the Civil Rights Activist, South Carolina political icon and confidant to President Barack Obama describes his rise from the Jim Crow-era South to become, as President Obama describes him, "one of a handful of people who, when they speak, the entire Congress listens." Clyburn's narrative recounts his humble beginnings in rural South Carolina and his early involvement in Civil Rights and public service. He was elected president of his NAACP youth chapter when he was 12 years old, worked with Dr. Martin Luther King as leader of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and organized many civil righ ...
On this date, we celebrate African American architecture. Blacks have been involved in building and architecture since the colonial era of America. The plantation system relied heavily on slave craftsmen imported from Africa. Written records and examination of many of these buildings, such as Magnolia in Plaquemine’s Paris in 1785, the Gippy Plantation, in South Carolina, Windsor Hall in Greenville, Georgia, indicate slave involvement. Some slave artisans were hired out to other owners such as James Bell of Virginia, who was sent to Alabama to construct three spiral staircases for the Watkins-Moore-Grayson mansion. A number of free Blacks also designed and built in the antebellum South. Charles, a free Black carpenter, wood worker, and mason, contracted with Robin de Logny in 1787 to build Destrehan Plantation in St. Charles Parish, LA. Louis Metoyer studied architecture in Paris and designed the Melrose House in Isle Breville, LA. Blacks designed a number of other plantations throughout the confederacy ...
Back In The Day - May 23 1430 Joan of Arc was captured by the Burgundians and subsequently sold to the English. 1533 Henry VIII's marriage to Catherine of Aragon is declared null and void. 1618 The Thirty Years War begins. 1701 Captain William Kidd, the Scottish pirate, is hanged on the banks of the Thames. 1785 Benjamin Franklin announces his invention of bifocals. 1788 South Carolina becomes the eighth state to ratify U.S. Constitution. 1830 The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad began the first passenger service in the United States. 1861 Pro-Union and pro-Confederate forces clash in western Virginia. 1862 Confederate General "Stonewall" Jackson takes Front Royal, Virginia. 1864 Union General Ulysses Grant attempts to outflank Confederate Robert E. Lee in the Battle of North Anna, Virginia. 1873 The North West Mounted Police force was formed in Canada. It would later be known as the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. 1900 Civil War hero Sgt. William H. Carney becomes the first African American to receive the Meda ...
1954-05-20 *David Paterson was born on this date in 1954. He is an African American politician. David Alexander Paterson was born in Brooklyn, NY to Portia and Basil Paterson. His father was a New York State Senator and secretary of state, and deputy mayor of New York City. Paterson traces his mother’s roots of the family to the American colonial era in the states of North Carolina and South Carolina. His father is half Jamaican. His paternal grandmother, Evangeline Rondon Paterson was secretary to Black Nationalist leader Marcus Garvey. His paternal grandfather was Leonard James Paterson a native of St. George's, Grenada who arrived in the United States aboard the S.S. Vestris on May 16, 1917. His father's side consists of white ancestors from England, Ireland, and Scotland, while his mother's side includes eastern European Jewish ancestry as well as the Guinea-Bissau region of West Africa. At the age of three months, Paterson contracted an ear infection which spread to his optic nerve, leaving him wit ...
* Today in Black History - April 12 * 1787 - Richard Allen and Absalom Jones organize Philadelphia's Free African Society which W.E.B. Du Bois refers to, over a century later, "the first wavering step of a people toward a more organized social life." 1825 - Richard Harvey Cain is born in Greenbrier, Virginia. He will become an AME minister, an AME bishop, publisher, member of the House of Representatives, and a founder of Paul Quinn College in Waco, Texas. 1861 - The Civil War begins as Confederate troops attack Fort Sumter, South Carolina. 1864 - Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest captures Fort Pillow, Tennessee, and massacres the inhabitants, sparing, the official report says, neither soldier nor civilian, African American nor white, male or female. The fort is defended by a predominantly African American force. 1869 - The North Carolina legislature passes anti-Klan legislation. 1898 - Sir Grantley H. Adams is born in Barbados. He will become a political leader and will found the Barbados Progre ...
African American convicted of killing 2 white girls, all white jury. Executed 1944 in South Carolina.
Today, April 12, is the Feast Day of Pope Julius I. Today we commemorate the first human in space, Yuri Gagarin; and Global Day of Action on Military Spending. On this date in: 1204 – The Crusaders of the Fourth Crusade breach the walls of Constantinople and enter the city, which they completely occupy the following day; 1776 – American Revolution: With the Halifax Resolves, the North Carolina Provincial Congress authorizes its Congressional delegation to vote for independence from Britain; 1831 – Soldiers marching on the Broughton Suspension Bridge in Manchester, England cause it to collapse; 1861 – American Civil War: The war begins with Confederate forces firing on Fort Sumter, in the harbor of Charleston, South Carolina; 1864 – American Civil War: The Fort Pillow massacre: Confederate forces kill most of the African American soldiers that surrendered at Fort Pillow, Tennessee; 1928 – The Bremen, a German Junkers W33 type aircraft, takes off for the first successful transatlantic aeroplan . ...
I need a roommate for either Patton Hall or Piedmont North. (but if you're persuasive.. I can room in the Commons too) So here's 10 Facts about me: 1. I've lived in Japan for over 10 years. (I am half Japanese & African American) 2. I love to work out.. so if you're not about that Freshman 15, we're perff for each other. 👌😭 3. I'm all about adventure. If you willing to go out & explore Atlanta, try new foods, ride all the rides at six flags (haven't been to a six flags since 7th grade) & party... I'm so your girl. 4. ...but then again. I'm serious about academics. I'm graduating in the top 10 for my class so I want to keep that reputation up at Georgia State. 5. I plan on majoring in Public Policy.. but might be changing to nursing or economic, depending on how everything goes. I want to also either double major or minor in a language. 6. I'm head over heels in lev with Childish Gambino, Jhene Aiko, Frank Ocean, Fall Out Boy, Panic At the Disco & Kendrick Lamar. (the only concert I've ever gone to w ...
Today in OUR Story - March 18 * "1895 - 200 African Americans leave Savannah, Georgia for Liberia. 1901 - William Henry Johnson is born. The Florence, South Carolina native will leave his home for New York and Europe, where he will develop a deliberate and controversial primitive painting style. Among his more famous works will be "Chain Gang," "Calvary," and "Descent from the Cross." 1939 - Charley Pride is born in Sledge, Mississippi. Intent on a career in baseball, he will begin his country music career in 1960, singing between innings at a company-sponsored baseball game where he is a player. A recording contract will follow in 1964 and a debut with the "Grand Ole Opry" in 1967. Pride will become the first African American to become a successful country music star. His awards will include a 1972 Grammy. 1941 - Wilson Pickett is born in Prattville, Alabama. He will become Rhythm & Blues singer and will begin his career as the lead tenor with The Falcons ("I Found a Love" - 1962). He will become a ...
Black Bike Week is an annual bike rally that takes place in South Carolina over Memorial Day weekend. Up to half a million predominantly African American bik...
Good news everyone! Jim DeMint said South Carolina solved racism because they have an African American senator!
