New York City & World War

New York is the most populous city in the United States and the center of the New York Metropolitan Area, one of the most populous metropolitan areas in the world. World War II, or the Second World War (often abbreviated as WWII or WW2), was a global war that was under way by 1939 and ended in 1945. It involved a vast majority of the world's nations—including all of the great powers—eventually forming two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. 5.0/5

New York City World War Grand Central Station John Blanchard United States American War American Civil War Columbia University Rio Grande Confederate States Pulitzer Prize Studs Terkel Westminster Kennel Club African American Great Depression New York

History “IN THE DAYS OF THE GIANTS” A BRIEF PERSPECTIVE ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN JACOBI MEDICAL CENTER AND THE Albert Einstein College OF MEDICINE Michael Touger, M.D. Department of Emergency Medicine/Jacobi Medical Center Associate Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine/Albert Einstein College of Medicine The story of Jacobi Medical Center and its affiliated medical school begins decades before their opening in 1955. During the Great Depression and the second World War, little hospital construction was completed in New York City. By 1948 a post-war population boom created a crisis of hospital overcrowding. This was compounded by an uncontrolled tuberculosis epidemic. Streptomycin had been discovered in the 1940s but no effective combined drug chemotherapy treatment for TB existed; victims lingered in sanitariums or hospital TB wards, and the public was increasingly afraid of entering municipal hospitals for fear of contagion. Then Mayor O’Dwyer authorized five new hospitals, the largest two to ...
Janet Murray Fiske died Nov.13, 2012 at home in Vashon Community Care, Vashon, WA. She was 99 years old - 10 days from her 100th birthday. She will be remembered for her love of life, her generosity with family and friends, her enjoyment of the arts, her originality and style, her welcoming home, her passions and projects. Janet was born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, one of five children of Frederick G. Murray, a physician, and Janette S. Murray, an author, newspaper and radio correspondent, school commissioner and homemaker who was named American Mother of the Year in 1947. Janet graduated from Coe College in Cedar Rapids and taught school in Iowa and Massachusetts. Before earning a master of arts degree from Columbia University in New York City, she traveled and worked in France and Greece. In 1940 she married John C. Fiske, whom she met at Columbia. John worked in naval intelligence during World War ll and, after the war, the couple and their two children lived in Moscow, USSR, where John continued to work in ...
December 4 1783--General George Washington bids farewell to his troops at Fraunces Tavern in New York City at the end of the American Revolutionary War. 1918--Woodrow Wilson departs Washington, D.C., for France on the first European trip by a U.S. president. He headed the American delegation to the Versailles Peace Conference, seeking an official end to the first World War.
A TEST OF LOVE John Blanchard stood up from the bench, straightened his Army uniform, and studied the crowd of people making their way through Grand Central Station. He looked for the girl whose heart he knew, but whose face he didn't, the girl with the rose. His interest in her had begun thirteen months before in a Florida library. Taking a book off the shelf he found himself intrigued, not with the words of the book, but with the notes penciled in the margin. The soft handwriting reflected a thoughtful soul and insightful mind. In the front of the book, he discovered the previous owner's name, Miss Hollis Maynell. With time and effort he located her address. She lived in New York City. He wrote her a letter introducing himself and inviting her to correspond. The next day he was shipped overseas for service in World War II. During the next year and one-month the two grew to know each other through the mail. Each letter was a seed falling on a fertile heart. A Romance was budding. Blanchard requested a ph ...
On this day in 1919, a parade was held in New York City to honor U.S. troops who fought in the first World War. All total, more than 2 million American soldiers fought on the battlefields of Western Europe and 50,000 lost their lives.
This comment was just sent to me: One economist called rent control "the best way to destroy a city, other than bombing." My comment: the well-meaning regs passed in New York City during World War Two eventually led to a housing market disaster in the South Bronx and other parts of the city by the late 1960's.
biography[-]by Eugene Chadbourne The large discography of this artist is full of what hipsters might refer to as "heavy scenes." Doubling on several saxophones as well as clarinet, the instrumentalist credited as both Freddy Skerritt and Alfred Skerritt -- not to mention the Fred and Al variations -- is best known for more than a decade's worth of playing Latin jazz with Machito & His Afro-Cuban Orchestra. Noteworthy projects with this band included a famous session featuring alto saxophone soloist Charlie Parker. Skerritt also performed and recorded with classic jazz stars Fats Waller and King Oliver: this wide range of jazz styles, not to mention the alternating first names, has fooled even some pretty sharp discographers into thinking that all this musical merit was the work of more than one Skerritt. Born in the British West Indies, the reed player was brought up in New York City, where he actually started out as a drummer. By the second half of the '20s he was established as a reed section man in gro ...
