South Africa & Great Britain

South Africa, officially the Republic of South Africa, is a country located at the southern tip of Africa. Great Britain or Britain (Scottish Gaelic: Breatainn Mhòr, ) is an island situated to the northwest of Continental Europe. 5.0/5

South Africa Great Britain United States New Zealand Nelson Mandela South African President Obama Winston Churchill White House New York United Kingdom New York City Jonnie Peacock South Korea Cape Town Nazi Germany Madison Square Garden Big Ben Boxer Rebellion

Today in History Jan 24, 1965: Winston Churchill died Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill, the British leader who guided Great Britain and the Allies through the crisis of World War II, dies in London at the age of 90. Born at Blenheim Palace in 1874, Churchill joined the British Fourth Hussars upon his father's death in 1895. During the next five years, he enjoyed an illustrious military career, serving in India, the Sudan, and South Africa, and distinguishing himself several times in battle. In 1899, he resigned his commission to concentrate on his literary and political career and in 1900 was elected to Parliament as a Conservative MP from Oldham. In 1904, he joined the Liberals, serving in a number of important posts before being appointed Britain's first lord of the admiralty in 1911, where he worked to bring the British navy to a readiness for the war that he foresaw. In 1915, in the second year of World War I, Churchill was held responsible for the disastrous Dardanelles and Gallipoli campaigns, ...
100 Years ago. 19 December 1914 British Government declare Khedive Abbas Hilmi deposed, and proclaim Prince Hussein Kamel Pasha as Sultan of Egypt. - Great Britain declares adherence to Franco-Moorish Treaty of 1912. - The naval trawler HMT Orianda struck a mine and sank in the North Sea off Scarborough, Yorkshire with the loss of a crew member. Survivors were rescued by HMS Brighton. - The Cargo Ship Tritonia struck a mine and sank in the Atlantic Ocean 22 nautical miles (41 km) North West of Tory Island, County Donegal. - Allied airmen bomb German airsheds at Brussels. - In an endeavour to provide some relief to the French at Arras, a British force, spearheaded by the Indian Lahore Division launched an attack on the German trenches at Givenchy, successfully capturing two lines of enemy trenches. Germans counter-attack at Givenchy and Festubert. - Galicia: Desperate sortie by Austrian garrison of Przemsyl repelled by Russians. - South Africa: Captain Fourie and Lieutenant Fourie condemned for high trea . ...
New strong wave of leaders in EU wants to dump sanctions, be friends with Russia and is EU critical. One man’s death is another man’s bread (a Dutch proverb). It describes perfectly how USA is trying to defend its dying Petrodollar and never-payable-debt by forcing EU to destroy itself by sanctions against Russia. Meanwhile, the BRICS cooperation is working. Putin signs multi-Billion gas and 16 other deals with Xi Jinping. Putin will sign a 25 unit nuclear power station deal with Modi in India, and South Africa and Venezuela is just in the "pipeline". And so on. The EU countries will soon get new leaders, because the old ones have deceived EU. The new ones are EU-critical, sanction-opponents and Russian friends. See here Podemos in Spain, Nigel Farage in Great Britain, Marine Le Pen in France, Beppe Grillo and Mateo Salvini in Italy and Syriza in Greece. And so on. They are the future - whether left, center or right - because they defend their countries against EU and USA economic imperialism, which m ...
Patrice Lumumba was a great man and a great hero to many in Africa. The U.S. CIA in concert with Great Britain and Belgium assassinated this great man and put in Mobuto Sese Seko in power. This happened in the early 1960's. Patrice Lumumba was a great man, great hero and an inspiration to so many people. He was a democratically elected leader and the U.S. CIA had him assassinated and ushered in a brutal dictatorship that had links to Idi Amin in Uganda and UNITA in Angola under Jonas Savimbi and even the Apartheid regime of South Africa at the time and his name was Mobuto Sese Seko. He destroyed the economy of the Congo and renamed the country, 'Zaire', in 1971. He wanted to appease his former colonial masters. The U.S., Great Britain, France and Belgium all helped ruin and destroy the Congo while Mobuto was in power. The ravaged and plundered and pillaged that country of valuable natural resources like copper, diamonds and other natural resources.
Safaricom Sevens Update: BIGGEST EVENT EVER - For the benefit of all fanatics preparing for this year’s Safaricom Sevens, the Kenya Rugby Union wishes to publish an update of the organisation in place. It will be the second year that the Safaricom Sevens will take place at the iconic 60,000 Safaricom “Home of Heroes’ Stadium on the north eastern suburbs of Nairobi having debuted there last year. So far, 19 quality teams, at least half a dozen of them full national teams, have expressed 100% commitment to participate. We are in constant communication and expect a full-house. The teams are: Samurai Invitational (mainly Fiji’s international stars) Australia Icons – (Australia) Samoa Spain, Argentina Germany Uganda Canada (Doubtful) Russia (To Confirm) Zimbabwe Welsh Warriors – (Great Britain) Auckland Metro – (New Zealand) Western Province Union – (South Africa) Sharks – (South Africa) England Students - (Great Britain) Wailers – (Great Britain) Stade de France – (France) Kenya “Shuja ...
Baseball baseball Vocabulary | Knowledge Quiz | Vocabulary Quiz For hundreds of years people in many parts of the world have played "bat and ball" games. In these games, a player on one team throws a ball and a player on the other team tries to hit the ball with a bat and score runs. Today, the two most popular bat and ball games are cricket and baseball. While cricket is popular in England, Australia, India, Pakistan, South Africa, and many other Commonwealth countries, baseball is popular in the U.S.A., Canada, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and many Central American countries. Baseball is becoming more and more popular in many other countries as well, especially in China where it's being actively promoted by the American leagues as they try to make it the world's number one bat and ball game. History In the eighteenth century, many people from Great Britain and Europe travelled to the new colonies in North America to settle and build new lives. These settlers took along traditional games that their famili ...
Modes. Probably the most ancient ways of making music and the most daunting for western ears. So begins a yearlong study and application of the mysterious and misunderstood science we call modes. Starting in the Far East and working towards the Middle East and Baltic/Slavic regions then turning due south through Turkish and Eastern Mediterranean territory into Egypt and East Africa to South Africa and north along the West African coast where I'm sure to find rythm patterns untouched. North into Spain and Medievil Europe where the modes were dismantled and changed to please the Papacy and finally the island kindoms of Ireland, Scotland and Great Britain where the bulk of American music styles originated before we again adapted them into our own style of music, being blues, jazz, gospel and Appalachian folk or country music. Always a fun read and equally good study. I expect it will be better the third time around as I can get below the surface of complex modal behavior a little quicker now.