* Today in Black History - March 04 * "Once a year we go through the charade of February being 'Black History Month.' Black History Month needs to be a 12-MONTH THING. When we all learn about our history, about how much we've accomplished while being handicapped with RACISM, it can only inspire us to greater heights, knowing we're on the giant shoulders of our ANCESTORS." So Here's My Contribution... As It Is, It Shall Be."DAILY". * 1837 - The second major African American newspaper, the "Weekly Advocate" changes its name to the "Colored American." 1869 - The forty-second Congress convenes (1871-73) with five African American congressmen: Joseph H. Rainey, Robert Carlos Delarge, and Robert Brown Elliott from South Carolina; Benjamin S. Turner, of Alabama; Josiah T. Walls of Florida. Walls is elected in an at-large election and is the first African American congressman to represent an entire state. 1889 - The fifty-first Congress convenes. Three Black congressmen: Henry P. Cheatham of North Carolina; Thoma ...
Festivals The Jubilee Festival of Heritage is held annually in August on the grounds of the historic Mann-Simons Site in Columbia, SC. The festival was started in 1978 by Historic Columbia Foundation as a way to celebrate the rich heritage and entrepreneurial spirit of the Mann-Simons family, while also acknowledging and honoring African American culture throughout South Carolina. Jubilee features a variety of activities, including hands-on demonstrations, from some of the region’s most skilled artists and craftsmen, musical entertainment including African drumming, R&B, jazz, and gospel, and vendors with African-influenced and traditional merchandise. Highlights of the festival also include tours of the Mann-Simons Site, African American heritage site tours, and many other activities throughout the day. Harambee literally means “all pull together” in Swahili. It derives from a Kenyan tradition of events that helps to build and maintain community. The Annual Harambee Festival in Columbia, SC is one ...
Urban Souls Dance Company presents Exodus: A Black History Concert tomorrow at 8pm at Cullen Performance Hall. Exodus highlights the mass migration of African Americans from South Carolina to Liberia in 1878. This work speaks to the idea of people of color having a soul deep connection to Africa.
The 26th Regiment United States Colored Troops, also called the 26th Regiment New York Infantry (Colored) was an African American combat unit, one of three colored troop units from the state of New York, that fought in the American Civil War. The unit was organized on Riker's Island in February 1864 by the Union League Club of New York. The commanding officer was Col. William Silliman. After a short deployment at Annapolis, MD, the regiment was sent to the Department of the South and participated in battles at Johns Island, Honey Hill, and Tulifinny, South Carolina. Lt. Col. William B. Guernsey succeeded Col. Silliman on June 18, 1865, and the 26th Regiment was mustered out under his command in South Carolina on August 28, 1865. Notable members include: David Carll, who has a hill in Oyster Bay, NY, named after him; Noah Elliott, the unit's hospital steward, who went on to become the first African American physician in Athens, Ohio; and Benjamin F. Randolph, who as Chaplain was the unit's sole African Ame ...
Tonight, we have all of the great NC programming you love, plus two fascinating local documentaries! At 10PM, EDUCATION OF Harvey Gantt tells the story of the first African American accepted to a white college in South Carolina, later becoming mayor of Charlotte. Then, at 10:30PM, COLORED SCHOOL uses rare archival footage, alumni stories and a jazz score to help tell the story of a 'lost city' - Charlotte's Second Ward, a vibrant neighborhood & the center of Charlotte's African American community.
Happy Birthday, Josh White! Here’s a man who never disappeared and constantly changed with times for his entire life! He would be 100, today! Celebrating the life and music of Bluesman Josh White, born February 11, 1914 ~ Josh White (born Joshua Daniel White in Greenville, South Carolina, 11 February 1914 or 1915; died Manhasset, New York, 5 September 1969) was an American folk, blues, and gospel singer and guitarist. White was amongst the first blues performers to attract a large white and middle-class African American following, transcending the typical barriers at the time associating blues with a rural and working-class African American audience, and performed in prestigious night clubs and theatres during the 1930s and 1940s. His best known song at the time was probably “Jelly, Jelly”, He recorded in a wide variety of contexts, from recordings in which he was accompanied only by his own guitar playing to others in which he was backed by jazz groups and gospel vocal groups. He was prominently .. ...
THE CLAFLIN UNIVERSITY PSYCHOLOGY CLUB IS PROUD TO BRING TO YOU Black History Month FAMOUS African AmericAN PSYCHOLOGISTS TRIVIA EACH WEEK DURING FEBRUARY The first correct response emailed to Dr. Bagasra at abagasrawill receive a $25 gift card. Wnners will be announced at the end of each week. This week's trivia question: Born in Greenwood, South Carolina in 1911, this early Black Psychologist studied intelligence in the African American population and was a pioneer for African Americans in Clinical Psychology. A veteran of World War II, he earned his PhD at Northwestern and became the first African American chief psychologist for the Veterans Administration. WHO AM I?
On January 28, 1963, a young black man from Charleston named Harvey Gantt enrolled at Clemson College, making him the first African American accepted to a white school in South Carolina. Tune in tonight at 10:30 for 'The Education of Harvey Gantt, narrated by Phylicia Rashād, to learn the pivotal story of desegregation:
WHAT YOU KNOW 'BOUT JESSE.!?!?! 1984 presidential campaign Main article: Jesse Jackson presidential campaign, 1984 On November 3, 1983, he announced his campaign for President of the United States in the 1984 election, becoming the second African American (after Shirley Chisholm) to mount a nationwide campaign for president. In the Democratic Party primaries, Jackson, who had been written off by pundits as a fringe candidate with little chance at winning the nomination, surprised many when he took third place behind SenatorGary Hart and former Vice President Walter Mondale, who eventually won the nomination. Jackson garnered 3,282,431 primary votes, or 18.2 percent of the total, in 1984, and won three to five primaries and caucuses, including Louisiana, the District of Columbia, South Carolina, and one of two separate contests in Mississippi. More Virginia caucus-goers supported Jesse Jackson than any other candidate, but Walter Mondale won more Virginia delegates. In May 1988, Jackson complained that he ...
"Honoring African History Month" William H. Carney Sergeant William Carney of New Bedford, MA, became the first African American awarded the Medal of Honor for "most distinguished gallantry in action" during the assault on Fort Wagner, South Carolina, on July 18, 1863. After being shot in the thigh, Carney crawled uphill on his knees, bearing the Union flag and urging his troops to follow. The Civil War was almost two years old when President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863. With that historic step, for the first time, Black American's were encouraged to enlist in the Union Army. Change is Good!
Black History in AUGUSTA, GA. African Americans in Augusta Augusta's racial makeup has long been largely African American. Its African American citizens have contributed greatly to the rich tapestry of the city's history. A number of listings in the National Register of Historic Places reflect the role of African Americans. Georgia initially banned slavery during earliest colonial times, but eventually the Trustees allowed it, acquiescing to pressure from colonists who saw slavery providing economic benefit to their neighbors across the Savannah River in South Carolina. Remote Augusta worked gangs of enslaved Africans brought over from Carolina even before it was legal to do so. Production of cotton required intensive labor to grow and pick, as well as to prepare to sell and send to market. Cotton’s potential for making high profits accelerated the desire of southern planters to own more slaves in order to grow more cotton, and slavery grew ever more prevalent after invention of the cotton gin in 179 .. ...
