North Korea & Washington Post

North Korea , officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK; Chosŏn'gŭl: ), is a country in East Asia, occupying the northern half of the Korean Peninsula. The Washington Post is the most widely circulated newspaper published in Washington, D.C., and oldest extant in the area, founded in 1877. Located in the capital city of the United States, The Post has a particular emphasis on national politics. 5.0/5

North Korea Washington Post State Department Kim Jong United States Mamata Banerjee Google News Korean War Kim Jong Un South Korea South Korean Fox News North Korean West Bengal Chief Kim Jong Eun Democratic National Committee Pirate Bay Wendy Sherman

Why does North Korea hate the United States? Let's go back to the Korean War. - Washington Post
North Korea detains American at airport: Washington Post -
North Korea detains American at airport - Washington Post
Pence tells North Korea not to underestimate American resolve - Washington Post
North Korea launches another missile, perhaps one that can reach US - Washington Post
North Korea is ‘racing towards the nuclear finish line' Me and interviewed in Washington Post
This Article from China Post mentioned my Rohinyas Muslim had worst year in Asia 2014--Do you believe? - Who had worst year in Asia in '14? - By Curtis S. Chin and Jose B. Collazo January 2, 2015, 12:00 am TWNAs 2015 unfolds, it's time for one last look at the year we left behind. A year ago, taking a page from Washington Post political columnist Chris Cillizza's awarding U.S. President Barack Obama the dubious distinction of “Worst year in Washington,” we took to the digital pages of Fortune Magazine. The challenge — naming who had the “Worst year in Asia” — and the “winner” then of that least desired of 2013 prizes: Obama also, for what proved to be his lost year in Asia, marked by cancelled trips and persistent questions of where's the substance to a much ballyhooed pivot toAsia amid China's rise and seemingly never-ending talks toward a Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal.This past December, Cillizza returned to Obama, and not in a good way. Last year may well have offered numerous co ...
"North Korea has denied hacking Sony Pictures’ computer systems in retaliation for its movie “The Interview,” which revolves around a plot to assassinate North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong Un. But the secretive state has called the crippling cyberattack a “righteous deed” and has suggested that its “supporters and sympathizers” might be taking revenge on its behalf." —Washington Post.
2 Americans freed by North Korea back in US - Washington Post
Local media reports North Korea fires projectiles into sea as rival Seoul ... - Washington Post
30 minute post,,More up in just a bit,,ALOT has happened this month! 🌎WEEKLY HEADLINES FOR THIS WEEK * NEWS REPORTS/COMMENTARY w/ NewsMax & Next News Network * For MONDAY ,July 28, 2014 NEXT NEWS HEADLINERS -Back Stories Next News Headline Block 725/14: NEXT NEWS SPECIAL REPORTS: TOP STORIES!! (Newsmax) **some recap from previous news postings May still be here in case you missed them! * Palin Challenges WashPost 'Wusses' to Cover Obama Like Nixon Sarah Palin issued a challenge to the Washington Post to do the same job investigating President Barack Obama as it did with President Richard Nixon during Watergate. Tentative Deal Reached on VA Reform The chairmen of the House and Senate Veterans Affairs committees have reached a tentative agreement on a plan to improve veterans' healthcare after they lashed out at each other over their competing bills late last week. Rep. Jeff Miller, a Florida Republican, and Sen. Report: Hamas Turns to North Korea for Arms Hamas militants in Palestine are hammering out a ...
North Korea launches missiles in latest test-fire Washington Post SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea launched two ballistic missiles into the sea on Sunday, South Korea said, the latest in a series of test-firings seen as expressions of anger over the North's failure to win talks on receiving...