Watchman News- Bishop Tony Palmer dead….Killed in motorcycle accident in U.K. TRUNEWS – Monday July 21, 2014 Episcopal Bishop Tony Palmer is dead. He was involved in a motorcycle accident in Great Britain on Sunday. Rev. Palmer was rushed to a hospital where he underwent surgery for hours. He died from complications caused by the injuries. He was an ordained bishop in the Communion of Evangelical Episcopal Churches. The breakaway group is not officially aligned with the Anglican Communion. He maintained an online religious site called The Ark Community. Born in South Africa, Rev. Palmer was the manager of the Kenneth Copeland Ministries’ office in that country. Married to an Italian Roman Catholic woman, Rev. Palmer left his employment with KCM and moved to Italy where he started an ecumenical ministry to connect Protestant Christians with Roman Catholic Christians. He told Trunews in a radio interview that Kenneth Copeland Ministries was his first financial supporter. Bishop Palmer made glo ...
2014 Lorian Hemingway Short Story Competition Winners and Honorable Mentions: This year the Lorian Hemingway Short story Competition received 938 entries from the United States and around the world, including Brazil, Russia, Switzerland, Germany, France, Scotland, Australia, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Ireland, Great Britain, Singapore, Romania, South Africa, Kenya, and many more. We wish we could award an Honorable Mention to each who entrusted their stories to us. Please know that your stories were read with great care and that the memory of them will not fade. Each of you who entered keep the art of fiction alive. And that is no small gift. Our first-place winner will receive an award of $1,500 and publication in Cutthroat: A Journal of the Arts. Second and third-place winners will each receive cash awards of $500. First-Place Winner: Lizzy Welby London, United Kingdom for her story: “The Breakers” Second Place Winner: James Carey Doane Sayville, New York for his story: “The Birth of Revenge” ...
2014 International Cup fixture released The AFL released the 2014 International Cup fixture today. The 2014 International Cup will be played in Melbourne from August 9 to 23. There will be 18 men’s and seven women’s teams competing. Men’s teams: Canada, China, Fiji, Finland, France, Indonesia, Ireland, Great Britain, India, Japan, Nauru, New Zealand, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, South Africa, Sweden, Tonga, USA. New teams for IC14: Finland, Indonesia and Pakistan. Women’s teams: Canada – Northern Lights, Canada – Midnight Suns, Ireland, Fiji, Tonga, USA – Freedom, USA – Liberty. The majority of matches will be played at Royal Park in Parkville and for the first time a community round will be played as curtain-raisers to suburban, amateur and country matches. The women’s grand final will be played at Punt Road Oval and the men’s grand final will be the curtain-raiser to the Round 22 AFL match between Hawthorn and the Geelong Cats at the MCG. The men’s fixture is divided into three pool ...
Adela Recordon, Chilean surfer. A total of 32 countries and 400 athletes and team officials are confirmed in the 2014 VISSLA ISA World Junior Surfing Championship (WJSC). The world’s largest and most important Junior competition will take place in La FAE, one of the best and most consistent surf breaks in Ecuador. ... The confirmed countries are Argentina, Australia, Austria, Barbados, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Ecuador, France, Germany, Great Britain, Guatemala, Hawaii, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Russia, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, Tahiti, Trinidad & Tobago, Uruguay, USA, Venezuela and Wales. Kehu Butler's world ranking took a dramatic rise at the 2014 Vissla ISA World Junior Surfing Championship held in Ecuador over the last fortnight. The 14-year-old Omanu surfer was the best performed New Zealander finishing in 7th place in the under-16 division after a 31st place last year. ... His father Kahn managed the New Zealand team in Ecuador that ...
With Michelle Obama in China and the President set to take a trip to Belgium on Tuesday, there has been a lot of press about their trips and their associated costs. Some facts to consider: With 31 trips for a total of 119 days abroad, President Obama has now traveled more than any other president, although Bush 43 and Clinton also set records before him. Air Force One Costs over $228,000 per hour to fly. The President sometimes travels with a 900-person, 45-car, 2 Air-Force Ones, and a 3-cargo plane entourage. The 13-hour visit in South Africa for Mandela’s funeral cost an estimated $11 million (including 127 hotel rooms and not including the flight). Annual costs for supporting the White House exceed $1.4 billion. By way of comparison, travel expenses for the royal family of Great Britain was less than $9 million in 2012 and the cost to maintain them for the year was $55 million. Bonus: The properties owned by the royals generate north of $200 million in rent, so when you include that figure, England a ...
Random Fact! We've all seen the tropical Bird-of-Paradise flower but do you know where it gets it's name? Strelitzia reginae a.k.a Crane Flower is native to South Africa and was named after Queen Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, wife to King George III of Great Britain. The word reginae is Latin for "of the queen". It's magnificent fluorescent colours and shape give way to the common name, as it resembles the crest of a birds head and beak. The leaves are broad and flat, resembling that of a banana leaf. Some botanists believe that tropical birds cause cross-pollination by landing on the hardy buds and carrying pollen to other plants. It has become a very popular house hold plant and can be propagated quite easily from division, as it grows from a rhizome root structure.
Wikipedia: "Jaja Wachuku as Foreign Affairs Minister of Nigeria preferred quiet consultation, especially with the two major Anglo-American powers: Great Britain and the United States - in search of solutions to continental and international problems. For example, there was a lot of hue and cry as a result of the Rivonia Trial in South Africa in 1963 following the arrest of Walter Sisulu, Ahmed Kathrada, Govan Mbeki, Denis Goldberg, Raymond Mhlaba, Andrew Mlangeni, Lionel Bernstein and others. They and Nelson Mandela, who was serving term on his 1962 conviction, were charged with "sabotage and... conspiracy to overthrow the Government by revolution and by assisting an armed invasion of South Africa by foreign troops." These charges were treasonable and carried the death penalty. Jaja Wachuku quietly invited Lord Head, the British High Commissioner in Lagos and also United States' Ambassador Joseph Palmer II - and strongly urged them to intercede with their governments to prevail on the apartheid regime in ...