On September 22, 1979 Matthew Perry became the first African American federal judge in South Carolina
African American History MOMENT January 18, 1993: Martin Luther King, Jr. Day is officially observed for the 1st time in all 50 states. *On May 2, 2000, South Carolina Governor Jim Hodges signed a bill to make Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday an official state holiday. South Carolina was the last state to recognize the day as a paid holiday for all state employees. Prior to this, employees could choose between celebrating Martin Luther King Day or one of three Confederate holidays.*
This Day in Innovative Black Men History, Jan. 14th: Births: - Julian Bond, legislator, Civil Rights leader, born in 1940. - John Oliver Killens, novelist, born in 1916. Ernest E Just, biologist and pioneer of cell divsion, serves as V.P. of American Zoologists, in 1930. I.D. Shadd elected Speaker of the lower house of the Mississippi legislature, in 1874. In 1975, William T. Coleman is named Secretary of Transportation by President Gerald R. Ford. He is the second African American to hold a Cabinet level position. In 1895, Blacks organized the National Steamboat Company in Washington, D.C. The company sailed a steamboat, the "George Leary," between DC and Norfolk, Virginia. The luxury boat held a capacity of 1,500 passengers and included three decks, sixty-four state rooms, on hundred berths, and a dining room. In 1868, South Carolina Constitutional Convention, the first official assembly in the West with a Black majority, met in the Charleston Clubhouse with seventy-six Black delegates and forty-eight w ...
It seems like there is an outbreak of African American teen males who want to be rappers, drug dealers, or the "hardest" thing on the block. For years, we, as the black male species, have degraded ourselves in society. It bothers me because the black men I look up to and respect fought for the very opposite. I've studied the likes of the late great Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Nelson Mandela, Langston Hughes, Thurgood Marshall, Barack Obama, and one of the most influential men that I've had the pleasure to hear speak, Dr. Andrew Young, and it seems like we as a whole are not reaching our true potential. One of these reason is because we lack positive male role models, and I want to change that. I'm starting a mentoring group in Orangeburg, South Carolina, and I need some positive black men to help me with this. I know that I may be a recording artist, but with the help of this program, I will encourage my "younger brothers" to become doctors, lawyers, teachers, scientist, directors, photographer ...
*On this date in 1922 Ophelia DeVore was born. She was an African American fashion model, and is an entrepreneur. From Edgefield, South Carolina, she was one of ten children of John Walter DeVore who was German and French and Mary Emma Strother who was Black and Indian. Her father owned a road contracting business and her mother was a teacher and church organist. DeVore said that her father was her mentor in learning to communicate well with people, and her mother stressed education, the importance of appearance, and etiquette. Her mother also taught DeVore that she did not have to be trapped by racism. She attended segregated schools until she was nine, and then moved to Winston-Salem to life with her mother’s brother John. Two years later she was moved to New York City to stay with her great-aunt Stella Carter. This was to prevent any future educational interruptions due to her fathers travel schedule. DeVore began doing occasional modeling when she was 16 years old. Mainly because of the Depression ( ...
Ten more Generally Useless Facts About the American Civil War. 1. The first American ironclad to see action was not CSS Virginia (the ex Merrimack) but rather the Confederate semi-submersible "submarine ram" CSS Manassas. 2. Although there were exceptions in state units ( the Louisiana Native Guard, for instance), and some naval crews were integrated, the Confederacy did not authorize Black combat units until 1865; none saw combat. The main problem was that the primary advocates argued that any man, regardless if race, should be granted full citizenship in the CSA - something specifically prohibited for slaves. 3. At the outbreak of the American Civil War, one of South Carolina's wealthiest slave owners was an African American man. 4. The first shots of the American Civil War did not cause any deaths or serious injuries; the only casualties of Fort Sumter occurred when the changing of the flags ceremony was taking place with the surrender if the Union garrison. A signaling cannon exploded and killed a s . ...
A woman named Abby Fisher, a former slave from South Carolina, is the author of the first published African American cookbook.
Chubby Checker Ernest Givens better known by his stage name Chubby Checker (Ernest Evans, October 3, 1941, Spring Gulley, South Carolina) is an African American singer-songwriter. One extremely effective element towards changing the mood and feel regarding race relations in America and the world during the tense Civil Rights Era was from an unlikely source, “Social Dancing.” Arguably, “the Twist” was just as effective in breaking down racial resistance as many of marches by Dr. Martin Luther King (I wonder if MLK knew how to Twist?). That is how powerful of a weapon this dance came to be. And the King of the Twist was Chubby Checker! Not that this was the intent and Chubby Checker is definitely not a Civil Rights advocate by any means, in fact for years he was denying that he was even Black, but indirectly Social Dancing’s impact leaked into the mechanics of the struggle. During the early 60’s all the youth of America was doing “the Twist,” it didn’t matter what race or part of the coun ...
State Sen. Lee Bright, R-Spartanburg may get Tea Party votes but i think his comment about "If you elect me to the Senate, you will think Jesse Helms has rose from the dead," Bright said. I have no idea if he knows who Jesse Helms is or he is just playing to the extreme right but Jesse Helms was a racist in the Senate. He opposed, at various times, Civil Rights, disability rights, feminism, *** rights, affirmative action and abortion. He was qouted once as telling the first African American to the Senate he missed the times when Slavery was around. He told President Clinton he better have body guards when he comes to his town. So i am confused why someone would say they want to be him? He is running for U.S Senate in South Carolina against Senator Graham. Now the scary part is not him but that he will win. He isn't the problem i have its Senator Ted Cruz who said we needed more people like Jesse Helms in the Senate a few weeks ago at a Tea Party rally and he drew loud applauses when he said that. He is po ...
* Today in Black History - July 9 * 1863 - Union troops enter Port Hudson. With the fall of Vicksburg (on July 4) and Port Hudson, Union troops control the Mississippi River and The Confederacy is cut into two sections. Eight African American regiments play important roles in the siege of Port Hudson. 1868 - Francis L. Cardozo is installed as secretary of the state of South Carolina and becomes the first African American cabinet officer on the state level. 1893 - Dr. Daniel Hale Williams performs the world's first open-heart surgery at Chicago's Provident Hospital (which he founded in 1891) on James Cornish, who had been stabbed in the chest and was dying from blood accumulation around the heart. Dr. Williams brought Mr. Cornish to surgery, where he proceeded to open his chest, drain the blood and successfully sutured the pericardium. 1901 - Jester Hairston is born in Belew's Creek, North Carolina, and will move at a very early age to the Homestead section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he will grow u ...
Today in Our Story - July 6 * "1853 - A National Black convention meets in Rochester, New York, with 140 delegates from nine states. James W.C. Pennington of New York is elected president of this meeting, generally considered the largest and most representative of the early African American conventions. 1854 - The Republican Party is organized to oppose the extension of slavery. 1868 - Eighty-five African Americans and 70 white representatives meet in Columbia, South Carolina, at the opening of the state's General Assembly. It is the first and last U.S. legislature with an African American majority. 1869 - African American candidate for Lt. Governor of Virginia, Dr. J.H. Harris, is defeated by a vote of 120,068 to 99,600. 1931 - Deloreese Patricia Early is born in Detroit, Michigan. Shewill become a singer known as Della Reese. As a teen-ager, she will tour with gospel great Mahalia Jackson and, at the age of 18, will form the Meditation Singers and become the first performer to take gospel music to t ...
