New York City & Columbia University

New York is the most populous city in the United States and the center of the New York Metropolitan Area, one of the most populous metropolitan areas in the world. Columbia University in the City of New York, commonly referred to as Columbia University, is an American private Ivy League research university located in New York City, New York, United States. 5.0/5

New York City Columbia University New York Catholic Church United States New York University New Jersey Occidental College Pulitzer Prize Barack Obama Los Angeles Barnard College York University Catholic University Ivy League American Red Cross Howard University

"A Columbia University study in 2008 found that about 10 percent of New York City public-school children are Muslim.". Jihad?
Columbia University is the second largest land owner in New York City, after the Catholic Church.
1968: Vietnam War: Student protesters at Columbia University in New York City take over administration buildings and shut down t…
Barack Obama's Columbia University years in New York City in new - Daily Mail
Columbia University is the 2nd largest landowner in New York City after the Catholic Church,
The Department of Dance of Barnard College, Columbia University in New York City, invites applications for a full-time, renewable thr...
A Columbia University student who was accused of rape is suing the New York City school for allowing his accuser to publicly brand him a
PESHAWAR: Safoora Arbab has earned her Bachelor’s degree from Columbia University in New York City with her major...
Columbia University student urges Humans of New York to continue work in New York City public schools
Congratulations to Peter Szymanski on committing to play football at Columbia University in New York City!
Help support us and the Aberdeen Trip to Columbia University in New York City raise $7,500.00 at
WHAT WOULD YOU DO?... BILL de BLASIO, Mayor, New York City: •Bill de Blasio was born Warren Wilhelm, Jr., on May 8, 1961. He first changed his name to the hyphenated Warren de Blasio-Wilhelm, adding his mother’s maiden name. In 2002, he dropped the “Warren” and the “Wilhelm,” and changed his name for a second time to what it is currently, Bill de Blasio. •Bill de Blasio was the campaign manager for Hillary Clinton’s Senate campaign in 2000. •Bill de Blasio was a fervent supporter of the Marxist Sandinista government in Nicaragua in the 1980′s, a government that was backed by the Communist Soviet Union and Cuba. •At the height of Cold War tension, while still a student at New York University, de Blasio toured the Communist Soviet Union in 1983. •His first job was in 1984 with the NYC Department of Juvenile Justice. •Bill de Blasio received a master’s degree in International and Public Affairs at Columbia University, the same school attended by Barack Obama. •Bill de Blasio ran ...
Happy Birthday, Shirley Chisholm! Congresswoman Shirley Anita St. Hill Chisholm was the first African-American woman elected to Congress. Chisholm was a founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus and the first African American to make a serious bid for the Presidency of the United States of America. Congresswoman Chisholm was known for her advocacy on behalf of women and underserved minorities. She was also noted for her opposition to the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War, her support of full-employment programs, and her efforts on behalf of black colleges, compulsory education, and minimum wage. Read her autobiography: Chisholm was born in New York City on November 30, 1924. She grew up in Barbados and in Brooklyn, New York. She graduated with a Bachelor's Degree from Brooklyn College in 1946. While working as a teacher, Chisholm earned a Master's degree in elementary education from Columbia University's Teacher's College. Until 1964, she served as a director of a childcare center and an educati ...
Yes, of course, Milvia Villamizar that's the same wagon of subway line 1, in New York City that took you every day at Columbia University. The truth is that I went to the campus into two oportunides between the months of October and November, to hear lectures of prominent Venezuelans. The first time colleague and writer Boris Munoz offered an interesting conference on "Writing about the Carribean from National Perspectives", within the context of the symposium: "Imaging and Imagining the Greater Carribbean" where closed with a joint musical concert of Aquiles Baez Dos , accompained by a group of exceptional Venezuelan and Latin America musicians, living in NYC. And I also attended a second time to the facilities of the University of Columbia to hear his presentation of contemporary art master Rolando Peña, in the Center for Ethnomusicology, which gave a detailed explanation with a magnificent audiovisual support on the beginnings, development and evolution his artistic work to the present. Both experie . ...
Happy Birthday: October 26, 1837 (1926): Louisa Lee Schuyler was an American leader in charitable work. During the Civil War she was appointed as the corresponding secretary in the Woman's Central Association of Relief (WCAR) in New York City to coordinate the efforts of the volunteers on the home front. In 1873 she organized the New York State Charities Aid Association and in the following year established the first training school for nurses in the United States in connection with Bellevue Hospital. In 1907 she was appointed one of the original trustees of the Russell Sage Foundation. In recognition of her 40 years of activity in charitable work she received in 1915 the first honorary degree of LL.D. ever conferred upon a woman by Columbia University. She was a founder of the National Society for the Prevention of Blindness.
Does anyone else find it curious that the doctor who tested positive for the Ebola virus and lived in Hamilton Heights, which is located in upper Manhattan, in New York City bypassed NY Presbyterian Hospital (which is about 20blks from his location/home) affiliated with Columbia University (is a teaching hospital) to travel to the eastside of Manhattan, approximately, 140 blocks down and 13 avenues over, from his home, to go to Bellevue Hospital??? Bellevue is a city hospital which is predominately utilized by the working poor, indigent, those without access to adequate health care, people of language and color. This doctor who lived on the Westside of Manhattan also bypassed, St. Luke'/Roosevelt Hospital, Mt. Sinai Hospital, New York Hospital, New York University Hospital, all of these hospitals have huge budgets in research and teaching, have world renowned doctors, have been named some of the best hospital in the country. This doctor with EBOLA, decides to traverse through the city to Bellevue *** ...
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"Expert witnesses for the defense – including Drs. Carl Hart, Associate Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry and Psychology at Columbia University in New York City, retired physician Phillip Denny, and Greg Carter, Medical Director of St. Luke’s Rehabilitation Institute in Spokane, Washington – will testify that the accepted science is inconsistent with the notion that cannabis meets these Schedule I criteria." "This is the first time in recent memory that a federal judge has granted an evidentiary hearing on a motion challenging the statute which classifies cannabis to be one of the most dangerous illicit substances in the nation. Attorneys Zenia Gilg and Heather Burke, both members of the NORML Legal Committee, contend that the federal government’s present policies facilitating the regulated distribution of cannabis in states such as Colorado and Washington can not be reconciled with the insistence that the plant is deserving of its Schedule I status under federal law." "They ...
Labor History -TODAY- October 13 American Federation of Labor votes to boycott all German-made products as a protest against Nazi antagonism to organized labor within Germany - 1934 More than 1,100 office workers strike Columbia University in New York City. The mostly female and minority workers win union recognition and pay increases - 1985 National Basketball Association cancels regular season games for the first time in its 51-year history, during a player lockout. Player salaries and pay caps are the primary issue. The lockout lasts 204 days - 1998 Hundreds of San Jose Mercury News newspaper carriers end 4-day walkout with victory - 2000
on 1910 Tau Epsilon Phi: Tau Epsilon Phi Fraternity is founded on the campus of Columbia University in New York City, New York.
Poet, writer, teacher, and political activist Amiri Baraka (October 7, 1934 – January 9, 2014), formerly known as LeRoi Jones and Imamu Amear Baraka, was born Everett LeRoi Jones in 1934 in Newark, New Jersey. He attended Rutgers University and Howard University, spent three years in the U.S. Air Force, and returned to New York City to attend Columbia University and the New School for Social Research. Baraka was well known for his strident social criticism, often writing in an incendiary style that made it difficult for some audiences and critics to respond with objectivity to his works. Throughout most of his career his method in poetry, drama, fiction, and essays was confrontational, calculated to shock and awaken audiences to the political concerns of black Americans. For decades, Baraka was one of the most prominent voices in the world of American literature. Baraka’s own political stance changed several times, thus dividing his oeuvre into periods: as a member of the avant-garde during the 1950s, ...
"Hundreds of students turned out for a rally at Columbia University in New York City on Friday bearing mattresses...
