President George Washington & Potomac River

George Washington ( – , 1799) was the first President of the United States of America, serving from 1789 to 1797, and the dominant military and political leader of the United States from 1775 to 1799. He led the American victory over Great Britain in the American Revolutionary War as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army from 1775 to 1783, and presided over the writing of the Constitution in 1787. Washington became the first president by unanimous choice, and oversaw the creation of a strong, well-financed national government that maintained neutrality in the wars raging in Europe, suppressed rebellion and won acceptance among Americans of all types. The Potomac River flows into the Chesapeake Bay, located along the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States. 5.0/5

President George Washington Potomac River United States New York White House National Mall New York City Benjamin Banneker United States Constitution Congress House Ronald Reagan Capitoline Hill Saddam Hussein New Zealand Stanley Cup President Richard Nixon Former White House

On This Day: Thursday March 27, 2014 This is the 86th day of the year, with 279 days remaining in 2014. Holidays Feast day of St. Rupert, St. Athilda, and St. John of Egypt. Myanmar/Burma: Army Day / Resistance Day. Luxembourg: Osweiler. Events 1512 - Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de Leon sighted Florida. 1703 - Czar Peter the Great founded the city of St. Petersburg. 1794 - President George Washington and Congress authorized creation of the U.S. Navy. 1860 - The corkscrew was patented by M. L. Byrn of New York. 1884 - The first long-distance telephone call was made, between Boston and New York City. 1899 - Guglielmo Marconi sent the first radio signals, across the English Channel. 1912 - The wife of President William Howard Taft planted cherry trees on the bank of the Potomac River, in an event celebrating a gift by the Japanese government of 3,020 cherry trees to the U.S. government. 1917 - The Seattle Metropolitans became the first U.S. team to win the Stanley Cup as they defeated the Montreal Canadiens. ...
Pierre (Peter) Charles L'Enfant was given the task of creating the city plan for the new capital city.[6] L'Enfant chose Jenkins Hill as the site for the Capitol building, with a grand boulevard connecting it with the President's House, and a public space stretching westward to the Potomac River.[7] In reviewing L'Enfant's plan, Thomas Jefferson insisted the legislative building be called the "Capitol" rather than "Congress House". The word "Capitol" comes from Latin and is associated with the Roman temple to Jupiter Optimus Maximus on Capitoline Hill.[8] In addition to coming up with a city plan, L'Enfant had been tasked with designing the Capitol and President's House, however he was dismissed in February 1792 over disagreements with President George Washington and the commissioners, and there were no plans at that point for the Capitol
Boundary Stones of the District of Columbia Recent News August 11, 2013: DC Diamond Hikers walked the diamond. May 25, 2012: WAMU covered ASCE's restoration project in its "Borders And Boundaries" story. Greater Greater Washington detailed the lack of government oversight of the stones. Nov. 15, 2011: Stephen Powers was named NACABOSTCO co-chairman. Oct. 22, 2011: Restoration project led by ASCE's Stephen Powers covered by Mt. Vernon Estate, Greater Greater Washington, and the NW Current. Oct. 07, 2011: WETA's "More Unusual Attractions" featured the stones at 22:41-24:30. Early History The Residence Act of July 16, 1790, as amended March 3, 1791, authorized President George Washington to select a 100-square-mile site for the national capital on the Potomac River between Alexandria, Virginia, and Williamsport, Maryland. President Washington selected the southernmost location within these limits, so that the capital would include all of present-day Old Town Alexandria, then one of the four busiest ports in ...
HISTORY OF WASHINGTON, D.C. The history of Washington, D.C. is tied to its role as the capital of the United States. Originally inhabited by an Algonquian-speaking people known as the Nacotchtank, the site of the District of Columbia along the Potomac River was first selected by President George Washington. The city came under attack during the War of 1812 in an episode known as the Burning of Washington. Upon the government's return to the capital, it had to manage reconstruction of numerous public buildings, including the White House and United States Capitol. The McMillan Plan of 1901 helped restore and beautify the downtown core area, including establishing the National Mall, along with numerous monuments and museums. Unique among cities with a high percentage of African Americans, Washington has had a significant black population since the city's creation. As a result, Washington became both a center of African American culture and a center of civil rights movement. Since the city government was run ...
Nov 3, 1964: D.C. residents cast first presidential votes On this day in 1964, residents of the District of Columbia cast their ballots in a presidential election for the first time. The passage of the 23rd Amendment in 1961 gave citizens of the nation's capital the right to vote for a commander in chief and vice president. They went on to help Democrat Lyndon Johnson defeat Republican Barry Goldwater in 1964, the next presidential election. Between 1776 and 1800, New York and then Philadelphia served as the temporary center of government for the newly formed United States. The capital's location was a source of much controversy and debate, especially for Southern politicians, who didn't want it located too far north. In 1790, Congress passed a law allowing President George Washington to choose the permanent site. As a compromise, he selected a tract of undeveloped swampland on the Potomac River, between Maryland and Virginia, and began to refer to it as Federal City. The commissioners overseeing the deve ...
Members of the sophomore class at Mt. Vernon, the residence of President George Washington, located on the banks of the Potomac River.
September 9, 1791 , the first U.S. President in honor of the new nation's capital called Washington, D.C. lies midway along the eastern seaboard of the United States, about 90 miles inland from the Atlantic Ocean, south of Maryland, north of Virginia and 233 miles south of New York City. Situated on the northern bank of the Potomac River, its size is approximately 68 square miles, carved out of land donated by the state of Maryland. Divided into four quadrants: Northwest, Southwest, Northeast, Southeast. The U.S. Capitol building marks the center where the quadrants meet. It was founded in 1791 and named after President George Washington. "Columbia" in "District of Columbia" refers to Christopher Columbus. Washington, the District of Columbia is not a state, nor is it part of any state. It is a unique "federal district" created specifically to be the seat of government. The actual population in D.C. is approximately 553,500, but if you include the entire Metro area, the population is around 5.8 million. T ...
