New Zealand & British Empire

New Zealand is an island country located in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The British Empire comprised the dominions, colonies, protectorates, mandates and other territories ruled or administered by the United Kingdom. 5.0/5

New Zealand British Empire United States Great Britain United Kingdom United Nations European Union Mandarin Chinese West Germanic South Africa British Commonwealth British Isles First World War Anzac Day Old Norse Paramount Chief Salvation Army Oxford English Dictionary

After Class Question With Sikander And Jahanzaib. English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and is now a global lingua franca. It is spoken as a first language by the majority populations of several sovereign states, including the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, Australia, Ireland, New Zealand and a number of Caribbean nations; moreover, it is an official language of almost 60 sovereign states. It is the third-most-common native language in the world, after Mandarin Chinese and Spanish. It is widely learned as a second language and is an official language of the European Union, many Commonwealth countries and the United Nations, as well as in many world organisations. English arose in the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of England and what is now southeast Scotland. Following the extensive influence of England, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom from the 17th to mid-20th centuries through the British Empire, it has been widely propagated around the world. Throu ...
Today in history On Sept. 26, 1789, Thomas Jefferson was named as the U.S.' first Secretary of State, and John Jay became the first chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. In 1872, In New York City, the first shrine temple, named "Mecca," was established. In 1907, New Zealand and Newfoundland became dominions within the British Empire. In 1914, the U.S. Congress established the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). In 1918, in the final major battle of World War I, the Battle of the Argonne began. In 1934, the steam ship RMS Queen Mary was launched. In 1940, during World War II, Japanese troops invaded French Indo-China. In 1941, Nazi troops executed about 34,000 Jews in Kiev. In 1944, Soviet troops liberated Estonia. In 1950, the city of Seoul, South Korea, was recaptured from the North Koreans by United Nations troops. In 1953, the U.S. and Spain signed a defense treaty, giving U.S. forces four bases there. In 1960, support on behalf of Cuba for the USSR was announced by Fidel Castro; and the first televised ...
New Zealand lost 2% of its population in WW1 fighting for the British Empire
The General Intelligence: In the 19 th Century we had the British Empire and the British East India Company. In the 21 st Century we have the U.S.A. Microsoft and Apple computers. I still don't see a point for New Zealand, is any of this relevant?
NY Times Editiorial: "Kiwi flag proclaims New Zealand as a South Pacific Outpost of the British Empire."
Political cartoons of Kaiser Wilhelm and mysterious panic-inducing aeroplanes on the home front were some of the lesser known aspects of the Great War, revealed by two UNE historians invited to speak at the first major international conference to mark 100 years since the beginning of the First World War. Dr Richard Scully and Dr Brett Holman attended the four-day conference, “the British Empire and the Great War – Colonial Societies and Cultural Responses,” at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore in February. Dr Scully presented a paper that examined the use of political comic art around the world to stoke public outrage towards Germany in the early stages and during the War. “Kaiser Wilhelm is still among history’s most recognisable personalities. His upturned moustache was a gift to cartoonists, and due to the popularity of political cartoons, everybody knew who the enemy was: the Kaiser and all he stood for,” Dr Scully said. “The ‘Kaiser cartoons’ are notable among the well-k ...
he word English comes from the eponymous Angle , the name of the Germanic tribe who are thought to originate from the region of Angeln in Jutland (now northern Germany). [19] For the possible etymology of this word, see the article Angeln and Angles . Significance [ edit | edit source ] See also: Anglosfir Modern English, sometimes described as the lingua franca of the first global, [20] [21] is the dominant language , or in some cases even established as an international language in communications, science, information technology, business, marine, [22] aerospace, [ 23] entertainment, radio and diplomacy. [24] The spread of English beyond the British Isles began with the growth of the British Empire , and in the 19th century has a global reach. [25] Following British colonization from the 16th century until the 19th , English became dominant in the United States , Canada , Australia , and New Zealand . Economic growth and cultural influence of the United States and its status as a superpower globally sin ...