OBAMA:     After High School, Obama moved to Los Angeles in 1979 to attend Occidental College. In February 1981, Obama made his first public speech, calling for Occidental to participate in the disinvestment from South Africa in response to that nation's policy of apartheid.[26] In mid-1981, Obama traveled to Indonesia to visit his mother and half-sister Maya, and visited the families of college friends in Pakistan and India for three weeks.[26] Later in 1981, he transferred as a junior to Columbia College, Columbia University in New York City, where he majored in Political Science with a specialty in International Relations[27] and lived off-campus on West 109th Street.[28] He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in 1983 and worked for a year at the Business International Corporation,[29] then at the New York Public Interest Research Group.[30][31] In 1985, Obama was among the leaders of May Day efforts to bring attention to the New York City Subway system, which was in a bad condition at the time. Obama ...
Henry Louis "Lou" or "Buster"[1] Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941) was an American baseball first baseman who played 17 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees (1923–1939). Gehrig was renowned for his prowess as a hitter and for his durability, a trait which earned him his nickname "The Iron Horse". He finished with a career batting average of .340, an on-base percentage of .447, and a slugging percentage of .632, and he tallied 493 home runs and 1,995 runs batted in (RBIs). A seven-time All-Star[2] and six-time World Series champion, Gehrig won the Triple Crown in 1934[3] and was twice named the American League's (AL) Most Valuable Player. Gehrig was the first MLB player to have his uniform number retired, and he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1939. A native of New York City and attendee of Columbia University, Gehrig signed with the Yankees in 1923. He set several major league records during his career,[4] including the most career grand slams (23) (since bro ...
Facing Challenges by Daisaku Ikeda Two African-American sisters, Sadie and Bessie Delaney, were born in the southern United States at the end of the nineteenth century. Growing up, the sisters experienced great pain because of deep-rooted discrimination against people of African descent. They often shook with anger at the treatment they received. But they refused to be defeated, learning to laugh off discrimination and encouraging each other not to despair. The sisters determined: If society isn’t going to accept us when we have the same ability as white people, then we’re just going to have to become even more capable. They drew strength from their father, who used to say, “Don’t ever give up. Remember, they can segregate you, but they can’t control your mind. Your mind’s still yours.” Through tireless effort, they gained places to study at Columbia University. Sadie, the elder sister, became the first African-American to teach domestic science at High School level in New York City. Bessie, ...
Lebanese architect Amale Andraos has been appointed as the new dean of the Graduate School of Architecture, Preservation and Planning at Columbia University in New York City.
Chris Hedges is an American Journalist specializing in American politics and society. Hedges is currently a columnist for news website Truthdig, a senior fellow at The Nation Institute in New York City, and a contributing author for OpEdNews. He spent nearly two decades as a foreign correspondent in Central America, the Middle East, Africa and the Balkans. He has reported from more than fifty countries, and has worked for The Christian Science Monitor, NPR, The Dallas Morning News, and The New York Times, where he was a foreign correspondent for fifteen years (1990–2005). In 2002, Hedges was part of the team of reporters at The New York Times awarded the Pulitzer Prize for the paper's coverage of global terrorism. He also received the Amnesty International Global Award for Human Rights Journalism in 2002. He has taught at Columbia University, New York University, Princeton University and The University of Toronto. He currently teaches prisoners at a maximum-security prison in New Jersey. He writes a wee ...
Happy Birthday, David Dinkins! David Norman Dinkins (born July 10, 1927) is an American politician who served as the 106th Mayor of New York City, from 1990 to 1993. He was the first, and to date only, African American to hold that office. Before entering politics, Dinkins served in the US Marine Corps, graduated *** laude from Howard University, and received a law degree from Brooklyn Law School. He served as Manhattan borough president before becoming mayor. Under the Dinkins administration, crime in New York City decreased more dramatically and more rapidly than at any time in previous New York City history. After leaving office Dinkins was named professor of Public Affairs at Columbia University. Dinkins was a member of the Board of Directors of the United States Tennis Association, and a member of The Jazz Foundation of America. He serves on the boards of the New York City Global Partners, the Children's Health Fund (CHF), the Association to Benefit Children and the Nelson Mandela Children's Fund (NM ...
In one month I will be living in New York City. In two I will be attending Columbia University. Boom.
Hans Gorg Conried, Jr. (March 23, 1917 – January 5, 1982), was an American character actor, very active in voice-over roles and comedian, best known for providing the voices of Walt Disney's Adult Flower in Bambi (1941), George Darling, and Captain Hook in Peter Pan (1953), for playing the title role in The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T, Dr. Miller on The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show, Professor Kropotkin on the radio and film versions of My Friend Irma and for his work as Uncle Tonoose on Danny Thomas's sitcom Make Room for Daddy. He was born on March 23, 1917 in Baltimore, Maryland to Hans Georg and Edith Beryl (Gildersleeve) Conried. He was named Hans Georg Conried Jr. The story that his real name was Frank Foster is false.[1] His Connecticut-born mother was a descendant of Pilgrims, and his father was a Jewish immigrant from Vienna, Austria.[2] He was raised in Baltimore and in New York City. He studied acting at Columbia University and went on to play major classical roles onstage. Conried worked in ...
Lion head in front of Butler Library, Columbia University, New York City.
Did NOT see those "chic as" at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City, yesterday ;-)
William Henry Vanderbilt 1821-1885 Billy was born in New Brunswick, New Jersey on May 8, 1821.He was married to Maria Louisa Kissam and had eight children. He was the grandfather of Alice Vanderbilt Shepard Morris. Alice and her husband owned Bogue Chitto in Hulls Cove, Maine. Billy inherited $100 million from his father, railroad mogul, Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt. At the time of Billy`s death, the fortune was valued at $194 million.He was the owner of the New York Central Railroad and other railroads. William Vanderbilt was an active philanthropist and gave to the YMCA, the Metropolitan Opera and Columbia University among many others. He loved art and collected more than 200 paintings during his lifetime. Some were valuable works of the Old Masters. He died on December 8, 1885 in New York City. His estate was left to his wife and children, the bulk of it going to his eldest sons, Cornelius and William who were also chairmen of his companies.
ON this day THIRTY YEARS AGO.On this day in 1984, the now-classic comedy Ghostbusters is released in theaters across the United States. Produced and directed by Ivan Reitman, Ghostbusters starred Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis as disgraced parapsychology professors in New York City who turn to “paranormal investigation”--hunting down and capturing ghosts---to make money after Columbia University yanks their research grants. Suddenly overwhelmed by the demand for their services, they hire a fourth team member (Ernie Hudson) who predicts that the increased supernatural activity is building to a catastrophic Judgement Day-like scenario. His fears turn out to be right on target, and all *** breaks loose after a skeptical government official (William Atherton) pulls the plug on the ghostbusters’ containment system. Sigourney Weaver and Rick Moranis co-starred as Manhattan apartment dwellers possessed by followers of a long-dead deity, Gozer, with whom the ghostbusters must wage a climactic ba ...
Our 2012 and 2013 YESpreneurs of the Year! These young ladies are committed to their education, building a successful business and helping their community. Please donate or become a sponsor at our 3rd Annual YES Conference in New York City on November 1, 2014. We are partnering with Barnard College/Columbia University to educate, empower and energize girls 8-17 to become entrepreneurs and business leaders. We will announce our 2014 recipient very soon! She is awesome! stay tuned!
The 2014 Pulitzer Prize winners and finalists were announced Monday at Columbia University in New York City
Gary Becker, the Nobel Prize winner economist died yesterday. His book was not an easy one to read specially for a narrow-minded finance PhD student :) Here is a very interesting interview with him REGION: I understand that you found the initial inspiration for your work on the economics of crime while searching for a parking spot. BECKER: True story. REGION: Would you tell us that story? BECKER: I was coming down for an oral exam at Columbia University when I was teaching there. In those days instead of written exams for Ph.D. students, we gave them orals. And my task was to ask a half-hour of questions on price theory. I was living in the suburbs, I drove down to Columbia and I was a little late. And it's New York City, so it's not easy to find a parking place. Columbia had no parking for its faculty in those days, so either you parked illegally or you went into a parking lot. Those were your choices. So as I got there I had to make that decision. I remember making that calculation of what are my chance ...
