New York City & George Washington

New York is the most populous city in the United States and the center of the New York Metropolitan Area, one of the most populous metropolitan areas in the world. George Washington ( – , 1799) was the first President of the United States of America, serving from 1789 to 1797, and the dominant military and political leader of the United States from 1775 to 1799. He led the American victory over Great Britain in the American Revolutionary War as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army from 1775 to 1783, and presided over the writing of the Constitution in 1787. Washington became the first president by unanimous choice, and oversaw the creation of a strong, well-financed national government that maintained neutrality in the wars raging in Europe, suppressed rebellion and won acceptance among Americans of all types. 5.0/5

New York City George Washington Federal Hall United States New York Continental Army New Jersey Wall Street George Washington Bridge Hudson River Revolutionary War Ground Zero American Revolution Fraunces Tavern General George Washington Continental Congress

Henry Knox, one of George Washington's young generals, on New York City
Douglas Fairbanks hoisted Charlie Chaplin at the foot of President George Washington's statue, New York City, 1918.
On this day in 1789, on the balcony of Federal Hall in New York City, George Washington took the oath of office... https:…
1789 – At Federal Hall on Wall Street in New York City, George Washington takes the oath of office to become the first elected President
Today in History: 1789, President-elect George Washington moved into the 1st executive mansion, the Franklin House in New York City. 🏛🌎🗽
I've been to the 9/11 memorial in New York City. If you ever go, you must visit St. Paul's Chapel, where George Washington worshipped.
1776: Amer Rev - Gen. George Washington appointed Major Gen. Israel Putnam commander of the troops in defense of New Y…
The Jeffrey's Hook Lighthouse under the George Washington Bridge in New York City, NY. It was made famous in the ...
Learn Our History Today: On November 16, 1776, during the American Revolution, Fort Washington, New York fell to Hessian forces under Lieutenant General Wilhelm von Knyphausen. The last major patriot defensive position on the New York side of the Hudson River, the fall of Fort Washington was absolutely devastating to the American cause. Along with the three thousand men who were captured when the fort fell, all of the cannons, ammunition, and supplies housed in the important fortification were also lost. These supplies were sorely needed by the patriot army of General Washington, which after a series of desperate and deadly battles in and around New York City was now a shadow of its former self. With no defensive fortifications left, and little to no ammunition and supplies, George Washington and his army were now forced into a headlong retreat. Across the state of New Jersey, it was said that one could track Washington’s army simply by following the paths of blood in the snow, and the British certainly ...
October 28, 1776 The Battle of White Plains was a battle in the New York and New Jersey campaign of the American Revolutionary War fought on October 28, 1776, near White Plains, New York. Following the retreat of George Washington's Continental Army northward from New York City, British General William Howe landed troops in Westchester County, intending to cut off Washington's escape route. Alerted to this move, Washington retreated farther, establishing a position in the village of White Plains but failed to establish firm control over local high ground. Howe's troops drove Washington's troops from a hill near the village; following this loss, Washington ordered the Americans to retreat farther north. Later British movements chased Washington across New Jersey and into Pennsylvania. Washington then crossed the Delaware and surprised a brigade of Hessian troops in the December 26 Battle of Trenton. Background Main article: New York and New Jersey campaign British General William Howe, after evacuating Bos ...
Happy Birthday Nicole! October 3: In 1712 the Duke of Montrose issues a warrant for the arrest of Rob Roy MacGregor; in 1778 Captain James Cook anchors in Alaska; in 1789 George Washington makes the first Thanksgiving Day designated by the national government of the U.S.; in 1849 author Edgar Allan Poe is found delirious in a gutter in Baltimore under mysterious circumstances; in 1863 the last Thursday in November is declared as Thanksgiving Day by United States President Abraham Lincoln as are Thursdays, November 30, 1865 and November 29, 1866; in 1872 the Bloomingdale brothers open their first store at 938 Third Avenue, New York City; in 1873 Captain Jack and companions are hanged for their part in the Modoc War; in 1942 the Nazis successfully launch a V2 rocket for the first time and it is the first man-made object to reach space; in 1955 The Mickey Mouse Club debuts on ABC; in 1961 The *** Van *** Show premieres on CBS-TV; in 1962 Mercury spacecraft Sigma 7 is launched from Cape Canaveral with astro . ...
Vintage Postcard of the Week: This is a late 1940's linen postcard of the Henry Hudson Parkway looking north toward the George Washington Bridge in New York City, part of the route in my new video coming Monday afternoon.
Today in 1776: George Washington and the Continental Army evacuate New York City.
Through the Second Continental Congress, the Patriots fought the British in the American Revolutionary War (1775 - 1783). The British sent invasion armies and used their powerful navy to blockade the coast. Former Virginia militia soldier George Washington became the Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army, working with Congress and the states to raise armies and neutralize the influence of Loyalists. While precise proportions are not known, about 40% of the colonists were Patriots, 20% were Loyalists and the rest were neutral or did not reveal loyalties. As the war continued some changed their loyalties. Claiming British rule was tyrannical and violated the rights of Englishmen, the Patriot leadership professed the political philosophies of liberalism and republicanism to reject monarchy and aristocracy, and proclaimed that all men are created equal. The Continental Congress declared independence in July 1776, when Thomas Jefferson as the primary author, and the Congress unanimously approved an edited ...
As a little girl, I’ll never forget going on a class trip to Jumel Terrace in New York City where we learned about the life of America’s first president, George Washington. There, I was fascinated, along with the rest of my classmates, to hear the story of George Washington’s false teeth. Our tour g…
Some fun 4th of July facts for ya . America’s independence was actually declared by the Continental Congress on July 2, 1776. On that night the Pennsylvania Evening Post published the statement: “This day the Continental Congress declared the United Colonies Free and Independent States.” So what happened on the Glorious Fourth? The document justifying the act of Congress — you know it as Thomas Jefferson’s Declaration of Independence — was adopted on the fourth, as is indicated on the document itself, which is, one supposes, the cause for all the confusion. As one scholar has observed, what has happened is that the document announcing the event has overshadowed the event itself. When did Americans first celebrate independence? Congress waited until July 8, when Philadelphia threw a big party, including a parade and the firing of guns. The army under George Washington, then camped near New York City, heard the news July 9 and celebrated then. Georgia got the word August 10. And when did the Bri ...
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On this day in 1775 George Washington was appointed head of the Continental Army. 1836 Arkansas became the 25th state. 1844 Charles Goodyear received a patent for a process to strengthen rubber. 1849 James Polk, the 11th president of the United States, died in Nashville, Tenn., at age 53. 1864 Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton signed an order establishing a military burial ground, which became Arlington National Cemetery. 1902 The 20th Century Limited, an express passenger train between New York and Chicago, began service. 1904 More than 1,000 people died when fire erupted aboard the steamboat General Slocum in New York City's East River. 1923 Baseball Hall of Famer Lou Gehrig made his major league debut with the New York Yankees. 1969 The variety show "Hee Haw" premiered on CBS. 1978 King Hussein of Jordan married 26-year-old American Lisa Halaby, who became Queen Noor. 1991 Mount Pinatubo in the northern Philippines exploded in one of the biggest volcanic eruptions of the 20th century, killing about 800 ...