DID YOU KNOW that on this day in 1907 KENORA WINS Stanley CupMontreal Quebec – Kenora Thistles ice hockey team sweep the Montreal Wanderers in 2 games for the Stanley Cup. 1839 Wolfville Nova Scotia – Acadia College opens in Wolfville; now Acadia University 1891 Boston Massachusetts – Calixa Lavallée dies at age 48; composer of O Canada. 1900 Halifax Nova Scotia – Second Contingent of Canadian troops sails from Halifax for South Africa; more troop ships leave January 27 and February 21 1936 London England – Edward, Prince of Wales, proclaimed King Edward VIII, one day after the death of his father, George V; will abdicate Dec 11th to marry divorced American Wallis Simpson. 1942 Count Basie records "One O'Clock Jump" 1903 Harry Houdini escapes police station Halvemaansteeg in Amsterdam 1813 Pineapple introduced to Hawaii 1799 Edward Jenner's smallpox vaccination is introduced 1976 Great Britain / France First Concorde 21st January, 1976: The First Concordes with commercial passengers take off Fr ...
Before the first Cricket World Cup The first ever international cricket match was played between Canada and the United States, on the 24 and 25 September 1844. [2] However, the first credited Test match was played in 1877 between Australia and England , and the two teams competed regularly for The Ashes in subsequent years. South Africa was admitted to Test status in 1889. [3] Representative cricket teams were selected to tour each other, resulting in bilateral competition. Cricket was also included as an Olympic sport at the 1900 Paris Games , where Great Britain defeated France to win the gold medal . [4] This was the only appearance of cricket at the Summer Olympics . The first multilateral competition at international level was the 1912 Triangular Tournament , a Test cricket tournament played in England between all three Test-playing nations at the time: England, Australia and South Africa. The event was not a success: the summer was exceptionally wet, making play difficult on damp uncovered pitches, ...
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Today in History: January 8 1681 The Treaty of Radzin ends a five year war between the Turks and the allied countries of Russia and Poland. 1745 England, Austria, Saxony and the Netherlands form an alliance against Russia. 1815 A rag-tag army under Andrew Jackson defeats the British on the fields of Chalmette in the Battle of New Orleans. 1871 Prussian troops begin to bombard Paris during the Franco-Prussian War. 1892 A coal mine explosion kills 100 in McAlister, Oklahoma. 1900 The Boers attack the British in Ladysmith, South Africa, but are turned back. 1908 A subway line opens linking the New York boroughs of Brooklyn and Manhattan. 1940 Great Britain begins rationing sugar, meat and butter. 1946 President Harry S. Truman vows to stand by the Yalta accord on self-determination for the Balkans. 1954 President Dwight Eisenhower proposes stripping convicted Communists of their U.S. citizenship. 1963 President John F. Kennedy attends the unveiling of the Mona Lisa. 1975 Ella T. Grasso becomes Governor of Co ...
Fatality in Cape to Rio on Bille 6 JANUARY 2014 Thirty-six yachts cast off from Cape Town at 12h00 on 4 January for the 3300nm Cape to Rio Race, with teams representing Angola, Australia, Croatia, Germany, Great Britain, India, Italy and South Africa. The race started in 10 knots of North West breeze and sunshine after a thick fog bank hovered over Table Bay for most of the morning. But, as predicted a South Atlantic low pressure system reached the fleet on the first night. With reports of 40 to 60 knts of wind and swells of 6 metres, many yachts experienced difficulties with the conditions but most are coming through the worst part. This report was posted at 20:00 SAST on 5 January 2014: BILLE (an Angolan registered Bavaria 54) reported earlier in the race that they mainsail problems and that they were proceeding back to Cape Town for repairs. At 15:00 a report was received that the yacht was dismasted and there were a number of serious injuries on board, including one fatality. MRCC have activated all t ...
Cape Town, South Africa, October 26, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — GREAT Britain     takes line honours in Race 3 of the 2013-14 edition of the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race from   Rio de Janeiro   to   Cape …
LONG WALK TO FREEDOM Chapter 13 AFRICANS could not vote, but that did not mean that we did not care who won elections. The white general election of 1948 matched the ruling United Party, led by General Smuts, then at the height of his international regard, against the revived National Party. While Smuts had enlisted South Africa on the side of the Allies in World War II, the National Party refused to support Great Britain and publicly sympathized with Nazi Germany. The National Party’s campaign centered around the swart gevaar (the black danger), and they fought the election on the twin slogans of Die kaffer op sy plek (The *** in his place) and Die koelies uit die land (The coolies out of the country) — coolies being the Afrikaner’s derogatory term for Indians. The Nationalists, led by Dr. Daniel Malan, a former minister of the Dutch Reform Church and a newspaper editor, were a party animated by bitterness — bitterness toward the English, who had treated them as inferiors for decades, and bitt .. ...
- Mahatma Gandhi - Revered the world over for his nonviolent philosophy of passive resistance, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was known to his many followers as Mahatma, or "the great-souled one." He began his activism as an Indian immigrant in South Africa in the early 1900s, and in the years following World War I became the leading figure in India's struggle to gain independence from Great Britain. Known for his ascetic lifestyle–he often dressed only in a loincloth and shawl–and devout Hindu faith, Gandhi was imprisoned several times during his pursuit of non-cooperation, and undertook a number of hunger strikes to protest the oppression of India's poorest classes, among other injustices. After Partition in 1947, he continued to work toward peace between Hindus and Muslims. Gandhi was shot to death in Delhi in January 1948 by a Hindu fundamentalist. * - Early Life - Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was born on October 2, 1869, at Porbandar, in the present-day Indian state of Gujarat. His father was the dewan ...
DEBUNKING THE CRITICISMS, DTC SERIES "Islam is inherently violent. Why is it that most terrorists are Muslims?". From my study of World Politics, I have come to the conclusion that: "He who controls the Media, controls the masses". Through the Media, the Night could be portrayed as the Day; the Black as the White; and the Victor as the Villain. In the 18th century, George Washington (1732-99) fought against Great Britain for America's Independence from British Rule. Through the lens of the then British Government, George Washington was indeed, a die-hard TERRORIST! In the 20th century, Nelson Mandela (1918-2013) fought against the Racist Apartheid Government of South Africa. Through the lens of the then Government of South Africa, Mandela was a dangerous TERRORIST! It was only on July 2nd, 2008 that the US Congress finally voted a law to remove Nelson Mandela from their Black-List. It wasn't because they realize how stupid the Black-List was, but because they wanted to mark Mandela's 90th Birthday. During ...
