New York City & Great Britain

New York is the most populous city in the United States and the center of the New York Metropolitan Area, one of the most populous metropolitan areas in the world. Great Britain or Britain (Scottish Gaelic: Breatainn Mhòr, ) is an island situated to the northwest of Continental Europe. 5.0/5

New York City Great Britain United States White Star Line North Atlantic Ocean New York North America Thomas Andrews Big Ben Indian War Bruce Ismay United Kingdom South Africa San Francisco North Carolina Winston Churchill American Civil War Madison Square Garden

5.21.1938 - David Lawrence Groh was born in Brooklyn, attended Brooklyn Technical H.S., then enrolled at Brown University where he graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a degree in English literature. He performed with the American Shakespeare Theatre, then went to Great Britain to attend the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art on a Fulbright scholarship, and served in the U.S. Army from 1963 to 1964. On his return to New York City, he studied at the Actors Studio. He made his television debut in the Gothic daytime soap opera Dark Shadows on ABC in 1966. Groh is best known for his portrayal of Joe Gerard in the 1970s television series Rhoda, opposite Valerie Harper. After Rhoda, Groh starred in his own series, the short-lived Another Day, and went on to make his Broadway theatre debut in Neil Simon's Chapter Two. From 1983 to 1985, Groh played D.L. Brock on General Hospital, leaving the show to appear in Off Broadway play Be Happy for Me (1986). Other New York City theater credits include Road Show (1987), a ...
China has developed some of the world’s largest architecture and most advanced technology but the country’s next project would be its biggest accomplishment yet. The Chinese government is in the planning stages of building an 8000+ mile long high speed underwater railway from China to America, according to Chinese media reports. The overall trip would begin on the north side of China in Beijing, run through Siberia and travel 125 miles underwater spanning the Bering Strait, then through Alaska and Canada before ending its route in New York City. The trip from one end to the other would take about 2 days, the official report states. The real question here is, will China even attempt to build it after planning and estimating the cost? Most engineers are skeptical that it can be done since the underwater strait is supposed to be four times longer than the current longest underwater railway, the Euro channel, connecting Great Britain and France. “The Beijing Times listed the China-US line as one of four ...
Carol Thomas April 14th. My Lovely wife's birthday. Interesting facts about today Notable Dates 42 BC - Sidereal vernal equinox: New Year in South East Asia 69 BC– Vitellius, commander of the Rhine armies, defeats Emperor Otho in the Battle of Bedriacum and seizes the throne. The Roman Armies first major defeat. 1849 – Hungary declares itself independent of Austria with Lajos Kossuth as its leader 1865 – U.S. President Abraham Lincoln is assassinated in Ford's Theatre by John Wilkes Booth 1894 - First Cinema opens in New York City. 1912 – The British passenger liner RMS Titanic hits an iceberg in the North Atlantic at 23:40 1927 – The first Volvo car premieres in Gothenburg, Sweden. 1931 – First edition of the Highway Code published in Great Britain. 1942 – Malta receives the George Cross for its gallantry 1969 – At the U.S. Academy Awards there is the only tie ever for the Academy Award for Best Actress between Katharine Hepburn and Barbra Streisand. 1986 – The heaviest hailstones ever ...
Know the true Titanic story. Follow me and enjoy. Send your questions. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean on 15 April 1912 after colliding with an iceberg during her Maiden Voyage from Southampton, UK to New York City, US. The sinking of Titanic caused the deaths of more than 1,500 people in one of the deadliest peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. The RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service. Titanic was the second of three Olympic class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line, and was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast with Thomas Andrews as her naval architect. Andrews was among those lost during the sinking. On her Maiden Voyage, she carried 2,224 passengers and crew. Under the command of Edward Smith, the ship's passengers included some of the wealthiest people in the world, as well as hundreds of emigrants from Great Britain and Ireland, Scandinavia and elsewhere throughout Europe seeking a new ...