Our first president, George Washington, lived in three houses. The first two were in New York City. The third was in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Finally, Washington decided to compromise. He picked a patch of land on the Potomac River eventually called Washington DC
On April 30, 1789, George Washington climbed to the second-floor balcony of Federal Hall in New York City, then...
The band members posing with George Washington at Federal Hall in New York City.
On this day in US History, 1789 President-elect George Washington leaves Mount Vernon for his inauguration in New York City. 1862 Abraham Lincoln signs a bill ending slavery in the District of Columbia. 1912 Harriet Quimby becomes the first woman to fly across the English Channel. 1947 Much of Texas City, Texas, is destroyed when a ship carrying fertilizer blows up in its harbor, killing nearly 600 people. 1963 Martin Luther King Jr. writes his “Letter from Birmingham Jail” while incarcerated for protesting against segregation. 2007 The deadliest School Shooting in U.S. history leaves 33 dead at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia.
"Common Core will be here forever", "Common Core is NOT going away", "Bill Gates has TOO much money and influence." "Pearson owns half the world" I'VE HEARD IT ALL BEFORE ! Time for a little NON Common Core history lesson: By the end of 1776, George Washington and the American forces had been outmaneuvered and badly beaten by the British RIGHT HERE in New York City. Washington had basically had his *** handed to him by General Howe and General Cornwallis. We looked like *** for even TRYING to free ourselves from England! Plenty of people were ready to pack it in, give up, and say "We'll never get rid of the British" It was EASY to look at the British as being unbeatable, and many people did. RIGHT NOW it is easy to look at Common Core as something that will be here forever. Guess what? Other, stronger, more courageous voices KNEW that the future was NOT set in stone. They KNEW they had to defend their rights and our freedom. More importantly, they persevered. They LEARNED how to beat an enemy who was ...
25 interesting facts about New York City! 1. New York City has 4,000 street food vendors. 2. The average temperature of New York City’s pavement on a hot summer day is 150 degrees. 3. 100 million Chinese food cartons are used annually in New York City. 4. Gennaro Lombardi opened the first US pizzeria in NYC in 1895. 5. Manhattan’s Chinatown is the largest Chinese enclave in the Western Hemisphere. 6. New York City was was briefly the US capital from 1789 to 1790 and was the site of the inauguration of George Washington as President on April 30, 1789. 7. The state fruit is the apple. 8. New Yorkers travel an average of 40 minutes to work each day. 9. More than 47 percent of New York City’s residents over the age of 5 speak a language other than English at home. 10. The Federal Reserve Bank on New York’s Wall Street contains vaults that are located 80 feet beneath the bank and hold about 25 percent of the world’s gold bullion. 11. More than 250 feature films are shot on location in New York City e ...
Today, here in New York City, where winter seems to never die, I was once again reminded of just how small the world really is. I went to the Metropolitan Museum today to see the Martin Guitar exhibit in the music hall section. It's my first day off in 8 days and I was pretty punchy, needing something to look at besides the clothing I sell and the folks who stroll Madison Avenue. For you Martin Guitar fans, the exhibit has the Martin Guitar Eric Clapton played on the MTV show 'unplugged'. Pretty amazing. After, I drifted to the Western art and American exhibit. Imagine that. It amazes me what guys like Russell and Remington did with depicting the Calvary man, The High Plains Indian and the wild stock. Just seems so real to me. Then, up to the American wing to see my old pal, George Washington in every state of repose. Never gets old. On my way out I wanted to scoop up a gift for a Texas Amigo who hosted me and Ashley for a top shelf night out on the town, complete with a night night cap high a top the Fou ...
By Christmas Eve of 1776, the American Revolution was, in essence, over. The Americans had lost. George Washington was out of options. His army, now down to only a few thousand, had lost seven battles in a row and was freezing on the west bank of the Delaware River awaiting the end. The British, on the other hand had 33,000 soldiers, well over a hundred ships and were partying in New York City and preparing for the final surrender. Most of the American troops had resolve, but they had lost hope that England could ever be defeated. Half of Washington’s army, 1,500 men, were quitting that week and going home because their enlistments were up. Washington decided on one final offensive. He gathered the same fishermen who had helped him retreat in August from New York and had his beleaguered troops ferried across the half frozen Delaware at midnight on Christmas Day. Just before they boarded the boats, the General had the American Crisis, the challenge by Thomas Paine, read to the men. “These are the times ...
Meet Samuel "Black Sam" Fraunces, famed West Indian innkeeper and chef who migrated to New York City in the 1750s and became the first White House chef for President George Washington. According to Juliet Walker in THE HISTORY OF BLACK BUSINESS IN AMERICA (P. 43) he portrayed himself as a "caterer" and went on to purchase the elegant DeLancy mansion where he opened it as a tavern and inn. The Fraunces Tavern became famous during the Revolutionary War as lodging for John Adams and the Massachusetts delegation. After independence from England was declared, the Fraunces Tavern became the stopover for members of the Continental Congress -- including future president George Washington and his staff. During the war, Fraunces enlisted in the Continental Army while his wife managed the tavern. He served in Washington's own division and returned to his tavern business after the war. When Washington was elected president, he appointed Fraunces as the first White House chef and the tavern retained its reputation as ...
raccoon (n.) Look up raccoon at Dictionary.com also racoon, c.1600, arocoun, from Algonquian (Powhatan) arahkun, from arahkunem "he scratches with the hands." Early forms included Capt. John Smith's raugroughcum. In Norwegian, vaskebjørn, literally "wash-bear." *** (n.) Look up *** at Dictionary.com short for raccoon, 1742, American English. It was the nickname of Whig Party members in U.S. c.1848-60, as the raccoon was the party's symbol, and it also had associations with frontiersmen (who stereotypically wore raccoon-skin caps), which probably ultimately was the source of the Whig Party sense (the party's 1840 campaign was built on a false image of wealthy William Henry Harrison as a rustic frontiersman). The insulting U.S. meaning "black person" was in use by 1837, said to be ultimately from Portuguese barracoos "building constructed to hold slaves for sale." No doubt boosted by the enormously popular blackface minstrel act "Zip *** (George Washington Dixon) which debuted in New York City in 1834. ...
The first State of the Union address, as required by the U.S. Constitution (A2S3), was delivered to Congress in person by George Washington on January 8, 1790 in New York City. In 1801, Th. Jefferson changed the practice, wrote his address and sent it off to Congress, where it was read by a clerk. T.J. disliked the optics of a grand speech, finding it too regal, too reminiscent of Britain's annual "Speech From the Throne". Woodrow Wilson revived the personal speech in 1913 and, with a few reversions in the late-20thC., former-president Jimmy Carter being the last, thus far, to send a scribing to Congress, it is a grand speech once again. What would you prefer? Did you watch our SOTU last night? What did you find of interest? What made you applaud and cheer, or cringe and snicker?