I just learned that I got admitted to Columbia University in New York City. Now I've got something to think about for the next couple days...
Brian Dennehy, Actor: Ratatouille. Imposing, barrel-chested and now silver-haired Brian Dennehy is a prolific US actor, well respected on both screen and stage for the best part of 25 years. He was born in July 1938 in Bridgeport, CT, and attended Columbia University in New York City on a football s…
Students say Columbia University has long been a haven for casual drug sales. Then an anonymous complaint brought New York City police to campus, resulting in a major bust.
Religious Beliefs protect against depression!. A study of 103 people by the Columbia University in New York City...
Future U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder is seen in the 1973 yearbook of Columbia University in New York City. He graduated from the Ivy League school that year. (Image courtesy of "University Arch...
The Center for Complicated Grief will hold an advanced Complicated Grief Treatment (CGT) workshop at Columbia University School of Social Work in New York City on July 11-12, 2014. The 2-day workshop is intended for licensed mental health professionals who are knowledgeable about principles, strategies and techniques used in CGT and wish to develop skills in the specific procedures used in this efficacy-tested treatment approach. About the Workshop The advanced training will provide an in-depth discussion of core “signature” techniques used in CGT. The focus will be on video and/or live demonstration of techniques and role-play exercises for participants. Prerequisites The advanced workshop is open to licensed mental health professionals that have previously participated in a CGT Introductory Workshop or Class. Additional Prerequisites Include: 1. At least 2 years of experience working with bereaved individuals 2. Current employment in a setting that provides bereavement services (e.g. Hospice Organiz ...
The 2014 Pulitzer Prizewinners and Nominated Finalists will be announced Monday, April 14, 2014 at Columbia University in New York City. The announcement will take place at 3:00pm eastern daylight time.
Very proud to announce that genius nephew, Eddie Crouse, will be attending Columbia University in New York City starting in the fall. That's an Ivy League education folks. Yup!!
Richard Brick -- producer, Columbia University film professor and the first ever Commissioner of New York City's Office of Film, Television and Broadcasting --
I have just returned from New York City, where I spent spring break visiting with fellow-organist friends and attending a series of excellent organ recitals. One highlight was a superb concert at Christ and St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, near Lincoln Center, performed by students of Paul Jacobs, who showcased the organ as an accompanying/chamber music instrument, together with violin, trumpet, cello and others. Impressive performances by the Artemis String Quartet and the avant-garde Kronos Quartet at legendary Carnegie Hall rounded off the experience. I also got to try out the delicately beautiful Fritts organ at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church and the brand new magnificent Schoenstein instrument at Fordham University, in the Bronx. And I saw the small but insightful exhibition of Nazi "Degenerate Art" at the Neue Galerie, the German/Austrian art museum *** stylish Viennese coffee house near the Metropolitan Museum. The only disappointment was that Columbia University's excellent library is sternly and for ...
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Pero yung Masters in Political in Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Columbia University, New York City, THE BEST.
Barrier Breaker Shero: Audre Lorde Poet, essayist, and novelist Audre Lorde was born on February 18, 1934, in New York City. Her parents were immigrants from Grenada. The youngest of three sisters, she was raised in Manhattan and attended Catholic school. While she was still in High School, her first poem appeared in Seventeen magazine. Lorde received her B.A. from Hunter College and an M.L.S. from Columbia University. She served as a librarian in New York public schools from 1961 through 1968. In 1962, Lorde married Edward Rollins. They had two children, Elizabeth and Jonathon, before divorcing in 1970. Her first volume of poems, The First Cities, was published in 1968. In 1968 she also became the writer-in-residence at Tougaloo College in Mississippi, where she discovered a love of teaching. In Tougaloo she also met her long-term partner, Frances Clayton. The First Cities was quickly followed with Cables to Rage (1970) and From a Land Where Other People Live (1972), which was nominated for a National Bo ...
How to Warm Up A short warm-up stokes your blood flow and preps your body for exercise. Your muscles respond better to challenges if they're loose and warm. Warm-ups should take 5 to 10 minutes. You'll know you're done when you feel ready for more of a challenge. Before Cardio Warm up with a slow-paced aerobic activity. Go for a walk, use a treadmill or elliptical trainer on a low setting, or bike at an easy pace, suggests Carol Ewing Garber, PhD. She's an Associate Professor of movement sciences at Teachers College, Columbia University. Start slow and gradually ramp up your pace and intensity. Before Strength Training Choose an easy cardio activity that warms up multiple muscles at once, such as treadmill walking, slow jogging, or easy pedaling on a stationary bicycle. Or home in on specific muscle groups, says New York City celebrity trainer Joel Harper, whose clients include Olympic medalists. "They do 100 reps of the body part they're working that day. If they're doing shoulders, they'll do 25 punchin ...
Fun Fact Friday: The largest private landowner in New York City is the Catholic Church. The second largest is Columbia University.
Barack Obama initially started his course of higher education at Occidental College in California before transferring to Columbia University in New York City. A
The first asphalt blocks were used in a road in 1824 in Champs-Elysees in Paris, the work of Edward de Smedt, a Belgian immigrant at New York City's Columbia University. He engineered a 'well-graded,' maximum-density asphalt in 1872 that was used in Battery Park and Fifth Avenue in NYC.
Bonus Black History Facts - Shirley Chisholm attended Brooklyn College on a scholarship and then earned a master's degree in education from Columbia University. After becoming an expert on early childhood education, she worked as a consultant to New York City's Bureau of Child Welfare, from 1959 to 1964. In 1968, Chisholm became the first black woman to win a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. In 1972, Chisholm declared her candidacy for the office of president of the United States; making her the first black and first woman to make this bid.
Charles Drew - The Blood Bank [Black History Facts] Charles Drew (1904-1950) was born on June 3, 1904 in Washington, D.C. Charles Drew excelled in academics and sports during his graduate studies at Amherst College in Massachusetts. Charles Drew was also a honor student at Mcgill University Medical School in Montreal, where he specialized in physiological anatomy. Charles Drew researched blood plasma and transfusions in New York City. It was during his work at Columbia University where he made his discoveries relating to the preservation of blood. By separating the liquid red blood cells from the near solid plasma and freezing the two separately, he found that blood could be preserved and reconstituted at a later date. Charles Drew's system for the storing of blood plasma (blood bank) revolutionized the medical profession. Dr. Drew also established the American Red Cross blood bank, of which he was the first director, and he organized the world's first blood bank drive, nicknamed "Blood for Britain". His ...
Sure ya could never be up to dem Mulligan's...Hercules Mulligan (1740-1825) Hercules Mulligan was born in Co. Antrim, Ireland in 1740 to Hugh and Sarah Mulligan. At that time the Irish people were victims of the Penal Laws that restricted their right to education, to hold office, to vote, to possess arms and to own property of any monetary value. This was the Ireland that the Mulligan family left in1746 to come to the American colonies in search of a better life. They settled in New York City where the family prospered and went on to own and operate their own accounting business. After graduating from King's College (now Columbia University), Hercules worked in his father accounting business as a clerk. Being an ambitious young man he went on to open his own custom tailoring and haberdashery business that catered to wealthy clients including British Crown force officers stationed in the city. He married Elizabeth Sanders, daughter of John Sanders of NY and niece of Admiral Sanders of the British Navy ...
