North Korea & New York Times

North Korea , officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK; Chosŏn'gŭl: ), is a country in East Asia, occupying the northern half of the Korean Peninsula. The New York Times is an American daily newspaper founded and continuously published in New York City since 1851. The New York Times has won 106 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any news organization. 5.0/5

North Korea New York Times United States North Korean National Security Agency Kim Jong South Korean White House Ban Ki United Nations Edward Snowden Kim Jong Un Sony Pictures Der Spiegel Los Angeles Times Central News Agency North York Kevin Mirallas

China Struggles for Balance in Response to North Korea's Boldness - New York Times
US Weighs Tighter Sanctions on North Korea if China Fails to Act - New York Times
I'm a little flabbergasted the New York Times unquestioningly attributes the Sony hack to North Korea...
8AM NEWS: Former Vice Chancellor of Mbarara University of Sciences and Technology, Prof Frederick Kayanja, has been appointed Chancellor of Gulu University. The Acholi Khadi has urged President Museveni to fulfill pledges he made to the Muslim community in Acholi Sub-region during the 2006 and 2011 general elections or risk losing out on their votes come 2016. Bushenyi-Ishaka municipality received 25, 000 United States dollars in form of aid from Gemert-Baker municipality in Netherlands earmarked for different projects in the municipality. BUSINESS: Access Power MEA a power project developer for the Middle East and Africa, and EREN, a leader in renewable energy, last week announced the launch of Access Infra Africa, dedicated to investing in the early stage development of power projects in Africa. The US knew North Korea was behind the Sony Pictures hack because it had secretly infiltrated the country's computer networks in 2010, according to the New York Times and Der Spiegel. ELSEWHERE: Voters in Zambia ...
As of recent not only has the United States been under attack from the White House and law makers over 1st Amendment rights but the outsourcing of that fight has been underway.  North Korea decided the movie titled, "the Interview" was to risque and made cyber threats that if the movie were to be released it would hack major movie makers. The threat was met with extreme caution throughout all of Hollywood. A petition was presented to major stars to support the movies release presented by none other than George Clooney and it wasn't received well at all. Clooney was unable to get a single signature and after a very short stint the petition was dismissed. Later it was learned N. Korea had help in the hacking scheme and was indirectly responsible.       The hack took place even though Sony Pictures pulled it and the U.S. in defiance grew angry over the inability to see the film due to threats from a Dictator like Kim Jong Un. The idea was that of how could any extension of the U.S. bow to demands over C ...
Public editor chides New York Times for 'little skepticism' over US govt claim that North Korea hacked Sony
ALERT -- Sony Hack is Almost Certainly an Inside Job (by Paul Joseph Watson) -- The FBI will release a statement today blaming North Korea and its allies China, Iran and Russia for the Sony hack, while President Obama will also give a press conference in which he will finger the Hermit Kingdom as the culprit, despite the fact that the evidence overwhelmingly suggests North Korea was not responsible for the attack and that it was more likely an inside job. The Stalinist state will be implicated for the hack attack despite the fact that, as the New York Times reported, “It is not clear how the United States determined that Mr. Kim’s government had played a central role in the Sony attacks.” It is also likely that the hackers had “inside help” from a Sony employee given that, “Embedded in the malicious code were the names of Sony servers and administrative credentials that allowed the malware to spread across Sony’s network.” Despite the FBI as of just a few days ago focusing on a Sony employ ...
Kenneth Bae and Matthew Todd Miller, Released by North Korea, Land in the US - New York Times
As the wingnuts gin up a new rumor that Bergdahl joined the Taliban and was allegedly seen playing soccer and otherwise fraternizing during his five years of captivity, I was reminded of this New York Times story from a few years back about how Americans reacted to POWs from the Korean War: " After the war, thousands of American P.O.W.’s returned under suspicion of having collaborated with the enemy while in captivity. A handful, on orders from their captors, had, in fact, falsely accused the United States of conducting germ warfare against North Korea. Congress was transfixed by “the fear that the soldiers could have been brainwashed by the Chinese and still be spying for them,” Col. Elspeth Cameron Ritchie wrote in the journal Military Medicine. Dread that the Chinese Communists had created zombie sleeper agents spread quickly and ran deep." It, of course, was not true, either.
NIGERIA IMPLICATED IN A FRESH MATCH-FIXING SCANDAL | PREMIUM TIMES. Nigeria officials may face prolonged ban if found guilty of match fixing. Nigeria has been implicated in yet another football match-fixing scandal, with the revelation that the friendly match between the Super Eagles and North Korea on the eve of the 2010 World Cup in South Africa was doctored. The allegation, published by the New York Times, opens a fresh can of worms in a series of claims that Nigeria has featured prominently for years in the dubious art match-rigging. Nigeria won the friendly against the North Korean side by 3-1. Besides the result, that match also grabbed the headlines over a stampede that occurred before the commencement of the exhibition game, as hundreds of South Africans and other fans trooped to the stadium to catch a glimpse of the Eagles. It now turns out they were served a script worked out by a gambling syndicate. The New York Times said South African officials allowed a notorious Singaporean syndicate, Footb ...