* Today in Black History - July 2 * 1777 - Vermont, not one of the original 13 states, becomes the first U.S. territory to abolish slavery. 1822 - Denmark Vesey, slave freedom fighter, and 5 aides are hanged in Blake's Landing, Charleston, South Carolina. 1908 - Thurgood Marshall is born in Baltimore, Maryland. He will have the most distinguished legal career of any African American as the NAACP's national counsel, director-counsel of the organization's Legal Defense and Educational Fund, and leader of some of the most important legal challenges for African Americans' constitutional rights, including "Brown v. Board of Education" in 1954. In addition to sitting as a circuit judge for the Second Circuit, Marshall will be named U.S. Solicitor General in 1965 and associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court in 1967, where he will serve for 24 years. 1925 - Patrice Lumumba, revolutionary and first prime minister of the Republic of the Congo, is born in Stanleyville, Belgian Congo. 1927 - George Fisher is born ...
Some states want to go back to count African American as 3/5 man. The Thirteenth Amendment: The Abolition of Slavery The Issue: What is the history behind the 13th Amendment? Is it "self-enacting"? What sorts of private activities might Congress regulate under its enforcement provision? Introduction Delegates to the Constitutional Convention of 1787 hotly debated the issue of slavery. George Mason of Virginia argued eloquently against slavery, warning his fellow delegates: "Every master of slaves is born a petty tyrant. They bring the judgment of heaven on a country. As nations cannot be rewarded or punished in the next world, they must be in this. By an inevitable chain of causes and effects, providence punishes national sins by national calamities." Southern delegates, on the other hand, argued strenuously that the new government should not be allowed to interfere with the institution of slavery. Delegate John Rutledge of South Carolina, for example, told delegates that "religion and humanity ha ...
The racist, cowardly, venal, and evil majority on the Supreme Court just gutted the Voting Rights Acts. We can't let this pass. It is time for us to mobilize again. I'm ready to put on my marching shoes and go to jail. Now is the time for the college age generation to show us they can do something other than gaze at their iphones. Clarence Thomas is a traitor to his race. He loves kissing Antonin Scalia's *** and fawning, scratching his head, and brown nosing around fascist Tea Party Types. He reminds me of the slave who turned in Denmark Vesey when he was planning a Slave Rebellion in South Carolina in 1831. That slave was rewarded by the Charleston slaveholders. He reminds me of Judas Iscariot. Was he rewarded with pieces of silver. How can an African American deliberately punish his own people? Brave people marched, were beaten, went to jail, and died to get voting rights. Clarence Thomas benefitted from those efforts. If there are any schools or other buildings named after him, they should be renamed. ...
When we celebrate Thanksgiving, we are celebrating genocide. When we celebrate Memorials Day, we forget that it was started by a handful of black slaves in Charleston, South Carolina in honor of the Federal troops who lost their lives trying to free them from slavery. Most Americans do not know about the Philippine-American War in which the Philippine people fought against the USA for their independence (1899-1902) much like the US fought Great Britain. As Americans, we are embarrassed by our history and this shows in our History class rooms. The government has taken these major events and either completely deleted them from the history books or they have taken them and watered them down. The Civil Rights Movement and the Jim Crow laws are so watered down that students now days have no idea what horrors that the African American community suffered. As Americans we need to end this watering down of our history whether it is good or bad! We are not only hurting the educational system by doing so, but we are ...
“From 1780 to the British surrender in 1783 the Scoffelites or Tories held out in the back country of South Carolina and Georgia, and according to the still respected pioneer American historian of Loyalism remained in the ascendancy. With the British regulars and their many thousands of newly escaped Black allies controlling the coast, and maroon power allied to the Crown in the interior, Great Britain was able to restore the colonial governments of the Deep South in those years, and there was no United States political authority in the region. British government and "colored" ascendancy were never militarily overthrown in the South, but fell because of Cornwallis's disaster far in the north at Yorktown, and the decision of the British government to end the war.” “Thus to the pages of African American History are added African American battles and campaigns against slavery of greater magnitude than the Nat Turner and Stono insurrections and the brilliant plans of Denmark Vesey and Gabriel. To the hi ...
A sudden and inglorious end to an amazing career. South Carolina's State Senator Robert Ford after a 20 year career in the SC State Senate, in service to its citizens, ended with a forced resignation, last week. Robert Ford is a 64 year old, African American, fire brand and Civil Rights Activist, who marched with Martin Luther King. He is a veritable treasure trove of stories about that movement. He was beaten, fire hosed and thrown into jail 73 times. His house was burned to the ground, in addition to, a whole host of other racist delights to dissuade his mission, he nevertheless, risked his life in pursuit of Civil Rights. State Senator Ford was elected to Charleston City Council in 1974 and to the State Senate in 1992. He was always his own man and at times risked the ire of even Democrats to do what he perceived to be the right thing. After a long career of service by a man who should be honored, he was humiliated into a resignation. He has been vilified for his sloppy book keeping and renting di ...
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BLACK FACT: On June 5, 1783 Oliver Cromwell, an African Americansoldier in the Revolutionary War, receives an honorable discharge and the Badge of Merit from George Washington. BLACK FACT: On June 5, 1894 George Washington Murray an African American inventor of Sumter, South Carolina received 3 seperate patents in one day for a planter, cotton-chopper, and fertilizer distributor, respectively. BLACK FACT: On June 5, 1950 The United States Supreme Court in the case of Henderson v. United States abolished segregation in railroad dining cars and in the case of McLaurin v. Oklahoma State Regents ruled that a public institution of higher learning could not provide different treatment to a student solely because of his/her race. In the Henderson case, the court did not rule on the “separate, but equal” doctrine, but found that the railroad failed to provide Henderson with the same level of service provided to a white passenger with the same class of ticket. In the McLaurin case, they ruled that the Universi ...
THE Nikki Haley STORY The GOP hired this guy"Roan Garcia-Quintana, a director of the white supremacist Council of Conservative Citizens (CofCC), is closely tied to anti-immigrant organizations in the United States. Garcia-Quintana is a well-known leader in the CofCC, a group descended from the White Citizens Councils, which opposed desegregation of schools during the Civil Rights era." Well I am a concerned citizen of South Carolina to see our governor cohort with the enemy send a bad message. Governor hired a racist to her reelection committee. Seeing that I am African American, I see this action no good for South Carolina. I knew Nikki Haley was a bad person in my eyes’ but I did not know she would stoop so low to hire a white supremacist well this will show her as being a racist and inconsiderate of my feelings and the rest of the African American people. Well face book fans please respond to let me know how you feel!
Justice Department to monitor special election in South Carolina May 7, 2013 by Ed Morrissey Today’s the day that voters in South Carolina’s 1st Congressional District march to the polling stations and decide whether to elect the disgraced former governor or the comedian’s sister to represent them in the House of Representatives. As if that wasn’t bad enough, now visitors will be coming to town to watch them make this embarrassing choice, and I don’t mean the media: The Justice Department will monitor voting in Charleston County, South Carolina, in Tuesday’s special election to fill a House of Representatives seat. The department did not give a reason for the monitoring. Tuesday’s vote will take place under South Carolina’s new law mandating photo identification for voters, and Justice Department monitor observed primary elections. Although Attorney General Eric Holder opposed that law, he now appears to be trolling for anecdotes for his challenge to it. Oddly enough, he didn’t appear to ...
Chloe just came home with an A on her 'Root Causes of American Slavery and the Civil War" Test. My little social-justice-oriented historian in the making. Chloe's learning about these important points in our history reminded me of the horrific learning experience I had in my 7th and 8th grade years. Not only did my school have a 'slave auction' but I remember being assigned a social studies project in which I got the state of South Carolina. I presented on this state -- even constructing a plantation with cotton fields -- and never mentioned the state's horrific past in terms of slavery and the exploitation of Blacks. My teacher never discussed these atrocities nor did my text book. I'm so glad that Chloe goes to a public school with a mandated African American History curriculum (as well as lessons on other racial and ethnic groups, religions, and class). She was all about Frederick Douglass and John Brown today!