Last month, as actors on U.S. late night shows each took turns impersonating Toronto Mayor Rob Ford, a surprising number decided to portray the chief executive with a stereotypical Canadian accent - nasal, slow and punctuated with "ehs" and "aboots." In truth, Rob Ford sounds pretty much like an American, save for the occasional Canadianism, such as "mickey of vodka." In October, Jules Sherred, a B.C.-based contributor to GeekMom.com, decided to put some of the unique quirks of Canadian English to the test. The blogger compiled a list of 82 words that, according to Sherred, made American friends "look at me with a blank stare," and then ran them past a survey group comprising 52 Canadians, 104 Americans and 19 people from the rest of the former British Empire, including New Zealand, Australia, Scotland, England and Wales. Two months and 17,000 data points later, the blogger ranked each word both by how familiar it was to the Canadians and how unfamiliar it was to the rest of the English-speaking world. Wh ...
The annexation of the Cook Islands and Niue as part of New Zealand was a two-stage process. First, the Governor, Lord Ranfurly, left for his second visit to Rarotonga on H.M.S. Mildura , on 1 October 1900:Ranfurly, Earl of, Chapter 7 April 1899, September 1900. The two expeditions to the Cook Islands and annexation, New Zealand notes (1) - 1897-1901, Manuscript MSX-4950, Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington ...this time for the definite purpose of annexation. According to the L.M.S. reports, the Māoris did not even know that the British authorities had agreed to annex the Cook Islands until the day H.M.S. Mildura arrived, although rumours from an undisclosed source preceded the ship’s arrival by two or three days. On Monday 8 October 1900 five Rarotongan ariki (Makea, Tinomana, Pa, Karika, and Kainuku), as well as the mata’iapo/rangatira Tara’are, Vakapora, Vaimotu, Kaimarama, V. Moate, Terei and Tamarua, ceded Rarotonga to Great Britain as part of the British Empire, not to New Zealand:Cessatio ...
Happy Thursday from Jason, I've moisturised and I'm smellin' good. Anyway, on this day in history... 1580 - Sir Francis Drake finishes his circumnavigation of the Earth. 1820 - Colonel Robert Gibbon Johnson proved tomatoes weren't poisonous by eating several on the steps of the courthouse in Salem, New Jersey. 1907 - New Zealand and Newfoundland each become dominions within the British Empire. 1960 - In Chicago, the first televised debate takes place between presidential candidates Richard M. Nixon and John F. Kennedy. 1960 - Fidel Castro announces Cuba's support for the U.S.S.R. 1969 - In the U.K., the Beatles released "Abbey Road". 1973 - Concorde makes its first non-stop crossing of the Atlantic in record-breaking time. 1984 - The United Kingdom agrees to the handover of Hong Kong 1994 - In the U.S., the trial of OJ Simpson began. The ex-footballer was charged with the murder of his ex-wife and her friend, and was controversially acquitted. 2011 - The village of Winkleigh in Devon was rated the best pl ...
Cricket moves out of England Cricket was introduced to North America via the English colonies in the 17th century,[3] probably before it had even reached the north of England. In the 18th century it arrived in other parts of the globe. It was introduced to the West Indies by colonists[3] and to India by British East India Company mariners in the first half of the century. It arrived in Australia almost as soon as colonisation began in 1788. New Zealand and South Africa followed in the early years of the 19th century.[4] Cricket never caught on in Canada, despite efforts by an imperial-minded elite to promote the game as a way of identifying with the British Empire. Canada, unlike Australia and the West Indies, witnessed a continual decline in the popularity of the game during 1860–1960. Linked to upper class British-Canadian elites, the game never became popular with the general public. In the summer season it had to compete with baseball. During the First World War, Canadian units stationed in Britain ...