A surprisingly rare balanced article on North Korea in the New York Times.
I just read on the New York Times website that Russia has launched a full scale invasion of Ukraine. Turns out the Crimean invasion was a way to capture a large portion of Ukraine's Navy to strengthen their position in the Black Sea and to stage an assault on the Southern area of Ukraine while the main force moves in from the East in a "hammer and anvil" strategy. I really don't think the UN will only respond with economic sanctions for this which means World War III may have just begun. Some analysts speculate that China and North Korea may side with Russia if the UN moves militarily against Russia.
Last Tuesday, the New York Times threw its considerable weight behind the conclusions of the United Nations Commission of Inquiry on Human Rights in [North Korea]. The commission's report cites hundreds of witnesses who testified to “unspeakable atrocities.”
North and South Koreans Meet in Emotional Family Reunions - New York Times: National PostNorth and South Korea...
I have no idea why the trip was canceled at the last minute the first time, and I don't know why it's been called off now. But if I'm Kim's handlers and I'm reading that the Secretary of State will be visiting Park shortly, while someone the New York Times refers to as "Washington's Ambassador for Human Rights to North Korea" is being sent to us, I'm going to be insulted. Perhaps I'm showing my naivety with regard to protocol when dealing with states that are not diplomatically recognized, but I can't help but think of when those journalists were being held by them, and Hilary called the elder Kim a "big baby." That's when former president Bill Clinton flew over to save the day. They were over the moon. Perhaps it's cowing to their tactics. But so what? As I've been saying for months, all of these recent "executions" are simply signaling policy shift, despite what the "experts" say. And bear in mind that the first to go was the liaison to China. This could be the year they lean more Westward...if Park d . ...
The 45-year-old Korean American missionary imprisoned in North Korea for more than a year made a public plea to the U.S. government at a press conference on Monday in Pyongyang in the hopes of being released, the New York Times reports. “I believe that my problem can be solved by close cooperation a...
check this out Leader's Uncle Executed as a Traitor, North Korea Says - New York Times: N...
From the Modern Tokyo Times: US-Saudi Rift: Divorce Good for American Taxpayers and Christians Sunday, October 27, 2013 Vojin Joksimovich, PhD Modern Tokyo Times This is Part III of my essay on Obama’s War with Assad. In Part II, I asserted that the Russian president Vladimir Putin, having learned what happened in Libya and having experienced his own battle with Chechen insurgents, in the last minute he became the savior of President Obama’s credibility. There was a lack of popular support for the war both in the US and Europe as exemplified with congressional statistics of 100:1 calls against the war. However, Washington warmongers, such as Senator McCain were mad at Putin after the New York Times published his op-ed on September 12. Putin made the case for international law and for not allying with Al Qaeda. In doing so, he chided the American exceptionalism in the sense that the US cannot be exempted from international laws that everyone else is supposed to follow. Challenging American exceptionali ...
check this out Freed by North Korea, War Veteran Returns to US - New York Times: The Guardian...
Portrait of the NSA: No detail to small to watch by Ewen MacAskill, The Guardian Barack Obama hailed United Nations secretary general Ban Ki-moon as a “good friend” after the two had sat down in the White House in April to discuss the issues of the day: Syria and alleged chemical weapons attacks, North Korea, Israel-Palestine, and climate change. But long before Ban’s limousine had even passed through the White House gates for the meeting, the US government knew what the secretary general was going to talk about, courtesy of the world’s biggest eavesdropping organization, the National Security Agency. One NSA document – leaked to the Guardian by whistleblower Edward Snowden just a month after the meeting and reported in partnership with the New York Times – boasts how the spy agency had gained “access to UN secretary general talking points prior to meeting with Potus” (president of the United States). The White House declined to comment on whether Obama had read the talking points in advan ...
"Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN On GPS this Sunday: A GPS panel on Syria, Russia, the White House and the Republican Party. Weighing in will be Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Remnick, New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof, former Mitt Romney foreign policy advisor Dan Senor and American Enterprise Institute scholar Danielle Pletka. “I think that many Democrats, as well, are deeply troubled that the president's [Syria] strategy has been a moral failure and practically has, you know, we've certainly seen the violence spread into Lebanon, creating real risks to Jordan, as well, and to Iraq,” Kristof says. “Now, it's not clear that any other strategy would be any better. He may well say that. But I think there's a lot of real discomfort that the administration has been essentially paralyzed and that this isn't working very well.” Then, Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman on some of the bright spots in the U.S. economy. And later, inside the Hermit Kin ...