Today In Black History • March 10, 1849 Hallie Quinn Brown, educator, writer, and activist, was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Brown earned her Bachelor of Science degree from Wilberforce University in 1873 and then taught at schools in Mississippi and South Carolina. From 1885 to 1887, she was dean of Allen University and from 1892 to 1893 lady principal of Tuskegee Institute. She became professor of elocution at Wilberforce in 1893 and frequently lectured on African American issues, the temperance movement, and women’s suffrage. Brown spoke in London, England at the International Woman’s Christian Temperance Union conference in 1895 and the International Congress of Women in 1899. Brown was a founder of the Colored Women’s League which in 1894 merged into the National Association of Colored Women. She served as president of the Ohio State Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs from 1905 to 1912 and the National Association of Colored Women from 1920 to 1924. She also spoke at the Republican Na ...
Gullah also called Geechee is a creole language spoken by the Gullah people, an African American population living on the Sea Islands and the coastal region of the U.S. states of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and northeast Florida. The Gullah language is based on English, with strong influences from West and Central African languages. In 1822 The discovery of a massive slave revolt, master-minded by Denmark Vesey led to higher restrictions for free blacks, slaves and their white supporters. Hundreds of them were held in the Old City Jail. By this time the Charleston population was 23,000 with an African- American majority.
Today in South Carolina History - February 24 After the revelation of a secret bi-racial daughter of Strom Thurmond, no one knew the strange turn his family's history would take until this date in 2006. Declaring the "shock of his life", Civil Rights Activist the Rev. Al Sharpton revealed that his paternal great-grandfather, Colman Sharpton, was a slave belonging to Julia Thurmond Sharpton, the first cousin, twice removed, of Strom Thurmond. Mrs. Sharpton was recently widowed and heavily in debt. Her father-in-law sent four slaves from his plantation in South Carolina to her in Florida. This information was discovered by a study of African American genealogical records released by Ancestry.com.
Quilts For The Underground Railroad: Tumbling Block Or Boxes The Democrats in Southern States past laws limiting the movement and the freedom of African American slaves. Laws such as the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850, and the Dred Scott Decision of 1857. The following Southern Democratic States at the time that supported these laws were Delaware, Georgia, Maryland, South Carolina, Virginia, Florida, North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Arkansas, and Texas. There are times I wonder what did my granddad (Sam Dunn 1879), great-granddad (Andrew Dunn 1835), great, great granddad (Willie Dunn 1810) and his (Robert Dunn 1788) thought about these laws designed to limit the movement and freedom of slaves and how did these laws affect their lives everyday. I am sure that they heard of if they had never met Nat Turner, Noble Drew Ali, So Journey Truth, Frederick Douglas, Harriet Tubman and other Abolitionist and activist of the day. It was in these Southern Democratic States that God ra ...
Juneteenth Parade Recreates History Newstip Date: 06-09-2005   From Stony Island to Rainbow Beach, 79th Street will be transformed into the Freedom Trail -- with a recreation of slave quarters and Harriet Tubman leading a group of slaves to freedom -- for the 10th annual Juneteenth Freedom Parade and Celebration on June 18.   Sponsored by the Coalition to Improve Education in South Shore (CIESS), the parade will feature floats honoring African American heroes, with a "Sounds of Freedom" battle of high school marching bands at the subsequent celebration.   "Wanted" posters for runaway slaves will hang along 79th, and Harriet Tubman will be portrayed leading a group of fugitives from South Carolina (at Stony) to Canada (at Rainbow Beach).   The youth group God's Gang will premier their new traveling exhibit, a recreation of slave quarters featuring actual livestock and plants common in the Antebellum South -- reflecting the group's work with public housing children on ancestral research, urban agricult ...
Today’s History Spotlight: Ernest E. Just Ernest Everett Just (August 14, 1883 – October 27, 1941) was a pioneering African American biologist, academic and science writer. Just's primary legacy is his recognition of the fundamental role of the cell surface in the development of organisms. In his work within marine biology, cytology and parthenogenesis, he advocated the study of whole cells under normal conditions, rather than simply breaking them apart in a laboratory setting. Just was born in South Carolina to Charles Frazier Just Jr. and Mary Matthews Just on 14 August 1883. His father and grandfather, Charles Sr., were dock builders. When Ernest was four years old, both his father and grandfather died. Just’s mother became the sole supporter of Just, his younger brother, and his younger sister. Mary Matthews Just taught at an African American school in Charleston to support her family. During the summer, she worked in the phosphate mines on James Island. Noticing that there was much vacant land ...
Modjeska Monteith Simkins (1899 - 1992) Modjeska Monteith was born on 5th December, 1899. She attended Benedict College, South Carolina and after graduating in 1921 became a schoolteacher at the Booker T. Washington School in Columbia. When she married Andrew Simkins, a prosperous African American businessman, she was forced to resign as the local public school system did not allow married women to teach. In 1931 Simkins found employment with the South Carolina Tuberculosis Association as Director of *** Work. Her role was to raise funds and assist in health education among African Americans. Simkins established clinics for tuberculosis testing at churches, schools and cotton mills. She also published a newsletter and arranged for annual meetings with other African American leaders. Shocked by the poverty she witnessed, Simkins became more concerned with politics and joined the National Association for the Advancement of Coloured People (NAACP). The South Carolina Tuberculosis Association became conc ...
Black History FACT: JANE EDNA HUNTER (1882 -1971) Born in South Carolina to a free-born daughter of freed slaves, and the son of a slave woman and a plantation overseer, Jane Edna Hunter came from humble beginnings. She rose from these beginnings to become a great leader and inspiration to African American women. After a difficult childhood filled with the strain of performing manual labor and walking 12-miles to school, Hunter migrated to Cleveland Ohio. She arrived in 1905 as a 23-year-old single African American woman. In 1911, inspired by a desire to help other single black women avoid the pitfalls of urban life, Hunter convinced a group of female friends to save a NICKEL EACH WEEK AND SAY A PRAYER with the goal of establishing the Working Girl’s Association. Hunter founded the Phillis Wheatley Association, a boarding house and job training center to aid and assist other single, newly arriving African American women. The Phillis Wheatley Association was the first institution designed to meet the nee ...
Eliza Virginia Capers (September 22, 1925 – May 6, 2004) was a Black American actress. Born in Sumter, South Carolina, Capers attended Howard University and studied voice at the Juilliard School in New York City. She made her Broadway debut in Jamaica in 1957. She also appeared in Saratoga and Raisin, for which she won the Tony for Best Actress in a Musical. Capers was a familiar face to television audiences. In addition to a recurring role on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, she appeared in many television programs, including Have Gun Will Travel, Marcus Welby, M.D., My Three Sons, Mannix, The Waltons, Mork & Mindy, Highway to Heaven, St. Elsewhere, Murder, She Wrote, Evening Shade, The Golden Girls, Married with Children, The Practice and ER. Capers founded the Lafayette Players, a Los Angeles repertory theatre company for African American performers. She was the recipient of the National Black Theatre Festival Living Legend Award, the Paul Robeson Pioneer Award, and the NAACP's Image Award for theatre ex ...
