Revolutionary War & New York

The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), the American War of Independence, or simply the Revolutionary War in America, began as a war between the Kingdom of Great Britain and thirteen British colonies in North America, and ended in a global war between several European great powers, such as conflicts in India and West Africa between Great Britain and France. New York (locally ) is a state in the Northeastern region of the United States. New York is the 27th-most extensive, the 3rd-most populous, and the 7th-most densely populated of the 50 United States. 5.0/5

Revolutionary War New York United States George Washington New York City Continental Army New Jersey General George Washington Fort Ticonderoga Hudson River American Revolution American Revolutionary War Long Island Benedict Arnold President Abraham Lincoln

"Hey, Uncle Sam. What's your story? All of us boys and girls want to know...We all grew up, seeing you point your finger at us, dressed in your red, blue and white outfit and beckoning us to come join up." Uncle Sam pulled up a chair and said, "It was all an accident, so to speak. A 14 year-old kid by the name of Sam Wilson ran away from home, during the Revolutionary War, to join his father and older brother, in order, to fight the British. At 23, he started a meat packing business and developed a reputation for being honest and hard-working and producing a good product. During the War of 1812, Wilson was made inspector of meat for U. S. Army forces in New York and New Jersey and worked for a contractor named Elbert Anderson. All of the meat was shipped in barrels and a stamp stating EA - US was placed on each barrel to identify contractor and country. The Gov. of New York visited the meat plant one day and asked what the letters stood for and a quick thinking worker told him that the U S stood for 'Uncl ...
On This Day in History, March 29 ... On this day in 1776, General George Washington appoints Major General Israel Putnam commander of the troops in New York. In his new capacity, Putnam was expected to execute plans for the defense of New York City and its waterways. A veteran military man, Putnam had served as a lieutenant in the Connecticut militia during the French and Indian War, where he survived capture by Caughanawega Indians at Detroit and led regiments in the victories at Ticonderoga and Montreal. Connecticut elected Putnam to the colony's General Assembly in 1766 in the wake of the Stamp Act Crisis. He was also among the founders of the Sons of Liberty in Connecticut. At the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, Putnam received a commission as a general in the Continental Army under General George Washington. --- On this day in 1797, social critic Mary Wollstonecraft, one of the earliest and most eloquent proponents of women's rights, marries William Godwin, the most famous radical reformer of his ...
William Jay, son of the First Supreme Court Chief Justice, helped found New York City's Anti-Slavery Society in 1833. His son, John Jay, was manager of New York Young Men's Anti-Slavery Society in 1834. Supreme Court Justice Joseph Story helped establish the illegality of the slave trade in the 1844 Amistad case. Salmon P. Chase, appointed Chief Justice by Lincoln, defended so many escaped slaves in his career he was nicknamed "Attorney-General of Fugitive Slaves." Cassius Marcellus Clay, diplomat to Russia for Lincoln and Grant, founded the anti-slavery journal True American in 1845 and helped found the Republican Party in 1854. Rufus King, born MARCH 24, 1755, was one of the youngest signers of the U.S. Constitution, only 32 years old. A Harvard Graduate, Rufus King was an aide to General Sullivan during the Revolutionary War. Rufus King later served as U.S. Minister to England and was a Senator from New York. In a speech made before the Senate at the time Missouri was petitioning for statehood, Rufus K ...
March 17th: Feast of Saint Patrick. Erin Go Bragh! In 1762, New York's first St. Patrick's Day parade took place. In 1776, British forces evacuated Boston during the Revolutionary War. In 1861, Victor Emmanuel II was proclaimed the first king of a united Italy. In 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt first likened crusading journalists to a man with "the muckrake in his hand" in a speech to the Gridiron Club in Washington. In 1912, the Camp Fire Girls organization was incorporated in Washington, D.C., two years to the day after it was founded in Thetford, Vt. (The group is now known as Camp Fire USA.) In 1943, the Taoiseach of Ireland, Eamon de Valera, delivered a radio speech about "The Ireland That We Dreamed Of." In 1950, scientists at the University of California at Berkeley announced they had created a new radioactive element, "californium." In 1959, the Dalai Lama fled Tibet for India in the wake of a failed uprising by Tibetans against Chinese rule. In 1966, a U.S. midget submarine located a missing ...
Interesting Historical Information: Henry Knox’s Long Haul On this day in 1776, George Washington’s Patriot army was in the final stages of pulling off one of the biggest surprises of the Revolutionary War, thanks to a bookseller named Henry Knox. The opening phase of the war found the British in control of Boston. The Patriots had not been able to break the redcoats’ hold on the port, and George Washington was running out of time since the enlistment terms of many of his men would soon expire. Henry Knox, who had owned the London Book Store in Boston and read all he could on military subjects, especially artillery, made an unlikely suggestion. Three hundred miles away, at Fort Ticonderoga in New York, lay the answer to the Patriots’ problem: cannons. If the Patriots could somehow get the heavy artillery to Boston—an idea that made several officers shake their heads—they could drive the British out. With Washington’s blessing, Knox hurried to Ticonderoga; chose 59 big guns; loaded them onto ...
George Washington statue (1927–28), by Frederick Roth, Washington's Headquarters, Morristown. General George Washington made the Ford Mansion in Morristown, New Jersey his headquarters in during the terrible winter of 1779—80. This Statue sits across from the Mansion. This statue was done by FG Roth of Englewood, NJ, who was one of the great American sculptors of the 19th century. General George Washington and the Continental Army spent almost half the American Revolution in New Jersey. During two critical winters of the Revolutionary War, 1777 and 1779–80, the countryside in and around Morristown, New Jersey, sheltered the main encampments of the American Continental Army and served as the headquarters of its commander-in-chief, General George Washington. From 1775 to 1783, New Jersey was home to a series of decisive events in the war for independence. Strategically located between the Continental Congress in Philadelphia and the British Army in New York, and midway between the New England colonies ...
A Great Story About Title Insurance in Honor of Presidents' Day From Michelle Korsmo – Chief Executive Officer of the American Land Title Association (ALTA) I hope everyone had a great Presidents’ Day, or as it is legally known, Washington’s Birthday. We have come to regard the holiday as a celebration of all of our presidents and before we get into the goings-on at ALTA, please indulge me in this industry-relevant story about our thirteenth President, Millard Fillmore. President Fillmore was born January 7, 1800, in Cayuga Country, New York. Just a year before his birth, the future president’s father, Nathaniel, and uncle, Calvin, purchased a farm in Locke Township sight unseen. The land was part of the central New York military tract set aside for sale to soldiers who had fought in the Revolutionary War. Faulty surveys, fraud and ignorance left title to land in the military tract uncertain, prompting the state of New York to send a team of commissioners to review and settle all land titles in th ...