As an adjunct to the article below, here's what's important to the Central News Agency of the Democratic Republic of North Korea as of today. Please keep in mind this is their CNN, their Fox News, their New York Times all rolled into one: May 19. 2013 Juche 102 Kim Jong Un Visits Mt. Myohyang Children's Camp DPRK Table-Tennis Players Crowned in World Championships National Games of Juvenile Sports Schools Open U.S. and Puppet S. Korea Accused of Unethical Crime against Kwangju Protesters Rodong Sinmun Slams Joint Military Maneuvers by U.S. and Its Followers New Year Address S. Korean Youth Stage Demonstrations for Peace against War Withdrawal of U.S. Forces, Conclusion of Peace Treaty Called for in S. Korea Action for Peace on Korean Peninsula Called for in S. Korea Punishment of Chun Doo Hwan Demanded in S. Korea Int'l Anti-Imperialist Seminar Supports Korean People's Just Cause French Organization Calls for Signature Campaign for Peace on Korean Peninsula DPRK's Nuclear Deterrent Upbuilding Supported A ...
(NEWSER) –North Korea today "completely scrapped" the armistice that held a tenuous peace on the peninsula for six decades, reports the Washington Post, even as American and South Korean troops began the large-scale military drills Pyongyang had warned them to abandon. The North is playing up its unpredictability, saying in a state-run newspaper today that with the armistice gone, “no one can expect what will happen next.” Further heightening tensions: The Red Cross hotline the North uses to communicate with Seoul has gone dead. "We called at 9am and there was no response," explains a South Korean official of the line, which it tries daily. The North has also threatened to cut off its hotline with UN troops—and to nuke the United States. If Pyongyang was enraged by fresh UN sanctions last week,today will be more of the same as the UN examines its appalling Human Rights record, the New York Times reports. An investigator will present a report that is expected to lead to an inquiry into possible cri ...
Today: North Korea's Threats And Capabilities, Opinion Page, Senate Immigration Proposal North Korea's Threats And Capabilities Responding to tightened sanctions and a new United Nations Security Council resolution condemning their December rocket launch, North Korea has threatened a new nuclear test, explicitly warning that the North Korean weapons program will target the United States. Host Neal Conan and guests Charles Armstrong of Columbia's Center for Korean Studies and David Sanger of the New York Times parse the latest rhetoric from Pyongyang and explore what it tells us about the new leadership of Kim Jong Un. Opinion Page According to the American Staffing Association, nearly 13 million people head to work as temporary and contract employees every year. On today's Opinion Page, sociologist Erin Hatton says that low-wage, temporary jobs are threatening to become the norm in the U.S. economy. She joins host Neal Conan to talk about the evolution of the temp industry, from a niche selling "women's w ...
Visible gains in North Korea -- for some Lifestyles have visibly improved in the North Korean capital since Kim Jong-un took power less than a year ago. But the changes among enjoyed by the elite in Pyongyang are being likened by observers to those of a Potemkin village, as new fashions and new construction are less apparent, if not downright absent, elsewhere in the impoverished nation. Spiegel Online (Germany) (10/12) The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (10/14) Los Angeles Times (tiered subscription model) (10/14)
A North Korean television broadcast featuring Mickey Mouse and other Disney characters appears to be a sign that the country’s new leader, Kim Jong-un, is warming up -- even just a tiny bit -- to Western culture, The New York Times reports. But Disney appears to be less than amused about the unautho...
From a New York Times story about how China is unable to keep North Korea and its young leader Kim Jong Un in check: In contrast to his taciturn father, Mr. Kim has been seen more in public, particularly with students and children, a propaganda campaign intended to present a more benign image to an ...
History June 13th; 1900, The Boxer Rebellion began in China; 1966, The U.S. Supreme ruled in Miranda V Arizona that suspects must be ad vised of their rights when taken into custody; 1967, Thurgood Marshall was the 1st. Black man nominated to the Supreme Court; 1971, The New York Times began publishing the Pentagon papers; 1986, Bandleader Benny Goodman passed away; 2000, The 1st. meeting between the leaders of South & North Korea occured.
Congrats to the LA Kings and to the National Hockey League.A champion in LA helps boost future TV contract rights and sells merchandise.A Stanley Cup for the North Korea Devils would only have helped "Captain" Lou Lamoriello's eventual New York Times obituary... no one cares about Lou's faceless team that plays in one of America's most dangerous cities...
Escape from Camp 14: One Man's Remarkable Odyssey from North Korea to Freedom in the West: A New York Times bestseller►
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