Northwestern University & African American

Northwestern University is a private research university in Evanston and Chicago, Illinois, USA. Northwestern has 12 undergraduate, graduate, and professional schools offering 124 undergraduate degrees and 145 graduate and professional degrees. African Americans (also referred to as Black Americans or Afro-Americans, and formerly as American Negroes) are citizens or residents of the United States who have at least partial ancestry from any of the native populations of Sub-Saharan Africa. 5.0/5

Northwestern University African American United States Fisk University Spelman College Bates College African Americans City Council Tuskegee Airmen Annie Lee Business Administration Civil Air Patrol Chicago City Council United States Air Force American University Georgetown University

Rex Ingram was not only one of our great black actors, he was also the first African American man to graduate from Northwestern University medical school. He was discovered on the street by the director of “Tarzan of the Apes” in 1918 and appeared in small in a number of films soon after. His break-through role came in 1940 when he appeared as a genie in the lamp in the British film, “The Thief of Baghdad.” From that point, his illustrious career included appearances on the stage, film and television.
Famed artist, humanitarian and our Notable Soror, Annie Lee has died. Soror Annie Lee has established herself internationally not only as an artist, but a respected and business savvy entrepreneur. Her noted ability to convey feelings through the faceless subjects of her paintings has won her a place in history as one of the icons of African American art. Born in Gadsden, Alabama in 1935 and raised in Chicago, Annie grew up learning how to cook, wash, clean and sew. These survival skills, which she learned along with her brother, instilled in her a work ethic that has served her well. In addition to sewing, Annie learned to knit, crochet and draw. She began painting at age ten in elementary school, where she won her first art contest and received a free semester of study at the Art Institute of Chicago. She continued honing her artistic skills resulting in a four-year scholarship to Northwestern University. However, she chose marriage and raising a family over attending school. Soror Lee did not resume pa ...
Willa Beatrice Brown was an American aviator and educator. Willa Beatrice Chappell Brown—The first African American woman to earn her pilot’s certification on U.S. soil. Willa Brown Chappell was born in Glasgow, Kentucky and was a 1927 graduate of the Indiana State Teachers College with a degree in education. Born: January 22, 1906, Glasgow, KY Died: July 18, 1992 Education: Northwestern University The famous Bessie Coleman, actually received her pilot’s license in France in 1921, because no U.S. pilots’ program would accept her. Sexism and racism was rampant, unfortunately.
BLACK HISTORY FACT: Dr. Daniel H. Williams Born: Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania 1856 Invention: Performed First Open Heart Surgery Dr. Daniel Hale Williams was an African American physician who made history by performing the first successful open heart surgery operation. Daniel Hale Williams was born in 1856 in Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania, the fifth of eight children. His father was a barber who died when Daniel was only nine. His mother was unable to provide for all the children on her own, so she moved the family to Baltimore, Maryland to stay with relatives. An apprenticeship with a shoemaker was found for Daniel; he remained there as a shoemaker's apprentice for three years while he was still a young child. As a teenager, he learned to cut hair and became a barber, living and working with a family who owned a barber shop in Janesville, Wisconsin. In Janesville Daniel began to attend high school. He graduated from Hare's Classical Academy in 1877. While working as a barber, he met Dr. Henry Palmer, a lea ...
Joseph J. Dennis (c. April 11, 1905 in Gainesville, Florida – 1977) was an American mathematician and served as the chairman of the Clark College mathematics department from 1930 to 1974. He earned his Ph.D. at Northwestern University in 1944. His thesis was "Some Points in the Theory of Positive Definite J-Fractions" (related to continued fractions) co-authored with H.S. Wall. He was the eleventh African American to earn a PhD.
Johnnetta Betsch Cole is an American academic. Cole was the first African American female president of Spelman College from 1987-1997. She was president of Bennett College from 2002-2007. She is currently serving as director of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African Art. Cole is the grand daughter of Florida's first black millionaire Abraham Lincoln Lewis and Mary Kingsley Sammis, the great granddaughter of Zephaniah Kingsley, a slave trader and slave owner, and his wife and former slave Anna Madgigine Jai, originally from current Senegal, whose Fort George Island home is protected as Kingsley Plantation. Cole enrolled in Fisk University at age 15, but transferred to Oberlin College, where she completed a B.A. in anthropology in 1957. She attended graduate school at Northwestern University, earning her masters (1959) and Ph.D. (1967) in anthropology. Cole received honorary degrees from Williams College and Bates College in 1989, Mount Holyoke College in 1998, Mills College in 1999, How ...