These people are moron grade and also Francine McKenzie (Mackensen) does not seem to understand they started a Civil War in Canada, all of which is illegal and immoral. It is how they operate in general around the word. They are not needed here. For them to claim to be in power here is obscene. Total breach of the Social Contract. Mortimer Jerome Adler (December 28, 1902 – June 28, 2001) was an American philosopher, educator, and popular author. As a philosopher he worked within the Aristotelian and Thomistic traditions. He lived for the longest stretches in New York City, Chicago, San Francisco, and San Mateo, California.[1] He worked for Columbia University, the University of Chicago, Encyclopædia Britannica, and Adler's own Institute for Philosophical Research.
" But the parallels between what happened to the Jews and to the Armenians are striking. In both cases, a murderous policy was shaped in wartime by high officials of state with far more single-minded objectives than those of their populations at large. They prevailed thanks to their control of the machinery of violence, both formal and informal, and to the resources that accrued to them from sudden large-scale dispossession. " London Review of Books , Vol.23 , No 3 , pp 19-21 The G-Word  ,  by Mark Mazower Mark A. Mazower (born 1958, London) is a British historian. His expertise is Greece, the Balkans and, more generally, 20th century Europe. He is currently a professor of history at Columbia University in New York City. Mark Mazower on the Armenian Genocide , as a book review on the following book : The Treatment of Armenians in the Ottoman Empire, 1915-16: Documents Presented to Viscount Grey of Falloden by Viscount Bryce Uncensored Edition by James Bryce and Arnold Toynbee, edited by Ara Sarafian, ...
James Langston Hughes was born February 1, 1902, in Joplin, Missouri. His parents divorced when he was a young child, and his father moved to Mexico. He was raised by his grandmother until he was thirteen, when he moved to Lincoln, Illinois, to live with his mother and her husband, before the family eventually settled in Cleveland, Ohio. It was in Lincoln that Hughes began writing poetry. After graduating from High School, he spent a year in Mexico followed by a year at Columbia University in New York City. During this time, he held odd jobs such as assistant cook, launderer, and busboy. He also travelled to Africa and Europe working as a seaman. In November 1924, he moved to Washington, D.C. Hughes's first book of poetry, The Weary Blues, (Knopf, 1926) was published by Alfred A. Knopf in 1926. He finished his college education at Lincoln University in Pennsylvania three Years Later. In 1930 his first novel, Not Without Laughter, (Knopf, 1930) won the Harmon gold medal for literature. He was particularly ...
The extraordinary writer and Second Generation Productions commissioned artist Sung Rno will be reading at Columbia University in the City of New York tomorrow night. "A new generation of Asian Americans, post-1965, was kicking things up, building community while finding their individual voices. Looking back decades later, we can see those flags as markers of a crucially important moment in Asian American and New York City history. This anthology considers what was changing, how, and why, featuring seminal work from the ‘90s paired with new reflections about the confluence of arts, activism, and community and the legacies of this cultural moment."
Finance Director OVERALL JOB FUNCTION: ICAP, a program of the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University in New York City, has been awarded funds to strengthen, support and enhance PMTCT Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) capacities of Ministry of Health (MOH) and USG implementing partners to promote the effective management, use and dissemination of PMTCT program data in Cameroon. ICAP will support a roll out of M&E tools in 84 health districts in 4 regions and eventually cascade to health care workers at 932 health facilities.ICAP Cameroon hired an accountant and it is seeking a Finance Director who will support all finance activities within ICAP Cameroon in close collaboration with the Country Representative/Technical Director (CR/TD), and New York Financial Department Strategic Information Unit and compliance team. Reporting to the Country Representative, the Director of Administration and Financewill oversee all finance and administration functions of ICAP Cameroon, including budget develop ...
where she completed courses required for the senior matriculation certificate she would need to pursue higher education. Upon obtaining that certificate, she was accepted into the baccalaureate program at Columbia University Teachers College in New York City, where she began study in the summer of 1933. She also spent the summer of 1934 and the academic year 1935-1936 in residence there, graduating in 1936 with a bachelor of science degree. Once back in Newfoundland, Manuel implemented many of the pedagogical concepts she had learned at Columbia
We are excited to be flying to NYC on Friday, January 17 to attend an award ceremony honoring Richie’s Grandfather, Alfred Richard Wolff who invented air conditioning. His grandfather will be recognized at the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers as an ASHRAE Pioneer of the Industry at the Society’s 2014 Winter Conference on Saturday January 18, 2014 in New York City. There will be thirty-two decedents of Alfred Richard Wolff’s family attending this event. The following is Richie's grandfather biography: Alfred R. Wolff (1859 – 1909) was considered the leading consulting heating and ventilating engineer at the end of the 19th century. Based in New York City, working with the leading architects of the time, he designed the H&V systems of many of the major buildings in New York, including St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Columbia University, New York Hall of Records, Metropolitan Life Building, Carnegie Hall, Gimbel Brothers Department Store, Bellevue Hospital, Nati .. ...
6 Factors That Affect How Insulin Works 1. The site of the injection. Insulin is absorbed most quickly when injected into the abdomen, followed by the upper arms, says Emily Coppedge, diabetes educator at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center in New York City. Injecting into the legs or the buttocks means the insulin will get absorbed more slowly, she says. But if you inject in the same site all the time, you'll develop scar tissue that can result in delayed absorption of the insulin. "It's important to rotate sites so this doesn't happen," Coppedge says. Similarly, insulin is absorbed faster when injected in a muscle you are using. For example, you may want to inject your insulin into the abdomen instead of the arm if you are planning on raking leaves or shoveling snow. 2. Type of insulin. Ideally, you want your insulin to start working at its peak right when your food is being digested. "Some of the short-acting insulins work within 30 minutes, and then there are longer-acting ...
St. Elizabeth Ann Seton, FOUNDRESS AND FIRST SUPERIOR OF THE SISTERS OF CHARITY Feast Day: January 4 Born: 28 August 1774 in New York City, New York, USA Died: 4 January 1821 in Emmitsburg, Maryland Canonized: 14 September 1975 by Pope Paul VI Patron of: Catholic Schools; State of Maryland This first American-born saint accomplished more in twelve years than most people do in a whole lifetime. From 1809 to 1821, the year she died, she laid the foundation for the Catholic parochial system in the United States, founded her Sisters of Charity, and ran her school and lived with her community at her headquarters in Emmitsburg, Maryland. Elizabeth Ann Bayley was the daughter of a distinguished colonial family in New York City, her father a physician and professor at what later became Columbia University. Her grandfather was rector of St. Andrew's Episcopal Church on Staten Island. Born in 1774 she married William Magee Seton, a wealthy young businessman, in 1794. They had five children. Mr. Seton had reversals ...
Happy Founders' Day! Today, Alpha Omicron Pi celebrates 117 years of friendship and sisterhood. On January 2, 1897 Alpha Omicron Pi was formally organized at the home of Helen St. Clair (Mullan) at Barnard College of Columbia University in New York City. That date was recognized as AOII Founders' Da...
Ivan, I'm so proud of you, my dude! I need to go up and interview him ASAP!! Ivan M. Hageman is the Head and Co-Founder of The East Harlem School at Exodus House (EHS), a small independent middle school in New York City created eleven years ago as a response to the inadequate public school education afforded inner city youth. Raised in East Harlem in a residential drug treatment center run by his parents, the Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Lynn L. Hageman, Ivan and his brother returned Years Later to the same building to create the school. Ivan attended Harvard University where after three years he received a Bachelor of Arts degree, magna *** laude, in Social Anthropology and later a Master's degree from Harvard's Graduate School of Education. After teaching in inner city public schools, Ivan returned to his alma mater, the Collegiate School, to run a diversity initiative and teach history. Ivan has received a summer Klingenstein Fellowship from Columbia University and the Next Generation Leadership Fellowship from t ...