Google News: A look at North Korea send-ups in pop culture - Washington Post | |
North Korea sentences S. Korean missionary to life - Washington Post
North Korea’s state-run Korean Central News Agency reportedly unleashed a variety of racial slurs directed at United States President Barack Obama. The reprehensible verbal rhetoric comes as North Korea prepares its fourth nuclear test. According to The Washington Post, Obama was referred to as a “clown,” a “dirty fellow,” and a person who “does not even have the basic appearance of a human being.” The dispatch continued, proclaiming Obama “still has the figure of a monkey while the human race has evolved through millions of years.” “It would be better for him to live with other monkeys at a wild …read more Source: Breitbart
Sudan votes against UN resolution on “invalid” Crimean referendum March 27, 2014 (WASHINGTON) – Sudan was among 11 countries at the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) that voted against a resolution declaring a referendum held this month in Crimea on the region splitting from Ukraine as invalid. Cuba, North Korea, Nicaragua, Syria, Venezuela, Zimbabwe, Armenia, Belarus and Bolivia also voted against the non-binding vote. There were also 58 abstentions in the 193-nation UN body. Following the vote, Moscow formally annexed Ukraine’s southern region after the results showed an overwhleming majority in favor of joining Russia. The move drew strong condemnation specially from the US and European countries some of which moved to impose unilateral sanctions. A Washington Post factbox states that about 2 million people live in Crimea of which around 60% see themselves as ethnic Russians and speak Russian. The referendum in Crimea is somewhat similar to the one held in October 2013 in the disputed regi ...
[source: This post may make you feel bad.*Warning: That feeling may be appropriate.** There are moments in life that feel like a swift slap in the face. No one courts that. No one wants to feel that pain. But, if it’s a slap that rearranges your priorities to align with God’s heart, then you will thank God even for that bracing offense.     I received that slap today when I read the Washington Post news item that Kim Jong-un has ordered the execution of 33 Christians reported to have been part of planting over 500 underground churches in North Korea. [imagined thirty-three of my Christian friends executed for leading people to Christ, facilitating worship, praying, or offering praise to God. I would be horrified, sad, and angry devastated but I would also know that God has the last word on their lives not Kim Jong-un or the evil power behind him. Still, I would want their deaths to motivate the church of Christ.   I would want their deaths to galvanize other believers to put feet to their own faith ...
CNN North Korea rescinds invitation to US envoy Washington Post SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea has cancelled for a second time its invitation for a senior U.S. envoy to visit the country to discuss a long-detained American's possible release, the State Department said Monday. The cancellation,...
Fellow Veterans - reading the Washington Post this morning about all the school closures, because it was "too cold", my mind wandered to my early childhood walking to school in sub zero temp's in rain, sleet, hail and snow. A natural progression was to the "Frozen Chosin" in 1950. Thus I was motivated to draft the following. They may not print it, but I got it off my chest!! Fraternally and ."Stay Warm"! Happy New Year, Warren Memo for: Letters to the Editor, Washington Post Chosin Reservoir - North Korea 1950 Cold? Ask a veteran of the Chosin Reservoir what cold is - 35 below zero with a wind chill factor of 70 below! And that was not fighting the Chinese and North Koreans from a warm heated hut - that was living in that bitter cold 24/7; wearing old WWII winter clothing never imagined for that extreme cold! In those temp's, if you were wounded and couldn't walk, it was almost certain death. Ask Dr. Stan Wolf, USN (Ret), now living in Bethesda, Maryland, what it was like to make "life or death" decis ...
A former FBI agent who went missing in Iran was working for the CIA there, not conducting private business as officials have previously claimed, The Associated Press and the Washington Post reported on Thursday. Both the State Department and Bob Levinson's family have long denied he was working for the U.S. government when he disappeared on a trip to Iran in 2007. But Thursday's reports from the Washington Post and the AP claim that Levinson had been on a CIA mission to dig up information. A source who's involved in the matter told CNN that there's proof that Levinson worked for the CIA undercover and under contract while also working as a private investigator. Watch this video WH calls for Levinson release Watch this video Longest-held American hostage U.S. tourist and Korean War veteran Merrill Newman arrives at the Beijing airport Saturday, December 7, after being released by North Korea. Newman was detained October 26 by North Korean authorities just minutes before he was to depart the country after v ...
Google News: Statement of American detained in North Korea - Washington Post | |
[tbs 정오뉴스] ▶(Report) Kim Jong-Un's Uncle Ouster Draws International Attention The news of Kim Jong-un's uncle made headlines in various international media outlets including the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post. South Korea's spy agency announced yesterday that Kim's powerful uncle, Jang Song-thaek, may have been dismissed from all his posts last month and that two of his aides were executed. The NIS said Jang has not been seen since the executions and such signs are an indication that Jang has probably been dismissed. Officials say Jang's ouster could give more power to Kim Jong-un and his close aides, including Choi Ryong-hae, which could increase instability in the Pyongyang regime. Experts also suggest that the North Korean leader is demonstrating swift ruthlessness in eliminating his potential political rivals, and the competition to be loyal to him is becoming fiercer. There was no official word from North Korea on Jang's fate, while some experts were skeptical about it noting t ...