So you think this winter is bad... The Sloatsburg Historical Society Presents The Severe Winter of 1779-80 and the Revolutionary War in the Ramapo Pass Monday, February 24, 7 P.M. The Sloatsburg Library One Liberty Rock Road Sloatsburg, New York 10974 The Ramapo Pass extends north from Suffern to Orange County for 16 miles through the Ramapo Mountains. In 1778 George Washington wrote "That Pass is so exceedingly important that they [The British] must never be suffered to possess it." A year later, a Continental Army chaplain marching through the Pass wrote "Our march lasted six days and traversed a county almost unpeopled; it proved fatal to many of the soldiers, in consequence of the cold, the bad weather, the horrid roads…” Historian Richard Koke later noted that "after the loss of Forts Clinton and Montgomery... Camp Ramapough was the last holdout of the Highlands fortifications..." These and many more historic particulars about the Ramapo Pass will be presented by Harmony Hall Curator, Geoff Welch ...
For those history buffs, like myself, and for those that live in Cities in America named after the Ancient Roman Dictator, Military leader, and mostly farmer, Cincinnatus (519-430 BCE---early in the development and evolution of Rome), this post might interest you: Within his lifetime Cincinnatus became a legend to the Romans. Twice granted supreme power, he held onto it for not a day longer than absolutely necessary. The high esteem in which he was held by his compatriots is illustrated with an anecdote from the end of his life: one of his sons was tried for military incompetence. The great Capitolinus defended him by asking the jury who would go to tell the aged Cincinnatus the news in the event of a conviction. The son was acquitted because the jury could not bring itself to break the old man's heart.[citation needed] Legacy Named in his honor is the town of Cincinnato, in Lazio, Italy. In the United States he was honored with the name of the town of Cincinnatus, New York and the Society of the Cincinna ...
Feb 16, 1786: James Monroe marries Elizabeth Kortright On this day in history, future President James Monroe weds a 17-year-old New York beauty named Elizabeth Kortright. The 26-year-old Monroe, already a famous revolutionary and practicing lawyer, married not for money, but for love. Elizabeth's father, once a wealthy privateer, had lost most of his fortune during the Revolutionary War. The Monroes settled in Virginia and promptly started a family. Elizabeth gave birth to two daughters, Eliza and Marie. A son, James, died in infancy. Elizabeth and the girls followed Monroe to Paris when President George Washington appointed him ambassador to France in 1794. There, he and Elizabeth became enthusiastic Francophiles. Elizabeth, with her sophisticated social graces, adapted easily to European society. The French aristocracy referred to her as la belle americaine. The violent fallout of the French Revolution marred the Monroes' sojourn in France. Members of the aristocracy whom the Monroes befriended were inc ...
Did you know.On this day February 12th, in 1733, Georgia became the last and 13th colony. The Thirteen Colonies were: Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts Bay, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina & Virginia. Georgia was founded by James Oglethorpe who was a British General and part of parliament, and his plan for Georgia was agrarian equality. It would be an agricultural economy preserved by family farming. Since 1607 colonists from all around the world, and primarily Europe, have been flocking to the New World with dreams and aspirations. The difference between the New World and Europe was that in the New World a person could do anything, become anyone, and was not restricted to a strict hierarchy. Georgia is named after King George II and was the fourth state to ratify the U.S. constitution. Georgia didn’t play a key role in the Revolutionary War because of its recent formation and small military; however, it sided wi ...
At Washington’s Headquarters State Historic Site, it takes three days to celebrate General George Washington’s birthday! Celebrate the great man’s birth on Saturday, February 15th, Sunday, February 16th and Monday, February 17th, from 12:00 PM until 4:00 PM, at the historic Headquarters and Museum in Newburgh.While you’re at the site meeting General Washington, take part in some of the exciting and informative programs and presentations being offered. All of them are family-friendly and full of history! During all three days the General will be greeting visitors in his office, while balladeer Thad McGregor will be entertaining them. Crafts and demonstrations will be offered for all who would like to take part. Reenactors will be performing military drills and giving presentations each day, culminating with a review of the troops by the General. The troops that will be present: Saturday - Lamb’s Artillery, Sunday - the 5th Connecticut, Monday - the 5th New York. In addition, each day will have ad ...
From the branch of Matthew: Dr. Gideon Noble, son of Rev Gideon, was born in Willington, Conn 8/03/1763 and died in Glastonbury, Conn 7/1807. Early in the Revolutionary War, a company of soldiers was raised in Willington, to march to New York. Being destitute of a fifer, they persuaded Rev Noble to allow his son Gideon, then 13 yrs of age, to accompany them in that capacity. He was at that early age, a good musician, and many a time did the soldiers, with whom he was a universal favorite, carry him on their shoulders over difficult places, while he played "March Away." He was considered the mere child of the army. He and his wife had 6 daughters! I hope they had many, many bathrooms!
 The most famous African American in the food service industry in the colonial and Revolutionary War was Samuel “Black Sam” Fraunces, a West Indian who migrated to New York City in the 1750s.  In 1762, he purchased the DeLancy manision on the corner Broad and Pearl Streets for two thousand pounds.  He opened it as a tavern and inn and soon earned the reputation not only as the leading restaurateur of New York but also as having “the finest hostelry in Colonial America.”
The Mayflower Compact The "Mayflower Compact" was signed on 11 November 1620 onboard the Mayflower shortly after she came to anchor off Provincetown Harbor. The Pilgrims had obtained permission from English authorities to settle in Virginia, whose northern border at the time extended up to what is now New York. The Pilgrims had originally intended to settle near the mouth of the Hudson River, but due to dangerous shoals and a near shipwreck on their attempt to head south, they decided instead to plant themselves outside the bounds of the Virginia Company patent--which caused some "mutinous speeches" amongst some of the passengers. The Mayflower Compact was an attempt to establish a temporary, legally-binding form of self-government until such time as the Company could get formal permission from the Council of New England. This formal permission came in the form of the Pierce Patent of 1621. The original Mayflower Compact has been lost, perhaps falling victim to Revolutionary War looting. The text was ...
I guess they called him "MACK" The man that brought the McElhannon name to the US John McElhannon John McElhannon enlisted in the Revolutionary War, Pennsylvania Line, from York Co., PA, according to his application for service in the war. The young emigrant from Ireland must have been a strong supporter of the colonial cause during the American Revolution, because he joined the Continental Army. He said he served in the war three years and upward as a private under General Anthony Wayne. He participated in the Battle of Brooklyn, August 27, 177 at Long Island, New York. Was captured at Fort Washington, New York and was not released until the Battle of Princeton, after which he served under Captain Armstrong, Colonel Stewart and General Anthony Wayne in the Battles of White Plains, New York, Brandywine and Germantown, Pennsylvania. John McElhannon continued to serve two or three short terms in the militia, dates not recollected. He said he was scarcely ever called by his proper name by other soldiers, but ...