The years we grew up were the best times our country went through. I graduated from Maine - Endwell Senior High School in 1966. Even though the world was in turmoil we did not feel that until the last years in High School. 1962 they removed prayer from schools. Then Bible reading was also removed. Soon afterwards abortions were allowed, state by state. Not one country has survived their great powers after killing babies. JFK physical fitness program was getting us to be fit and ready for Viet Nam. Kennedy was killed Nov 22, 1963, The world we knew before starts to crumble. I know you know all this. Then 911,,, God removes the hedge of protections that allows us to be stuck down. Where??? What would become Wall Street, NYC. It was down the road in the chapel that George Washington and the first Congress of the United States dedicates our country to God. On what will become Wall Street is our first Capital of the United States. Yes it was New York City. Today they continue to remove God from our countries . ...
The traffic on the George Washington Bridge is nothing to joke about. Anyone who has driven from New Jersey to New York City knows the...
The George Washington Bridge (known informally as the GW Bridge,[4] the GWB,[5] the GW,[6] or the George[7]) is a double-deckedsuspension bridge spanning the Hudson River, connecting the Washington Heights neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City to Fort Lee, Bergen County, New Jers...
By the time you read my NEW YEARS EVE post I should be dancing n floating on a cruise boat up the Henry Hudson river under the George Washington Bridge then down the East River under the Brooklyn bridge then circle n wave at the Staue Of Liberty as the NEW YEARS DAY fireworks light up New York City skyline on my birthday
*ON THIS DAY IN WEATHER HISTORY* THURSDAY DECEMBER 26, 2013 1776 - George Washington crossed the ice clogged Delaware River. He marched on Trenton in the midst of snow and sleet thus surprising and capturing many of the British garrison. (David Ludlum) 1947 - New York City received a record 26.4 inches of snow in 24 hours, with as much as 32 inches reported in the suburbs. The heavy snow brought traffic to a standstill, and snow removal cost eight million dollars. Thirty thousand persons were called upon to remove the 100 million tons of snow. The storm claimed 27 lives. (26th-27th) (David Ludlum) 1983 - Miami, FL, established a December record with a morning low of 33 degrees. Just three days earlier, and again three days later, record warm temperatures were reported in Florida, with daytime highs in the 80s. (The National Weather Summary) 1987 - Freezing rain plagued parts of the south central U.S., from northwest Texas to southwestern Missouri. Southwestern Missouri was turned into a huge skating rink ...
Events December 9 1788 - George Washington sold his race horse, Magnolia, to Colonel Henry Lee. Washington reportedly got 5,000 acres of Kentucky farmland in the trade. 1793 - The first daily newspaper in New York City was founded by Noah Webster. The American Minerva was published for the first time this day. 1884 - Levant Richardson of Chicago, IL received his patent for the ball-bearing roller skate. His teeth chattered all the way to the Post Office box, downtown. The pavement was kind of rough on those early skates... 1926 - The U.S. Golf Association legalized steel-shaft golf clubs. Many of the new clubs are still wrapped around tree trunks, put there by angry golfers who couldn’t make them work any better than the clubs made with hickory sticks. 1934 - Because of ground conditions, the New York Giants football team preferred to wear basketball sneakers, as they defeated the Chicago Bears, 30-13, for the NFL championship. 1940 - The Longines Watch Company signed for the first FM radio advertising ...
Tomorrow on CBS Sunday Morning: Mo Rocca takes a rare, behind-the-scenes glimpse into the world of The Freemasons, the world’s oldest and largest fraternity, whose members include George Washington, Gerald Ford, Henry Ford and John Wayne. Anthony Mason visits Katz’s Deli, a landmark delicatessen in New York City known for its huge pastrami sandwiches, which is marking its 125th anniversary. Starting at 8am on CBS44.
Today in OUR story - December 4 * "1783 - George Washington's farewell address to his troops is held at Fraunces Tavern in New York City. The tavern is owned by Samuel "Black Sam" Fraunces, a wealthy West Indian of African and French descent who aided Revolutionary forces with food and money. 1807 - Prince Hall, activist and Masonic leader, joins the ancestors in Boston, Massachusetts. 1833 - The American Anti-Slavery Society is founded in Philadelphia by James Barbados, Robert Purvis, James McCrummell, James Forten, Jr., John B. Vashon and others. 1895 - Fort Valley State College is established in Georgia. 1895 - The South Carolina Constitutional Convention adopted a new constitution with "understanding clause" designed to eliminate African American voters. 1899 - The Fifty-Sixth Congress convenes with only one African American congressman, George H. White, from North Carolina. 1906 - Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. is founded on the campus of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, becoming the first . ...
Wednesday, December 4, 2013, the 338th day of the year. Today is Environment Day in Thailand and Navy Day in India and Italy. On This Date in History: 771: King Carloman died and his brother, Charlemagne, became King of the Franks. 1110: During the First Crusade, the Crusaders capture and sack Sidon, near Tyre, in present day Lebanon. 1642: Cardinal Richelieu, who had been King Louis XV's Chief Minister, died. 1674: French Missionary and explorer Father Jacques Marquette founded a mission on the shores of Lake Michigan which the Indians had named for an exotic wild onion, Chicago, which would become the third largest city in the U.S. Happy Birthday. 1679: Thomas Hobbes, English philosopher, died. 1745: Charles Edward Stewart's Army (Bonnie Prince Charlie) reached Derby. Its furthermost advancement point during the Second Jacobite Rebellion. 1783: George Washington bids a tearful farewell to his officers at Fraunces Tavern in New York City following the British troop withdrawal at the end of the R ...
Witnessed George Washington's Memorial Funeral JOHN WILLIAM CHASE LEVERIDGE (1792-1886) Death Of The First President On 18 December 1799 the nation's first President, George Washington, was interred in his tomb on his estate at Mount Vernon, Virginia. News of his death was not published in New York City until December 19. Many places in the United States held funeral memorials and in New York City the funeral memorial was held Tuesday on the last day of the year in 1799. Elaborate Procession According to the New York Times on the 100th anniversary of the funeral memorial on 31 December 1899 wrote - "Near the end of the procession after large contingents of military and political officials was the large bier heavily draped in black carrying a large funeral urn, over which hovered the large figure of an eagle with dropping wings and bearing in it's beak an emblem commemorate of the death of Washington. All business was suspended, the flags floated at half mast and shipping and public buildings, minute g ...
25 NOV Today in Military History 1177 Battle of Montgisard: King Baldwin IV of Jerusalem & 200 knights defeat Saladin 1185 Uberto Crivelli is elected Pope as Urban III (1185-1187) 1277 Giovanni Gaetani Orsini is elected Pope as Nicholas III (1277-1280), ending a six month vacancy 1357 Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV issues letter of protection to the Jews of Strasbourg 1405 Padua surrenders to the Venetians after a long siege 1643 Battle of Tuttlingen: Imperialists defeat the French 1758 The British capture Fort Duquesne from the French 1760 King George III ascends the throne 1775 Congress begins issuing Letters of Marque and Reprisal 1783 Evacuation Day: the British leave New York City, their last base in the US, and that evening Governor George Clinton of New York honors George Washington with a banquet at Fraunces' Tavern, where thirteen toasts were offered, beginning with "The United States of America" 1790 The Veteran Corps of Artillery of the State of New York is organized at the City Arms Tavern, Bro ...