All you Racists out there wanting to send foreign nationals back to their own country. Emigration and immigration has been happening since time immemorial, but has accelerated during time of Empire building, the biggest ever empire being the British Empire, in those times we didn't just migrate to the countries we took them over by force, murdering many of the nationals of some of those countries, including India, America, Australia, New Zealand, Tasmania, Palastine, Bermuda, British West Indies, Barbados etc. to name but a few. Even though we had vilified Indian muslims during the Raj 1864-1947 2 million of them gave their lives fighting for Britain in world war two and many more were wounded. Do you ever see vagrant or wino Asian Muslims I have never seen one. Go in to Geriatric wards in hospitals, rest homes or nursing homes and you will see very few asian muslims because their culture is to look after family members themselves. There are also many white skinned people in this country who are muslims. ...
Re-posting since it is important historical info which explains our current situation. With the genocidal expansion of the Muslim Ottoman Empire with a world wide Caliphate the West way too often faced these deadly forces. In 1801, the Pasha of Tripoli, Yusuf Qaramanli, citing late payments of tribute to non-Muslims, demanded additional tribute and declared war on the US. The US successfully defeated Qaramanli’s forces with a combined naval and land assault by the US Marine Corps. The US treaty with Tripoli concluded in 1805 which included a ransom for American prisoners in Tripoli. Events like these were escalating and were some of the reasons leading to WWI when The Ottoman Empire & pre-Nazi Germany were allies. During WWI, The Ottoman Empire did the Armenian Genocide between 1915–1923 that killed 1,800,000 people; the Ottoman Empire & Germany waged war in the Battle of Megiddo in 1918 against our allies the British Empire, India, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, France, etc. WWI weakened and . ...
Celebrate proudly my friends. Enjoy! February 6, 2013 is Waitangi Day "February 6, 2013 isWaitangi DayIt’s Waitangi Day! If you're not from New Zealand, chances are you've never heard of today's Reason to Celebrate. Waitangi Day commemorates the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi on February 6, 1840. This is the document that officially made New Zealand part of the British Empire, guaranteeing the indigenous people of New Zealand the rights to their land and the same personal rights as British citizens.The indigenous people (called the Maori) viewed the treaty as a sacred pact. There are many customs associated with Waitangi Day including family gatherings, ceremonies, and parades to celebrate Maori culture. It is also the day that the Order of New Zealand is bestowed upon individuals who have given outstanding service to their Celebrate Waitangi Day, book a trip to New Zealand, learn more about the history of this island nation, or watch a movie filmed amidst its beautiful landscapes! Happy Waitangi Day ...
A fundamental change in the constitutional structures of the British Commonwealth (formerly the British Empire, and not to be confused with the Commonwealth of Australia) did occur, however, in the late 1920s. Under the British Royal and Parliamentary Titles Act 1927, which implemented a decision of an earlier Commonwealth conference, the unified Crown that had heretofore been the centre point of the Empire was replaced by multiple crowns worn by a shared monarch. Before 1927, King George V reigned as king in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, the Irish Free State, South Africa, etc., each of these states, in effect, as dominions, amounting to a subset of the United Kingdom. After 1927, he reigned as King of Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, South Africa, etc. The form of use in the royal title as issued by King George V[20] did not mention the dominions by name, except 'Ireland', which changed from being referred to as Great Britain and Ireland to Great Britain, Ireland, indicating that it was no longer part ...
2should ganguly the next coach of indian cricket team? When Zimbabwean-born Duncan Fletcher was appointed as the coach of Team India on April 27, 2011, on a two-year contract, he had a reputation to live up to. In his eight-year stint as the coach of England team, Fletcher had helped the team scale quite a few peaks. From 1999 to 2007, under Fletcher’s able guidance, the English team achieved series wins away from home in Sri Lanka, Pakistan, the West Indies, and South Africa. The English team also recorded, during this period, eight consecutive wins — three of them coming against New Zealand, four against the West Indies, and one against South Africa. Fletcher’s crowning glory as the coach, however, was the 2005 Ashes win when England beat Australia 2-1 in the five-match Test series to lift the Ashes after an 18-year wait — an achievement that brought Fletcher an Order of the British Empire (OBE) and a speedy review and approval of his application for British citizenship by the British Home Secr ...