Little Giant Ladders
The Ellis Island Timeline 1630-1770 Ellis Island is no more than a lot of sand in the Hudson River, located just south of Manhattan. The Mohegan Indians who lived on the nearby shores call the island Kioshk, or Gull Island. In the 1630s, a Dutch man, Michael Paauw, acquires the island and renames it Oyster Island for the plentiful amounts of shellfish on its beaches. During the 1700s, it is known as Gibbet Island, for its gibbet, or gallows tree, used to hang men convicted of piracy. 1775-1865 Around the time of the Revolutionary War, the New York merchant Samuel Ellis purchases the island, and builds a tavern on it that caters to local fisherman. Ellis dies in 1794, and in 1808 New York State buys the island from his family for $10,000. The U.S. War Department pays the state for the right to use Ellis Island to build military fortifications and store ammunition, beginning during the War of 1812. Half a decade later, Ellis Island is used as a munitions arsenal for the Union army during the Civil War. Mean ...
Today in History: Today is Tuesday, Dec. 31, the 365th and final day of 2013. On Dec. 31, 1879, Thomas Edison first publicly demonstrated his electric incandescent light in Menlo Park, N.J. On this date: In 1775, during the Revolutionary War, the British repulsed an attack by Continental Army generals Richard Montgomery and Benedict Arnold at Quebec; Montgomery was killed. In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed an enabling act paving the way for Virginia's western counties to become the state of West Virginia, which took place in June 1863. In 1909, the Manhattan Bridge, spanning the East River between Manhattan and Brooklyn, was officially opened to vehicular traffic. In 1942, Frank Sinatra opened a singing engagement at New York's Paramount Theater. In 1946, President Harry S. Truman officially proclaimed the end of hostilities in World War II. In 1951, the Marshall Plan expired after distributing more than $12 billion in foreign aid. In 1969, Joseph A. Yablonski, an unsuccessful candidate for the pr ...
Who actually owns the Federal Reserve Central Banks? The ownership of the 12 Central banks, a very well kept secret, has been revealed: Rothschild Bank of London Warburg Bank of Hamburg Rothschild Bank of Berlin Lehman Brothers of New York Lazard Brothers of Paris Kuhn Loeb Bank of New York Israel Moses Seif Banks of Italy Goldman, Sachs of New York Warburg Bank of Amsterdam Chase Manhattan Bank of New York (Reference 14, P. 13, Reference 12, P. 152) These bankers are connected to London Banking Houses which ultimately control the FED. When England lost the Revolutionary War with America (our forefathers were fighting their own government), they (the Banksters) planned to control us by controlling our banking system, the printing of our money, and our debt. The individuals listed below owned banks which in turn owned shares in the FED. The banks listed below have significant control over the New York FED District, which controls the other 11 FED Districts. These banks also are partly foreign owned and con ...
Why, God? Part One by Charles R. Swindoll Psalm 94:19; Psalm 10:1 The date, September 11, 2001, is forever etched in our national memory. That morning stands as the never-to-be-forgotten hour when time stood still as we stared in horror and disbelief. With calculated and unconscionable malice, beastly terrorists stabbed our nation repeatedly in the heart—the World Trade Center in New York, at the Pentagon in Washington, and along a quiet countryside in southwest Pennsylvania. Thousands of unsuspecting civilians were brutally murdered. Our fellow Americans bled and died, some immediately, many slowly and painfully, all unexpectedly. Others bravely escaped with their lives bruised, broken, and burned. In my mind, there isn't a *** hot enough for the cowards who perpetrated these vicious and brutal crimes against innocent victims. May the pain of their everlasting punishment know no bounds and find no relief. And we cry out, "Why, God?" I have studied the Revolutionary War and, in depth, the War Between t ...
December 8th: Feast of the Immaculate Conception. In 1776, during the Revolutionary War, Gen. George Washington's retreating army crossed the Delaware River from New Jersey into Pennsylvania. In 1854, Pope Pius IX proclaimed the Catholic dogma of the Immaculate Conception, which holds that Mary, the mother of Jesus, was free of original sin from the moment of her own conception. In 1886, the American Federation of Labor was founded in Columbus, Ohio. In 1914, "Watch Your Step," the first musical revue to feature a score composed entirely by Irving Berlin, opened in New York. In 1941, the United States entered World War II as Congress declared war against Japan, a day after the attack on Pearl Harbor. In 1949, the Chinese Nationalist government moved from the Chinese mainland to Formosa as the Communists pressed their attacks. In 1961, a fire at Hartford Hospital in Connecticut resulted in 16 deaths. The Beach Boys' first single, "Surfin'," was released. In 1962, the first session of the Second Vatican Cou ...
Today is Monday, Nov. 25, the 329th day of 2013. There are 36 days left in the year On this date: In 1783, the British evacuated New York, their last military position in the United States during the Revolutionary War. In 1908, the first issue of The Christian Science Monitor was published. In 1940, the cartoon character Woody Woodpecker made his debut in the animated short "Knock Knock." In 1952, the play "The Mousetrap," a murder mystery by Agatha Christie, first opened in London's West End; it is the longest continuously running show in history. In 1957, President Dwight D. Eisenhower suffered a slight stroke. In 1973, Greek President George Papadopoulos was ousted in a bloodless military coup. In 1980, Sugar Ray Leonard regained the World Boxing Council welterweight championship when Roberto Duran abruptly quit in the eighth round at the Louisiana Superdome. In 1986, the Iran-Contra affair erupted as President Ronald Reagan and Attorney General Edwin Meese revealed that profits from secret arms sales ...
(Church History) Thomas Coke Landed with Secret Orders By: Dan Graves, MSL Thomas Coke was pleased. After a "very agreeable voyage" of almost seven weeks, he stood once again on firm soil. On this day, November 3, 1784 he landed in New York with secret orders from John Wesley that few Methodists even in England knew about. Just two months earlier, Wesley had secretly ordained Coke as superintendent of the Methodist Church in the American colonies with power to ordain other superintendents in the New World. For several years, Wesley had tried to persuade the Church of England to ordain Methodist bishops. His requests met with rejection. Events in America forced his hand. The Anglican church had virtually collapsed in Virginia after the Revolutionary War, and the Methodists, who received the sacraments from Church of England ministers, had nowhere to go. Searching Scripture and historical precedent, Wesley concluded that presbyters like himself had authority to ordain bishops. With the aid of Rev. James Cre ...