This day in the past for November 14th… → 1380 - 633 years ago - Charles VI is crowned king of France at age 12. His frequent bouts of mental illness earn him the nickname "Charles the Mad." → 1666 - Samuel Pepys reports on 1st blood transfusion (between dogs). → 1732 - The first US professional librarian, Louis Timothee, hired in Philadelphia. → 1765 - Robert Fulton born, builder of first steamboat: the Clermont; dies Feb 24, 1815. → 1778 - Philadelphia - George Washington writes Henry Laurens, president of the Continental Congress, that his French ally, the Marquis de Lafayette, wants to undertake a campaign against the British in Canada, to regain New France. → 1792 - Capt George Vancouver is 1st Englishman to enter San Francisco Bay. → 1812 - As Napoleon Bonaparte's army retreats form Moscow, temperatures drop to 20º below zero. → 1832 - The first horsecar (a streetcar drawn by horses) was displayed in New York City; fare 12 cents. The vehicle had room for 30 people in three compart ...
For the most part, and with the exception of the publication of the Declaration of Independence, 1776 had been a brutal year for Patriot morale. The Continental Army, under the command of George Washington, had been more or less routed in and around New York City, suffering tremendous casualties. Morale was low and the ragtag Continental Army was forced to retreat through New Jersey to the west side of the Delaware River into Pennsylvania. On the other side of the river, in Trenton, N.J. were three regiments of Hessian soldiers (German soldiers) numbering about 1,400. General Washington planned an attack on the Hessians from three directions to be executed on December 26, 1776, the day after Christmas. As the Continental Army prepared to cross the Delaware River on their way to Trenton, sleet and snow had begun to fall, delaying the crossing. With great effort and difficulty, the army eventually crossed the river in Durham boats, and the horses and artillery were ferried across. Two men fell overboard dur ...
Where do you 'go' when you read? Do you get so engrossed in the story that you feel you are virtually on that journey? Are you oblivious to what is going on around you? Walk around New York City, traveling in the footsteps of inspirational people including George Washington, Mark Twain, Sojourner Truth and more -
Zachary Scott (Febr 21, 1914 – Oct 3, 1965) American actor, most notable for his roles as villains and "mystery men". Born in Austin, Texas, he was a distant cousin of George Washington, and his grandfather had been a very successful cattle rancher. Scott intended to be a doctor like his father, Zachary Scott Sr. (1880–1964), but after attending the University of Texas for a while, he decided to switch to acting. He signed on as a cabin boy on a freighter which took him to England, where he acted in repertory theatre for a while, before he returned to Austin, and began acting in local theater. Alfred Lunt discovered Scott in Texas and convinced him to move to New York City, where he appeared on Broadway. Scott made his debut on Broadway in a revival of Ah, Wilderness! in 1941 with a small role as a bartender. Three years later, Jack Warner saw him in a performance of Those Endearing Young Charms and signed him to appear in The Mask of Dimitrios. He appeared the next year in Mildred Pierce to much ac . ...
This is the water under the George Washington Bridge in New York City.
* Today in Black History - July 10 * 1775 - General Horatio Gates, George Washington's adjutant general issues an order excluding African Americans from serving in the Continental Army. 1875 - Mary McLeod Bethune is born in Mayesville, South Carolina. She will become a noted educator and founder of Daytona Normal and Industrial Institute in Daytona Beach, Florida in 1904 (now Bethune-Cookman College). In 1935, she will also found the National Council of *** Women. She will join the ancestors on May 18, 1955. 1927 - David Norman Dinkins is born in Trenton, New Jersey. He will move as a child to Harlem. He will serve as a marine during World War II and will attend and graduate from Howard University after the war. He will receive his law degree from Brooklyn Law School in 1956. He was in private practice until 1975, even though he was active in politics and held some office. He began full time elective office in New York City that year and held the offices of City Clerk and Manhattan Borough President. In . ...
ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY: 0118 - Hadrian, Rome's new emperor, made his entry into the city. 0455 - Avitus, the Roman military commander in Gaul, became Emperor of the West. 1540 - England's King Henry VIII had his 6-month-old marriage to his fourth wife, Anne of Cleves, annulled. 1609 - In a letter to the crown, the emperor Rudolf II granted Bohemia freedom of worship. 1755 - General Edward Braddock was killed when French and Indian troops ambushed his force of British regulars and colonial militia. 1776 - The American Declaration of Independence was read aloud to Gen. George Washington's troops in New York. 1789 - In Versailles, the French National Assembly declared itself the Constituent Assembly and began to prepare a French constitution. 1790 - The Swedish navy captured one third of the Russian fleet at the naval battle of Svensksund in the Baltic Sea. 1792 - S.L. Mitchell of Columbia College in New York City became the first Professor of Agriculture. 1808 - The leather-splitting machine was patented by ...
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Small World I've been off the grid for a week and now that I've returned I wanted to share one of the many things I enjoyed and learned in Reykjavik, Iceland. Alexander Stirling Calder was an American sculptor and teacher. He was also the father of sculptor and Roxbury resident Alexander (Sandy) Calder. While Stirling Calder's best-known works are George Washington as President on the Washington Square Arch in New York City and the Swann Memorial Fountain in Philadelphia, another is the Leif Eriksson Memorial in Reykjavík, Iceland. In 1929, he won the national competition for a monumental statue of Leif Eriksson, to be given by the United States to Iceland in commemoration of the 1000th anniversary of the Icelandic Parliament. Standing before the Hallgrímskirkja, the Lutheran cathedral in Reykjavík, and facing west toward the Atlantic Ocean and Greenland, the Leif Eriksson Memorial (1929–32) has become as iconic for Icelanders as the Statue of Liberty is for Americans. I stood at this statue and lat ...
Have a Fun yet Safe 4th of July!!! Independence day quiz (found on About.com puzzles) 1) Who was the primary author of the Declaration of Independence? a) Benjamin Franklin b) George Washington c) Thomas Jefferson d) John Adams 2) After losing New York City to the British, which river did George Washington and his men cross on Christmas Day in 1776 in a prelude to a surprise attack on the Hessian garrison? a) Hudson River b) Potomac River c) Connecticut River d) Delaware River 3) The "midnight ride" of which American patriot was later immortalized by poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. a) John Hancock b) Samuel Adams c) Joseph Warren d) Paul Revere 4) Which of the following was not one of the thirteen original colonies? a) Georgia b) Virginia c) Vermont d) Massachusetts Find more fun and interesting facts on about.com (answer Key...1=C, 2=D, 3=D, 4=C )
June 28: Have a "perfect" day! (For the math geeks, the only day of the year when the date and numerical month are Perfect Numbers - positive integers that are equal to the sum of their proper positive divisors: 6=1+2+3; 28=1+2+4+7+14.) In 1776 the Battle of Sullivan's Island ends, the first decisive victory for American troops in the Revolutionary War; also in 1776 Thomas Hickey, a member of George Washington's guard, is hanged for mutiny and sedition; in 1838 the coronation of Queen Victoria; in 1914 Austrian Archduke Ferdinand and his wife are assassinated in Sarajevo triggering World War I; in 1919 the Treaty of Versailles is signed in Paris officially ending WWI; in 1969 the *** Rights Movement begins with New York City's Stonewall Riots. Birthdays: Henry VIII (1491); Flemish painter Peter Paul Rubens (1577); Methodist theologian John Wesley (1703); composer Richard Rodgers (1902); actor/director/writer Mel Brooks (1926); NASCAR legend Junior Johnson (1931); actor Pat Morita (1932); Procol Harum bass ...