May 31st 1433 - Sigismund was crowned emperor of Rome. 1854 - The Kansas-Nebraska Act passed by the U.S. Congress. 1859 - The Philadelphia Athletics were formally organized to play the game of Town Ball. 1859 - In London, Big Ben went into operation. 1870 - E.J. DeSemdt patented asphalt. 1879 - New York's Madison Square Garden opened. 1880 - The first U.S. national bicycle society was formed in Newport, RI. It was known as the League of American Wheelman. 1884 - Dr. John Harvey Kellogg patented "flaked cereal." 1889 - In Johnstown, PA, more than 2,200 people died after the South Fork Dam collapsed. 1900 - U.S. troops arrived in Peking to help put down the Boxer Rebellion. 1902 - The Boer War ended between the Boers of South Africa and Great Britain with the Treaty of Vereeniging. 1907 - The first taxis arrived in New York City. They were the first in the United States. 1909 - The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) held its first conference. 1910 - The Union of South Africa ...
English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and is now the most widely used language in the world.[4] It is spoken as a first language by the majority populations of several sovereign states, including the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, Australia, Ireland, New Zealand and a number of Caribbean nations. It is the third-most-common native language in the world, after Mandarin Chinese and Spanish.[5] It is widely learned as a second language and is an official language of the European Union, many Commonwealth countries and the United Nations, as well as in many world organisations. English arose in the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of England and what is now southeast Scotland. Following the extensive influence of Great Britain and the United Kingdom from the 17th century to the mid-20th century, through the British Empire,[6][7][8][9] it has been widely propagated around the world, becoming the leading language of international discourse and the lingua franca in ma ...
Margaret Thatcher Was Less Worthy of U.S Respect Than Nelson Mandela? Victor Keith Four U.S. Presidents, current and former, will attend the funeral of Nelson Mandela. Upon his death, flags were ordered flown at half mast. Nelson Mandela, no matter what one's opinion of him, was indeed a historical figure who sacrificed much to end a morally evil system of government that denied rights to citizens based upon their race. He was of great service to the transformation of South Africa. Margaret Thatcher, on the other hand, was not only a historical figure in British history but she was also a tremendous ally of the United States during the Cold War. She stood side by side with the U.S. during a time when it was not domestically popular to do so. Both her economic and foreign polices helped to maintain Great Britain as a serious player in the world affairs. Upon the death of the Iron Lady, however, this administration did not bother to fly the flags at half mast. Not only did the president not attend her fun . ...
I have been observing with keen interest the adulation tributes by the Great Britain, the United States and some so-called African leaders both current and past ever since the demise of Nelson Mandela. Because the US and the UK succeeded in manipulating Mandela to allow their Imperial Capitalist and their Satellite Allies to flourish after post-apartheid South Africa, they want us to believe that Mandela was a saint and the greatest African ever lived. Yesterday, I read on one of the websites that our own President Kuffour, whose political tradition embraced apartheid, was quoted as saying that Mandela was a saint. Can you believe this? This is wonderful. That is a blatant lie, Mandela only won a political freedom for his people, today as we speak in South Africa, the white minority still controls all the resources in the country. The majority blacks are the poor mine workers and the tiller of the land. Where is the economic freedom for South Africans? No wonder all those who had radical views about the S ...
England under Common Law Jurisdictions.  and all other nations under this law. Common Law.   Common Laws is over which countries ? doe it cover. The Common Law constitutes the basis of the legal systems of: England and Wales and Northern Ireland in the UK, Ireland, the law of individual U.S. states (except Louisiana), federal law throughout Canada and the law of the individual provinces and territories (except Quebec), Australia (both federal and individual states), Kenya, New Zealand, South Africa, India, Myanmar, Malaysia, Bangladesh, Brunei, Pakistan, Singapore, Hong Kong, Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Bahamas, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica, St Vincent and the Granadines, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Trinidad and Tobago, and many other generally English-speaking countries or Commonwealth countries (except the UK's Scotland, which is bijuridicial, and Malta). Essentially, every country that was colonised at some time by England, Great Britain, or the United Kingdom uses Common Law except those that we ...
Great Britain has taken the Kinjarling Cup for the Southern Sleigh Ride from Cape Town South Africa to Albany, Australia in Race 4 Race of the Clipper Round the World. The Henri Lloyd came in second in this leg, but retains the lead in overall points. Well done all!
November 15, 1884 Colonization of Africa organized at international conference in Berlin, November 15, February 26. Major colonial holdings included: Great Britain desired a Cape-to-Cairo collection of colonies and almost succeeded though their control of Egypt, Sudan (Anglo-Egyptian Sudan), Uganda, Kenya (British East Africa), South Africa, and Zambia, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), and Botswana. The British also controlled Nigeria and Ghana (Gold Coast). France took much of western Africa, from Mauritania to Chad (French West Africa) and Gabon and the Republic of Congo (French Equatorial Africa). Belgium and King Leopold II controlled the Democratic Republic of Congo (Belgian Congo). Portugal took Mozambique in the east and Angola in the west. Italy's holdings were Somalia (Italian Somaliland) and a portion of Ethiopia. Germany took Namibia (German SouthWest Africa) and Tanzania (German East Africa). Spain claimed the smallest territory - Equatorial Guinea (Rio Muni).
the heart has its reasons. That reason itself just can't fathom"? ~ Sir Seretse and Ruth Khama Despite pressure from his own people and the governments of Great Britain and South Africa, Sir Seretse Khama refused to divorce his wife. Their marriage inspired the film "A Marriage of Inconvenience" starring Michael Duffield, Niamh Cusack, Raymond Johnson. "Trip down memory lane", by Margaret Bourke-White]
CURRENT AFFAIRS UPDATE. G20 Summit 2013 took Place in St. Petersburg, Russia. The G20 Leaders' Summit took place in St.Petersburg on 5-6 September 2013 presided by Russia. The G20 nations discussed ways to ensure economic growth and financial stability, create jobs and combat unemployment, stimulate investment and promote multilateral trade, international development and anti-corruption. The members of the Group of Twenty (G-20) are: Australia, Argentina, Brazil, Great Britain, Germany, European Union, India, Indonesia, Italy, Canada, China, Mexico, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, USA, Turkey, France, South Africa, Republic of Korea, and Japan. The presidency of the G20 rotates annually among its members. The G20 Leaders took notice of the final recommendations that the Business 20, Civil 20, Labour 20, Think 20 and Youth 20. To continue and expand dialogue, the G20 Leaders met with the representatives of business community and trade unions on the sidelines of the Summit. A number of round table discuss ...