February 27: In 1782 the House of Commons of Great Britain votes against further war in America; in 1801, pursuant to the District of Columbia Organic Act of 1801, Washington, D.C. is placed under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Congress; in 1844 the Dominican Republic gains independence from Haiti; in 1860 Abraham Lincoln makes a speech at Cooper Union in New York City that is considered largely responsible for his election to the Presidency; in 1870 the current flag of Japan is first adopted as the national flag for Japanese merchant ships; in 1881 the last major battle of the First Boer War, the Battle of Majuba Hill, is fought; in 1900 British military leaders receive an unconditional notice of surrender from Boer General Piet Cronje at the Battle of Paardeberg in the Second Boer War; in 1922 a challenge to the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, allowing women the right to vote, is rebuffed by the Supreme Court of the United States in Leser v. Garnett; in 1940 Martin Kamen and Sam Ru ...
This is a very interesting read, but it's like preaching to the Choir-most of you who take time to read this will agree--Those who do not agree will not read. Dr. Charles Krauthammer - AN AMAZINGLY BRILLIANT MAN! 1. Born: March 13, 1950 2. Birthplace: New York City, New York 3. Raised in Montreal, Canada 4. Attended Mc Gill University and Harvard Medical School 5. 1972 diving accident left him paralyzed from the neck on down. 6. Directed psychiatric research for the Carter administration 7. Began writing career in 1981 with The New Republic 8. Helped develop the "Reagan Doctrine" in the 80's 9. Appointed to Presidential Council on Bioethics in 2002 Dr. Krauthammer is frequently on the Fox News Channel. He is an M.D., a lawyer and is paralyzed from the neck down. A friend went to hear Charles Krauthammer. He listened with 25 others in a closed room. What he says here is NOT 2nd-hand but 1st. The ramifications are staggering for us, our children and their children. Last Monday was a profound evening. Dr. Ch ...
Historical Events, this day February 10 Feb 10, 2014 In 1763, the Treaty of Paris ended the Seven Years' War between Britain and Spain and also the French and Indian War, with France ceding Quebec to Great Britain. In 1863, the world-famous dwarfs General Tom Thumb and Lavinia Warren get married in New York City. In 1870, the Young Women's Christian Association was founded in New York. In 1897, the slogan All The News That's Fit To Print first appeared on page one of The New York Times. In 1931, New Delhi was made the capital of India. In 1962, captured U-2 spy plane pilot Francis Gary Powers was returned to the United States by Russia in exchange for Soviet spy Rudolf Abel. In 1964, 82 Australian sailors died when an aircraft carrier and a destroyer collided off New South Wales, Australia. In 1967, Minnesota and Nevada ratified the 25th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The amendment deals with presidential succession. In 1987, U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop endorsed television advertising for co ...
Robert Charles O'Hara Benjamin Robert C. A. Benjamin (1855-1900) a distinguished lawyer and newspaper editor, was born in Saint Kitts. He attended Trinity College, Oxford in Great Britain. In 1876 he found employment in New York City and became a citizen. By 1880 he had read law in Alabama and Tennessee and had been admitted to the Tennessee bar. In 1888 he moved to California and, as the first known black attorney there, established a thriving practice with a prestigious white law firm. He also served as the city editor of the white-owned Los Angeles Sun. Later he moved to San Francisco where, in his practice and as editor of the black San Francisco Sentinel, he championed African-American causes. Considered an "intense race man" he presided over the California conference of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, covering California, Oregon, and Washington. Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division
Just when you thought nothing major happened in history today...BAM! December 26, 1620 - The Pilgrim Fathers landed at New Plymouth, MA, to found Plymouth Colony, with John Carver as Governor. 1865 - The coffee percolator was patented by James H. Mason 1908 - Texan boxer "Galveston Jack" Johnson knocked out Tommy Burns in Sydney, Australia, to become the first black boxer to win the world heavyweight title. 1921 - The Catholic Irish Free State became a self-governing dominion of Great Britain. 1947 - Heavy snow blanketed the Northeast United States, burying New York City under 25.8 inches of snow in 16 hours. The severe weather was blamed for about 80 deaths. 1956 - Fidel Castro attempted a secret landing in Cuba to overthrow the Batista regime. All but 11 of his supporters were killed. 1982 - The Man of the Year in "TIME" magazine was a computer. It was the first time a non-human received the honors. 1996 - Six-year-old beauty queen JonBenet Ramsey was found beaten and strangled in the basement of her fa ...