Sleepy Hollow TV Series (Pilot) Review: The classic story of the headless horseman and Ichabod Crane set in present day Sleepy Hollow, New York. Starring Tom Mison, Nicole Beharie, Orlando Jones, Katia Winter with John Cho and Clancy Brown. The episodes starts in 1781 with Ichabod Crane (Mison) fighting a Hessian Horseman in a battle during the Revolutionary War. Ichabod dies in battle after beheading the Hessian and then wakes up alive in a cave 232 years later in Present Day Sleepy Hollow. Then Lt. Mills (Beharie) and Sheriff Corbin (Brown) responding to a crime scene and find themselves confronted by the Hessian now undead headless horseman. After the Sheriff is beheaded and a wandering out of time Ichabod is arrested, Lt. Mills and her Police department enlist Ichabod's help or knowledge to apprehend the rampaging headless horseman. The specials effects with the limited TV budget is very effective, creating effective scenes with a minimum of CGI effects. The production design is also effective, creati ...
A Notable Minnesota Freemason... Pine, Oran Steadman -- Surgeon of the Minnesota Soldiers' Home, GAR Garfield post Commander-- 0. S. Pine as he usually writes his name-is a "Green Mountain Boy'' worthy of the lineage by his own personal experience and war service. He was born in the town of Underhill, Vt., 13 Oct 1845. His father , Joseph Pine, was still living in 1900, at the age of eighty years and was a farmer in moderate circumstances . The family dates from pre-revolutionary times. Joseph Pine's grandfather served: in the Revolutionary War under the noted Ethan Allen. His mother was sister to Judge Randall, of New York, the father of Alexander W. Randall, one-time governor of Wisconsin and· Postmaster General under President Johnson. Dr. 0. S. Pine's mother's maiden name was Perlina *** the daughter of Rev. Orange *** a Free Will Baptist minister of the Vermont conference. She died in 1894, after more ·than fifty years of married life, having had five children, three sons and two daugh ...
On September 21, 1780, General Benedict Arnold betrayed his country when he gave the British information that could allow them to capture the American fort at West Point on the Hudson River in New York. At the time, Americans regarded Arnold as a hero for his bravery in the Revolutionary War. He had fought with daring skill at Fort Ticonderoga, Quebec, Valcour Island, and Saratoga. But he grew resentful at promotions other officers received, and he hungered for money to support the lifestyle he enjoyed with his young wife, the beautiful young Peggy Shippen. Arnold began exchanging secret messages with the enemy, offering betrayal in exchange for money and high rank in the British Army. On the night of September 21, he sealed the traitorous deal when he met with Major John André, aide to the commander of all British forces in North America, and handed him detailed information on West Point, which Arnold commanded. Arnold returned to the fort while André, disguised in civilian’s clothes, made his way to ...
Sleepy Hollow: A Revolutionary War hero wakes up in modern day New York, where he's paired with a female cop. *
A Toronto-area woman unwittingly purchased six Revolutionary War-era documents at a upstate New York estate sale for $3 about a year ago -- only to learn the state of New Jersey has long been looking for them.
Uh, you mean Liberty City? There is no such thing as New York City, and the revolutionary war was hundreds of years ago.
They Risked All. [American Almanac, July 4th]. July 4th; They Risked All. On July 4, 1776, delegates to the Continental Congress in Philadelphia voted to adopt the Declaration of Independence. The men who issued that famous document realized they were signing their own death warrants, since the British would consider them traitors. Many suffered hardship during the Revolutionary War. William Floyd of New York saw the British use his home [on Locust Lane, Mastic Beach, Long Island] for a barracks. His family fled to Connecticut, where they lived as refugees. After the war Floyd found his fields stripped and house damaged. The house was repaired, and then in the 1950's was converted to a duplex. The old plaster and lath were all removed, and all new modern electric system and heating were installed, and totally insulated. The house sits on the east side of the street, front faces west. At the end of 1957, the two lane Camp Upton Road from the Camp Upton Research facility in Upton, to the south shore at the ...
Benedict Arnold (1741-1801) was an Early American hero of the Revolutionary War (1775-83) who later became one of the most infamous traitors in U.S. history after he switched sides and fought for the British. At the outbreak of the war, Arnold participated in the capture of the British garrison of Fort Ticonderoga in 1775. In 1776, he hindered a British invasion of New York at the Battle of Lake Champlain. The following year, he played a crucial role in bringing about the surrender of British General John Burgoyne's (1722-92) army at Saratoga. Yet Arnold never received the recognition he thought he deserved. In 1779, he entered into secret negotiations with the British, agreeing to turn over the U.S. post at West Point in return for money and a command in the British Army. The plot was discovered, but Arnold escaped to British lines. His name has since become synonymous with the word “traitor.”
Wayne County, founded in 1798, was named for General Anthony Wayne, a hero of the Revolutionary War. Railroads and canals have played a part in the county's development as well as the development of New York and Philadelphia. Even as early Wayne County settlers cleared thick forests for homesteads and farms, cities to the east were encountering a shortage of wood and fuel. Coal deposits over the mountains to the west in nearby Lackawanna County would relieve the shortage if an economical method of transporting the coal to market could be found. The solution seemed to be a combination of canal and railroad. In 1823, the Erie Canal in New York was nearing completion. New York State gave its blessing to the construction of the Delaware and Hudson Canal on a 108-mile waterway to run between Honesdale and the Hudson River terminus near Kingston, New York. Work began in July 1825 and was completed in 1828. Meanwhile, a Gravity rail system had been invented by Josiah White, founder of the Lehigh Coal and Navigat ...
Here is a little coffee fact that will make you feel a bit smarter...In the mid-1600's, coffee was brought to New Amsterdam, a location later called New York by the British. Though coffee houses rapidly began to appear, tea continued to be the favored drink in the New World until 1773 when the colonists revolted against a heavy tax on tea imposed by King George. The revolt, known as the Boston Tea Party, would forever change the American drinking preference to coffee. When coffee reached North America during the Colonial period, it was initially not as successful as it had been in Europe. During the Revolutionary War, however, the demand for coffee increased so much that dealers had to hoard their scarce supplies and raise prices dramatically; this was also due to the reduced availability of tea from British merchants. After the War of 1812, during which Britain temporarily cut off access to tea imports, the Americans' taste for coffee grew,and high demand during the American Civil War together with advan ...
From "American Minute" for May 28th: He left Yale for four years to fight in the Revolutionary War. After graduation, he became a lawyer and taught school in New York. Dissatisfied with the children's spelling books, he wrote the famous Blue-Backed Speller, which sold over one hundred million copies. After twenty-six years of work, he published the first American Dictionary of the English Language. His name was Noah Webster, and he died MAY 28, 1843. In his 1788 essay, "On the Education of Youth in America," printed in Webster's American Magazine, Noah Webster wrote: "Select passages of Scripture...may be read in schools, to great advantage. In some countries the common people are not permitted to read the Bible at all. In ours, it is as common as a newspaper and in schools is read with nearly the same degree of respect." Noah Webster continued: "My wish is not to see the Bible excluded from schools but to see it used as a system of religion and morality." In his History of the United States, 1832, Noah . ...