Shabbat shalom from Rabbi Genende and CHC There are probably few cities that exude the sense of empire like Washington DC. With its classical buildings and sculptures, its grand road (the National Mall), its magnificent monuments and centres of influence (the White House and the US Capitol) radiating off the main wide avenues, it makes a definite statement of power and history. It’s hard not to be awed by this elegantly designed city, boarded by the Potomac River, conceived by President George Washington in 1791 and planned by Major L’Enfant, a French artist, engineer and friend of Washington. The city was built to impress and it does with its enforced height restrictions, landscaped parks, wide streets, open spaces, vistas and impressive structures. Being in Washington in the early summer was a special delight and being there for a Jewish-Muslim mission was a rare and unusual pleasure. I was part of a delegation of Muslim and Jewish leaders from Australia, New Zealand and South Africa invited by the ...
Celebration For two hundred years, the White House has stood as a symbol of the Presidency, the United States government, and the American people. Its history, and the history of the nation’s capital, began when President George Washington signed an Act of Congress in December of 1790 declaring that the federal government would reside in a district "not exceeding ten miles square…on the river Potomac." President Washington, together with city planner Pierre L’Enfant, chose the site for the new residence, which is now 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. As preparations began for the new Federal City, a competition was held to find a builder of the "President’s House." Nine proposals were submitted, and Irish-born architect James Hoban won a gold medal for his practical and handsome design. Construction began when the first cornerstone was laid in October of 1792. Although President Washington oversaw the construction of the house, he never lived in it. It was not until 1800, when the White House was nearly c ...
The District of Columbia was founded, and made the capital of the US July 16, 1790. In 1783 Congress decided to create a new capital apart from any state, and in 1787 the framers of the Constitution provided for a capital district. The U.S. capital was originally Philadelphia. Washington D.C. became the new capital on July 16, 1790. Several different cities served as the national capital until the late 1700s. Congress then wished the nation's capital to be permanent. Disagreements rose as to which state it would be a part of. In 1790, Alexander Hamilton proposed a solution that established the new permanent capital on federal land rather than in a state. President George Washington was asked to pick the site. Both Maryland and Virginia gave up land along the Potomac River that became the District of Columbia, established in 1791. DC history actually began in 1790 when the United States Constitution was adopted on September 15, 1787, Article 1, Section 8, Clause 17, included language authorizing the establ ...
December 1, 1790: Shepherdstown considered for nation's capital If early western Virginia leaders had had their way after the Revolutionary War, the national capital would now be located in the vicinity of the Jefferson County community of Shepherdstown. That may seem hard to believe, but Jim Surkamp, who's researched eastern panhandle history, says Shepherdstown had a legitimate shot at becoming the nation's seat of government. Surkamp: They were an early front runner. They made the most substantial offer in land and money of any of the sites that were submitting for the nation's capital. The Virginia General Assembly approved the idea and made its position clear to President George Washington, who was to make the final decision. Washington's only stipulation governing his choice of sites was that the capital be located along the Potomac River. On December 1, 1790, two prominent Shepherdstown residents, Henry Bedinger and William Good, wrote to Washington supporting Shepherdstown's bid. There was a great ...
Today is Sunday, Jan. 13, the 13th day of 2013. There are 352 days left in the year. Today's Highlight in History: On Jan. 13, 2012, the Italian luxury liner Costa Concordia ran aground off the Tuscan island of Giglio and flipped onto its side; 32 people were killed. (Ship's captain Francesco Schettino (frahn-CHEHS'-koh skeh-TEE'-noh) faces possible trial on charges of manslaughter and abandoning ship before evacuation was complete.) On this date: In 1733, James Oglethorpe and some 120 English colonists arrived at Charleston, S.C., while en route to settle in present-day Georgia. In 1794, President George Washington approved a measure adding two stars and two stripes to the American flag, following the admission of Vermont and Kentucky to the Union. (The number of stripes was later reduced to the original 13.) In 1864, composer Stephen Foster died in a New York hospital at age 37. (In his pocket: a note which read, "Dear friends and gentle hearts.") In 1898, Emile Zola's famous defense of Capt. Alfred Dre ...
It was on this day in history(1790),that the young American Congress declared that a swampy, humid, muddy and mosquito-infested site on the Potomac River between Maryland and Virginia will be the nation's permanent capital. "Washington," was named after the leader of the American Revolution and the country's first president George Washington.
July 16th, Our Lady of Mount Carmel 1782 – Mozart's opera Die Entführung aus dem Serail made its premiere, after which Emperor Joseph II anecdotally made the complaint that it had "too many notes". 1790 – U.S. President George Washington signed the Residence Act, selecting a new permanent site along the Potomac River for the capital of the United States, which later became Washington, D.C. 1951 – The Catcher in the Rye, an American coming-of-age novel by J. D. Salinger, was first published. 1957 Marine Maj. John Glenn set a transcontinental speed record when he flew a jet from California to New York in 3 hours, 23 minutes and 8 seconds. 1969 Apollo 11 blasted off from Cape Kennedy on the first manned mission to the moon. 1973 Former White House aide Alexander P. Butterfield publicly revealed the existence of President Richard Nixon's secret taping system during the Senate Watergate hearings. 1979 Saddam Hussein became president of Iraq. 1980 Ronald Reagan won the Republican presidential nomination ...
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