America has always led the world in innovation and the workers to carry these large projects out. During the Great Depression in the late 20's and early 30's we built the Empire State Building in New York City. After World War II President Eisenhower and his Administration were responsible for the National Highway System. Where is the innovation today and the leaders to support such projects. President Obama has tried to move our Representatives in Washington,D.C. to accomplish such projects but all he is confronted with is The Party of No, what a shame. Let's work with him and get people working again and and move America Forward.
Notes on “The Fourth of July” A divided nation? How very American of us. As we commemorate the 236th anniversary of our Declaration of Independence, revisiting our history helps remind us how far we've come — and just what still makes up the American character. For one thing, not all the 18th-century colonialists were keen on this whole independence thing: A good half-million were Loyalists to the British crown, and hung on to their royal connections in places like New York City, Long Island, and northern Georgia through the 1780s. The Fourth of July is also a good time to give credit where credit's due, stamp out a few myths, and find out lesser-known truths that are even juicier than the folklore. Neglected forefather? No argument -- founding fathers Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, and John Adams have name recognition (it helps that two became president). Lost in historical footnotes are the remaining members of the so-called Committee of Five in charge of drafting the Declaration: Roger Sher ...
From a friend of mine, Memorial Day is fast approaching. Yesterday, I had the privilege of attending a Luncheon for the Vietnam Veterans plaza memorial, New York City. To be in a room of heroes, male and female, is a humbling experience. Of note, they are humble people who still believe that service to one’s country is an honorable occupation and necessity. These are men and women who served in front areas of operation. One such member, 88 years old, Lou Gaspere, is a survivor of the Battle of the Bulge. 4 star General Peter Pace, retired Joint Chief of Staff, saw action in many theatres. Many more , not mentioned. To realize that these service people spanned the generations, from World War II, Korea through Vietnam, and again through Iraq and Afghanistan currently. We are truly blessed to have these people who serve us and as I usually do, I am asking that you remember our service men and women this weekend, at religious services you attend. That is one of the things they mentioned, ...
Date: Mon, 1875-05-17 Joel Elias Spingarn, a Jewish-American educator, literary critic, and activist, was born on this date in 1875 in New York City. He was the older brother of Arthur Spingarn and a professor of comparative literature at Columbia University from 1899 to 1911. He also served in the US Army in World War I as a Colonel. In 1919, he was a co-founder of the publishing firm of Harcourt, Brace and Company. Spingarn was a liberal who helped settle a dispute between W.E.B. DuBois and the followers of Booker T. ashington. Springarn also helped build the concept of a unified black movement through the founding of the NAACP. Spingarn was one of the first Jewish leaders of the NAACP, its second president, and chairman of its board from 1913 until his death in 1939. In 1913, he established the Spingarn medal, awarded annually for outstanding achievement by an African American. He encouraged the works of African American writers during the Harlem Renaissance, a period of intense Black literary activity ...
"Work is about a search for daily meaning, as well as daily bread, for recognition, as well as for cash." Studs Terkel(1912-2008)New York City born Jewish author of the 1985 Pulitzer Prize winning World War II book entitled, "The Good War"
Today is Studs Terkel's birthday. A Chicago based radio interviewer turned oral historian, the self-described "guerilla journalist" was born 100 years ago today in New York City. Terkel won a Pulitzer Prize for "The Good War: An Oral History of World War II." He said good interviewing was "listening with respect."
Today In Black History 5/11 • May 11, 1895 William Grant Still, “the dean” of African American classical composers, was born in Woodville, Mississippi but raised in Little Rock, Arkansas. Still started taking violin lessons at the age of 15 and taught himself to play a number of other instruments. Still attended Wilberforce University where he conducted the university band and started to compose. He also studied at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music. After serving in the United States Navy during World War I, he worked as an arranger for W. C. Handy and later played in the pit orchestra for the musical “Shuffle Along.” In 1934, Still was the recipient of the first Guggenheim Fellowship. In 1936, he conducted the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, becoming the first African American to conduct a major American orchestra, and in 1949 his opera “Troubled Island” (1939) was performed by the New York City Opera, the first opera by an African American to be performed by a major opera company. Stil ...