Thomas Whaley came to California in 1849 during the Gold Rush. He left New York City, the place of his birth, on January 1, 1849, on the Sutton and arrived 204 days later in San Francisco. He set up a store with George Wardle on Montgomery Street where he sold hardware and woodwork from his family's New York business, Whaley & Pye, and offered mining equipment and utensils on consignment. This young entrepreneur, born on October 5, 1823, came from a Scots-Irish family, which immigrated to Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1722. His great-grandfather, Alexander Whaley, a gunsmith, participated in the Boston Tea Party and the Revolutionary War where he provided flintlock muskets for soldiers and the use of his house on Long Island by General George Washington. Thomas' father, Thomas Whaley, carried on the family gunsmith business, and served in the New York Militia during the War of 1812. He married Rachel Pye, whose father, William, manufactured locks in Brooklyn.      Whaley's business acumen, acquired in par ...
SELFLESS 'As the Lord lives, whatever the LORD says to me, that I well speak." I Kings 22:14 FREEDOM'S COST Nathan Hale (1755-1776) was a schoolteacher when the Revolutionary War broke out in April 1775 at Concord and Lexington. Nathan's friend witnessed the siege of Boston and wrote a letter in which he said: "Was I in your condition...I think the more extensive service would be my choice. Our holy religion, the honor of our God, a glorious country, and happy constitution is what we have to defend." Soon after receiving the letter, Hale joined his 5 brothers in the fight for independence against the British and quickly rose to the rank of captain. Hale fought under General George Washington in New York, as British General William Howe began a military buildup on Long Island. Washington took his army onto Manhattan Island. At the battle of Harlem Heights, Washington asked for a volunteer to go on a spy mission behind enemy lines. Hale stepped forward and was sent out on his mission. For a week he gath ...
Astor became the richest man in the United States, inheriting roughly $18 million in 1848. Like his father, Astor invested in New York City real estate. Because of his vast holdings, he earned him the nickname the ??Landlord of New York.?? Astor married Margaret Armstrong, the daughter of a Revolutionary War general, in 1818. The couple had six children: Emily, John Jacob, Laura, Mary, William Backhouse, Jr., Henry, and Sarah. He died on November 24, 1875.
Black History at Yale University: Cortlandt Van Resselaer Creed (Med 1857). Creed is the first African American to be awarded ANY degree by Yale. He received an M.D. from the Yale School of Medicine. Cortlandt Van Rensselaer Creed was born in April of 1833. Named for Cortlandt Van Rensselaer, a Yale alumnus and the son of a wealthy New York family, the young Creed graduated from the New Haven Lancasterian School, a forerunner of James Hillhouse High School. Creed’s mother, Vashti Duplex, was New Haven’s first African American schoolteacher and the daughter of Prince Duplex, a Revolutionary War soldier who gained freedom from slavery upon service to the Continental Army. The alumnus’ father, John William Creed, possibly a native of Santa Cruz, West Indies, was a Yale College janitor and a successful caterer for Yale for over 20 years. At the age of twenty-one Cortlandt Creed applied and was accepted to the Medical Department of Yale College in 1854. After receiving his medical degree in 1857, Creed d ...
HONORING THE FATHER’S PHYSICAL DEGREE DAY “The Father” Allah was born Clarence Smith on Friday, February 22, 1928 in Danville, Virginia. He was the fifth son of Louis and Mary Smith. His mother nicked named him “Put” and was later affectionately known as “Puddin.” As a teen his family relocated to Harlem, New York. In 1946 he met Willeen Jowers and grew to love her very much. Young Clarence and Willeen had two sons together: A-Allah and B-Allah, born in 1949 and 1951 respectively. Later he married another woman named Dora. He and Dora also had two children named Clarence and Christine. In 1950, Clarence joined the U.S. Army and went to fight in the Korean War. He served as a Private First Class between October 1952 and October 1954. During his tour of duty he earned various prestigious awards: Bronze Service Star, Korean Service Medal, Presidential Unit Citation, and a United Nations Service Medal. While he was away in the military, his wife Dora was attracted to the teachings of the H ...
I have recently read a great book about the German Paltines in New York and their suffering during the Revolutionary War. The book Drums Along the Mohawk is based on the lives and quotes many original documents, and letters in the book. For the Beckers and the Joys this is a good book to read as we are descended from the German Palatines who married into the Beckers in New York. One of my favorite parts of the book though is a prayer that is given by one of the ministers which is as follows. O Almighty God, we are right now thinking of Mary Marte Wollaber. She is just 15 years old, but she is going with one of the soldiers at Fort Dayton. He is a Massachusetts man, O God, and it has come to my attention that he is married in the town of Hingham (the town of Thomas Joy and from which our Joy ancestors came) I have had her father and mother talk to her, I have talked to her myself, but she won't pay attention. We ask thy help, God Almighty, in bringing her back to the path of virtue, from which, we belie .. ...
On April 30, 1789, George Washington, standing on the balcony of Federal Hall on Wall Street in New York, took his oath of office as the first President of the United States. "As the first of every thing, in our situation will serve to establish a Precedent," he wrote James Madison, "it is devoutly…
Genealogy is interesting: Nathan Baxter was born in 1742, in Hebron, Tolland County, Connecticut. He married Mindwell Holdridge in 1761. In 1763 Nathan was arrested for counterfeiting ten pieces of pewter and copper. Because he had a wife, two small children and no property, Nathan couldn’t pay the fine and was indebted to his brother, Simon, for two years. He enlisted in the Revolutionary War in 1775 and was in the Lexington Alarm. He was at West Point when Benedict Arnold turned traitor. His son, Nathan, Jr. finished out his service for him. After the war, Nathan moved to Wardsborough, Windham County, Vermont. He later purchased an island in the St. Lawrence River. Nathan ended up selling his island to one of his sons and lived the remainder of his life in Norfolk, St. Lawrence County, New York where he died in 1833.
(cousin of Theodore Dwight), a Senator from New York and a Vice President of the United States; born in Newark, N.J., February 6, 1756; graduated from the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) in 1772; studied theology but soon abandoned it for the law; during the Revolutionary War entere...
notes that 200 years ago today, former U.S. Sen. John Armstrong of New York began serving as President James Madison's Secretary of War. Armstrong's career illustrates the importance of vetting such high-level appointments carefully. During the Revolutionary War, Armstrong was one of the ringleaders of the "Newburgh Conspiracy" against the Continental Congress. He was such a polarizing choice for what would now be called Secretary of Defense in 1813 that senators of his own political faction refused to confirm his nomination, and he barely squeaked through. He proved to possess poor judgment, typified by his belief that British forces would never threaten the nation's capital. After they burned the White House, President Madison finally demanded his resignation. The Senate should always take its "advise and consent" power seriously.