June 15, 2013, "The Ides of June", the 166th day of the year. On this date in History: 1215: British Nobles force King John to sign and put his seal on the Magna Carta at Runnymede, England. A move that is generally considered as the birth of freedom in Western Civilization. 1775: George Washington, is appointed by the Second Continental Congress head of the Army. 1864: Secretary of War Edwin Stanton signs an order establishing the expropriated property of Robert E. Lee as a military burial site which came to be known as Arlington National Cemetary. 1904: The steamboat General Slocum caught fire in the East River in New York City killing over 1,000 aboard. 1938: Baseball pitcher Johnny Vander Meer threw his second consecutive no-hitter against the Brooklyn Dodgers in the first night game ever played at Ebbets Field. 1962: The Students for a Democratic Society (S.D.S.) issued the Port Huron Statement. Birthdays Today: Rock Singer Steve Walsh (Kansas) is 62. Actress Julie Hagerty (Airplane) is 59. ...
It has been too long since we have taken a family vacation. We are going to New York City in July! Jordan, being 16, is excited about going to the Dakota and Strawberry Fields to be where Lennon once was. Me? I am excited about shopping on Fifth Avenue, visiting the 9/11 Memorial/Museum, going to the Fraunces Tavern where George Washington bid farewell to his troops, and reading Condoleezza Rice's book on the beach on the Jersey shore while my boys jet ski and "surf" in the ocean. Can't wait!
Today in History – 1768 - Captain James Cook sets sail on first voyage of discovery and maps the coasts of New Zealand and Australia. 1787 – The Constitutional Convention opened I Philadelphia with George Washington as president. 1861 – President Abraham Lincoln suspends the writ of habeas corpus during the Civil War. 1935 – Babe Ruth hits the last homerun of his career - his 714th at Forbes Field, Boston. 1950 – The first passenger cars are allowed on the new Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel in New York City. 1953 – The World’s first atomic shell is fired in Nevada. 1961 – President John F. Kennedy asks congress to approve program to send man to the moon. 1976 – George Lucas’ “Star Wars” opens across America. 1979 – The worst domestic air crash in US history occurs when American Airlines Flight 191 loses an engine just after takeoff from Chicago O’Hare, causing a violent crash that kills all 271 people aboard and two others on the ground. 2011 – Oprah Winfrey’s most-watched daytime ...
ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY: 585 BC - The first known prediction of a solar eclipse was made in Greece. 1085 - Alfonso VI took Toledo, Spain from the Moslems. 1787 - The Constitutional Convention opened in Philadelphia with George Washington presiding. 1810 - Argentina declared independence from Napoleonic Spain. 1844 - The gasoline engine was patented by Stuart Perry. 1844 - The first telegraphed news dispatch, sent from Washington, DC, to Baltimore, MD, appeared in the Baltimore "Patriot." 1895 - Oscar Wilde, a playwright, poet and novelist, was convicted of a morals charge and sentenced to prison in London. 1895 - James P. Lee first published "Gold in America -- A Practical Manual." 1911 - President of Mexico, Porfolio Diaz, resigned his office. 1925 - John Scopes was indicted for teaching the Darwinian theory in school. 1927 - Ford Motor Company announced that the Model A would replace the Model T. 1927 - The "Movietone News" was shown for the first time at the Sam Harris Theatre in New York City. 1935 - B ...
Today in 1789, George Washington took office as the 1st President of the US at Federal Hall in New York City.
PDPFF: George Washington and Chester A. Arthur were the only Presidents to be inaugurated in New York City. That is also the only notable thing about Chester A. Arthur's presidency.
1) a. Martin Van Buren, the 8th president. The previous presidents were born as British subjects. 2) a. George Washington. He was inaugurated in New York City on April 30 but before he left his native Virginia he had to borrow money from a neighbor to pay off his debts. 3) d. Teddy Roosevelt was the youngest serving president, assuming the job at the age of 42 in 1901 when President William McKinley was assassinated. Kennedy, at 43, was the youngest to be elected, in 1960. 4) a. William Howard Taft, the 27th president president, from 1909-1913, served as chief justice from 1921-1930. He was also dean of the University of Cincinnati Law School and U.S. secretary of war. 5) The six Jameses: Madison, Monroe, Polk, Buchanan, Garfield and Carter. 6) c. James Monroe, who dropped out of college at age 18 to fight in the Revolutionary War. On December 25, 1776, Monroe crossed the Delaware and led a charge at Trenton, getting wounded in the battle. He was hit in the left shoulder with a musket ball, which cut his ...
Mark your calendars! Saturday, May 4 at 11:00 I will be leading another tour of battlefield events that occurred at Historic New Bridge Landing, in River Edge, New Jersey. The featured topic this year will be the 1780 encampment and forage of the Continental Army at Steenrapie. George Washington and all his senior generals met at the Steuben House that September to determine the course of action for the remainder of the campaign. Washington had amassed an army of 13,000 men in Bergen County, only awaiting the arrival of 10,000 French troops and a large fleet to drive the British from New York City. Only half the French troops arrived, and those that did were too sick at Newport, Rhode Island to be of any use. That, coupled with a real scarcity of provisions, meant that not only was the army unable to attack New York City, it was on the point of starvation. Troops deserted by the dozen; morale sank, and the army took to plundering the inhabitants of Bergen County, as clearly shown by this letter fro ...
This Day in Music History for February 12th: ON THIS DAY February 12th: 1906 - George Cohans musical "George Washington," premieres in NYC. 1940 - "The Adventures of Superman," with Bud Collyer in the title role, began its 11-year run on radio as a syndicated show on New York City's WOR. It became a network show on Mutual in August 1942 as a 15-minute serial airing three to five times a week. 1956 - Dean Martin was at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Memories Are Made Of This. 1956 - Screamin' Jay Hawkins recorded "I Put a Spell On You." 1957 - The Coasters recorded "Young Blood." 1957 - The Crickets released the single "Maybe Baby." 1960 - Pat Boone's "Pat's Great Hits" album was certified Gold. 1961 - "Shop Around" by the Miracles on Tamla Records became the first million-selling single on one of Berry Gordy's Motown labels. It was also Motown's first record on Billboard's R&B singles chart. 1962 - At United Studios in Hollywood, Ray Charles recorded "Hide 'Nor Hair" and "At The Club." 1963 - At the C ...