Bigger than The Great Escape. The story of the first successful mass tunnel escape from a POW camp in First World War Germany. Situated in Lower Saxony, Germany, Holzminden swung open its barbed wire gates to welcome its first guests in September 1917. It was here that the transient population of officers and orderlies from Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, South Africa, India and Argentina found themselves at the mercy of the despotic Kommandant, Karl Niemeyer, who prided himself on his unblemished breakout record. Serial escapees who had attempted multiple escapes from other camps were sent here for containment. A group of intrepid officers hatched a daring breakout plan that was to become the blueprint for escape attempts in subsequent wars. Under the feet of their German captors, the officers dug a 55m long tunnel through concrete foundations, rock and packed earth with little more than ingenuity and kitchen cutlery. Nine months later, twenty-nine officers emerged from the exit hole in a ...
*Gandhi was a successful lawyer with a law office in South Africa. *Gandhi led a 200 mile Salt March so that the people of India could make and gather their own salt. His goal was for the people of India not to buy salt from the British. *Gandhi went on a 21 day fast to protest against the war between the Muslims and the Hindus and also to protest against Great Britain no allowing India to be free. *The greatest accomplishment of Gandhi was his life-long fight for the independence of India. His dream for his country's independence finally became reality on August 15, 1947. happy gandhiji jayanti.
The Biker Code The *** s Angels are the biggest outlaw motorcycle gang in the world, with chapters throughout the United States, Canada, Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Liechenstein, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and Brazil. Because of the wide range that the *** s Angels cover, once a prospect is allowed into the club, he must follow a certain regimental rules of code that every country follows. Members give an oath to obey their creed and code of conduct. The symbols are red and white colors, which stand for power and purity. Their dress code is a distinct one and is known world wide as belonging to the *** s Angels motorcycle gang. The jackets are worn for physical protection from the weather but they are also a symbol of communication. The jackets are usually covered with patches, drawings, and their national symbol, which describes the status of the members. Some members even show bodily ad .. ...
Today In History, September 21 • 1217 – Livonian Crusade: The Estonian leader Lembitu and Livonian leader Kaupo the Accursed are killed in the Battle of Matthew's Day. • 1784 - 'The Pennsylvania Packet and Daily Advertiser' is published for the first time in Philadelphia. It was the first daily paper in America. • 1860 – In the Second Opium War, an Anglo-French force defeats Chinese troops at the Battle of Palikao. • 1893 - Frank Duryea takes what is believed to be the first gasoline-powered automobile for a test drive. The 'horseless carriage' was designed by Frank and Charles Duryea. • 1896 - British forces under Horatio Kitchener take Dongola in the Sudan. • 1897 - The New York Sun runs its 'Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus' editorial. It was in response to a letter from eight-year-old Virginia O'Hanlon. • 1899 - Anglo-Boer War 2, South Africa: Hong Kong offers military assistance to Great Britain. 1900 – 1960 • 1904 – Namibia: A clash between resistance leader Jakob Mareng ...
Super Eagles BEST TEN OF ALL TIME Since Nigeria won its independence from Great Britain in 1960, the fledgling Super Eagles have gone from strength to strength. Nigeria waited until the '70s before clearly putting their footballing credentials on the map. Success at the international level quickly followed, and with their rise in to an African footballing powerhouse they have produced some of Africa's and the World's finest players. Appearances in three of the last four World Cups, and two wins in the Africa Cup of Nations and an Olympic gold, and silver medals to their credit the Super Eagles players have shown their abilities on some of the biggest footballing tournaments in the world, but who are the Super Eagles best ever players? No. 10: Mikel John Obi Mikel John Obi was only 15 when he made his debut for Plateau United in 2003, and representing Nigeria in the World Under-17 youth tournament in Finland. After the tournament he moved to South Africa to play for Ajax of Capetown, before representing Ni ...
Today In History, June 20 • 0451 - Roman and Barbarian warriors bring Attila's army to a halt at the Catalaunian Plains in eastern France. • 1397 - The Union of Kalmar unites Denmark, Sweden, and Norway under one monarch. • 1605 - Russia's Czar Theodore II is assassinated in a palace revolution. • 1756 - Scores of British prisoners (146, by British accounts) are shut in a cell that became known as the 'Black Hole of Calcutta', by the nawab of Bengal; only 21 escape suffocation during the night. • 1791 - King Louis XVI of France is captured while attempting to flee the country in the so-called Flight to Varennes. • 1793 - Eli Whitney applies for a cotton gin patent. The cotton gin initiated the American mass-production concept. • 1837 - Queen Victoria ascends to the British throne following the death of her uncle, King William IV. During her reign, Great Britain takes over new territories, also in South Africa, becoming the most powerful empire of the 19th century. She ruled for 63 years. * 1 ...
Ex: Jonathan Power Subject: Up and up in the developing world. Date: June 11th. 2013. Never in the history of mankind have the living conditions and prospects of so many people changed so dramatically and so fast. The birthplace of the Industrial Revolution, Great Britain, took 150 years to double its output. The US which industrialised later took 50 years. Both countries had a population of less than 10 million when they industrialised. Today China and India with populations over a billion each have doubled their output in less than 20 years- and many other developing countries have done as well. According to the UN's recent Human Development Report- which everyone should read on line- it is more exciting than most novels- reports that by 2050 Brazil, China and India will account for 40% of the world's output. The combined incomes of eight developing countries- Brazil, Argentina, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, South Africa and Turkey- already equals that of the USA. Their success is boosting the fortu ...
Update by Minister Naledi Pandor on the SA-UK VISA REGIME The matter of the visa regime between South Africa and the United Kingdom has received considerable public attention. This arises from the fact the current regime imposed on South Africa by the British authorities has an impact on the large traveller volumes between the two countries. Let me provide some background to this matter – in March 2008 Britain unilaterally imposed visa requirements on South Africans wishing to travel to Great Britain following the outcome of a Visa Waiver Test the British authorities had conducted on countries they deemed to be a high risk from an immigration point of view. Taking into account the concerns raised by the UK government in this regard, the South African government understanding was that the security issues raised by the British authorities related only to holders of ordinary South African passports. However, the British authorities extended the visa regime to holders of diplomatic and official passports. S ...