EDITORIAL: What happens if they try to take our guns? 2/04/13 | by David LaPell 116 122 Over the course of the last month or so since the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, the fight for gun rights has been unlike anything I’ve seen in my lifetime and perhaps the most dynamic since the Revolutionary War (and even then our own elected officials were not trying to suppress gun ownership). So, what do we do if these bans on semi-automatic weapons come to fruition? What does that even look like? A halt to production like during the 1994 AWB? Registration? Confiscation? What happens to gun owners and our country if they try to take our guns? Shoot local Here in New York, the feeling that all of these things mentioned above could become a reality is palpable. Governor Andrew Cuomo’s now infamous “No one needs ten bullets to kill a deer” speech set the tone and, after shelling out thirty pieces of silver, he got enough “pro-gun” politicians to cave in and pass what is now the strictest gun c . ...
I read a total running nerd book last summer called Indian Running, by Peter Nabokov.  It's an old book from 1980 and was part of Nabokov's doctoral dissertation (he is an anthropology prof at UCLA).   Nabokov documents the history and tradition of distance running among Native American tribes throughout North America.  Early American settlers, war generals, and native people recount stories of "messengers" within most Native American tribes, whose only tribal role was to deliver messages as fast as possible.     Native runners often took vows of celibacy and honesty and would abstain from certain foods so that they could devote their entire life to running fast and far.  They were elevated to the level of a "foreign diplomat" - almost as important as the chief.  They were honest, noble, and FAST.   One account from a Revolutionary War commander recounts the story of how he hired an Iroquois runner to deliver a message to a fort 60 miles away through the wooded, rocky hills of New York State.  Th ...
Last week we told you about the airplane museum that learned a plane on exhibit for 60 years was still filled with volatile fuel that could explode. The fuel was removed safely. Last Friday, Jan. 11, 2013, workers in New York's Central Park found that a Revolutionary War cannon owned by the park was still loaded with gunpowder and a cannonball. The New York bomb squad was called. Squad members tilted the barrel of the cannon, and the cannonball rolled out. Then they removed over a pound of gunpowder. It could have exploded. As we said last week, be careful with any antiques that could hold gunpowder or other explosives. They can explode if moved carelessly.
  Region free multi-languages   Description:   From Revelations to Revolution   Building on the rich storyline established in previous games in the series, this new entry into the Assassin's Creed saga is the most expansive and ambitious offering yet, bringing tantalising new revelations on the ongoing war between the Assassins Brotherhood and the Knights Templar.   Set in 18th century Colonial America during the time of the Revolutionary War, Assassin's Creed 3 introduces gamers to a new protagonist in the form of Connor Kenway, a half-English, half-Native American man, who becomes unwittingly drawn into the conflict after his home is attacked by colonists.   Featuring a variety of significant historical figures from the period, such as George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, General Lafayette and King George III, as well as brilliantly realised recreations of 18th century cities including Boston and New York, Assassin's Creed 3 continues the series' tradition of bringi ...
Today's Origin of "Old Sayings Explained": "Yankee Doodle": Meaning: A popular song of patriot troops during the Revolutionary War. Origin: Legend has it that during the French and Indian War, the shabbily dressed troops of Colonel Thomas Fitch of Norfolk, Connecticut inspired a British Army surgeon with musical talents, a Dr. Sheckburgh (or Shackburg) to write the derisive song “Yankee Doodle.” The story is recounted in the Federal Writer's Project Connecticut (1938): “According to local tradition, Elizabeth Fitch, on leaving the house to bid goodbye to her brother (Colonel Fitch) was dismayed by the ill-sorted costumes of the 'cavalry.' Exclaiming, “You must have uniforms of some kind,” she ran into the chicken yard, and returned with a handful of feathers announcing, “Soldiers should wear plumes,” and directed each soldier to put a feather in his cap. When Sheckburgh saw Fitch's men arriving at Fort Crailo, Rensselaer, New York, he is reputed to have exclaimed, “Now stab my vitals, they ...
Captain SILAS WHEELER Born March 17, 1752 in Concord, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. Parents were JONAS WHEELER and PERSIS BROOKS. Married SARAH GARDNER. She was born November 23, 1760; and died in 1827. Died November 25, 1828 in Wheeler, Steuben County, New York. CHILDREN 1. RUTH WHEELER (twin), born about 1782. Married NATHAN ROSE. 2. SARAH WHEELER (twin), born during the Revolutionary War. Married WILLIAM HOLMES. 3. GRATTAN HENRY WHEELER, born August 25, 1783 in South Kensington, Washington County, Rhode Island; died March 11, 1852 in Wheeler, Steuben County, New York. Married FRANCES BAKER. Married ELIZA AULLS in 1814. from HISTORICAL GAZETEER OF Steuben County NEW YORK by Millard F. Roberts, 1891 Page 569 WHEELER is an interior town lying northeast of the centre of the county, and is bounded north by Prattsburgh, east by Urbana, south by Bath and west by Avoca. It was formed from Bath and Prattsburgh, February 25, 1820, and was named in honor of Capt. Silas Wheeler. A part of Avoca was taken off in ...
On this day ~ January 1 1781 - Lord Cornwallis surrendered to General George Washington at Yorktown, Virginia, marking the end of the Revolutionary War. 1797 - Albany became the capital of New York State, replacing New York City. 1808 - The United States Congress officially prohibited the African slave trade, though the decree was much ignored. 1863 - President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring that slaves in rebellious states were free. 1892 - Ellis Island Immigrant Station in New York formally opened. 1898 - Manhattan, the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island were consolidated into New York City. 1994 - The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) went into effect. 1999 - The euro, the new single currency of 11 European countries, officially came into existence.
Fraunces Tavern, New York. George Washington hung out here before battle and now, I am too. Except the whole revolutionary war part..
The Town of Cortlandt Commnity Profile The Town of Cortlandt, New York is located in the northwestern corner of Westchester County. The Town is bounded on the west by the Hudson River, the north by Putnam County, the east by the Town of Yorktown and on the south by the Towns of New Castle and Ossining. Cortlandt includes two incorporated villages, Croton-on-Hudson and Buchanan and several hamlets including Montrose, Crugers and Verplanck. The Hudson River, the New York City Watershed Lands, numerous wooded hills and steep slopes, wetland areas and streams define the rural character of the Town. Hendrick Hudson discovered the Hudson River in 1609, sailing his ship the Half Moon north anchoring at Verplanck’s Point. Cortlandt derived its name from the Van Cortlandt family who began purchasing land in 1677 from the Croton River north to Anthony’s Nose and east to Connecticut. Cortlandt was the site of many skirmishes during the Revolutionary War. Local Roads, such as Watch Hill, Gallows Hill and Furnace ...