Check out this keynote speech at President Obama's 2013 Inaugural Prayer Breakfast. 40 minutes total, yet seems like 5. Rabbi offers prophetic prayers for our President, our nation, and all of us. He connects Old Testament prophesy towards Israel to New York City and 911, to George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and to present day America. Not only prophetic, his message is bold, educational, and understandable. He calls us to action and it is serious stuff. There is NO political correctness, but rather prophetic truth and prophetic wisdom. It is raw. Take the time to listen, heed the message of old and of new, take the time to share it, and then commit the prophesy to memory and to your life. Our individual response will be either one of pride and defiance, or of one of humble obedience. I pray for the later - in and by our President, our nation, and each one of us!
In the love of Christ JESUS Emmanuel's mighty unconquerable Name (Philippians 2:10-11) who is Martin Luther King Jnr. - Abraham Lincoln, who is Ishmael Barack Hussein Obama the African (Kenya born) yet American Hawaii conceived - Joe Biden and all other high exalted names. who are all merely under the banner of the cursed Egyptian/Jewish Dung and Scarab Tree of the Sin of Luciferian witchcraft (1 Samuel 15:23)... Scripturally known as abomination that leadeth all unto desolation (Daniel 12:10-11 - Matthew 24:15) namely The Apotheosis of George Washington/Lucifer. which was secretly made as a rule of law by both houses of Masonic Congress, led by General Albert Pike (born as the new age unicorn - red heifer Boston Ma (Numbers 23:18). a blood ritual son of Lucifer/George Washington (Numbers 24:17-21), part and parcel to the modern day Antichrist simply known as David the Jewish/Egyptian Scarab Rockefeller/Solomon Sassoon born in New York City (12th of June 1915). In other words these are all the Antichrist ...
Rev Al Sharpton wants President Obama to be added to Mt Rushmore along with George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, and Theodore Roosevelt. Rev Sharpton claims that Teddy Roosevelt had limited accomplishments and wasn't really qualified to be on Mt Rushmore. Teddy in 1889 while serving on the US Civil Service Commission lead the reform effort to replace patronage with merit in the awarding of government jobs. In 1895, he became New York City police commissioner. In 1897 he served as Assistant Secretary of the Navy. In 1898 Teddy commanded the Rough Riders, including the charge up San Juan Hill during the Spanish American War. In the fall of 1898 he was elected Governor of New York. Elected Vice President in 1900. Assumed the Presidency after the assassination of President William McKinley. As President from 1901-1908, Teddy re-implementing the Sherman Anti-Trust Act of 1890, to break up some of the largest and most powerful corporations there-by making businesses more competitive. He secured ...
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Todays history jan6 0871 - England's King Alfred defeated the Danes at the Battle of Ashdown. 1205 - Philip of Swabia was crowned as King of the Romans. 1453 - Frederick III erected Austria into an Archduchy. 1540 - King Henry VIII of England was married to Anne of Cleves, his fourth wife. 1720 - The Committee of Inquiry on the South Sea Bubble published its findings. 1759 - George Washington and Martha Dandridge Custis were married. 1838 - Samuel Morse publicly demonstrated the telegraph for the first time. 1896 - The first American women’s six-day bicycle race was held at Madison Square Garden in New York City. 1900 - In India, it was reported that millions of people were dying from starvation. 1900 - Off of South Africa, the British seized the German steamer Herzog. The boat was released on January 22, 1900. 1912 - New Mexico became the 47th U.S. state. 1930 - The first diesel-engine automobile trip was completed after a run of 792 miles from Indianapolis, IN,to New York City, NY. 1931 - Thomas Ediso ...
Here’s tonight’s American History lesson kids. I was reading an article recently about how most American’s are feeling no impact of the long war in the Middle East and how less than 1% of military age Americans have served in the military. I then read an interesting statement regarding the general apathy of colonial Americans in the early stages of the American Revolution. General George Washington sent an early Philadelphian Revolutionary War hero to meet with the Colonial Congress in Philadelphia. His mission was to plead more money, supplies, and manpower following multiple embarrassing defeats in the defense of New York City. What General Thomas Mifflin found a people “divided and lethargic”. He said the people were, “slumbering under the shade of peace and in the full enjoyment of the sweets of commerce”. As we enjoy the “sweets of commerce” this season please remember we are still a country at war, our Soldiers and their families have been ridden hard these last 11-years.
The company that manufactures the greatest number of women's dresses each year is Mattel. Barbie's got to wear something George Washington spent about 7% of his annual salary on liquor Nearly one third of New York City public school teachers send their own children to private schools Al Gore's roommate in college (Harvard, class of 1969) was Tommy Lee Jones
Mind blowing!! Must read! George Washington gave the first inaugural speech on April 30, 1789. Guess where? In New York City, the nation's capital at that time. In this speech, he held nothing back. God Almighty was clearly in charge. That very day, Washington blessed our great nation and warned America of judgement if God was ever removed. After he spoke, he led his VP, John Adams and other leaders to a small church for a prayer meeting at St. Paul's Church which is located at Ground Zero. Can you believe it??? This church was the only building at Ground Zero left unharmed the day of 9/11. Read Isaiah 9:10 There was a sycamore tree located by this church. It was knocked (Cut down) as a result of the Twin Towers falling. 9/11 was no accident. God is trying to shake our nation to return to Him. The blessings and the curses began at the very same location!
The future King of France was Prince Louis-Philippe Duc d’Orleans. in the 1790s. Louis Philippe visited the United States for four years as an exile during the time of the French Revolution. He spent time in Philadelphia where his brothers Antoine and Louis-Charles were staying. He visited New York City where he stayed at the Somerindyck family estate on Broadway and 75th Street with other exiled French princes. Louis-Philippe visited Boston where he also taught French for a short period and lived over what is now the Union Oyster House, Boston’s oldest restaurant. During his time in the United States the future King France met with American politicians including General George Washington, George Clinton, John Jay, Alexander Hamilton, and President John Adams.
American History Parade 1774 Colonists in Annapolis, Maryland, stage the Annapolis Tea Party by burning the tea ship Peggy Stewart. 1781 Lord Cornwallis surrenders his British Army at Yorktown, Virginia, effectively ending the Revolutionary War. 1829 Baltimore’s monument to George Washington, a 178-foot-high marble column, is completed. 1873 In New York City, representatives of Princeton, Yale, and Rutgers draw up the first set of intercollegiate football rules. 1987 On a day remembered as Black Monday on Wall Street, the Dow Jones Industrial Average drops 508 points, or 22.6 percent.