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Guyana (i/ɡaɪˈænə/ gy-an-ə),[6] officially the Co-operative Republic of Guyana,[1] is a sovereign state on the northern coast of South America. Culturally, it is part of the Anglophone Caribbean and is one of the few Caribbean countries that is not an island. The Caribbean Community (CARICOM), of which Guyana is a member, has its secretariat's headquarters in Guyana's capital, Georgetown. Guyana was originally colonized by The Netherlands. Later, it became a member of the British Empire and remained so for over 200 years until it achieved independence on 26 May 1966. On 23 February 1970, Guyana officially became a republic. In 2008, the country joined the Union of South American Nations as a founding member. Like the independent nations of Australia, Canada, and New Zealand, Guyana is a member state of the Commonwealth of Nations (formerly known as the British Commonwealth) and is the only commonwealth state on mainland South America. Additionally, Guyana is the only South American nation whose offi ...
Evelyn Johnson Global Human ‘AWAKENING’ will Not be Stopped..! Benjamin Fulford 11-15-11…”The cabalists struggle in vain to stop the new financial system”… “The global human awakening will not be stopped” November 15, 2011 Despite seeming bad news on several fronts last week, insiders assure us that plans for a new financial system are going ahead on all fronts. Instead of perpetual war and genocide on behalf of an inbred elite, the people of the planet are choosing to end poverty, stop environmental destruction and push for a new life-centered scientific and technical revolution. Major assistance emerged as a 59-nation group claiming to represent the Red Dragon Society or Maiona, offered its support to the new system. The Red Dragon is headed by Admiral Heemi Hau, Paramount Chief of the NGAPUHI in New Zealand and links 59 countries plus 2700 tribes mostly in the South Pacific Region. They back their words with treaties with the British Empire going back to the 1700’s as well as older tr ...
"God Save the Queen"[1] (alternatively "God Save the King") is an anthem used in a number of Commonwealth realms, their territories, and the British Crown Dependencies.[2] The words and title are adapted to the gender of the current monarch, e.g., replacing "Queen" with "King", "she" with "he", and so forth, when a king reigns. The author of the tune is unknown, and it may originate in plainchant, but a 1619 attribution to John Bull is sometimes made. God Save the Queen is the de facto British national anthem and has this role in some British territories. It is one of two national anthems for New Zealand (since 1977) and for several of Britain's territories that have their own additional local anthem. It is the royal anthem of Australia (since 1984), Canada (since 1980[3]), Barbados, Jamaica,[citation needed] and Tuvalu. In countries not previously part of the British Empire, the tune of "God Save the Queen" has provided the basis for various patriotic songs, though still generally connected with royal ce ...
Ambassador Mapuranga: Well, you know that the West has an agenda. From the time we launched the Land Reform program. … You have to realize that Zimbabwe and South Africa were earmarked to be “White man’s country.” That is the phrase that was used by great administrators like Lord Salisbury, Sir Harry Johnston, Lord Milner; those who administered the British Empire. They said that Zimbabwe, which was then Southern Rhodesia, together with South Africa, Australia, New Zealand and Canada, are “White man’s country,” meaning that they were for permanent White settlement and domination. This policy entailed that the native population would be herded into, in my country they were called, “native reserves.” I grew up in a native reserve myself. The rest of the country was taken over for British, White settlement. This policy also envisaged that the ratio between the incoming British settlers and the natives would be changed in favor of the White settlers. It happened successfully, totally success ...
Trying to explain 'State' to Taran, without his eyes glazing over. Yes, we are a State AND a country. No, States in the US are not countries, but part of a Federal Republic, and so on. "So why aren't we part of the USA?" he asked. "Because in 1776, New Zealand hadn't even been explored by Europeans let alone a colony of the British Empire. And, and, our history and institutions are different and the Pacific Ocean is in the way and would've taken George Washington a month to sail over to ask us to join them, that's why." "Would we have joined them?" he asked. "Ummm."