Happy African American History month (What, I said it?)! 10 facts about history! 1. In horse races the first handicapping tables along with the first racing forms were invited by an African-American! 2. The word Africa comes from the Greek word Ah- frik which means: with out cold. 3. Africa invited Christianity, which means our western morals and ways of governing life comes from Africa! 4. Africans taught white farmers of the Lowlands of South Carolina who couldn't get their rice crop to flourish and how to grow rice, white framers started importing slaves from the rice countries of Africa: Gambia, Sierra Leone, and the Windward. 5. West Africa’s Ethiopia invited coffee during the early biblical periods. 6. Who was the first African American to successfully perform open heart surgery, Daniel Hale Williams. A graduate of CHICAGO Medical School in 1883. 7. The first African American to earn a Ph.D was Edward A. Bouchet. Born on September 15, 1852 in New Haven, Connecticut. 8. John Love an African Americ ...
REMEMBERING OUR BELOVED Delta Sigma Theta SOROR ESSIE MAE WASHINGTON-WILLIAMS! Essie Mae Washington-Williams (October 12, 1925 – February 4, 2013) was an African American writer and teacher. She was the oldest child of the late Strom Thurmond, the former Governor of South Carolina and longtime United States Senator. She was born to Carrie Butler, a 16-year-old black girl who worked as a household servant for Thurmond's parents, and Thurmond, then 22 and unmarried. Washington-Williams graduated from college, earned a master's degree, married and had a family, and had a 30-year professional career. Washington-Williams did not reveal her biological father's identity until she was 78 years old, after Thurmond's death in 2003. He had paid for her and her children's college educations and took an interest in her and her family all his life. In 2004 she joined the United Daughters of the Confederacy through Thurmond's ancestral lines. She encouraged other African Americans to do the same, to enlarge the lineag ...
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African American History Across North Carolina North Carolina's African American heritage is rich and diverse. In slavery and in freedom, black residents shaped state politics and institutions, literary traditions, religious practice, and the lives of their fellow North Carolinian's. The African American struggle for Civil Rights and equality touched all regions of the state, and the following is a listing, grouped by region, of some important dates for African American History in North Carolina. The Coast 1806 Thomas H. Jones was born on a plantation near Wilmington but was eventually sold to a shopkeeper who taught him reading, writing, and basic arithmetic. Jones escaped slavery in 1849 by hiding on a ship bound for New York. In the North, he worked for the abolitionist cause and published three narratives: Experience and Personal Narrative of Uncle Tom Jones; Who Was for Forty Years a Slave. Also the Surprising Adventures of Wild Tom, of the Island Retreat, a Fugitive *** from South Carolina (1850 ...
Random thought: Shout out to Governor Deval Patrick-he appointed his former African American chief of staff William "Mo" Cowan to senate appointment. Cowan is more than qualified to fill the position but Deval did so to "make history" as there have never, ever been two African Americans in the Senate EVER and there are many qualified people capable of serving. Interesting note: Both Senators (Mass and South Carolina) were appointed, not elected. So have we really grown as a country?
Four years ago I stood with my daughter and two brothers with a massive group of excited people to celebrate the inauguration of our countries first Bi-racial President..The overwhelming feelings we shared still I find very hard to put into words.But I thought a great deal about my grandfather and his descendants in South Carolina on that day. My grandfather was the hardest working man I knew. He was a farmer who endured the Jim Crow rules, white only establishments, and the taking of his farm through eminent domain. His descendants had to buy their own freedom and the freedom of their children.We have documents listing the price paid for each. I think about my father who served this country proudly in the Korean War who as a civilian would not be allowed to sit in restaurants with other African American vets during the years of segregation. I think about the day my father attended the March on Washington to hear MLKs Speech I have A Dream and how moved he was by the event. My father will never forget th ...
This is the 2nd installment of what an African American experiences living in New York City. I want to bring to you what is it to live in Bedford Stuyesant Brooklyn or as Brooklynites call it Bed-Stuy. Bed-Stuy is made up of 142,000 African Americans of many diverse backgrounds. Most are descendants or have ties to Virginia, North and South Carolina. You run into most and they will tell you I'm going down south. I used to hear that quite a bit when I was younger. Being from Texas I was not used to hearing that term because down south for us was Mexico. Bed-Stuy is bound by Bushwich to its north (mainly Puerto Ricans and Crown Heights to its south (mainly West Indians and jews.) To its east, East New York another African American neighborhood. In total with the combined African American areas along with the West Indian population of its neighboring area its the largest concentration of blacks in the country with over 900,000 residents. The area is made up of residential historical brownstones and Brooklyn ...
The president of the NAACP says that Tim Scott, Senator from South Carolina does not believe in Civil Rights! I find this hard to believe as Senator Scott is black/ African American.
Today this country marks the anniversary of Lincoln's "Emancipation Proclamation" which supposedly freed all the slaves. This is fine, except he only freed the slaves held in another country, the Confederate States of America, where he had no control. He did not free the slaves held in his own country. So in reality, he freed no one. Lincoln kept the Army segregated and paid black Solders less than white Soldiers. In the south, blacks and whites fought side by side, there were even black officers. In 1860 South Carolina boasted 137 black slave owners. According to federal census reports, on June 1, 1860 there were nearly 4.5 million Negroes in the United States, with fewer than four million of them living in the southern slave holding states. Of the blacks residing in the South, 261,988 were not slaves. Of this number, 10,689 lived in New Orleans. The country's leading African American historian, Duke University professor John Hope Franklin, records that in New Orleans over 3,000 free Negroes owned slave ...
TAKEN FROM A TIME MAGAZINE SEPT 2000 ARTICLE. Hip-hop's roots are not Jamaican, nor Puerto Rican, nor African American, but African. It's part of the continuum of African art forms — in some traditional African societies, for example, we find the "griot," who is the storyteller or oral historian. How is that much different from an MC telling a story (think of Slick Rick, Ice Cube, or Snoop Dogg) or rhyming about the past. Hip-hop is a collision between African American, West Indian and Puerto Rican cultures, with the understanding that we are all African people. My point is that no matter where we were enslaved in the Western Hemisphere, be it Jamaica, Brazil or South Carolina, we as Black people held on to modes of speech, dance movements, and attitudes (what some call "cool") that formed the foundation for hip-hop's emergence in an African-American context. So the point of the exhibition is to give people an overview of hip-hop culture and history and, really, to encourage people to do their own homew ...
Well, the problem about this argument is this is what is taught in our schools. I attended elementary school in Pennsylvania, and junior and senior high schools in South Carolina, and all of them indoctrinated us to the idea that the Civil War was fought to end slavery. This may have been the end result, but that wasn't why it started. The initial aim of the Union at the onset of war was to preserve the Union to prevent the potential domination of the Western Hemisphere by European colonial powers, several of which were financially backing the rebel South. It was only a year and a half after the initiation of hostilities that the Emancipation Proclamation was issued by President Lincoln, a decree that possessed no teeth in the rebel states. African American slaves in the Deep South were not, in fact, legally set free until the 13th Amendment was passed and went into effect on December 6, 1865. So did Lincoln free the slaves? The debate may be up in the air, but his election in 1860 certainly paved the way ...