LAND REFORM IN ZIM Land reform in Zimbabwe officially began in 1979 with the signing of the Lancaster House Agreement, an effort to more equitably distribute land between the historically disenfranchised blacks and the minority-whites who ruled Zimbabwe from 1890 to 1979. The government's land distribution is perhaps the most crucial and most bitterly contested political issue surrounding Zimbabwe. It can be divided into two periods: from 1979 to 2000, where a principle of willing buyer, willing seller was applied with economic help from Great Britain and secondly, beginning in 2000, the fast-track land reform program. Mugabe's targets have included black political opponents as well as white farmers.[clarification needed][1] Background The white farming population, originating from Europe and South Africa first arrived in Southern Rhodesia in the 1890s.[2] In 1918, the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council in London ruled that the land of Southern Rhodesia was owned by the Crown and not by the British S ...
Prince Charles' biographical tribute to his mother, the Queen, is on PBS. Lots of old family movie footage. At her coronation it was interesting to hear the names of all the nations subject (still) to England, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Ceylon and Pakistan. Yes, Pakistan. In 1925, while her Father George was still King, one fifth of the peoples living on the planet were still subjects and one fourth of the real estate. The empire had been reduced significantly by the independence of India in 1948. It seems today that of all of the countries on Earth, only 22 have not been invaded by Great Britain at some time in the past (only Guatamala, Bolivia and Paraguay in the Western Hemisphere) or nine out of ten. Today, Elizabeth is head of 16 "realms" with 54 other territories in the "Commonwealth" several of which are in Africa. My point, the World is a very different World than it was in my Grandfather's childhood. It is not controlled by Britain any more. America and the old U.S.S. ...
A BRIEF HISTORICAL LOOK AT THE BIRTH AND EVOLUTION OF INNER WHEEL TOWARDS GLOBAL DIFFUSION Even before 1934, some Clubs were formed in other parts of the world, having heard about the Inner Wheel organisation in Great Britain & Ireland - such as Ballarat (1931), North Sydney (1933) and Bendigo (1933) in Australia - in the following years, more Inner Wheel Clubs formed, for example, the Napier Club (1936) in New Zealand, Port Elizabeth (1938) in South Africa, and Winnipeg (1943) in Canada. From 1945 Inner Wheel continued to expand globally, with the formation of at least 15 Clubs in remote places. Equally, Inner Wheel's penetration into Europe is extremely interesting. The first European Club outside of Great Britain and Ireland was formed at Bergen (Norway) in 1935, thanks once again to Margarette Golding; the second, after ten years, in 1946 at Apeeldom, Holland. The Association began to change from a national organisation to a worldwide organisation, and it was felt that a closer connection was necessar ...
In defence of Shaykh Ahmed Deedat (may Allaah have mercy on him) Praise be to Allaah. Firstly: Shaykh Ahmed Hoosen Deedat was born in Sirat in India in 1918 CE, and his father migrated to South Africa shortly after he was born. When he was nine years old his mother died and he joined his father in South Africa, where he lived for the rest of his life. In South Africa, Ahmed Deedat appeared in his first debate in 1977 CE, and later appeared in the Royal Albert Hall in Great Britain. He debated with some of the greatest Christian clerics such as Clark, Jimmy Swaggart, Anis Shuroush, and others. The Muslims benefited from that and affirmed their belief in Islam and the Qur’aan, and came to know the distortions and lies that exist in the distorted religions. Some Christians whom Allaah blessed with guidance also benefited from that. On Monday August 8, 2005 CE, the daa’iyah Shaykh Ahmed Deedat passed away and met his Lord at the age of 87, in his home in Verulam in KwaZulu Natal in South Africa, after a l ...
Via Captain Paul Watson Today is the 100th day since the Steve Irwin left Williamstown, Victoria to begin Operation Zero Tolerance. The crew have been 100 days at sea except for brief fuel stops in Pago Pago, American Samoa and Timaru, New Zealand. From Melbourne to American Samoa to New Zealand to the Ross Sea where the Japanese whaling fleet was found and then a 2200 mile chase westward. We are now directly South of India. This is an incredibly dedicated crew hailing from Australia, New Zealand, Canada, the USA, Hungary, Italy, Germany, South Africa, Great Britain, Spain, and India. The Steve Irwin is just one of the four ships deployed by Sea Shepherd for Operation Zero Tolerance. On Day 100 the Japanese whaling fleet is scattered. The Nisshin Maru and the Yushin Maru continue to run westward. The Yushin is tailing the Steve Irwin. The Yushin Maru is low on fuel and separated from the Nishin Maru by hundreds of miles. The Sam Simon is tailing the whaling fleet tanker Sun Laurel. The Bob Barker is witho ...
A fundamental change in the constitutional structures of the British Commonwealth (formerly the British Empire, and not to be confused with the Commonwealth of Australia) did occur, however, in the late 1920s. Under the British Royal and Parliamentary Titles Act 1927, which implemented a decision of an earlier Commonwealth conference, the unified Crown that had heretofore been the centre point of the Empire was replaced by multiple crowns worn by a shared monarch. Before 1927, King George V reigned as king in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, the Irish Free State, South Africa, etc., each of these states, in effect, as dominions, amounting to a subset of the United Kingdom. After 1927, he reigned as King of Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, South Africa, etc. The form of use in the royal title as issued by King George V[20] did not mention the dominions by name, except 'Ireland', which changed from being referred to as Great Britain and Ireland to Great Britain, Ireland, indicating that it was no longer part ...
Today In History • 1265 - England's Parliament meets for first time. • 1697 - Notorious pirate Captain William Kidd is reported off Cape Town, South Africa. • 1835 - Xhosa warriors overrun the Eastern Cape frontier in South Africa. • 1839 - Chile defeated a confederation of Peru and Bolivia in the Battle of Yungay. • 1841 - The island of Hong Kong was ceded to Great Britain. It returned to Chinese control in July 1997. • 1885 - The roller coaster was patented by LA Thompson. • 1904 - Herero Revolt: Repairs begin on the destroyed state railway line between Waldau and Karibib in then German South West Africa. • 1904 – Herero Revolt: Ovaherero living in Swakopmund, and prisoners captured in the first days of the war, are placed on the ship 'Eduard Bohlen', which is anchored off the coast of Swakopmund. Not knowing what to do with the prisoners, the authorities offer the male prisoners to the South African mines at the Witwatersrand, which gladly accept them as cheap labour. • 1921 - The n ...