Nothing is Impossible. "Bannister, Sir Roger Gilbert, 1929-, British athlete. On May 6, 1954, at Oxford's Iffley Road track, Bannister, a physician, became the first man to run the mile in less than 4 min, a barrier many experts had long considered unbreakable. His time was 3 min 59.4 sec. Australia's John Landy and New Zealand's Peter Snell bettered the record that year, but in August, Bannister defeated Landy at the British Empire Games in Vancouver, clocking 3:58.8 in a thrilling race. For his accomplishments, he became Sports Illustrated's first Sportsman of the Year".
Today's "Diamond Jubilee" fun fact: Queen Elizabeth Ii is not only the Monarch of the UK, but she is also the official Head of State of 16 other countries, including Canada, Austraila, New Zealand, and Belize. (That's a lot of territory to be Head of State of!) She is also the official head of the British Commonwealth of Nations, the modern decendant of the old British Empire, with the notable exceptions of the USA, India, and a few other countries - though those countries are strong allies of the UK.
But you are a chosen people, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people belonging to God, that you may declare the praises of him who called you out of darkness into his wonderful light.” – 1 Peter 2:9 In 1865, William Booth was in the East End of London, preaching to crowds of people in the streets. Outside The Blind Beggar Public House some missioners heard him speaking and were so impressed by his preaching that they invited him to lead a series of meetings they were holding in a large tent. Booth preached to the poor and destitute of London's East End and realized his calling was to preach to the poor. He established the Christian Mission and from that ministry, the Salvation Army came forth. In the early 1880s, operations were extended to other countries, notably the United States, France, Switzerland, Sweden and others, including to most of the countries of the British Empire: Australia, Canada, India, South Africa, New Zealand, Jamaica, etc. During his lifetime, William Booth established Salva ...
Anzac Day marks the anniversary of the first major military action fought by Australian and New Zealand forces during the First World War.[3] The acronym ANZAC stands for Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, whose soldiers were known as Anzacs. Anzac Day remains one of the most important national occasions of both Australia and New Zealand,[4] a rare instance of two sovereign countries not only sharing the same remembrance day, but making reference to both countries in its name. When war broke out in 1914, Australia and New Zealand had been dominions of the British Empire for thirteen and seven years respectively.
New Zealand (Māori: Aotearoa) is an island country located in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses ‒ that of the North and South Islands ‒ as well as numerous smaller islands. New Zealand is situated some 1,500 kilometres (900 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and roughly 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the Pacific island nations of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long isolation, New Zealand developed a distinctive biodiversity of both animal and plant life. Most notable are the large number of unique bird species, many of which became extinct after the arrival of humans and introduced mammals. With a mild maritime climate, the land was mostly covered in forest. The country's varied topography and its sharp mountain peaks owe much to the tectonic uplift of land and volcanic eruptions caused by the Pacific and Indo-Australian Plates clashing benea ...
Anzac Day Anzac Day occurs on 25 April. It commemorates all New Zealanders and Australians killed in war and also honours returned servicemen and women. The date itself marks the anniversary of the landing of New Zealand and Australian soldiers – the Anzacs – on the Gallipoli Peninsula in 1915. The aim was to capture the Dardanelles, the gateway to the Bosphorus and the Black Sea. At the end of the campaign, Gallipoli was still held by its Turkish defenders. Thousands lost their lives in the Gallipoli campaign: 87,000 Turks, 44,000 men from France and the British Empire, including 8500 Australians. To this day, Australia also marks the events of 25 April. Among the dead were 2721 New Zealanders, almost one in four of those who served on Gallipoli. It may have led to a military defeat, but for many New Zealanders then and since, the Gallipoli landings meant the beginning of something else – a feeling that New Zealand had a role as a distinct nation, even as it fought on the other side of the world in ...
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