December 11, 1769---Edward Bevan of London, England, patents venetian blinds. 1844, Nitrous oxide ("laughing gas") becomes the first dental anesthetic when Dr. John M. Riggs uses it for a tooth extraction on Dr. Horace Wells, in Hartford, Connecticut. 1936, After ruling for less than one year, Edward VIII becomes the first British monarch to abdicate the throne, in order to marry American divorcee Wallis Simpson. 1946, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. offers a six-block area of Manhattan in New York City for the world headquarters of the United Nations. The offer was accepted the next day. 1967, The world's first supersonic airliner, the Concorde, is unveiled in Toulouse, France. The plane had been jointly developed by France and Great Britain. 1972, U.S. Apollo 17 lands on the moon's surface for a three-day exploration. It was the final Apollo mission to the moon. 1978, Massive riots and demonstrations take place in Tehran against the Shah of Iran. BORN ON THIS DAY: Nobel Prize winning scientist Robert Ko ...
May 31st 1433 - Sigismund was crowned emperor of Rome. 1854 - The Kansas-Nebraska Act passed by the U.S. Congress. 1859 - The Philadelphia Athletics were formally organized to play the game of Town Ball. 1859 - In London, Big Ben went into operation. 1870 - E.J. DeSemdt patented asphalt. 1879 - New York's Madison Square Garden opened. 1880 - The first U.S. national bicycle society was formed in Newport, RI. It was known as the League of American Wheelman. 1884 - Dr. John Harvey Kellogg patented "flaked cereal." 1889 - In Johnstown, PA, more than 2,200 people died after the South Fork Dam collapsed. 1900 - U.S. troops arrived in Peking to help put down the Boxer Rebellion. 1902 - The Boer War ended between the Boers of South Africa and Great Britain with the Treaty of Vereeniging. 1907 - The first taxis arrived in New York City. They were the first in the United States. 1909 - The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) held its first conference. 1910 - The Union of South Africa ...
Wallace Hartley would probably appreciate the fact that his violin was recovered from his body * hours after the Titanic sunk into the ice cold Atlantic and, in 2013, purchased for 1.4 million dollars during an auction in Great Britain. He had, after all, led the Titanic orchestra and his family, like those of his musicians had received only a small portion of their salary as "compensation" because, as the White Star Line's attorneys successfully established: "as employees of the Cunard Line, the orchestra members had not completed the cruise from Southhampton to New York City. * (Hartley placed his violin in a case which he wore over his shoulder as the ship sank)
1683 - The first Mennonites arrived in America aboard the Concord. The German and Dutch families settled in an area that is now a neighborhood in Philadelphia, PA. 1847 - "Jane Eyre" by Charlotte Bronte was first published in London. 1848 - The steamboat SS California left New York Harbor for San Francisco via Cape Horn. The steamboat service arrived on February 28, 1849. The trip took 4 months and 21 days. 1857 - The American Chess Congress held their first national chess tournament in New York City. 1863 - The first Turkish bath was opened in Brooklyn, NY, by Dr. Charles Shepard. 1866 - The Reno Brothers pulled the first train robbery in America near Seymour, IN. The got away with $10,000. 1880 - The National League kicked the Cincinnati Reds out for selling beer. 1884 - The Naval War College was established in Newport, RI. 1889 - In Paris, the Moulin Rouge opened its doors to the public for the first time. 1889 - The Kinescope was exhibited by Thomas Edison. He had patented the moving picture machine i ...
De la página de F1. Formula One racing’s governing body, the FIA, has published the calendar for the 2014 world championship following a meeting of its World Motor Sport Council in Croatia on Friday. It features four additions to the 2013 schedule - New Jersey, Austria, Russia and Mexico - with three Grands Prix - Korea, New Jersey and Mexico - listed as provisional. The New Jersey round will be the second of three races on consecutive weekends, sandwiched between Monaco in late May and Canada in early June. It will take place on a temporary street circuit along the Hudson River in Weehawken and West New York, with the New York City skyline as its backdrop. The Austrian round in late June will be staged at Spielberg’s Red Bull Ring, formerly known as the A1-Ring, which previously hosted the race between 1997 and 2003. The venue began life as the Osterreichring, home to the Austrian Grand Prix for 18 consecutive years from its inception in 1970. An all-new circuit in Sochi, home to the 2014 Winter Oly ...