Things I learned while doing my Ethics presentation on Bob Jones University's interracial ban: 1). The university wouldn't allow African American students even after other secular universities, like Clemson, did. In fact, it took the university longer than other secular schools (the University of South Carolina accepted its first African American in 1873). 2). One of the founding board of trustees, Bib Graves, was a prominent member of the Klu Klux Klan and a close friend with Dr. Bob Sr. In addition, BJU had a dorm named after him during the time I was there. 3). Bob Jones III gave a presentation of 9 passages in the Old and New Testaments that defended his view that people shouldn't date other races. When asked about it on Larry King live he stated that, "We can't point to a verse in the Bible that says you shouldn't date or marry inter-racial." 4). Dr. Bob Jones Senior said that African American slaves should be thankful for southerns taking them captive; he said, “they might still be over there in t ...
Ok, we need to change the demographics of the Republican Party and appeal to women and minorities, according to Boehner. Alright, John Boehner, resign and cede the speakership to Michelle Bachman while Eric Cantor can give up the majority seat to Tom Scott, an African American from South Carolina. There, problem solved and the face of the Republican Party changed
With the end of the Civil War and the Reconstruction period following in the South, a bitter resentment was held by the defeated Confederates. Federal troops occupied the South during reconstruction and upheld the citizenship of the newly freed African American slaves. some ran for local office, some for state office. This infuriated the white Southern inhabitants. It was the election of 1876, where Tilden held a popular vote advantage over Hayes. There were still 20 uncounted electoral votes from Florida, Louisiana and South Carolina. The South made the bargain of pledging those votes to Hayes over Tilden thus guarantteing a Hayes victory for the promise of removal of the Northern occupiers. The deal was done and the Southerners exacted revenge for losing the war on blacks until just recently. Yes there was the Civil Rights Movement and Civil Rights Act of '64 and Voting Rights Act of '65 allowing blacks to become voters once again. In those years in between life for blacks in the South was marred with l ...
Well, THIS is an interesting bit of liguistic trivia that I just came across. My daughter's Girl Scout troop wondered, "What does Kumbaya mean?" So I looked it up, and learned something about one way that American English has been morphed over the centuries: If you look in a good songbook you'll find the word helpfully translated as "come by here". Kumbaya apparently originated with the Gullah, an African-American people living on the Sea Islands and adjacent coastal regions of South Carolina and Georgia. (The best known Sea Island is Hilton Head, the resort area.) Having lived in isolation for hundreds of years, the Gullah speak a dialect that most native speakers of English find unintelligible on first hearing but that turns out to be heavily accented English with other stuff mixed in. The dialect appears in Joel Chandler Harris's "Uncle Remus" stories, to give you an idea what it sounds like. In the 1940s the pioneering linguist Lorenzo Turner showed that the Gullah language was actually a creole consi ...
Once again, the rumors about straight ticket voting arise. Voters in states that don't even have straight ticket voting are being warned against it. Straight ticket voting is only available in Alabama, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Utah and West Virginia. Only in North Carolina must you vote separately for president/Vice President if voting straight ticket. My thinking on the reason behind these misleading emails? They assume (erroneously) EVERY African American vote is a vote for President Obama. But if we believe it's a multiple step process, we'll stop at President/Vice President and forget the rest. With record length ballots this year (Converse has a 59 screen ballot), other races could be lost...crucial Board of Education, Supreme Court, countless legislative and other positions. Personally, I'm willing to stand all day in the booth to ensure the right thing (as I see it) is done. Here are some links... Fake Group Hands Out Fliers Meant To ...
The Democratic National Convention in Charlotte., N.C. was a great turn out of Democrats from across the USA. It was a unifying event which featured a Reception from the Delegates and Members of the Congressional Black Cauvus and honored several Civil Rights Leaders from North and South Carolina. This event hosted by Sheryl Lee Ralph and Hill Harper recognized Atty. Julius Chambers, Civil Rights Lawyer; Dr. Kenneth Chambers, Physician/OBGYN; Franklin McCain, one of the A&T State University Four, students who started who started the sit-in movement in America by sitting at the Woolworth Lunch counter all day-waiting to be served. Mary Mc Allister, N.C.'s first African American woman in the State Senate (26 years of service), Harvey Gantt, first African American Mayor of Charlotte and Rev. Jesse Jackson, graduated from N.C. A&T State University, each were among those honored.
With exeption to John F. Kennedy, EVERY single American president before Barack Obama was a white Anglo Saxon Protestant with ancestry from ONLY the country to which we got our independence from, Great Britain, or at least near it. In 1972, if you had stopped an average person on the street and told them that exactly 40 years later, in the 2012 presidential election that you would have an African American president running against a Mormon, with two Catholics as their running mates, they probably would have sent you to a mental institution. However, that is America. We continue to surprise and we continue to beat the odds, no matter how hard those odds are. No matter where you stand on the issues, and wether you agree with Mr. Obama or Mr. Romney, all of us need to come together on both sides and recognize on both sides the true history that we a re witnessing. Thought the busses in montgomery, to the water fountains in south Carolina, and the ghosts of Mississippi, and the nearly 100 year persecution of ...
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Today In Black History (I swear everytime I see this its a white person..everytime a read it..its a brother..why Donald Russell Long) August 27, 1884 Rose Virginia Scott McClendon, a leading Broadway actress of the 1920s, was born in Greenville, South Carolina. McClendon started acting in church plays as a child, but did not become a professional actress until she won a scholarship to the American Academy of Dramatic Art when she was in her thirties. McClendon made her stage debut in the 1919 play “Justice.” She was one of the few black actresses who worked consistently in the 1920s and was considered “the *** first lady of the dramatic stage,” appearing in productions such as “Deep River” (1926), “Porgy” (1928), and “Mulatto” (1936). In 1935, McClendon co-founded the *** People’s Theatre in Harlem. She died July 12, 1936 and in 1937 the Rose McClendon Players was established in her honor. • August 27, 1909 Lester Willis Young, Hall Of Fame jazz tenor saxophonist and clarineti ...
On 18 February 1920 the Woman's Suffrage Act was presented and referred to the Senate. Ironically, a week earlier, the General Assembly had rejected the "proposed [nineteenth] amendment to the Constitution of the United States on woman suffrage." Other southern states, including Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina also fought to keep women away from the polls. With the founding of the Equal Suffrage League (ESL) of Virginia in 1909, a state-based group affiliated with the National American Woman Suffrage Association, women in the commonwealth began lobbying for the vote. Lila Meade Valentine served as the ESL's first president. The group worked tirelessly for a decade, struggling to debunk the argument made by anti-suffragists of the inevitability of *** rule" that would result from women's suffrage. Those opposed to females gaining the vote feared that a combination of African American men, who gained the franchise through the Fifteenth Amendment, along with African American women voters . ...
Great time tonight at the Democratic Unity Rally in downtown Madison at Brocach. I had the pleasure of introducing myself to 2 of the Democratic challengers for the US House from Wisconsin, Rob Zerban in the 1st CD (Yes, Ryan's seat) and Pat Kreitlow (running for Dave Obey's old seat). I can also now say that I have heard two of the foremost African American legislators in the nation. My Alma Mater, Knox College, hosted a speech by Rep. John Lewis of Georgia who was promoting his biography. Tonight, I heard Rep. James Clyburn (D - South Carolina) who is the Assistant Minority Whip for Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (3rd highest ranking Democrat in the House). In case any of us have lost sight of why the election in 75 days is so important, Rep. Clyburn's remarks tonight truly put things in a rather stark perspective.