America's Santa It's been said that Dutch settlers brought the tradition of Saint Nicholas to the North American city of New Amsterdam (which the British would later rename "New York"). However, research shows there's little evidence that Nicholas played much of a part in these early settlers' celebrations. It seems more likely that Saint Nicholas became an American tradition during a wave of interest in Dutch customs following the Revolutionary War. Washington Irving (of Sleepy Hollow fame) included him in "A History of New York City" written in 1809. John Pintard, founder of the New York Historical Society, took an especially keen interest in the legend and the Society hosted its first St. Nicholas anniversary dinner in 1810. Artist Alexander Anderson was commissioned to draw an image of the Saint for the dinner. He was still shown as a religious figure, but now he was also clearly depositing gifts in children's stockings which were hung by the fireplace to dry. Perhaps nothing has fixed the image of Sa ...
Welsh: Located in the SW corner of Montgomery County on Highway 70 between Glenwood and Hot Springs. White Plains see Buckville White Town: Between Oden and Pencil Bluff, nearly in Pencil Bluff. There use to be a general store here. Montgomery - There are eighteen Montgomery Counties in the USA. In keeping with the tradition of naming townships after military and political leaders Montgomery County, Arkansas was named in honor of a Revolutionary War (1775-1783) hero, General Richard Montgomery (1738-1775). Born in Swords, County Dublin, Ireland. The 2nd New York marched with General Montgomery's army on the successful drive through the Champlaign Valley to Fort Saint John. There they laid siege to that British outpost which surrendered after two months of steady rains, floods, and sickness. In November, Montgomery pushed the army forward with the promise of provisions and quarters. Montreal fell with little resistance and they arrived with 300 troops to join Colonel Benedict Arnold's forces from Maine ...
On December 4, 1783, President George Washington, then commanding general of the Continental Army, summoned his military officers to Fraunces Tavern in New York City to inform them that he will be resigning his commission and returning to civilian life. Washington had led the army through six long years of war against the British before the American forces finally prevailed at the Battle of Yorktown in 1781. There, Washington received the formal surrender of British General Lord Cornwallis, effectively ending the Revolutionary War, although it took almost two more years to conclude a peace treaty and slightly longer for all British troops to leave New York. Although Washington had often during the war privately lamented the sorry state of his largely undisciplined and unhealthy troops and the ineffectiveness of most of his officer corps, he expressed genuine appreciation for his brotherhood of soldiers on this day in 1783. Observers of the intimate scene at Fraunces Tavern described Washington as "suffuse ...
Some 100 Revolutionary War reenactors marched through Fort Lee in full uniform on Saturday to mark the 236th anniversary of General George Washington's retreat from British forces in New York.
I am drying the tears from my eyes after watching NBC's TODAY show during which Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Janet Napolitano, swore in 30 New York immigrants as citizens of our United States. They came here from far and wide and there was even one from China! Secretary Janet Napolitano had them swear the Oath which was first officially recorded Oaths of Allegiance made on May 30, 1778 at Valley Forge, during the Revolutionary War. The current oath is as follows: "I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I will bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform noncombatant service in the Ar . ...
Why should we stand fast with Irael? Well besides the fact that we gave our word; At a crucial turning point in America’s history, the courage and generosity of one man—a Jewish man—changed the course of history and ensured the success of the Revolutionary War…and yet it’s a story that has almost totally been forgotten. His name was Haym Solomon, and when I read his story, I knew you needed to hear it, too. Born to a European Jewish family, Solomon came to America around 1772, just three years before the Revolutionary War began. He established a successful brokerage business in New York, enjoying for the first time in his life freedom from persecution because of his race and ancestry. When the war began, even though most of his clients were loyal to the British crown and it meant he might lose his business, Haym Solomon loved his adopted homeland and dedicated his resources to helping the Revolution succeed. He joined the Sons of Liberty and became an active part of the fight for independence. B ...
All of you in New Jersey this is for you! Save money today! With a rich American History, including over 100 Revolutionary War conflicts, the Garden State deserves all the respect it can get. That’s why we work with New Jersey-based power and transmission companies to deliver electricity and gas services just the way our Customers like – with the highest standards of service in the industry. Because in New Jersey, that’s just how it’s got to be. Ambit Energy Customers receive their New Jersey electric and gas services from these transmission and distribution companies: PSEG provides electricity and gas to the six largest cities in New Jersey Jersey Central Power and Light (JCP&L) is the main provider of electricity in northwestern and eastern New Jersey Atlantic City Electric is the supplier of electricity for southern New Jersey Rockland Electric provides electricity to northeastern New Jersey along the New York border South Jersey Gas provides gas to seven counties in southern New Jersey New Jer ...
On 19 October 1781, British General Charles Cornwallis surrendered his army of some 8,000 men to General George Washington at Yorktown, giving up any chance of winning the Revolutionary War. Cornwallis had marched his army into the Virginia port town earlier that summer expecting to meet British ships sent from New York. The ships never arrived. Note, General Charles O'Hara carried Cornwallis' sword to the American and French commanders.
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Today is Wednesday, October 17, 2012 and today in American Revolutionary War History: 1777 - British General John Burgoyne surrendered his army of 5,000 men to Horatio Gates at Saratoga, New York. This was the first large-scale surrender of British forces in the Revolutionary War. 1781 - George Washington accepted British General Charles Cornwallis's surrender at Yorktown, VA. This event effectively ended America's War for Independence. Revolutionary War Quotes: "I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty, or give me death." -- Patrick Henry
In America the first newspaper appeared in Boston in 1690, entitled Publick Occurrences. Published without authority, it was immediately suppressed, its publisher arrested, and all copies were destroyed. Indeed, it remained forgotten until 1845 when the only known surviving example was discovered in the British Library. The first successful newspaper was the Boston News-Letter, begun by postmaster John Campbell in 1704. Although it was heavily subsidized by the colonial government the experiment was a near-failure, with very limited circulation. Two more papers made their appearance in the 1720's, in Philadelphia and New York, and the Fourth Estate slowly became established on the new continent. By the eve of the Revolutionary War, some two dozen papers were issued at all the colonies, although Massachusetts, New York, and Pennsylvania would remain the centers of American printing for many years. Articles in colonial papers, brilliantly conceived by revolutionary propagandists, were a major force that inf ...