June 14, 1982 Two days after a million marched in New York City calling for a freeze on all nuclear testing, there were 1,665 arrested at a War Resisters League (WRL)-organized civil disobedience action. The WRL protested at each of the U.N. missions of the five then-declared nuclear weapons powers: the United States, the Soviet Union, Great Britain, France and China.
Today in History for June 4th : 1792 – Captain George Vancouver claims Puget Sound for the Kingdom of Great Britain. 1812 – Following Louisiana's admittance as a U.S. state, the Louisiana Territory is renamed the Missouri Territory. 1825 – General Lafayette, a French officer in the American Revolutionary War, speaks at what would become Lafayette Square, Buffalo, during his visit to the United States. 1855 – Major Henry C. Wayne departs New York aboard the USS Supply to procure camels to establish the U.S. Camel Corps. 1862 – American Civil War: Confederate troops evacuate Fort Pillow on the Mississippi River, leaving the way clear for Union troops to take Memphis, Tennessee. 1876 – An express train called the Transcontinental Express arrives in San Francisco, California, via the First Transcontinental Railroad only 83 hours and 39 minutes after leaving New York City. 1896 – Henry Ford completes the Ford Quadricycle, his first gasoline-powered automobile, and gives it a successful test run. ...
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Portrait of Theodosia Burr: On December 31, 1812, the beautiful and vivacious Theodosia Burr, wife of wealthy Governor Joseph Alston of South Carolina, left her husband's plantation and sailed north on the Patriot to visit her beloved father, the famous Aaron Burr, in New York City. In early January the vessel was accosted off Cape Hatteras by ships of Great Britain, then at war with the United States, but was permitted to proceed on its journey. The Patriot was never seen again nor, with any certainty, was Theodosia. An angry storm that very night swept the coast of North Carolina. Some say that during the gale pirates boarded the Patriot, removed all valuables, forced passengers and crew to walk the plank, then sank the ship. But legend persists that Theodosia survived, that she was cast ashore in a small boat onto the Outer Banks, bereft of all possessions except a portrait of herself, and that, with her sanity completely gone, she was thereafter cared for by a Banker fisherman and his wife. The years ...
* Today in Black History - March 12 * 1791 - Benjamin Banneker and Pierre Charles L'Enfant are commissioned to plan and develop Washington, DC. 1868 - Great Britain gives Basutoland, the status of protectorate at the request of King Moshweshwe. The request of protection was to prevent attacks by the Cape Colony. 1877 - The British annex Walvis Bay, an important deep water port in South West Africa. 1888 - Hall Johnson is born in Athens, Georgia. In 1925, he will organize and direct the Hall Johnson Choir as well as have significant success as an arranger. One of his early stage successes will be as choral director for the 1930 Broadway play "The Green Pastures" and the 1933 play, "Run Little Chillun," for which he will write the book and music. Johnson and his choir will move to Hollywood in 1936 to make the film version of "The Green Pastures." 1926 - The Savoy Ballroom, nicknamed the "Home of Happy Feet," opens in New York City. 1932 - Andrew Young is born in New Orleans, Louisiana. He will become a ...
This Day in History On February 26 1815 Napoleon escaped from the Island of Elba. He then began his second conquest of France. 1907 The U.S. Congress raised their own pay to $7500. 1919 The Grand Canyon National Park is established by Congress. Ten years later to the day, President Coolidge will sign a measure establishing Grand Teton National Park. 1930 New York City installed traffic lights. 1945 In the U.S., a nationwide midnight curfew went into effect. 1946 Captain James Gallagher and 14 crew members take off aboard Lucky Lady II as they begin what will become the first non-stop flight around the globe. The plane will be refueled four times while in the air before landing back in the U.S. on March 2. 1951 The 22nd Amendment was ratified, which limited U.S. Presidents to two terms. 1952 Prime Minister Winston Churchill announces that Great Britain has developed its own atomic bomb. 1987 The Tower Commission rebuked U.S. President Reagan for failing to control his national security staff in th ...