IMAGINE if Bill O'Reilly had said something remotely similar about Hillary Clinton. Every newspaper from the NY Times, to the Washington Post all across the country to the LA Times and up the Left Coast to the SF Chronicle would be headlining it on the front page. Their op ed pages would be filled with demands he be removed from the air. MSNBC would smell blood in the water and run specials on O’Reilly’s obvious depravity. Every Democrat in the Senate and House would go AWOL for a day to honor the offended honor of Hillary Rodham Clinton. There would be demonstrations at nearly every university demanding O’Reilly be forced to attend a six (6) month reeducation camp in China or, better yet, North Korea. Yes, I’m exaggerating but – and this is a tragedy – not exaggerating all that much when you think about the bias endemic in the media and education. Meanwhile, Martin Bashir prattles on, still on the MSNBC’s payroll and still on the air. What a pathetically revolting excuse for a what trie ...
North Korea and massive amounts of lab-grade meth? Check. Multinational drug-smuggling syndicate? Check. Former U.S. soldier turned globe-trotting hitman? Check. This story in the Washington Post this morning has it all: Five men have been charged with conspiracy to import 100 kilograms of nearly pu...
Public backlash has caused Elle to pull an image of a North Korea soldier from Joe Zee's September "A to Zee" column about military trends. As first uncovered by Washington Post's Max Fisher on November 19: Elle magazine, in an article posted today on
Axis of Fantasy vs. Axis of Reality France, Israel and Saudi Arabia confront an administration conducting a make-believe foreign policy. By Bret Stephens Updated Nov. 11, 2013 7:42 p.m. ET When the history of the Obama administration's foreign policy is written 20 or so years from now, the career of Wendy Sherman, our chief nuclear negotiator with Iran, will be instructive. In 1988, the former social worker ran the Washington office of the Dukakis campaign and worked at the Democratic National Committee. That was the year the Massachusetts governorcarried 111 electoral votes to George H.W. Bush's 426. In the mid-1990s, Ms. Sherman was briefly the CEO of something called the Fannie Mae Foundation, supposedly a charity that was shut down a decade later for what the Washington Post called "using tax-exempt contributions to advance corporate interests." From there it was on to the State Department, where she served as a point person in nuclear negotiations with North Korea and met with Kim Jong Il himself. T ...
After months of canvassing for Nigeria’s inclusion in the United Nations Security Council, the country, Thursday, finally got elected to occupy one of the non-permanent seats on the council. Also elected were Chad, Chile, Lithuania and Saudi Arabia. According to the Washington Post, Saudi Arabia and Chad easily won the seats despite criticisms from human rights groups. Nigerian and four other candidates, endorsed by regional groups, faced no opposition, as there were no contested races for the first time in several years. Hailing Nigeria’s inclusion as a Security Council member, President Goodluck Jonathan welcomed the development and conveyed Nigeria’s appreciation of the support of all member countries of the UN who voted for the country’s election. The five new non-permanent members were elected in the first round of voting by the 193-member General Assembly. Lithuania was the top vote-getter with 187 votes followed by Nigeria and Chile with 186 votes, Chad with 184 votes and Saudi Arabia with ...
Washington Post: DC rappers Pacman & Pe$o Go to North Korea to make a music video!
Google News: US veteran returns to North Korea to keep promise to fallen friend, Navy's ... - Washington Post | |...
Badass Completely Badass Veterans You've Never Heard Of: How much did Millett hate America’s enemies? In 1941, while training in the Army Air Corps, he heard President Roosevelt declare that America wouldn't go to war in Europe, so he deserted and joined the Canadian army to fight Nazis. While waiting in England to fight, the U.S. Army caught up, and he was allowed a transfer back to his native military, with which he fought in North Africa. While there, he was awarded the Silver Star for driving a burning ammunition-filled halftrack away from his fellow soldiers, then leaping away to safety just before it exploded. Millett then got promoted into the officer corps — despite the court-martial for desertion — and eventually served in Korea as a company commander, where he earned the Medal of Honor and the Distinguished Service Cross (the nation’s two highest medals for valor) for two leading two different bayonet charges. From his Washington Post obituary (he died one year ago): “We had acquired s ...