On this date in1905, Rev. William Holmes Borders was born. He was an African American minister and activist and writer. Born in Macon, Georgia he was the son of to Leila Birdsong and the Reverend James Buchanan Borders who pastured the Swift Creek Baptist Church. After graduating from high school, Borders left home for Atlanta, where he attended Morehouse College. Despite running out of money after only two years, a number of professors invited him to continue taking classes, and college president John Hope allowed the young man to graduate on the condition that he later repay the school. Borders attended Garrett Theological Seminary at Northwestern University on scholarship. There, he was exposed to the social gospel, which greatly influenced his commitment to social justice. He continued his courtship of Julia Pate, a graduate of Spelman College who was then attending the University of Chicago. The two were married in 1931 and later had two children, William Holmes Jr. and Juel Pate. He completed his b ...
"If You Don't Know - Now You Know!" Today, July 12th, we celebrate the life of Denise Nicholas (Donna Denise Nicholas; July 12, 1944); an African American actress and social activist who was involved in the American Civil Rights Movement. She is known primarily for her role as high school guidance counselor Liz McIntyre on the ABC comedy-drama series Room 222, and for her role as Councilwoman Harriet DeLong on the NBC/CBS drama series In the Heat of the Night. Nicholas was born in Detroit, Michigan, the daughter of Louise Carolyn and Otto Nicholas. She spent her early years in Detroit. With the remarriage of her mother to Robert Burgen, she then moved to Milan, Michigan, a small town south of Ann Arbor. At the age of 16 she appeared on the August 25, 1960 cover of Jet Magazine as a future school teacher prospect at the National High School Institute at Northwestern University. She graduated from Milan High School in 1961. Nicholas is the middle child of three, an older brother, Otto, and a younger sister, ...
Lloyd Augustus Hall (June 20, 1894 - Jan 2, 1971) African American chemist who contributed to the science of food preservation. By the end of his career, Hall had amassed 59 United States patents, and a number of his inventions were also patented in other countries. He was born in Elgin, Illinois on June 20, 1894. Hall's grandmother came to Illinois via the "Underground Railroad" at the age of sixteen. His grandfather came to Chicago in 1837 and was one of the founders of the Quinn Chapel A.M.E. Church. He later became the church's first pastor in 1841. Hall’s parents, Augustus and Isabel, were both high school graduates.Although Lloyd was born in Elgin, he moved to Aurora, Illinois. and was raised there by his parents. He later graduated in 1912 from East Side High School in Aurora. After graduating school he went on to study pharmaceutical chemistry at Northwestern University, earning a B.S. there and his master's at the University of Chicago. It was at Northwestern that Hall met Carroll L. Griffith, ...
New research shows half of people falsely convicted of serious crimes in the United States in recent decades are African American. An archive assembled by law school researchers at the University of Michigan and Northwestern University reveals more than 2,000 people who were falsely convicted of ser...
An Educational Success Story of African American Male Students in Chicago Filed in Enrollments, Underserved Youth on April 20, 2012 A 2006 report from the University of Chicago found that only one in 40 African American male students graduated from the city’s public high schools in the traditional four-year period. But the academic poor performance of the city’s youth is not universal. Urban Prep Academies is an organization that operates a network of public charter high schools in Chicago serving African-American men. This is the third year in a row that all graduating seniors have been accepted into four-year colleges. Many of the students plan to attend a historically Black college or university. Other schools where students have been accepted include Northwestern University, Bates College, Georgetown University, the University of Virginia, and the American University of Paris. Students at the schools are immersed in a challenging college preparatory curriculum and must abide by strict rules and a ...
Date: Mon, 1886-04-26 *William Levi Dawson was born on this date in 1886 in Albany, Georgia. He was the first African American to chair a regular House of Representatives committee. William Levi Dawson became one of Chicago's most influential politicians, serving as an elected representative and a political power broker in that city. In this way, he parallels the rising significance of African Americans in Democratic politics of the twentieth century. Three years after he graduated magna *** laude from Fisk University in Tennessee (1912), Dawson moved to Chicago to study law at Northwestern University; once finished, he entered into local politics. In 1942, after serving as alderman on the Chicago City Council, Dawson successfully ran for Congress, holding his seat until retiring in 1970. William Dawson spoke out about the poll tax and was credited with defeating the Winstead Amendment, which would have allowed military personnel to choose whether or not they would serve in integrated units. In 1949, Daws ...
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