235 years ago today, September 19, 1777, The battle of Saratoga County, New York began in the American Revolutionary War. Over 300 casualties on the American side and at least 1000 casualties for the British were incurred in what would become an ultimate American victory. Freedom is never free! Someone gave their all for you! Never forget that. © Dale Golden
A 9/11 thought. In America, there aren't many dates that live on in infamy. 9/11 (New York). 4/19 (Oklahoma City). 12/7 (Perl Harbor). 8/24 (Washington DC). When we've had it bad, we've had it real bad. But in general we actually do live in extreme security, and it's not until Perl Harbor or the Twin Towers happen that we really get a strong sense of just how good we do have it. It's a comparison of the worst compared to how good we generally do have it. And this isn't a "Americans are so posh they don't know how to sacrifice" kind of thing, but exactly the opposite. It's through vigilance and confidence, dedication and honor that we live in a world where the front pages have to cover petty crimes and politics due to lack of anything more to print. So on 9/11, while I do remember those who died in the terror attack, I reflect more upon the fact that 9/11 is a strange blip on a timeline of security stretching back almost to the Revolutionary War. Between the police forces at the local, state, and ...
This Day in History: General George Washington plans for a British attack, correctly asserting that they will seize New York, which they do and will hold until the end of the Revolutionary War, 1776; Isaac Singer gets a patent for his invention of a machine that helps millions of women do a tedious chore, 1851; IBM's MS- DOS operating system goes into what is considered the first mass-market personal computer, 1981; fossil hunter Susan Hendrickson discoveres three huge bones sticking out of a hillside near Faith, South Dakota which turn out to be the largest and most complete Tyrannosaurus Rex ever found in the entire world, 1990
What is the history of boycotts? The term originated in Ireland in 1780 when English estate manager Charles Cunningham Boycott was "boycotted" by famine-threatened Irish farmers for refusing to lower rents. Since then, boycotts have become an important part of American History, used to protest everything from government involvement in industries to unfair labor practices. Following the Stamp Act in 1765, American colonists in Boston, Philadelphia, and New York began a boycott of British goods that lasted through the Revolutionary War. A boycott strategy was adopted by trade unions during the labor movement of the late 1800s. German goods were boycotted by the American Jewish community in the 1930s and 1940s, and the Montgomery, Alabama bus boycott organized by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in the 1950s became a defining moment of the Civil Rights Movement. The United Farm Workers boycott of table grapes, begun by Cesar Chavez in the 1960s, and the recent boycott of Nestle over the marketing of infant formul ...
The original Purple Heart, designated as the Badge of Military Merit, was established by George Washington – then the commander-in-chief of the Continental Army – by order from his Newburgh, New York headquarters on August 7, 1782. The Badge of Military Merit was only awarded to three Revolutionary War soldiers and from then on as its legend grew, so did its appearance. Although never abolished, the award of the badge was not proposed again officially until after World War I.[3]
Have you ever wondered what happened to the fifty-six men who signed the Declaration of Independence? This is the price they paid: Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured before they died. Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned. Two lost their sons in the revolutionary army, another ha d two sons captured. Nine of the fifty-six fought and died from wounds or hardships resulting from the Revolutionary War. These men signed, and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor! All we had to do was just hold it together just hold onto what they gave us.. Thats all we had to do! DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. What kind of men were they? Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists. Eleven were merchants. Nine were farmers and large plantation owners. All were men of means, well educated. But they signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the penalty could be death if they were captured. Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw hi ...
George Washington was not the first president. He was actually the 8th. Read this to understand. I've known this for years and I've finally found a source in which I can use to tell who was the first president of the United States and to explain why the country believes George Washington was. The new country was actually formed on March 1, 1781 with the adoption of The Articles of Confederation. This document was actually proposed on June 11, 1776, but not agreed upon by Congress until November 15, 1777. Maryland refused to sign this document until Virginia and New York ceded their western lands (Maryland was afraid that these states would gain too much power in the new government from such large amounts of land). Once the signing took place in 1781, a President was needed to run the country. John Hanson was chosen unanimously by Congress (which included George Washington). In fact, all the other potential candidates refused to run against him, as he was a major player in the Revolution and an extremely i ...
The U.N. Small Arms Treaty By admin ~ July 6th, 2012 @ 13:52 By Aaron Cantor USAF (ret) On 27 July all of the bottom feeders from around the world will gather in New York to sign the Small Arms Treaty with the full support of Barak Obama and Hillary Clinton. These two snakes are going to try to tie the 2nd Amendment in a knot by way of an illegal treaty. Let me remind everyone, that if it is not authorized in the constitution, it is nothing more than a usurpation (not law) and is to be treated as such, in other words, it is not worth the paper it is written on, and the message to all of the scum that inhabits the U.N., is you WILL NOT dictate to the American people what we may or may not do in our own land. 236 years ago we took on what at that time was the most powerful nation in the world, with the finest army in the field, and small bands of farmers, storekeepers and frontiersmen kicked them in the rear and sent them packing, and the United States of America was born, so if you mutts want to take us on ...
The Mohawk were a tribe of Native Americans found in upstate New York. At least one of their members, Connor Kenway, joined the Assassin Order.[1] During the American Revolutionary War, the Mohawk sided with the British, and helped fight the Americans. After the war, most of the tribe migrated up into Canada.
Today we were able to tour the Pocono International Raceway in the official pacecar and then set off following Sullivan's March (mixed feelings about that phase of the Revolutionary War...) through northern Pennsylvania, stopping to swim in Bowman's Creek before following the West Branch of the Susquehanna river up to New York. Beautiful Scenery!
A Short History of the Adirondack Park I found in the APA site. History of the Adirondack Park Exploiting the Wilderness The first harvesting of the Adirondack forests began shortly after the English replaced the Dutch as the landlords of New Netherlands and changed its name to New York. Logging operations generated wealth, opened up land for farming, and removed the cover that provided a haven for Indians. After the Revolutionary War, the Crown lands passed to the people of New York State. Needing money to discharge war debts, the new government sold nearly all the original public acreage - some 7 million acres - for pennies an acre. Lumbermen were welcomed to the interior, with few restraints: "You have no conception of the quantity of lumber that is taken every winter... A great deal of land is bought of government solely for the pine on it, and after that is cut down, it is allowed to revert back to the State to pay its taxes." -- Joel T. Headley, The Adirondack: or Life in the Woods, 1849 This destru ...
The Heartbreak of Aaron Burr: Though he was a hero of the Revolutionary War, a prominent New York politician, an...
Did you know? On this date in 1775, Black patriots helped capture Fort Ticonderoga. Blacks participated in one of the first aggressive actions of American forces in the prelude to the Revolutionary War. Ethan Allen, the Green Mountain Boys, and numerous Black patriots captured Fort Ticonderoga. This incident took the British in New York by surprise and defeated them.
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1758: Birthdate of James Monroe, leader of the American Revolution and fifth President of the United States. During the Revolutionary War, Monroe was one of the many patriots who accepted “loans” from Haym Salomon, a Spanish and Portuguese Jew who immigrated to New York from Poland. This money enabled Monroe and the others to live in Philadelphia and carry on the war against the English.
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