Fort William Henry  Type: Fort  Built: 1755  In use: 1755-1757  Controlled by: Great Britain, New France  Battles/wars: Seven Years War  Location: At the southern end of Lake George  (A plan of the fort published in 1765).               Fort William Henry was a British fort at the southern end of Lake George in the province of New York. It is best known as the site of notorious atrocities committed by Indians against the surrendered British and provincial troops following a successful French siege in 1757.  (An event which is the focus of James Fenimore Cooper's novel The Last of the Mohicans, first published in January 1826.)   The fort's construction was ordered by Sir William Johnson in September 1755, during the French and Indian War, as a staging ground for attacks against the French fort at Crown Point called Fort St. Frédéric. It was part of a chain of British and French forts along the important inland waterway from New York City to Montreal, and occupied a key forward locatio ...
LOOK BACK.86 YEARS AGO...2/6 ...1927 NEWS of the time...The United States and Canada established formal diplomatic relations independent of Great Britain. An earthquake measuring 8.6 struck Xining, China killing 200,000. Later, Charles Lindbergh flew "The Spirit of St. Louis" across the Atlantic nonstop and solo, from New York City to Paris. In ENTERTAINMENT... Records were NOT made of Vinyl which did not come into use until the late 30's but were made of a mixture of Shellac, powdered slate and wax lubricant. Popular vaudevillian Al Jolson amazed audiences with his nightclub act in "The Jazz Singer," the first feature-length talkie. Opera and the Broadway musical were "married" in Jerome Kern's "Show Boat." MOVIES ... With the advent of the "talkie" technology in 1919, movies and movie theaters had proliferated greatly and would give rise to the Academy Awards later in the year. The Best movies of the day were "Sunrise," "The General,"The Kid Brother" and "The Jazz Singer." MUSIC we liked..."My Heart S . ...
Dr. Charles Drew, American physician who specialized in blood preservation. He developed ways to store, collect, and process large volumes of blood in blood banks for transfusion. Dr. Drew standardized the shipment of blood as well. As a leading authority in the field, he organized the blood plasma programs for Great Britain and the United States during World War II. In 1938, Drew received a Rockefeller Fellowship to study at Columbia University and train at the Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. There, he continued his exploration of blood-related matters with John Scudder. Drew developed a method for processing and preserving blood plasma, or blood without cells. Plasma lasts much longer than whole blood, making it possible to be stored or "banked" for longer periods of time. He discovered that the plasma could be dried and then reconstituted when needed. His research served as the basis of his doctorate thesis, "Banked Blood," and he received his doctorate degree in 1940. Drew became the first Afr ...
GOOD MORNING - TODAY IS SATURDAY, Feb. 2, the 33rd day of 2013 with 332 to follow. Sunrise in the Boston area is at 6:57 AM and sunset is at 4:58 PM. The moon is waning. The morning stars are Mercury, Mars and Saturn. The evening stars are Venus, Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune. Today is Groundhog day in the US and Candlemas in the Christian belief. ON THIS DAY: In 962 Otto I invaded Italy and is crowned Holy Roman Emperor. In 1536 the Argentine city of Buenos Aires was founded by Pedro de Mendoza of Spain. In 1653 New Amsterdam -- now New York City -- was incorporated. In 1801 the first parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland assembled. In 1848 the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo formally ended the Mexican War. In 1848 the United States paid Mexico $15 million for lands that eventually became Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas. In 1863 Samuel Langhorne Clemens decided to use the pseudonym "Mark Twain." In 1876 the National Baseball League was founded with eight teams: Boston, Chicag ...