Tom Brokaw talked about his life and career and responded to telephone calls and electronic communications. Topics included the World War II generation, the 1960s, and current politics. Video clips were shown of Mr. Brokaw in his office at 30 Rockefeller Plaza in New York City, talking about star...
TODAY IN HISTORY May 8th is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years). There are 237 days remaining until the end of the year. 1846 – Mexican-American War: The Battle of Palo AltoZachary Taylor defeats a Mexican force north of the Rio Grande in the first major battle of the war. 1861 – American Civil War: Richmond, Virginia is named the capital of the Confederate States of America. 1877 – At Gilmore's Gardens in New York City, the first Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show opens. 1886 – Pharmacist John Styth Pemberton first sells a carbonated beverage named "Coca-Cola" as a patent medicine. 1898 – The first games of the Italian football league system are played. 1902 – In Martinique, Mount Pelée erupts, destroying the town of Saint-Pierre and killing over 30,000 people. Only a handful of residents survive the blast. 1912 – Paramount Pictures is founded. 1919 – Edward George Honey first proposes the idea of a moment of silence to commemorate The Armistice of World War I, which later ...
May is Jewish American Heritage Month... "Hank Greenberg was born in New York City, and made a name for himself in Detroit, Michigan. Greenberg was a pioneering Jewish major league baseball player with the Detroit Tigers in the 1930s and 1940s. Nicknamed "The Hebrew Hammer" for his power hitting, first baseman Hank Greenberg was the first jewish player to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Greenberg's many awards and accomplishments include being twice named the American League's Most Valuable Player and All-Star five times. Hank famously refused to play during an American League pennant game in 1934 in observance of Yom Kippur. Hank was drafted and served in World War II, resuming baseball upon his return stateside. Greenburg retired with the 6th highest slugging average in major league history. After retirement from playing the game, Greenberg became the first Jewish baseball team general manager."~Factoid from the back of a box of matzos, and the reason I started eating it.
*** Tomorrow is the 5th of may *** Do you know what happened This day in History on May 5th? 1945 U.S.A. Japanese Bomb Kills in US 5th May 1945 : A Japanese balloon bomb explodes at Mitchell Recreation Area on Gearhart Mountain in Oregon, killing the pregnant wife of a minister and five children. This is the only recorded instants of deaths caused by Japanese Bombs on the American mainland in World War II. 1891 U.S.A. Carnegie Hall 5th May 1891 : Carnegie Hall originally called Music Hall has it's official opening in New York City with a concert conducted by maestro Walter Damrosch and composer Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky. 1921 France "Chanel Number 5" 5th May 1921 : Chanel introduced "Chanel Number 5" to some of her friends. Initially, it was given to preferred clients for free at her boutique. The fitting rooms in her boutique were also scented with No. 5. Coco Chanel commissions renowned perfumer Ernest Beaux to create the most expensive perfume in the world, Jasmine was the most expensive perfume oil and ...
Another historical data point for why one is awarded the Bronze Star Architect of Daring World War II Rescue Dies: George Vujnovich, the World War II OSS agent who orchestrated Operation Halyard, the largest ever escape of American airmen from behind enemy lines, has died, according to press reports. He died on April 24 of natural causes at his home in New York City, reported the Associated Press on Wednesday (via the Detroit Free Press). He was 96. The Pittsburgh native, born to Serbian immigrants, devised a plan in 1944 to rescue hundreds of US airmen who bailed out over Serbia on bombing missions against the Axis-held Ploesti oil fields in Romania. Working with Serbian guerrilla fighter Draza Mihailovich, leader of the Chetniks, Vujnovich and his OSS team built a makeshift mountaintop airfield from which US cargo aircraft ferried some 512 airmen to freedom between August and December 1944, reported the Los Angeles Times. In October 2010, Vujnovich received a Bronze Star Medal
Very interesting story about an amazing man. We are leaving now to go to his wife's (Doris Richter's) 100th birthday! I just found this on the web. Saranac Lake - Donald A. Richter, M.D., age 99, of Kiwassa Road, Saranac Lake, died Saturday Dec. 25, 2010 at Fletcher Allen Hospital in Burlington, Vt. Born Oct. 26, 1911 in Englewood, N.J., he was the son of Carl and Estelle (Growney) Richter. Donald graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York City, with a degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1935. He served in World War II with the rank of captain. He was trained for and specialized in anesthesia during the war and he, a nurse, and a surgeon were a team on the battle front, caring for injured soldiers. When the war ended, he was further trained in anesthesia under the direction of Dr. Virginia Apgar, who developed the Apgar test for newborns in use today. After he finished his residency at Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital, he, his wife and first three children then settled ...