Citizens of the following countries do not need visas when traveling to Brazil for tourism purposes for a period of up to 90 days: Andorra- Argentina - Austria - Bahamas - Barbados - Belgium - Bermuda -Bolivia - Bulgaria - Chile- Colombia - Costa Rica - Czech Republic - Denmark - Ecuador- Finland - France -Germany - Great Britain - Greece - Honduras - Hungary - Iceland -Ireland - Italy - Israel - Liechtenstein - Luxembourg - Malaysia - Malta - Monaco - Morocco - Namibia - Netherlands - New Zealand - Norway - Paraguay - Peru -Philippines - Poland - Portugal - San Marino - Slovenia - South Africa - South Korea - Spain - Surinam - Sweden - Switzerland - Thailand - Trinidad & Tobago - Tunis - Turkey - Uruguay - Vatican - Venezuela For more information contact the Brazilian consulate in your country. It is always good to look at the consulate if there was no change of rules for your country.
Today In History • 1652 - Jan van Riebeeck mentions seeing a comet at the Cape (South Africa). • 1777 - France recognised American independence. • 1791 - A traffic regulation in New York City established the first street to go 'One Way'. • 1830 - South American patriot Simon Bolivar died in Colombia. • 1890 - The railway line between Cape Town and Durban in South Africa is opened. • 1891 - Msiri, king of Garanganja (Katanga in the DR Congo), dies in battle. • 1895 - George L Brownell received a patent for his paper-twine machine. • 1903 - The first successful gasoline-powered airplane flight took place near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. Orville and Wilbur Wright made the flight. • 1914 - Great Britain declares Egypt a protectorate. • 1920 - South Africa receives the League of Nations mandate over then South West Africa (now Namibia). • 1939 - The German pocket battleship Graf Spee was scuttled by its crew, bringing the World War II Battle of the Rio de la Plata, off Uruguay, to an end. ...
While we work on our website, here is a short report about the convention of the World Federation of SPK in September: "The World Federation of the SPK held its convention in London, England during the weekend of September 22 and 23, 2012. Attending as delegates from Canada were Head Executive Board members President Andrzej Ruta and Treasurer Henryk Sokolowski. Next to Great Britain, Canada had the largest presence (3 votes - 2 present, 1 proxy). Clearly, despite the decline in membership over the years, Canada still has a strong Association. Delegates were also present from: Argentina, Denmark, France, South Africa, New Zealand, and Brazil. Scotland was also represented separately despite the fact that it is, for now, still a part of Great Britain. The single most important news item is that the World federation is not yet dissolving. Andrzej Ruta brought forward 3 motions, all of which were accepted by the delegates. The World Federation is to send letters to: 1) Queen Elizabeth, congratulating her on ...
Gaza a collection of cities and refugee camps is home to 1.5 million humans. This humans to the empire and Israel are all terrorist and suffer daily by sanctions, air raid, movement restrictions and bombing of it infrastructure (public building, schools, road, factories, hospitals, power plants, water purification plants and sewer just to name a few), systematic executions of its leaders and home demolition. This cruelty resembles apartheid camps of South Africa and is starting to look like the concentration camps of Western Europe during the rise of Fascism. The world is leaving them exposed to this inhuman treatment by its executers Israel and it powerful allies Great Britain and the United States. Collective punishment (is prohibitive by the United Nations) is never mentioned by the empire corporate media leaving these so called humans with no freedom of movement beyond the wall, built by Israel to keep the Palestinians in and badly needed supplies out. Their world consist of nothing but a struggl ...
Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church ..Founder St. Thomas the Apostle Independence Apostolic Era Recognition Oriental Orthodox Primate Baselios Mar Thoma Paulose II Headquarters Kottayam, Kerala, India Territory Universal Possessions United Arab Emirates, United States, Canada, Great Britain, Ireland, South Africa, Kuwait, Malaysia, New Zealand, Germany, Switzerland, Oman, Qatar, Bahrain, Singapore and Australia, Language Malayalam, English, Hindi, Konkani, Kannada, Syriac Adherents 3 million The Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church, also known as the Indian Orthodox Church, is an Autonomous Oriental Orthodox church centred in the Indian state of Kerala. It is one of the churches of India's Saint Thomas Christian community, which traces its origins to the evangelical activity of Thomas the Apostle in the 1st century. The church is locally headed by the autonomous Catholicos and its present primate is Baselios Mar Thoma Paulose II, Catholicos of the East and the Malankara Metropolitan. Historically, the Saint Thom ...
Michelle Obama Spent 42 Days on Vacation this Past Year by Keith Koffler on August 12, 2011, 11:05 am First Lady Michelle Obama over the last year has spent a total of 42 days on vacation, or a little more than one out of every nine days, according to a White House Dossier analysis of her travel. Her vacations, the cost of which are mostly borne by taxpayers, include trips to Panama City, Fla., Martha’s Vineyard, Hawaii, South Africa, Latin America, Vail, Colo., and her visit this week to her brother in Corvallis, Ore. The total does not include a nine day sojourn in Martha’s Vineyard that the Obamas will enjoy this month. Nor does it include a trip she made to Ireland and Great Britain in May, which I’m counting as official travel. The total vacation time would have been slightly higher had the Obamas gone as planned for an April weekend in Williamsburg, Va. The trip was cancelled due to an extended stalemate between President Obama and Congress over the budget. Mrs. Obama’s extensive vacation tr ...
Nelson Mandela is the treasure of South Africa, Winston Churchill the symbol of Great Britain, George Washinton the founding father of America, Abraham Lincoln the defender of the United States, Mwalimu Nyerere Mzee wa taifa of Tanzania and Lee Kuan Yew the creator of Singapore. Its not just politicians, Diego Armando Maradona is the No. 1 citizen of Argentina and Bob Marley is Jamaica. Over these 50 years of independence who has been the most influential Ugandan??
The Fastest Paralympians In History: Jonnie Peacock of Great Britain wins the gold medal, Richard Browne of the United States the silver and Arnu Fourie of South Africa the bronze, with Oscar Pistorius fourth in the T44 100m Finals
Wow. Great Britain's Jonnie Peacock wins the Men's 100m final (T44) in a paralympic record time of 10.90 seconds. American Richard Browne gets silver, Arnu Fourie of South Africa takes bronze and veteran Oscar Pistorious finishes fourth. Paralympic TV should be posting a replay soon for those who want to watch. Team SNS
Tune in this afternoon for one of the greatest sporting spectacles of the summer... At 5:24pm (our time), South African Oscar Pistorius will compete in the 100m final. The veteran "Blade Runner", who just led South Africa to relay gold in world record time, will take on teenaged world record holder Jonnie Peacock from Great Britain - along with the six other quickest amputees in the world. Can't wait! Team SNS
to all those against the boycott issue against RHCP and the respected smart move from Mashrou3 Leila: "... In the 1960s, the Anti-Apartheid Movements began to campaign for cultural boycotts of apartheid South Africa. Artists were requested not to present or let their works be hosted in South Africa. In 1963, 45 British writers put their signatures to an affirmation approving of the boycott, and, in 1964, American actor Marlon Brando called for a similar affirmation for films. In 1965, the Writers' Guild of Great Britain called for a proscription on the sending of films to South Africa. Over sixty American artists signed a statement against apartheid and against professional links with the state. The presentation of some South African plays in Britain and the United States was also vetoed. After the arrival of television in South Africa in 1975, the British Actors Union, Equity, boycotted the service, and no British programme concerning its associates could be sold to South Africa. Sporting and cultural bo ...
charlottemuchh: Oscar Pistorius, aka Blade Runner, from South Africa and Jonnie Peacock from Great Britain.