Outlines For Essential Factors In The Perils of Peace: America's Struggle for Survival After Yorktown On October 19, 1781, Great Britain's best army surrendered to General George Washington at Yorktown. But the future of the 13 former colonies was far from clear. A 13,000 man British army still occupied New York City, and another 13,000 regulars and armed loyalists were scattered from Canada to Savannah, Georgia. Meanwhile, Congress had declined to a mere 24 members, and the national treasury was empty. The American army had not been paid for years and was on the brink of mutiny. In Europe, America's only ally, France, teetered on the verge of bankruptcy and was soon reeling from a disastrous naval defeat in the Caribbean. A stubborn George III dismissed Yorktown as a minor defeat and refused to yield an acre of my dominions in America. In Paris, Ambassador Benjamin Franklin confronted violent hostility to France among his fellow members of the American peace delegation. In his riveting new book, Thomas F ...
A great article by Nancy Rubin Stuart: Rites and Lights of the Winter Solstice Friday, December 21st marks the winter solstice, a time when the North Pole tilts furthest away from the sun at 23.5 degrees, producing the longest night in the Northern Hemisphere. In the United States the sun will shine for less than ten hours on Friday: in New York City nine hours and 15 minutes; Chicago, nine hours and 7 minutes; and Los Angeles, nine hours and 53 minutes. Thanks to scientific knowledge, we understand why December 21st is the shortest day in the year. But that wasn't so for ancient human beings, who feared the sun might never shine long enough again to grow crops. So integral was sunlight to early man's survival that monuments surviving from the late Neolithic and Bronze Ages (most famously, Great Britain's Stonehenge and Ireland's Newgrange) reveal large rocks carefully placed to identify the timing of the winter solstice. Once that day was confirmed, prehistoric man followed rituals which often reappear i ...
Today In History • 1652 - Jan van Riebeeck mentions seeing a comet at the Cape (South Africa). • 1777 - France recognised American independence. • 1791 - A traffic regulation in New York City established the first street to go 'One Way'. • 1830 - South American patriot Simon Bolivar died in Colombia. • 1890 - The railway line between Cape Town and Durban in South Africa is opened. • 1891 - Msiri, king of Garanganja (Katanga in the DR Congo), dies in battle. • 1895 - George L Brownell received a patent for his paper-twine machine. • 1903 - The first successful gasoline-powered airplane flight took place near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. Orville and Wilbur Wright made the flight. • 1914 - Great Britain declares Egypt a protectorate. • 1920 - South Africa receives the League of Nations mandate over then South West Africa (now Namibia). • 1939 - The German pocket battleship Graf Spee was scuttled by its crew, bringing the World War II Battle of the Rio de la Plata, off Uruguay, to an end. ...
more mullins, secrets... showing the economic control of America rests in London... CHAPTER SIX The London Connection "So you see, my dear Coningsby, that the world is governed by very different personages from what is imagined by those who are not behind the scenes."55--Disraeli, Prime Minister of England during Queen Victoria’s reign. In 1775, the colonists of America declared their independence from Great Britain, and subsequently won their freedom by the American Revolution. Although they achieved political freedom, financial independence proved to be a more difficult matter. In 1791, Alexander Hamilton, at the behest of European bankers, formed the first Bank of the United States, a central bank with much the same powers as the Bank of England. The foreign influences behind this bank, more than a century later, were able to get the Federal Reserve Act through Congress, giving them at last the central bank of issue for our economy. Although the Federal Reserve Bank was neither Federal, being owned b ...
October 26 today.. 1795 – The French Directory, a five-man revolutionary government, is created. 1854 - Charles William Post was born. He was the inventor of"Grape Nuts," "Postum" and "Post Toasties." 1858 - H.E. Smith patented the rotary-motion washing machine. 1861 – The Pony Express officially ceases operations. 1905 - Norway gained independence from Sweden. 1914 - Jackie Coogan was born. He became the first child to appear in a full-length movie, "TheKid." 1940 – The P-51 Mustang makes its maiden flight. 1942 - The U.S. ship Hornet was sunk in the Battle of Santa Cruz during World War II. 1947 – The Maharaja of Kashmir agrees to allow his kingdom to join India. 1951 - Winston Churchill became the prime minister of Great Britain. 1955 - New York City's "The Village Voice" was first published. 1957 - The Soviet Union announced that defense minister Marchal Georgi Zhukov had been relieved of his duties. 1958 - Pan American Airways flewits first Boeing 707 jetliner from New York City to Paris. 197 ...