This Day in History: The Marquis de Lafayette along with George Washington's forces, French troops under Rochambeau and sailors under de Grasse surround the city of Yorktown, Virginia, forcing British General Cornwallis to surrender, effectively ending the American Revolutionary War, 1781; the supersonic plane "Concorde" makes its trans-Atlantic debut, landing at JFK Airport in New York City, 1977; the stock market suffers its worst one-day point drop in history, 1987; Mother Theresa, who gave her entire life to help poor, suffering people around the world is beatified, the first step toward sainthood, 2003
Today is the anniversary of the surrender that ended the American Revolutionary War, in Yorktown, Virginia, in 1781. George Washington had had a difficult spring. His troops were low on supplies and food, their clothing was in shreds, and there had been a steady stream of desertions from his ranks. By summer, Washington had only a few thousand troops camped at West Point, New York. The British expected Washington to attack New York City, which he had been planning to do for most of the spring. But when he learned that the British forces under the control of Lord Cornwallis were building a naval base on the Yorktown Peninsula in Virginia, he decided impulsively to march his army from New York to Virginia, in the hopes of trapping Cornwallis and capturing his army. Washington's plan to move his army 400 miles in order to catch his enemy by surprise was a bold move. He had to march his troops toward New York City first, to scare the British into hunkering down for an attack. Then he quickly moved south. Wash ...
Kevin Cahill has made a career being a "politician." Being entrusted with advocating and fighting for the goals of the public should not be a "lifetime profession," as it has been for Kevin Cahill. As this country's first Commander in Chief, George Washington set the precedent of what a "civil servant" should do. Serve one's country for a period of time, not to exceed ten years. then move aside. After a certain amount of time, career politicians lose touch with We the People, and they no longer act in the best interest of their constituents. They start to worry only about getting re-elected, and padding their own bank accounts. Ulster County, and the residents of New York State have already contributed enough to the financial well being of Kevin Cahill. While in Sheldon Silver's back pocket, Cahill has been a "team leader" for a corrupt and dishonest politician. Case in point, look at how many people have taken a "free bus ticket" from New York City to show up at the door at the Department of Socia ...
This Day in History: George Washington's troops come near to victory, then suffer defeat at the Battle of Germantown outside Philadelphia, 1777; renowned sculptor Gutzon Borglum begins work on his monumental masterpiece honoring American heritage in the Black Hills of South Dakota, blasting away granite in what would become Mount Rushmore, 1927; the Brooklyn Dodgers (known to some as "da bums") win their first and only World Series, 1955; the world's first orbiting satellite- Sputnik- is launched by the Soviet Union, beginning the "space race", 1957; Pope John Paul VI becomes the forst Pope to visit the U.S., arriving in New York City for a gala parade, 1965
So here's me..the New Yorker at heart, raised in Virginia, constantly singing the praises of New York City, as the greatest city in the world, at work. (And it is! I'm going the week before Christmas for the tree and the ice rink.) So, my co-worker hears all of this palaver and makes her 1st ever trip to the Big Apple, in search of the greatest time of her life. She returned to work today, with a disgruntled look on her face, a big fat screw you Tim, a $95 dollar parking ticket and a $56 dollar fine, for not having cash to cross the George Washington Bridge!(That's on top of the $12 dollars that it actually costs to cross that bridge) I felt so bad for her! I told her she'd have to try again. She was cheated and that I still stand by my statement. Hey, IT COSTS TO MAKE IT in the big city.literally!
When the British were forced to evacuate Boston, the whole complexion of the war changed. No longer a static siege, General Washington realized that cavalry would be useful in patrolling the Atlantic Coast Line for possible British landings, and to serve as couriers. As a result he was pleased to accept Captain John Learys of the Light Horse Troop of New York City, an independent Company of forty light dragoons. On June 21st Washington asked Congress to accept them as a Continental unit. Connecticut Governor Jonathan Trumbull and the State Assembly created three regiments of Light Horse under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Seymour and ordered them to proceed to the main army and place themselves under the command of George Washington. This 400 to 500 member Cavalry detachment arrived at Washington’s headquarters on July 11th, 1776. Unfortunately, they had left Connecticut in such a hurry that they failed to bring with them proper encampment equipment. Washington greeted them with mixed emotion ...
Follow: Video, Charles Kelley, Charles Kelley Arrested, Charles Kelley Hitchhiker, Charles Kelley Wanted, Charles Kelly, Manuel Velasco, Crime News . An undated photo provided by the Port Authority Police of Charles R. Kelley, 52, wanted as a person of interest in a Tennessee murder. Kelly was arrested Thursday, Sept. 20, 2012 when the truck he was riding in was stopped at George Washington Bridge on suspicion of evading toll. Kelly is awaiting extradition. When Manuel Velasco offered a hitchhiker a lift in his truck, he never guessed he'd be moving such dangerous cargo. On Thursday night, Velasco learned -- after a multi-state journey -- that the man he drove from the south to New York City was wanted in Tennessee for murder, the Knoxville News Sentinel reports. Authorities arrested Charles R. Kelley, 52, when Velasco allegedly attempted to bypass a toll on his way over the George Washington Bridge into Manhattan. Kelley met Velasco one week ago at a gas station off of Interstate 81 in Tennessee, accordi ...
This Day in History: 1679-New Hampshire is founded as a county of the Massachusetts Bay Colony 1793- The 1st Cornerstone of the Capitol Bldg. is laid by George Washington( who was a Mason) 1809- The Royal Opera House opens in London 1837-Tiffany & Co.(originally Tiffany & Young) is founded in New York City. The store is called a "Stationary & Fancy Goods Emporium" 1851-"The New York Times" is first published 1870-"Old Faithful" Geyser is observed and named by the Washburn-Langford Expedition into Yellowstone. 1885-Riots break out in Montreal to protest compulsory smallpox vaccinations. 1914-WWI, South African Troops land in German Southwest Africa 1919-The Netherlands gives women the Right to Vote. 1927- The Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS,Radio) goes on the air. 1970-Jimi Hendrix (11-27-1942) dies age 27.
Today is the birthday of Swedish actress Greta Garbo, born Greta Gustafsson in Stockholm (1905) AND, The jewelry store Tiffany & Co. was founded in New York City on this date in 1837. It was billed as a "stationery and fancy goods emporium" at the time AND, It was on this date in 1793 that George Washington laid the cornerstone for the Capitol Building. Now, go do something interesting.
Good morning Cohoes...Oh well the Fact of the Day: US capital For a short time, starting on September 13, 1788, New York City was the location of the new U.S. government, in place of Philadelphia. In 1790, the capital moved back to Philadelphia for 10 years before moving permanently to Washington, DC. ===Little Johnny's teacher asks, "George Washington not only chopped down his father's Cherry tree, but also admitted doing it. Do any of you know why his father didn't punish him?" Little Johnny replies, "Because George was the one holding the axe? =
Just passed through New York City = beautiful city/landmarks at night!!! Empire State bldg lit up on red, white & blue= gorgeous!! Over the George Washington Bridge the view is spectacular!!! New York, New York!!! Great city to visit!!!