Normalizing the Unthinkable John Pilger, Robert Fisk, Charlie Glass, and Seymour Hersh on the failure of the world's press by Sophie McNeill Z magazine, June 2006 The late journalist Edward R. Murrow might well have been rolling in his grave on April 21. That's because Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice gave a lecture that day in Washington, DC to journalists at the Department of State's official Edward R. Murrow Program for Journalists. For the Bush administration to use the memory of a person who stood up to government propaganda is ironic to say the least. Secretary Rice told the assembled journalists that "without a free press to report on the activities of government, to ask questions of officials, to be a place where citizens can express themselves, democracy simply couldn't work." One week earlier in New York City, Columbia University hosted a panel on the state of the world's media that would have been more in Murrow's style than the State Department-run symposium. Reporter and filmmaker John Pil ...
Today's American History Parade: 1651 By order of Puritan lawmakers in Massachusetts, any colonist caught observing Christmas with feasts or other festivities is fined five shillings. 1776 After crossing the Delaware, George Washington’s army defeats a Hessian force at Trenton, New Jersey. 1865 James Mason of Massachusetts wins the first U.S. patent, for a coffee percolator. 1868 President Andrew Johnson grants an unconditional pardon to all Confederates involved in the Civil War. 1933 Edwin H. Armstrong patents FM radio, which he developed at Columbia University in New York City. 1941 Winston S. Churchill becomes the first British Prime Minister to address Congress, calling for “courage and untiring exertion” to defeat the Axis powers.
Artist Biography by Heather Phares Contra Describing their sound as "Upper West Side Soweto," New York City's Vampire Weekend mix preppy, well-read indie rock with joyful, Afro-pop-inspired melodies and rhythms. Ezra Koenig, Chris Baio, Rostam Batmanglij, and Chris Tomson formed the band early in 2006, when they were finishing up their studies at Columbia University. Taking their name from a movie Koenig made during his freshman year, the band started out by playing gigs at the university's literary societies and at parties. Word spread about Vampire Weekend's unique sound and lyrics ("Oxford Comma," one of the band's earliest songs, referred to comma use in a list of three items), buoyed by the band's self-released EPs, which they recorded in locations spanning from their Columbia dorm rooms to a family barn. The buzz around Vampire Weekend reached a peak in 2007: that summer, the band embarked on its biggest tour yet, made several appearances at that year's CMJ Music Marathon, and signed with XL Records ...
Nu Nu Chapter Needs Our Help: A Call to Serve Aside from the social functions that define our year, the New York Alumni Chapter of Sigma Chi has other worthy purposes. One is to mentor young Sigs coming into the New York area. Another is to provide interest, support and guidance to the undergraduate brothers of New York City's Sigma Chi Chapter, Nu Nu at Columbia University. The Brothers of Nu Nu are a worthy group of Sigs and they strive to have a good Sigma Chi Chapter that makes them proud and follows our ideals. Sometimes they need our help to be better. As this is an open page, I must communicate in a non specific manner, but one area they need some good guidance is in interpreting and delivering our ritual...they are far from clueless but caring mentoring can make their practice much more meaningful. I think we have resources to help them in NYC. What I would like to do is to create a structure that will provide them with the knowledge and support to become more proficient in the use of our beau ...
US Senator. Signer of US Constitution. Although he was born into a wealthy and aristocratic family, he often went against their loyalist views to become one of the colonies most outspoken nationalists. He was born in what is now known as The Bronx section of New York City on his father's large estate. At the age of twelve he enrolled into what is now Columbia University, graduating in 1768. Three Years Later he received his Master's degree and after serving as an intern with a distinguished New York attorney he was admitted to the bar. In 1775 he was appointed to represent the family estate as a member of New York's Provincial Congress. During this time he became a staunch supporter for American independence putting him at odds with his loyalist mother and his half brother who was a senior officer in the British Army. With the start of the Revolution, Morris could have avoided military service. His right arm was badly hurt in a childhood accident and his leg was amputated after a carriage accident. These ...
AN EXCERPT FROM "HOW IT CAME INTO BEING" FROM "A COURSE IN MIRACLES" “How it Came” “A Course in Miracles began with the sudden decision of two people to join in a common goal. Their names were Helen Schucman and William Thetford, Professors of Medical Psychology at Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City. They were anything but spiritual. Their relationship with each other was difficult and often strained, and they were concerned with personal and professional acceptance and status. In general, they had considerable investment in the values of the world. Their lives were hardly in accord with anything that the Course advocates. Helen, the one who received the material, describes herself: "Psychologist, educator, conservative in theory and atheistic in belief, I was working in a prestigious and highly academic setting. And then something happened that triggered a chain of events I could never have predicted. The head of my department unexpectedly announced that he wa ...
Ivy League News: No Title: ...Fellowship, he currently lives in New York City, teaching at Columbia University in the spring 2013.
Artist Biography by Jason Ankeny After briefly entering the mainstream pop radar in 1981 with her lone hit "O Superman," Laurie Anderson enjoyed a public visibility greater than virtually any other avant-garde figure of her era. Her infrequent forays into rock aside, Anderson nevertheless remained firmly grounded within the realm of performance art, her ambitious multimedia projects encompassing not only music but also film, visual projections, dance, and -- most importantly -- spoken and written language, the cornerstone of all of her work. Born in the Chicago suburb of Glen Ellyn, Illinois on June 5, 1947, she studied violin as a teen; relocating to New York City at age 20, she later attended Barnard College, graduating with a B.A. in art history in 1969. After earning an M.F.A. in sculpture from Columbia University in 1972, Anderson taught art history and Egyptian architecture at City College; she mounted her first public performances a year later. Big Science By 1976, Anderson was regularly mounting p ...
New York City can be a surprise for people but last year Cloud Peak Fellow Nathaly Santana, from Cape Coral, Florida, knew that Barnard College at Columbia University was the right place for her to go to college. Nathaly wants to be an environmental scientist, but I think she just might become a writer, and Barnard College trains students well in both areas. She was accepted early decision. Here's what Nathaly has to say about her first few weeks at Barnard: Nathaly Loves Barnard and New York City Barnard is absolutely amazing! Class is going well so far. Remember that private school you mentioned on 110th street? The one that has a bus stop station in the front that could take me to the Museum? Well, I got a job there as a Teacher's Assistant for the after school program. I work twice a week, which I feel is enough to keep me busy in a positive way. Not to mention that I also have a mini internship on campus working with the Latin American Architecture department to research and edit their current pro .. ...
Anne Tyler (born Oct 25, 1941) Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist. Early life-The eldest of four children, she was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Her father was a chemist and her mother a Social Worker. Her early childhood was spent in a succession of Quaker communities in the mountains of North Carolina and in Raleigh. She didn't attend a school until she was 11, and this unorthodox upbringing enabled her to view "the normal world with a certain amount of distance and surprise." She graduated at 19 from Duke University and completed graduate work in Russian studies at Columbia University in New York City. She worked as a librarian and bibliographer before moving to Maryland. Career-She is noteworthy among contemporary best-selling novelists, for she rarely grants face-to-face interviews or does book tours, nor does she make many other public appearances, although she has made herself available through email interviews. Tyler's ninth novel, Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant, which she considers her ...
I read somewhere that although the streets of Paris and London were designed for leisurely, meandering strolls, that was not the case of the streets in New York City. They were "built on a grid that amplifies and feeds the relentless pace of life here." I agree. New York streets are not meant for strolling, much less meandering. They are meant for charging ahead, onward as far as your feet can take you. I'll never forget all those Saturday mornings, fall, winter and spring, when I'd put on my sneakers, layered my clothes and charged up to Broadway, across from Houston, heading toward 6th Avenue, and from there head up north, walking with a purpose all the way to Columbia University; doing the little detour at the entrance to Central Park, crossing the street on 72nd; and still charging ahead until four to five hours later I would enter the little hallway pizzeria on Broadway and W 114 -- or was it 113 -- that sold the largest and cheapest slices in the city. I'd buy my huge slice of pizza ($1 plus $1 more ...
Columbia University is Full of Zombies!: . Last fall, I moved to New York City to begin my doctoral studies in ...