Three firsts in New York City yesterday, yoga in Grand Central station during morning rush hour, espresso brownie with sea salt for afternoon snack, and the evening at Carnegie Hall to see the Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain. I love New York!
As a refresher, remember President Obama's international apology tour for America's "bad behavior" over the years to foreign leaders immediately after taking office in 2009? Remember when he proverbially flipped the bird to our friend Great Britain by returning a Winston Churchill bust that sat on the Oval Office for years just two weeks after his inauguration? Remember when President Obama threw our only true ally in the Middle East, Israel, under the bus by taking the Palestineans' side and asking the Jewish State to go back to indefensible 1967 borders? Remember when President Obama and his Attorney General Eric Holder wanted to try those responsible for 9/11 not in military tribunals, but in New York City, just blocks away from where they murdered 3,000 innocent Americans? Remember when President Obama offered Russia more "flexibility" after his re-election in November? Remember when Obama's closest White House advisers leaked highly classified national security secrets and intelligence to the press i ...
Your Majesty, there is no second. The first America's Cup was held in 1851, by the Royal Yacht Squadron of Great Britain as a race around the Isle Of Wight. The cup was won by the America, a 100-foot schooner from New York City. Queen Victoria asked an attendant who came second. His reply has become the motto of the competition. Click here for more America's Cup history. Napa Valley is the Official Wine Region of the 34th America’s Cup. For Unrivaled Access, Visit SAILNAPAVALLEY.COM
On This Day In History: Sep 12, 1951: Sugar Ray Robinson wins back belt , former middleweight champion Sugar Ray Robinson defeats Randy Turpin to win back the belt in front of 61,370 spectators at the Polo Grounds in New York City. Robinson, a New York City native, had lost the belt to Turpin two months prior in Turpin’s native London. By 1951, Sugar Ray Robinson was considered the best pound-for-pound fighter in boxing history. That summer, Robinson traveled to Great Britain for a vacation and publicity tour before his scheduled July 10 bout with Turpin, in which Sugar Ray was heavily favored. To the surprise of his fans around the world, however, the surprisingly strong Turpin battered Robinson and won the match in a 15-round decision. Afterward, Robinson requested and was granted a rematch. Two months later on September 12, the Polo Grounds set a middleweight fight attendance record for the rematch. The crowd was filled with well-known personalities from U.S. Army General Douglas MacArthur to stars ...
In June 1776, as Thomas Jefferson composed a draft of the Declaration of Independence from a second floor parlor of a bricklayer's house in Philadelphia, the largest invasion force in British Military History was headed for New York Harbor. By the time the last of the fifty-six signers had affixed their names to the final, edited document months later, an invading force of British soldiers had landed at Staten Island, the British had taken New York City, and the American patriots had committed themselves to a long and bloody struggle for liberty and independence. The Declaration announced to the world the separation of the thirteen colonies from Great Britain and the establishment of the United States of America. It explained the causes of this radical move with a long list of charges against the King. In justifying the Revolution, it asserted a universal truth about human rights in words that have inspired downtrodden people through the ages and throughout the world to rise up against their oppressors. J ...
With as little publicity as possible, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, on behalf of the OBAMA administration, will go to New York City to sign the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), now in the final stages of negotiation at the U.N., on July 27th. The treaty marks the beginning of an international crusade...
On This Day! 1965 - The Beach Boys' "California Girls" was released. 1967 - The Elvis Presley movie "Double Trouble" premiered. 1976 - Hall & Oates' "She's Gone" was released. 1978 - The movie "Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band," starring Peter Frampton and the Bee Gees, opened in New York City, NY. 1979 - Little Richard, billed as the Reverend Richard Penniman, spoke to a revival meeting in San Francisco about the dangers of rock & roll. 1987 - The movie biography of Richie Valens, "La Bamba," opened. 1990 - Pantera released "Cowboys From *** " It was their first major label release. 1990 - A wrongful death trial involving Judas Priest opened in Reno, NV. Parents had charged in a lawsuit that the band's "Stained Class" album contained subliminal messages that drove two teen-agers to attempt suicide. The judge cleared the group. 1995 - A three-night celebration of Frank Sinatra's 80th birthday began at Carnegie Hall. 1995 - Public Enemy postponed its televised farewell concert in Great Britain be ...