Day 14: India at London Olympics 2012 Yogeshwar Dutt goes down in prequarters of Men's 60kg freestyle wrestling, Basanta Bahadur Rana finishes 36th in men's 50km race walk, In Men's hockey, Indian team's ignominious run is complete with last place finish after losing 2-3 against South Africa. Gold Count(as of now): US-41, China-37, Great Britain-26
Congratulations team Pakistan for victory against South Africa in London Olympics 2012 - We badly need to win next match against Australia, it is do or die situation! Guys what are our odds - who should win Great Britain vs Australia and Spain vs Argentina today?
While the Olympics are carrying on, so is the Second Test at Headingley, against South Africa. England got thrashed in the First Test at the Oval, so we're looking to regain our reputation. But, why isn't cricket an Olympic sport? Why aren't we contending with the Springboks for gold medals? We wouldn't even have a problem getting together a Great Britain team, since the Welsh counties and Scotland play in English county cricket. Cricket is a national sport in nigh on a third of the world's population, far more than play bloody rounders, oh, sorry, baseball. So, IOC, how about it?
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Ndlovu, Matthew Brittain, John Smith and James Thompson secured South Africa's third gold medal after seeing off hot favourites Denmark, Australia and Great Britain on Thursday.
Great Gaffes!! Members of North Korea's women's Olympic soccer team walked off the field Wednesday when the flag of South Korea was mistakenly flashed on the big screen before their match against Colombia. North Korea regards its neighbor as a "puppet regime" of the West and the relationship between the two nations has become increasingly strained. 2012 Hockey: Apartheid song plays for South African players Last month, British field hockey authorities apologized to South Africa after an apartheid-era National Anthem played before an international game. The South African women's hockey team heard its pre-1994 anthem "Die Stem" play before a game against Great Britain. 2012 Amir of Kuwait International Shooting Grand Prix: "Borat" parody anthem plays A Kazakhstan sharpshooter Mariya Dmitrienko, who won gold at an international shooting championship, was stunned to hear a parody anthem from the movie "Borat" instead of her National Anthem. The lyrics blared: "Kazakhstan's prostitutes cleanest in the region, ...
The Troublesome Kabuga in Kenya Not long after it was up and running, the ICTR arrested several key suspects. This was to its credit and considered a huge success. Forty-five arrests were made in seventeen different countries and the cooperation of African states - eleven countries agreed to hand over ICTR suspects - was a significant factor. The 45 arrests took place in South Africa (1), Benin (2), Belgium (3), Burkina Faso (1), Cameroon (9), Côte d'Ivoire (2), Denmark (1), United States (1), France (2), Great Britain (1), Kenya (13), Mali (1), Namibia (1), Tanzania (1), Togo (2), Switzerland (1), Zambia (3). In July 1997, the biggest ever arrest operation took place in Kenya, netting nine suspects in total. The event was groundbreaking since Kenya had been an almost untouchable refuge for former Rwandan Hutu leaders between 1994 and 1997. These spectacular arrests also highlighted many important issues. Firstly, it was a clear demonstration that the Tribunal’s capacity to act and the cooperation of ...
Battlefield Tour with Ken Gillings this weekend, 8-10 June R1660 per person sharing - Are you joining us? EXPLORE THE ANGLO-Boer War BATTLEFIELDS On the 9th October 1899, the Zuid-Afrikaansche Republiek issued an ultimatum to Great Britain demanding the withdrawal of troops from its borders and that all troops en route to South Africa by sea should not land on its soil. Great Britain viewed this ultimatum with disbelief, dismay, disinterest and delight and chose to ignore it. Consequently, 48 hours later, the Anglo-Boer War broke out on the 11th October 1899. The first battle of the war was fought at Dundee on the 20th October 1899, followed the next day at Elandslaagte. The former was a pyrrhic victory for the British, whose commander in Dundee, Major General Sir William Penn Symons was mortally wounded while trying to encourage his troops. At Elandslaagte, the Boers suffered a crushing defeat at the hands of Colonel Ian Hamilton’s troops and their commander, General Jan Kock, was fatally wounded. Grad ...
All great men ever known in history- from Winston Churchill of Great Britain, Patrice Lumumba of Congo, to the legendary Madiba of South Africa, Martin Luther King Jr. of the United States, Cher of the Cuban Revolution- tend to share one common attribute: the unquenchable drive to tower above and overtake failure, man's deadliest enemy.
told ya pops no usa mens soccer this summer. Four countries have qualified teams to both the men's and the women's tournaments: Brazil, Great Britain (as hosts), Japan and New Zealand. In addition, Belarus, Egypt, Gabon, Honduras, Mexico, Morocco, Senegal, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, the United Arab Emirates and Uruguay qualified for the men's tournament, and Cameroon, Canada, Colombia, France, North Korea, South Africa, Sweden and the United States qualified for the women's tournament.
This is part of a press release (released) today about the cancer killer company called Cannabis Science that I have talked about several times. "The film premiered April 5, 2012 in Scottsdale, Arizona, followed by 3 showings per day. The first five showings were sold out, with the following ones close to sold out. Henry Miller states, "There were over 3,500 people who showed up for tickets throughout the day. We got 3 standing ovations for the very first showing. Every state that has legal medical marijuana is part of our formula to fight for federal justice and their acknowledgement of scientific reality. We touched every state. I'm getting calls from people all over the world asking how they can get the film. I haven't had one negative response. [Dr. Melamede] is a genuine, sincere person; a beautiful soul. We couldn't ask for a better doctor to be representing this." Miller has received calls from Japan, China, India, Russia, Great Britain, Germany, Australia, South Africa, France, and Canada. In addi ...
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