Obama-Xi summit: cyber security , North Korea and Syria on US-China agenda: [telegraph.co.uk] Last week the Washington Post obtained a report claiming Chinese hackers had even compromised designs for some of the most important US weapons systems and Chuck Hagel, the US defense secretary, warned...
NHL Stanley Cup Memorabilia from The Bradford Exchange Online
Associated Press Building Washington’s Blog May 21,2013 You know that the Department of Justice tapped scores of phone lines at the Associated Press. You might have heard that the Attorney General of the United States isn’t sure how often reporters’ records are seized. You might have learned that the Department of Justice is prosecuting a whistleblower regarding North Korea … as well as the chief Washington correspondent for Fox News who reported on what the whistleblower told him. As the Washington Post notes: [Department of Justice investigators] used security badge access records to track the reporter’s comings and goings from the State Department, according to a newly obtained court affidavit. They traced the timing of his calls with a State Department security adviser suspected of sharing the classified report. They obtained a search warrant for the reporter’s personal e-mails. You might have read that the Department of Justice Inspector General published a new report today saying that f ...
While investigating a 2009 leak pertaining to North Korea, the Department of Justice spied on Fox News reporter James Rosen, according to a report by the Washington Post.
(NEWSER) –North Korea today "completely scrapped" the armistice that held a tenuous peace on the peninsula for six decades, reports the Washington Post, even as American and South Korean troops began the large-scale military drills Pyongyang had warned them to abandon. The North is playing up its unpredictability, saying in a state-run newspaper today that with the armistice gone, “no one can expect what will happen next.” Further heightening tensions: The Red Cross hotline the North uses to communicate with Seoul has gone dead. "We called at 9am and there was no response," explains a South Korean official of the line, which it tries daily. The North has also threatened to cut off its hotline with UN troops—and to nuke the United States. If Pyongyang was enraged by fresh UN sanctions last week,today will be more of the same as the UN examines its appalling human rights record, the New York Times reports. An investigator will present a report that is expected to lead to an inquiry into possible cri ...
Is the Pirate Bay really moving to North Korea? - Washington Post (blog) ■My YouTube→
North Korea: Cold War history with U.S. justifies nukes The Cold War still rages in North Korea, and enemy No. 1 is the United States, which Pyongyang blames for making its much-condemned drive to develop nuclear weapons necessary. A rich vein of propaganda fueled by decades-old American threats holds that North Korea remains at risk of an unprovoked nuclear attack, though Washington and others say brinksmanship is the North's true motive. North Korea's latest nuclear test in February--its third--has led even China, its only major ally, to support another round of punishing U.N. Security Council sanctions. Washington and Beijing have approved a draft resolution that is expected to be circulated this week. North Korea's neighbors and the West condemn the North's efforts to develop nuclear missiles capable of hitting America as a serious threat to Northeast Asia's delicate security and a drain on the precious resources that could go to North Korea's largely destitute people. But in Pyongyang, the propaganda ...
AS BOUND WITH THE PERSECUTED CHURCH - (from house.org) American pastor Saeed Abedini remains locked away in Iran, facing torment and a possible eight years in the notorious Evin prison after his "trial" on January 27th. Abedini was arrested at a time he was working to establish a non-religious orphanage in Iran; he was convicted on charges of attempting to undermine the national security of Iran for his work with Iranian house churches. When he was permitted a brief meeting with his family, he had been beaten and tortured and psychologically worked over. He is not alone. Christians in a variety of countries face torture and imprisonment and death for meeting together to study the Bible or daring to tell others about the gospel. We hear of these precious people in Iran, North Korea, Burma, Indonesia, Nigeria, Laos, China, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Maldives, Mali. Churches are bombed or attacked by gunmen. Christians are forced to meet in secret or face severe penalties. In Laos earlier this month, three pastors ...