John Jay (Dec 12, 1745 – May 17, 1829) American statesman, Patriot, diplomat, a Founding Father of the United States, and the first Chief Justice of the United States (1789–95). Jay was born into a wealthy family of merchants and government officials in New York City. He became a lawyer and joined the New York Committee of Correspondence, and organized opposition to british rule. He joined a conservative political faction that, fearing "mob rule", sought to protect property rights and maintain the "rule of law" while resisting British violations of human rights. Jay served as the President of the Continental Congress from 1778 to 1779. During and after the American Revolution, Jay was a minister (ambassador) to Spain and France, helping to fashion United States foreign policy. His major diplomatic achievement was to negotiate favorable trade terms with Great Britain in the Jay Treaty of 1794. Jay, a proponent of strong, centralized government, worked to ratify the new Constitution in New York in 1788 ...
Perhaps you mistakenly thought, like I did until recently, that real investigative journalism into the criminal behavior in the dirtiest corners of the elites in big news, national politics and top law enforcement ended after Woodward and Bernstein's "Watergate" exposés. If you want to be shaken from your slumber with a revelation of just how down and dirty the networking between theses elites can and has gotten, you need look no further than the investigation which has been trickling out by dribs and drabs from FOX NEWS and Wall Street. Journal parent, News Corp. and their "Darth Vader" like leader, Rupert Murdoch seated atop this vast dark empire subverting even national government policies as revealed in Great Britain(so far). (News Corp. is an American multinational diversified mass media corporation headquartered in New York City, second largest in the world behind BBC) The story roll-up by Lowell Bergman, formerly of 60 Minutes and The New York Times and now of PBS Frontline is, in my view, the bes ...
May 7, 1789…The first Presidential Inaugural Ball was held in New York City. Each woman in attendance received a portrait of George Washington as a gift.1915…On its return trip from New York to Liverpool, the British ocean liner, Lusitania, was torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of Ireland and 1,198 lives were lost. The Lusitania was carrying a cargo of ammunition from the U.S. to Great Britain. This was Germany’s reason for the attack even though the ship was also carrying more than 2,000 civilian men, women and children.1940…Winston Churchill became British Prime Minister, an office he held through 1945. He returned to 10 Downing Street in 1951 for a second term as PM that lasted until 1955.1941…Glenn Miller & His Orchestra recorded "Chattanooga Choo Choo." The 78 RPM release went on to sell more than 1.2 million copies and was on the pop chart for nine weeks.1945…U.S. General Dwight D. Eisenhower met German Field Marshal Jodl in a schoolhouse in Rheims, France to accept Germany's un ...
May 5, 1494…On his second trip to the Western Hemisphere, explorer Christopher Columbus sighted the island of Jamaica and later named it Santa Gloria.1814…During the War of 1812, British forces attacked and destroyed Ft. Ontario in Oswego, New York at the eastern end of Lake Ontario. Later on the same site, a new construction of the fort was undertaken due to American tensions with Great Britain and to check smuggling activities between Canada and the United States.1821…On the island of St. Helena where he had been in exile, Napoleon Bonaparte died of stomach cancer at age 51.1847…The American Medical Association (AMA) was organized in Philadelphia.1891…The Music Hall (later Carnegie Hall) in New York City had its grand opening with first performer Pyotr Llych Tchaikovsky.1900…After six years in operation, The Billboard, later called just Billboard magazine, began weekly instead of monthly publication.1904…The third "perfect game" (no baserunners allowed) in the major leagues, and the first ...
today in history,0408 - Theodosius II succeeded to the throne of Constantinople. 1308 - King Albert was murdered by his nephew John, because he refused his share of the Habsburg lands. 1486 - Christopher Columbus convinced Queen Isabella to fund an expedition to the West Indies. 1707 - England, Wales and Scotland were united to form Great Britain. 1751 - America’s first cricket tournament was held in New York City. 1805 - The state of Virginia passed a law requiring all freed slaves to leave the state, or risk either imprisonment or deportation. and today is a day that I don't care about! anything!
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