By the early 1940s, scientists knew that chromosomes existed and that they were composed of smaller units called genes. Chemical analysis had revealed that the eucaryotic chromosome consists of about 50 percent protein and 50 percent deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). There was no particular interest in DNA for several previous decades because no role had been assigned to it. This changed when a Canadian-born American named Oswald Avery showed that DNA is responsible for the transmission of heritable characteristics. Avery moved from Canada to New York City in 1887. He attended Colgate University and in 1904 received his medical degree from the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University. He practiced medicine   American bacteriologist Oswald Avery, who demonstrated that DNA is the unit of genetic inheritance. for several months before he became more interested in the transmission of infectious diseases. In 1913, Avery arrived at Rockefeller Institute, where he worked as a bacteriologist for over ...
Headed to New York City early in the morning to go visit Columbia University!! So pumped!
Everyone and their uncle and their aunt is invited to Hancock for my mom's 101st Birthday. She was born Mary Taggart in New Haven CT, June 29, 1912. Her dad was Arther Faye Taggart who taught mining engineering at Columbia University in New York City. He met my grandmother Ruth Field at Stanford University, where Ruth was Secretary to the President. (So, my mom's parents met at a university, and my dad's parents met while they were both working at a mental hospital in Camden New York. This is the perfect recipe for a mad scientist!) My dad's mom Rose O'Connor was Head Nurse, while Fred Dillon was an orderly and also served as a fireman in Williamstown NY. They were active in the Catholic Church, my dad was the bell toller on Sundays. But he later became atheist or agnostic, as was my mom. My parents both became senior editors at The Reader's Digest in Pleasantville NY (see the movie Pleasantville, even though it has nothing to do with this and is entirely off-topic). Anyway I am extremely proud of my fol ...
“There are modern day giants of science,” announced Brian Greene, professor of physics and mathematics at Columbia University. He was speaking at this year’s World Science Festival in New York City, of which he is chairman and co-founder. He was introducing Nobel Laureate James Watson, who delivered...
Jun 6, 1775: New York Patriot Marinus Willet seizes British weapons On this day in 1775, Marinus Willett and a small group of Sons of Liberty confront British soldiers and seize five wagonloads of weapons as the Redcoats evacuate New York City. Willet was born in Jamaica, New York, on July 31, 1740. His great-grandfather, Thomas Willett, had been the first English mayor of New York City, a position Marinus would hold as well in the early 1800s. After attending King's College (now Columbia University), Marinus served as a lieutenant in the Seven Years' War, joining in the attacks on New York's Fort Ticonderoga and Fort Frontenac. He ended the war as a patient in the hospital at Fort Stanwix, New York, then under construction. After his successful capture of British arms on June 6, Willett was commissioned as a lieutenant colonel on June 28, 1775, and participated in the Patriots' ill-fated Canadian expedition, where he served as the commanding officer at Fort St. John. As colonial ire rose, Willett became ...
COMPLIMENTS OF POEMHUNTER.COM Biography of Erica Jong Erica Jong is an American author and teacher best known for her fiction and poetry. Career A 1963 graduate of Barnard College, and with an M.A. in 18th century English Literature from Columbia University (1965), Jong is best known for her first novel, Fear of Flying (1973), which created a sensation with its frank treatment of a woman's sexual desires. Although it contains many sexual elements, the book is mainly the account of a young, hypersensitive woman, in her late twenties, trying to find who she is and where she is going. It contains many psychological, humorous, descriptive elements, and rich cultural and literary references. The book tries to answer the many conflicts arising in women in today's world, of womanhood, femininity, love, one's quest for freedom and purpose. Personal Life Jong was born and grew up in New York City. She is the middle daughter of Seymour Mann (né Nathan Weisman, died 2004), a drummer turned businessman of Polish Jew ...
1956 MUSIC Dizzy (John Nirks) Gillespie (1917-93) was the first black to make an overseas tour sponsored by the United States Department of State. The jazz trumpeter and band-leader was born in Cheraw, South Carolina, and studied harmony and theory at Laurinburg Institute in North Carolina. He played in Cab Calloway's band from 1939 to 1941 and. along with Oscar Pettiford and Charlie "Bird" Parker, pioneered the formation of the jazz style called Bop. Mattiwilda Dobbs (1925- ) On Novenber 9, 1956, she became the third black to sing at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City, and as Gilda in Rigoletto, the first black to sing a romatic lead there. Born in Atlanta, she graduated from Spelman College and studied at Columbia University.
Henry Bacon (Nov 28, 1866 – Feb 17, 1924) American Beaux-Arts architect who is best remembered for the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. (built 1915–1922), which was his final project.-Education and early career-Henry Bacon was born in Watseka, Illinois. He studied briefly at the University of Illinois, Urbana (1884), but left to begin his architectural career as a draftsman, eventually serving in the office of McKim, Mead & White (MMW) in New York City, one of the best-known architectural firms in its time. Bacon’s works of that period were in the late Greek Revival and Beaux-Arts architectures associated with the firm, which included Paris World Expo 1889, Boston Public Library, New York Public Library, New York Herald Building, New York Harvard Club, Columbia University, Colombian World Expo in Chicago 1893, Pennsylvania Station in NYC, among others. His later works included the Danforth Memorial Library in Paterson, New Jersey (1908), the train station in Naugatuck, Connecticut, Court of the ...
1. The Central Reserve Police Force came into existence on 27 July 1939. What was its name at the time of formation? [A] Civil Representative's Police [B] Central Representative's Police [C] Crown Representative's Police [D] Majesty Representative's Police 2. Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia National Law University, one of the premier law institutes in India, is located in which city? [A] Kanpur [B] Lucknow [C] Agra [D] Meerut 3. Who is the current MD & Chairman of Punjab National Bank? [A] K R Kamath [B] V K Jain [C] G D Batra [D] S K Agarwal 4. Pulitzer Prize was established in 1917 by provisions in the will of an American publisher and is administered by Columbia University in New York City. Can you name him? [A] David Pulitzer [B] Michael Pulitzer [C] Fülöp Pulitzer [D] Joseph Pulitzer 5. She was an Indian social reformer and freedom fighter. She is most remembered for her contribution to the Indian independence movement; for being the driving force behind the renaissance of Indian handicrafts, handlooms, and ...
About Benjamin Graham Benjamin Graham was born Benjamin Grossbaum in London, England, to Jewish parents. He moved to New York City with his family when he was one year old. After the death of his father and experiencing poverty, he became a good student, graduating from Columbia University, as salutatorian of his class, at the age of 20. He received an invitation for employment as an instructor in English, Mathematics, and Philosophy, but took a job on Wall Street eventually starting the Graham-Newman Partnership. Career [edit] Benjamin Graham and his memoirs His book, Security Analysis, with David Dodd, was published in 1934 and has been considered a bible for serious investors since it was written. It and The Intelligent Investor published in 1949 (4th revision, with Jason Zweig, 2003), are his two most widely acclaimed books. Warren Buffett describes The Intelligent Investor as "the best book about investing ever written." Graham exhorted the stock market participant to first draw a fundamental distinc ...
Hi All, there are just a handful of spots left for the ICUR lab for Friday, March 8th on Allyship! Please register at are the bios of our amazing presenters! Sasha Neha Ahuja is a community organizer and healthcare/wellness provider from New York City. She has worked to organize at the intersections of migration and labor for almost a decade. Trained as a Social Worker, her role as a facilitator of community-centered and community-directed wellness underlines her commitment to justice. Sasha has devoted her work to political education projects with South Asian and Indo-Caribbean youth, organizing for justice in the labor movement, and Social Work practice from an accountable, anti-racist framework. Sasha currently works in reproductive health, and provides full-spectrum birth/abortion doula services. She holds a BA from Hunter College of the City University of New York (free CUNY!) and a MS in Social Work from Columbia University. Emily Saltzman is a sex-positive Social Worker that currently supports an . ...