On the date August 6th 1806 - Francis II, the last Holy Roman Emperor, abdicates, thus ending the Holy Roman Empire. 1862 - American Civil War: The Confederate ironclad CSS Arkansas is scuttled on the Mississippi River after suffering damage in a battle with USS Essex near Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 1923 - Henry Sullivan swims the English Channel. 1926 - Harry Houdini performs his greatest feat, spending 91 minutes underwater in a sealed tank before escaping. 1945 - World War II: the Atomic bombing of Hiroshima. An atomic bomb codenamed Little Boy is dropped by the American B-29 Enola *** on the city of Hiroshima in Japan at 8:16 a.m., killing 80,000 outright with another 60,000 dead by the end of the year due to fallout sickness. Ultimately, about 200,000 die due to the atomic bomb. 1965 - US President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the Voting Rights Act of 1965 into United States law. 1984 - Pop star Prince releases Purple Rain, the album which would launch him to superstardom. 2012-Casey Noble will be moving to ...
Today is Wednesday, April 4, the 95th day of 2012. There are 271 days left in the year. On this day in History: 1581 - Francis Drake completed the circumnavigation of the world. 1812 - The territory of Orleans became the 18th U.S. state and will become known as Louisiana. 1818 - The U.S. flag was declared to have 13 red and white stripes and 20 stars and that a new star would be added for the each new state. 1841 - U.S. President William Henry Harrison, at the age of 68, became the first president to die in office. He had been sworn in only a month before he died of pneumonia. 1862 - In the U.S., the Battle of Yorktown began as Union General George B. McClellan closed in on Richmond, VA. 1887 - Susanna M. Salter became mayor of Argonia, KS, making her the first woman mayor in the U.S. 1914 - The first known serialized moving picture opened in New York City, NY. It was "The Perils of Pauline". 1917 - The U.S. Senate voted 90-6 to enter World War I on the Allied side. 1932 - After five years of research, pr ...
Hillary Clinton Donald Trump Election Day Janet Reno North Carolina White House Brad Pitt Tesco Bank New Hampshire Robert Durst Tom Brady Supreme Court Barack Obama Attorney General Wall Street Rolling Stone Hong Kong Islamic State Andy Murray Manchester United Jose Mourinho Angelina Jolie Jeremy Clarkson Middle East Benedict Cumberbatch Lady Gaga Jennifer Aniston Black Lives Matter Old Trafford Doctor Strange Julian Assange Walking Dead Luke Shaw Mazel Tov South Carolina Laurie Hernandez Daily News Los Angeles Chicago Cubs World Series Theresa May Gareth Southgate Paul Katami Mutual Fund Mass Effect Angelina Jolie Pitt Rachel Bloom Washington Square Park Standing Rock Yoenis Cespedes Artificial Intelligence Man Accused Democratic Presidential Marriage Equality Des Plaines Ann Maguire John Oliver Ben Affleck President Obama James Comey Jon Jones Grant Park Director James Comey Kellyanne Conway Justice Department South Korea Ted Nugent Paul Ryan Glenn Beck Watch Bill Murray Dixville Notch Tracy Morgan South Korean President South Asian State Dept Gabrielle Union Susan B. Anthony Prime Minister Theresa May Sean Astin Rogue One Wrigley Field Rurik Jutting Elizabeth Banks Mel Gibson Scotland Yard Trevor Noah Premier League Real Housewives Swing Time Election Night Stephen Curry High Court Alastair Cook World Cup South Africa National Geographic Harry Potter Chris Smalling Snoop Dogg Big Bang Theory
© 2016