Why We Elect Liars as Leaders Nixon: “I Wasn’t Lying. I Said Things That Later On Seemed to Be Untrue” —Washington Post, NOVEMBER 29, 1978 Clinton Concedes He Lied About Affair —Washington Times, AUGUST 18, 1998 Obama Promises “Tax Cuts” to 95 Percent of Americans, Even Though 44 Percent of Filers Pay $0 in Income Taxes. —Manchester Union Leader, NOVEMBER 4, 2008 Did you ever stop to wonder why most governments—no matter where on earth you look, or what time period you consider—tend toward being tyrannical and predatory? I’m not referring just to those unfortunate nations suffering under openly brutal dictatorships. Even here in the West, where our elected governments portray themselves as benevolent and democratic, somehow they always end up taxing, legislating, and regulating us into servitude. Why? To bring this topic into sharp focus, let’s start by taking a whirlwind tour of the world’s governments: • Before America and its coalition partners invaded Iraq and deposed Sadda ...
North Korea names Kim Jong Eun 'marshal' of the military - Washington Post
Washington, May 23 — West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee says that Marxists and Maoists are plotting to kill her in league with the Pakistani intelligence, North Korea, Venezuela and Hun-gary. Banerjee made the sensational charge in an interview to the Washington Post. The Communist Party of ...
The election year stupida$$ery continues...Presdient Obama flip-flops on *** marriage, then makes "a courageous call" and makes $15 mil at a Hollywood fundraiser; meanwhile, the Washington Post devotes a 5000 word front page column to Governor Romney's high school days. Never mind taking a long, hard, dispassionate audit of President Obama's performance; never mind inquiring about Governor Romney's positions on economic policy and plans to deal with Iran and North Korea. Weknow precious little about Obama's high school and college years, but we're supposed to think Romney's a goon because of what HE did in high school? Rly? Srsly?
DTN North Korea: The benevolent Beastie: Adam Yauch remembered for rhymes and more - Washington Post: Sydney Mor...
LONDON (AlertNet) - The thought of spending just one day with a full stomach compelled Shin Dong-hyuk to take the biggest risk of his life. In 2005, he escaped North Korea's Camp 14, a prison holding political enemies of the state. He was 23, and all he had ever known of life was the labour camp - its conditions likened to a Soviet gulag or Nazi concentration camp. The subject of "Escape from Camp 14", a book by former Washington Post journalist Blaine Harden, Shin is thought to be the only person born in one of these camps to have escaped. "I never felt resentful about the way I had to live. I never thought there could be another way of life," Shin said at London's Frontline Club where he appeared with Harden this week. Shin was born in a "complete control district", about 30 miles long and 15 miles wide, in the mountainous centre of the country, and grew up among an estimated 15,000 prisoners who were put to work in the camp's coal mines, farms and factories. "The first thing I remember being taught by ...
Roger Ailes Chris Cornell White House President Trump Chelsea Manning Donald Trump Michael Flynn Theresa May Harry Kane Saudi Arabia President Donald Trump Supreme Court Princess Diana Romelu Lukaku Premier League James Comey Planned Parenthood Ken Owens Los Angeles Special Counsel Robert Mueller Jeremy Corbyn Bernie Sanders Middle East Ian Happ Joe Lieberman Pippa Middleton Cannes Film Festival David Harris Bella Hadid Harry Styles Dylan Hartley Lib Dem Nina Agdal President Recep Tayyip Erdogan Whole Foods Fox Business Venice Biennale South Side Merriam Webster Exclusive Interview Director James Comey Charlie Campbell Fresh Prince Joe Biden Mutual Fund Blue Jeans River North Aaron Carter Van Gerwen Mount Prospect Fort Leavenworth General Election Leicester City Jennifer Lawrence Johnny Depp Robin Wright Prince William Mount St Linkin Park Michel Basquiat New Jersey North Korea Neil Cavuto Tim Farron Villa Park Pizza Hut Arrested Development Girl Guides Wall Street Hillary Clinton Super Bowl David Bowie Peter Wright Jimmy Butler Black Hole Sun Emily Ratajkowski Uma Thurman Canary Islands Chicago River John Mccain Major League Baseball Hong Kong Las Vegas Viking River Cruise Royal Mail Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park Daily News Maria Sharapova Irish Lions Todd Haynes Jason Chaffetz Portage Park New Zealand Twin Peaks Cook County Northern Ireland Plaid Cymru Planet Hollywood Puerto Rican Day Parade
© 2017