Why do African American conservatives still try to justify their political choice by saying that the past Democratic Party was rascist when those same Democrats (i.e. Dixiecrats) such as Jesse Helms left the Democratic Party in droves and became Republicans. The Republicans created a whole political movement around rascism in the early 80's called the Southern Strategy. Please look it up and understand your political history. Please be advised you will never see a Confederate flag at a Democratic Political Rally or in a Blue State. What are the over and unders on the number of Confederate Flags at a Tea Party rally in South Carolina.
Born a slave in 1850s South Carolina and elected to Congress in the 1890s, George W. Murray appeared to be the antithesis of the African American male in the Jim Crow South and served as a beacon for African Americans who saw their hopes crushed in the aftermath of the Civil War. Early in the twe...
The night before the president will speak, former president Bill Clinton will speak. Traditionally, it's the night that the Vice President has his night before the Democratic people. They are already saying that it is a sign of trouble. No doubt, the billing of President Clinton speaking to rally Democratic support for President Obama is a very bold move, but why have someone speak for you that was in the corner for his wife, and after the South Carolina debacle of comparing Jessie Jackson with what Barak Obama did? Aside from that, we see that when you support Planned Abortionhood, the systematic murder of your own people in African American neighborhoods, and the sin of homosexuality (and racism within the homosexual community against their own sinful lifestyle), the odds are stacked against him. We have yet to see the GOP capitalize on this to reach out to the African American community in a meaningful way. Let's get past the olive branch and commit to lay out a solid plan that not just offer token stu ...
Today I attended the Reunion of the descendants of Isaac Durham (1860-1921) at the Butler Community Ctr outside of Fairfield, Freestone County, Texas. This was an awesome event! I delivered a brief lecture related to my genealogical research, obtained additional info on the family history, and ate some good BBQ and all of the trimmings. Isaac Durham was the youngest of six sons of an African-born slave named Gobi who died in Fairfield County, South Carolina. His bros were Belton, Allen, Minor, Chris, and Anderson. They came with their master to DeSoto Parish, Louisiana (where I conducted research in 2003) They were in Freestone County, Texas by 1870, acc. to census records. Allen was the great-great-great grandfather of my wife of 35 yrs, Debra. We married about the time of Alex Haley's "Roots," which gave me great inspiration. I hope and pray that I will soon be able to make my long-awaited trip to South Carolina and complete my research. I plan to title my fourth book "The Durhams of Fairfield: ...
New Journal on African American Education Founded at Wayne State University Filed in Black studies on June 1, 2012 The Institute for the Study of the African American Child at Wayne State University in Detroit has announced a new peer-reviewed journal entitled African American Learners. The journal states that it will present “empirical, theoretical, and methodological research and analysis of the home, school, and other environmental factors that impact the learning processes of African American children and adults.” The journal will include scholarly essays, commentaries, curriculum and media reviews, and research briefs. The primary focus will be on K-12 education but there will be special theme issues that deal with higher education topics. Dr. Boutte The co-editors of the new journal are Gloria Boutte, the Yvonne and Schuyler Moore Distinguished Professor in the College of Education at the University of South Carolina and Hakim Rashid, Associate Professor of human development and psychoeducationa ...
On this Day in History "I cherish the memories of a question my grandson asked me the other day when he said, 'Grandpa, were you a hero in the war?' Grandpa said 'No… but I served in a company of heroes.'" Sergeant Mike Ranney 585 BC A solar eclipse interrupts a battle outside of Sardis in western Turkey between Medes and Lydians. The battle ends in a draw. 1805 Napoleon is crowned in Milan, Italy. 1830 Congress authorizes Indian removal from all states to the western Prairie. 1863 The 54th Massachusetts, a regiment of African-American recruits, leaves Boston, headed for Hilton Head, South Carolina. 1859 The French army launches a flanking attack on the Austrian army in Northern France. 1871 The Paris commune is suppressed by troops from Versailles. 1900 Britain annexes the Orange Free State in South Africa. 1940 Belgium surrenders to Germany. 1953 Melody, the first animated 3-D cartoon in Technicolor, premiers. 1961 Amnesty International, a human rights organization, is founded.
Robert Smalls - an enslaved African American, a Union hero of the Civil War, and a US Congressman representing South Carolina. From Charleston, special guest host, Judge Alex Sanders discusses this South Carolinian's life and the impact he had on our state's history with various guests.
For the past four years Richard Reid, archivist of Voorhees College, has been conducting research on Elizabeth Evelyn Wright Menafee, the founder of the historically Black educational institution in Denmark, South Carolina. The research has produced a collection of photographs, letters, and other documents relating to Menafee’s effort to establish a school for Blacks in South Carolina. Menafee was born in Talbotton, Georgia, in 1872. Her father was an African American carpenter and her mother was a Cherokee Indian. She was a graduate of Tuskegee University and after moving to South Carolina wanted to start a school modeled after her Alma Mater. Menafee traveled to nine different locations in the state before deciding to establish the school which is now Voorhees College on April 14, 1897. The school was founded above a store. She later raised funds for the school to purchase land outside of town. She died in 1906 at the age of 34 and is buried on the campus of Voorhees College.(JBHE)
I thought that I was up all most of Charleston, South Carolina's rich African American History but every time I start to feel confident... another great African American is discovered. Here is the insight into a very intelligent man of color from the Low Country, Dr. Ernest Everett Just.
Just watched an episode of The Honeymooners. Alice wanted Ralph to not act old anymore but to rekindle their youth wehie they still could. So, Ralph talks to Norton and says he needs to relearn some of the dances he once knew like the Big Apple, the Suzie Q and the Hesitation Waltz. A little research reveals the following; "The dance that eventually became known as the Big Apple is speculated to have been created in the early 1930s by African American youth dancing at the Big Apple Club in Columbia, South Carolina. By the end of 1937, the Big Apple had become a national dance craze. On December 20, 1937, Life magazine featured the Big Apple in a four-page photo spread and the magazine predicted that 1937 would be remembered as the year of the Big Apple." - "Suzie Q (or Suzy Q) is the name of a dance step in the Big Apple, Lindy Hop, and other dances. In line dances this step is also known as Heel Twist." - "In the 1910s, a form called the "Hesitation Waltz" was introduced by Vernon and Irene Castle. The p ...
Today in history, April 9th: (1750) - The South Carolina Gazette reports that Caesar, a South Carolina slave has been granted his freedom and a life time annuity in exchange for his cures for poison and rattlesnake bite. Caesar and the famous James Derham of New Orleans are two of the earliest know African American medical practitioners. (1862) - On May 9, 1862 General Hunter of the Union Army issued a proclomation freeing the slaves of Georgia, Florida and South Carolina. A displeased President Lincoln anulled this act. Lincoln stated, "General Hunter is an honest man...He proclaimed all men free within certain states. I repudiated the proclomation." (1867) - Sojourner Truth delivers a speech to the First Annual Meeting of the American Equal Rights Association, championing for the rights of all people. (1899) - J.A. Burr, inventor, patented the Lawn Mower. Patent # 624,749.
Remember Jeremiah Wright, Obama's pastor who had some rather nasty things to say about the US? This past Easter weekend, in South Carolina, he supposedly said that Supreme Court Justice Clearance Thomas (who is a conservative African American), "worships some other kind of god". Considering one of Wright's friends, Farrakhan, and Wright's personal theology, he is right. Justice Thomas worships the only TRUE GOD, while Wright and Farrakhan worship the false god of islam.
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