Chapter II The myth of the 'rock-star professor' September 19, 2012 | 10:34 pm | Modified: September 20, 2012 at 12:04 am 437Comments Obama with his grandparents, Stanley and Madelyn Dunham, on a park bench in New York City, when Obama was a student at Columbia University. (Associated Press) Time magazine gushed in 2008 about Barack Obama's 12-year tenure as a law lecturer at the University of Chicago Law School, saying, "Within a few years, he had become a rock-star professor with hordes of devoted students." That may have been true during his first two years, when he ranked first among the Law School's 40 instructors, with students giving him a rating of 9.7 out of a possible 10. But law student evaluations made available to The Washington Examiner by the university showed that his popularity then fell steadily. In 1999, only 23 percent of the students said they would repeat Obama's racism class. He was the third-lowest-ranked lecturer at the Law School that year. And in 2003, only a third of the studen ...
This is a compilation of programs, events, and “media lounge” that involve a Yale student, scholar, and faculty (bold/blue highlight) offered at the CAA Annual Conference in New York City, February 13-16, 2013.  We hope you find it helpful and it encourages you to support one another. (Thanks to Kari Coyle for compiling this list!)   Yale History of Art Reception: Thursday, February 14th, 5:30-7:00 PM, Sheraton Hotel, 811 7th Ave, Conference Room E, Lower Lobby.  (The Sheraton Hotel is just across 53rd Street from the Hilton)   PROGRAM SESSIONS WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13th 12:30 PM-2:00 PM American Council for Southern Asian Art   Thinking beyond Royalty: Reassessing Temple Patronage in Premodern South Asia Bryant Suite, 2nd Floor Chairs: Katherine E. Kasdorf, Columbia University; Risha Lee, National University of Singapore   Divine Kingship Revisited: Indian Temple Art and Patronage in the Sixth to Eighth Centuries Julie Romain, Los Angeles County Museum of Art and University of California, Los Ang ...
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Dr. Charles Drew, American physician who specialized in blood preservation. He developed ways to store, collect, and process large volumes of blood in blood banks for transfusion. Dr. Drew standardized the shipment of blood as well. As a leading authority in the field, he organized the blood plasma programs for Great Britain and the United States during World War II. In 1938, Drew received a Rockefeller Fellowship to study at Columbia University and train at the Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. There, he continued his exploration of blood-related matters with John Scudder. Drew developed a method for processing and preserving blood plasma, or blood without cells. Plasma lasts much longer than whole blood, making it possible to be stored or "banked" for longer periods of time. He discovered that the plasma could be dried and then reconstituted when needed. His research served as the basis of his doctorate thesis, "Banked Blood," and he received his doctorate degree in 1940. Drew became the first Afr ...
What school did Barack Obama attend? Answer: Starting at age 6, Obama attended a Catholic school in Indonesia. At age 8, he attended a public school in Indonesia, nominally a Muslim school, which is where the "Muslim" tempest in a teapot comes from. At age 10, he left his mother and Muslim stepfather behind in Indonesia, moving to Honolulu to live with his Mom's parents. His grandmother was a Vice President for the Bank of Hawaii and was able to afford to send him to the prestigious private college preparatory Punahou Academy, still considered the finest school in Hawaii. He attended there from 5th grade, and graduated from High School there in 1979. Obama then attended Occidental College, a liberal arts college in Los Angeles from 1979 to 1981. He admittedly was a bit of a party animal there. He apparently got a bit more serious his sophomore year and transferred to Columbia University in New York City for his junior and senior years, graduating from Columbia in 1983. From 1988 to 1991 Obama attended Har ...
This Week at Innisfree: Wednesday January 30 at 7PM - Film - Maryse Condé Speaks from the Heart Ann Armstrong Scarboro of Boulder founded Mosaic Media to promote inter-cultural understanding through film. Her work with Susan Wilcox of FullDuck Productions highlights French Caribbean writers and artists from the African Diaspora, exploring their art, their ideas and their history. Scarboro will be present when Innisfree screens the English voiceover version of "Maryse Condé Speaks from the Heart," on Wednesday, January 30, 2013. Condé, the masterful novelist from Guadeloupe who has written at least 20 novels, 5 plays, numerous collections of essays and taught literature at Columbia University, gave this interview June, 2002, in New York City. She speaks of her childhood, her passion for honesty, her compassion for women, her love of family and her respect for the craft of writing. She describes her experiences with racism in France and the US, and the controversy her books have caused. She ends the ...
Born September 27, 1935, at the stop 5 of Puerta de Tierra. Son of Don José Quijano Dona Luz Maria Garcia and mats. Spent his childhood in Building A, Apartment 1, the Phalanx community. José Quijano Esteraz builds his life in New York City, where his parents emigrated in 1941 looking for better fortune. The Bronx became his community and thence absorbed musical trends prevailing at the time the student was his musical ear, without thinking that life awaited him a seat at the scene of the future stars of Latin rhythm. In Manhattan, his parents enrolled him in the academy Professor Maria Luisa Lecompte, mother of Luis Varona, the pianist of "Machito". He continued his musical studies at the Bronx getting Bocanegra Eduvijes classes. In 1948, at age 13, attended PS 52, a High School where he befriended Orlando Marín and Eddie Palmieri, two Puerto Ricans who would Years Later musicians. He continued his training in the Sound of Jazz School, and continued his studies at Columbia University. A trip to Puerto ...
If you care about architecture, here’s an occasion for satisfaction and expectation. Columbia University and the Museum of Modern Art, both in New York City,
Einstein visited New York City for the first time on 2 April 1921, where he received an official welcome by the Mayor, followed by three weeks of lectures and receptions. He went on to deliver several lectures at Columbia University and Princeton University, and in Washington he accompanied representatives of the National Academy of Science on a visit to the White House. On his return to Europe he was the guest of the British statesman and philosopher Viscount Haldane in London, where he met several renowned scientific, intellectual and political figures, and delivered a lecture at King's College.[52] In 1922, he traveled throughout Asia and later to Palestine, as part of a six-month excursion and speaking tour. His travels included Singapore, Ceylon, and Japan, where he gave a series of lectures to thousands of Japanese. His first lecture in Tokyo lasted four hours, after which he met the emperor and empress at the Imperial Palace where thousands came to watch. Einstein later gave his impressions of the ...
Lets have some GK lessons today onwards. HISTORICAL EVENTS ON 4th JANUARY: 1642 - King Charles I with 400 soldiers attacks the English parliament 1698 - Most of the Palace of Whitehall in London, the main residence of the English monarchs, is destroyed by fire. 1717 - Netherlands, England & France sign Triple Alliance 1725 - Benjamin Franklin arrives in London 1754 - Columbia University founded, as Kings College (NYC) 1762 - England declares war on Spain & Naples 1843 - Royal Academy (Technical Hague court) Delft opens Inventor/Industrialist Samuel ColtInventor/Industrialist Samuel Colt 1847 - Samuel Colt sells his first revolver pistol to the United States government. 1854 - The McDonald Islands are discovered by Captain William McDonald aboard the Samarang. 1863 - 4 wheeled roller skates patented by James Plimpton of NY 1865 - The New York Stock Exchange opens its first permanent headquarters at 10-12 Broad near Wall Street in New York City. 1878 - Sofia is emancipated from Ottoman rule. 1883 - Ontario ...
Dr. Dorothy Bloniarz Professional Statement About Our Physician Dr. Bloniarz started her medical career at Columbia University in New York City. From there, she attended medical school at Jagiellonian University in Krakow Poland. Dr. Bloniarz completed residences in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology at St. Vincent's Catholic Medical Center and Oregon Health and Sciences. She is currently board certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology. Dr. Bloniarz is commited to providing only the highest quality healthcare to her patients.
The Program in Narrative Medicine at Columbia University will present the New York City premiere of My Coma Dreams at the Miller Theatre on the Columbia University campus for two performances on Saturday, March 2, 2013. Based on the personal experience of pianist/composer Fred Hersch, who survived ...