Cornelius Vanderbilt III (Sep 5, 1873 – March 1, 1942) distinguished American military officer, inventor, engineer, and yachtsman, and a member of the prominent American Vanderbilt family. Biography-Called "Neily" by his close friends, he was the great-grandson of Cornelius Vanderbilt. He was born in New York City on Sep 5, 1873 to Alice Claypoole Gwynne and Cornelius Vanderbilt II. He was educated by private tutors at St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire before attending Yale University where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1895. Against his father's wishes, in August 1896 he married Grace Graham Wilson, the youngest child of New York banker Richard T. Wilson, Sr. Remaining at Yale until 1899, he earned a Bachelor of Philosophy degree and, having a great deal of interest in the mechanical and engineering aspects of his family’s railroad business, he also earned a degree in mechanical engineering. Ostracized by his parents and even to some extent by his siblings, on his father' ...
Also yesterday in history - August 22, 1776 - George Washington asked the Continental Congress for permission to burn New York City, to stop the city from being used to quarter troops arriving via the British fleet. It is declined, but his soldiers set 1/4th of the town ablaze on September 21. There are still many in the government that would like to enact Washington's plan right now.
Today is the birthday of the engineer and architect Pierre-Charles L'Enfant, born in Anet, France, in 1754. He studied art at the Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture for five years, and in 1776, he left school to volunteer for the colonial army in the American Revolution. He served under General Washington at Valley Forge, and would often sketch Washington and other soldiers. He eventually settled permanently in New York City and began working as an architect and civil engineer. In 1791, he lobbied George Washington for a job designing the new nation's capital, which was to be built on the banks of the Potomac River. Thomas Jefferson provided him with the maps of several European cities, and L'Enfant selected the best features of each. He first laid out a plan for the important capital buildings and connected them by broad avenues at diagonals. Over this, he laid a grid of rectangular blocks. This design created lots of triangles, circles, and squares where the streets intersected, and these were perf ...
Yesterday I took a walk down to the oldest part of New York City, where the Dutch landed and planted their flag near the current location of the Staten Island Ferry, where George Washington stood his officers rounds at Fraunces Tavern, now filled with Wall Street types, and where a bunch of smelly h...
See letter from my friend Kieran Doherty. We are trying to raise this money together. It is very important to both of us. Dear Friends and Family, I am writing to you to see if you can help out a very good friend of mine raise money for a truly wonderful cause. My good friend Chris Parcells from Madison has been selected to be a part of Team Best Buddies in the Inaugural US Ironman Championship taking place on August 11, 2012 in New York City/New Jersey. The race consists of a 2.4 mile swim in the Hudson River, a 112-mile bike course along the Palisades Parkway in New Jersey followed by a 26.2 mile run across the George Washington Bridge into Manhattan. I have been a proud member of the Board of Directors for Best Buddies Connecticut for the last 2 years. The mission of Best Buddies is something that I feel very strongly about and I have been blessed with the opportunity to help this tremendous organization. Best Buddies is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing friends and jobs for people with ...
he imperiled Arctic Ocean islands include Wrangel, Bennett, Jeannette and Henrietta. Wrangel became American in 1881 with the landing of the U.S. Revenue Marine ship Thomas Corwin. The landing party included the famed naturalist John Muir. It is 3,000 square miles in size. Northwest of Wrangel are the DeLong Islands, named for George Washington DeLong, the captain of USS Jeannette. Also in 1881, he discovered and claimed these three islands for the United States. He named them for the voyage co-sponsor, New York City newspaper publisher James Gordon Bennett. The ship's crew received a hero's welcome back inWashington, and Congress awarded them gold medals. In the Bering Sea at the far west end of the Aleutian chain are Copper Island, Sea Lion Rock and Sea Otter Rock. They were ceded to the U.S. in Seward's 1867 treaty with Russia.
A piece of history: Who is Colin Powell: Colin Luther Powell (b. 1937) was born in New York City, the son of Jamaican immigrants. With assistance from an affirmative action program designed to increase minority college enrollment, he graduated from the City College of New York and earned an MBA degree from George Washington University. Commissioned a second lieutenant in the Army in 1958, he served in Vietnam with the 23rd Division in 1968–69, and later commanded forces in South Korea, West Germany, and the United States. In 1986, Powell became commanding general of the Fifth Corps in Frankfurt, Germany, and President Ronald Reagan named him national security adviser, the first black man to fill that position, in 1987.
May 7, 1789…The first Presidential Inaugural Ball was held in New York City. Each woman in attendance received a portrait of George Washington as a gift.1915…On its return trip from New York to Liverpool, the British ocean liner, Lusitania, was torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of Ireland and 1,198 lives were lost. The Lusitania was carrying a cargo of ammunition from the U.S. to Great Britain. This was Germany’s reason for the attack even though the ship was also carrying more than 2,000 civilian men, women and children.1940…Winston Churchill became British Prime Minister, an office he held through 1945. He returned to 10 Downing Street in 1951 for a second term as PM that lasted until 1955.1941…Glenn Miller & His Orchestra recorded "Chattanooga Choo Choo." The 78 RPM release went on to sell more than 1.2 million copies and was on the pop chart for nine weeks.1945…U.S. General Dwight D. Eisenhower met German Field Marshal Jodl in a schoolhouse in Rheims, France to accept Germany's un ...
THIS DAY IN HISTORY: On the 30th of April 1789, George Washington took oath at Federal Hall, New York City, to...
The Relationship Between Christianity and Capitalism By Bill Moyers, Reader Supported News 22 April 12 Just as, 50 years ago, liberalism was the vital center of our politics, our religious landscape then was dominated by mainline Protestants and a Catholic Church becoming less Roman and more American every year. One of the most symbolic events occurred in 1958 when President Dwight D. Eisenhower laid the cornerstone for the new headquarters of the National Council of Churches here in New York City. Before a crowd of 30,000, Eisenhower quoted George Washington, who described religion as the firm foundation of the country's moral life. That was the decade America put God on our paper money and in the Pledge of Allegiance. And though the churchly DNA often fostered racism, anti-Semitism, bigotry and Cold War dogmatism, many thought biblical religion, in its various incarnations, was the engine driving the American future. But then, says Ross Douthat, American Christianity went off the rails - and now threate ...
On This Day: Thursday April 5, 2012 This is the 96th day of the year, with 270 days remaining in 2012. Holidays Feast day of St. Derfel, St. Vincent Ferrer, St. Ethelburga of Lyminge, St. Albert of Montecorvino, and St. Gerald of Sauve-Majeure. Taiwan: National Tomb-Sweeping Day. Events 1242 - The first non-Mongol czar, Alexander Nevsky, defeated the Teutons and Livonians in Novgorod, Russia. 1614 - Native American princess Pocahontas, daughter of the chief of the Powhatan Indian confederacy, married English colonist John Rolfe in Virginia. 1621 - The Mayflower sailed from Plymouth, Massachusetts, on a return trip to England. 1768 - The first U.S. Chamber of Commerce was founded, in New York City. 1792 - George Washington cast the first presidential veto, rejecting a congressional measure for apportioning representatives among the states. 1827 - James H. Hackett became the first American actor to appear abroad as he performed at Covent Garden in London, England. 1843 - Queen Victoria proclaimed Hong Kong ...
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