STRESS: IT REALLY CAN KILL YOU! Those who believed stress hurts hearts have more evidence to bolster their argument! A recent meta-analysis showed people who “feel stressed” appear to be at risk for developing coronary heart disease. In pooled results from six studies, individuals who had high perceived stress were 27% more likely to develop coronary heart disease subsequently compared with those who had low perceived stress, according to Donald Edmondson, PhD, of Columbia University's Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health in New York City, and colleagues. The effect size increased with older average ages among the participants of the included studies, the researchers reported online in the American Journal of Cardiology. To help understand this better, perceived stress "could be thought of as the equivalent of a 50-mg/dL increase in [LDL cholesterol], the authors wrote.
Why Are Kids in Asthma Hotspots in NYC More Likely to Visit the ER? Exercise May Be a Factor Dec. 17, 2012 — Asthmatic children in New York City neighborhoods with high rates of asthma make many more visits to the emergency room (ER) than those who live in other parts of the city. While socioeconomic factors such as lack of adequate preventive care are part of the equation (high-asthma neighborhoods tend to be lower income), new research points to a possible biological basis for the disparity. Asthmatic children living in asthma hotspots were twice as likely to experience a common symptom known as exercise-induced wheeze than were those in neighborhoods with lower asthma rates. Results by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center appear online in Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics. The study enrolled 195 middle-income children with asthma, ages 7 and 8, living throughout New York City -- in areas with varying asthma prevalence. Th ...
Joan Elizabeth Beach, a 15-year resident of Mesa, passed away Wednesday, December 5th. Joan was born in Hackensack, New Jersey on January 15, 1934 to Robert and Marion Horsey. She was raised in Harrington Park, New Jersey and frequently visited Cape May, New Jersey. She attended Green Mountain College in Vermont before completing her degree at Columbia University in Dental Hygiene in New York City. She is survived by her three children: Steven (Leslie), of Colorado; Elizabeth (Seth) and Joy, of a northern suburb outside Chicago. She is also survived by her significant other, Larry Barwick, six grandchildren: Shannon (Rob), Sean, Jamie, Brett, Marina, and Austin, and two great-grandchildren: Elizabeth and Finley. She leaves behind her nephew, Robert Horsey, nieces: Diane and Debbie, her first cousins: Bev and Pat, great-aunt Dot, and two pampered puppies: JJ and Ralphie. Joan lived a full life with her friends and family in places; from service life in Germany to the east coast, Hilton Head Island, Chicago ...
Janet Murray Fiske died Nov.13, 2012 at home in Vashon Community Care, Vashon, WA. She was 99 years old - 10 days from her 100th birthday. She will be remembered for her love of life, her generosity with family and friends, her enjoyment of the arts, her originality and style, her welcoming home, her passions and projects. Janet was born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, one of five children of Frederick G. Murray, a physician, and Janette S. Murray, an author, newspaper and radio correspondent, school commissioner and homemaker who was named American Mother of the Year in 1947. Janet graduated from Coe College in Cedar Rapids and taught school in Iowa and Massachusetts. Before earning a master of arts degree from Columbia University in New York City, she traveled and worked in France and Greece. In 1940 she married John C. Fiske, whom she met at Columbia. John worked in naval intelligence during World War ll and, after the war, the couple and their two children lived in Moscow, USSR, where John continued to work in ...
In the 1990s Klaus Jacob, a seismologist at Columbia University, led a study of the consequences of a major earthquake in New York City. He was then asked in his modeling techniques could be applied to a possible storm surge from a major storm. He accurately predicted the consequences of Hurricane Sandy. He is interviewed outside his home in Pierpont, NY, up the Hudson River from the George Washington Bridge. The bottom line is: "Certainly the victims of such events understand that sea level rise and climate change is a reality. It behooves the electorate to make a decision whether they want to have people in the government, and therefore elect them, that are climate deniers, and we will continue to suffer the consequences. I wonder how long we as voters allow us to have representatives in the government that take threats of national importance not serious. I think it is inexcusable, it is irresponsible, and it will have fatal and economic and livelihood consequences."
I could write a book of why I LOVE my President Obama, will try not to.. 1st Donald Trump, I watched PUBLIC BROADCAST ( now I know WHY Mitt said he will take away their funds).. Saw the original Birth Certificate and life history of Barak Obama. I saw documentations and pictures of the year books of where he went to High School, when he lived with his gparents in Hawaii & his activities. President Obama went to OXIDENTAL College in CA. Columbia University in New York City and Harvard Law School. The 1st black President of the Harvard Law Review & wrote a book to teach law.. Senator of IL. Still believes in a Unites States of America. Has the SAME beliefs since ? Now has ENDED 2 wars, saw that Osama Bin Laden was killed, um the "real" terrorist of our 911.. Yep still voting Democrat. I am just trying to get people to look & really KNOW the man you want as Commander in Chief...
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The Success of Oliver Scholars one story.. Paul Modesire shared it. Good Things Happen to Good People On Thursday, October 4, 2012 the United Way of New York City announced that they had chosen Sheena Wright to serve as their new President and CEO. Ms. Wright is an Oliver Scholar alumna (George School ’86, Columbia University ’90) and is a true embodiment of our core values of scholarship, leadership, and service. "I am thrilled to be embarking on this new chapter as President and CEO of United Way of NYC. I look forward to continuing and strengthening United Way's work to improve the lives of low income New Yorkers through initiatives in health, education and income," said Ms. Wright. "I grew up in the South Bronx with a teen mother who raised my sister and me by herself. The strength and fortitude of my mother combined with the help of community programs allowed me to accomplish everything I have today. I have seen first-hand how profound United Way's impact is in our City, and I'm thrilled to have ...
Sean Taro Ono Lennon was born on October 9, 1975 in New York City. It was his father's 35th birthday. After Sean's birth, John became a house husband, doting on his young son until his murder in 1980. Sean attended kindergarten in Tokyo, He later attended Columbia University, though for only three semesters before dropping out to focus on his music career. At 16 Sean co-wrote the song "All I Ever Wanted" with Lenny Kravitz for his 1991 album Mama Said. In 1996 Miho Hatori and Yuka Honda of Cibo Matto were invited by Ono to remix the song "Talking to the Universe." They met Sean and invited him to join them on tour as a bass player. This eventually led to Sean's becoming a member of the group. Lennon's solo début Into the Sun, was released in 1998.On October 22, 2011, Sean showed up on Wall Street with Rufus Wainwright and Josh Fox. The three played music throughout the day to protesters and others joined in.
Just got back from seeing John Legend, Al Sharpton, and Columbia University's very own Carl Hart speak out against the War on Drugs at the Apollo Theater. They promoted the film 'The House I Live In' - a documentary about the harm to society caused by and the life destroying affects of America's failed War on Drugs. There will be a showing in New York City tomorrow; check it out:
Cenk Uygur host of The Young Turks and founder of Wolf PAC gives a presentation at Columbia University in New York City on September 7, 2012. Join the Wolf P...
On right now: On KQED Public Radio's Forum for Tuesday, September 18: 'Occupy,' One Year Later / Martin Amis 9am Forum with Michael Krasny 'Occupy,' One Year Later Monday marked the first anniversary of "Occupy Wall Street," a movement that began with an encampment in New York City's Zuccotti Park and inspired similar protests across America and around the world. "Occupy" protesters staged large demonstrations in New York and San Francisco to celebrate the anniversary, but the milestone has left some people questioning the validity and success of the controversial movement. Guests include Buck Bagot, organizer with Occupy Bernal Heights; Lachlan Markay, investigative reporter with the Heritage Foundation, covering the Occupy movement; Joe Garofoli, politics reporter with The San Francisco Chronicle; and Todd Gitlin, author of "Occupy Nation: The Roots, the Spirit and the Promise of Occupy Wall Street" and professor of journalism and sociology at Columbia University.
I find myself at Columbia University, about to hear talks by Joe Salerno, Walter Block, and Lew Rockwell. Should be fun. I'd say that my weekend in New York City is going pretty well..
Our 1st Commitment of the fall as 7'0 St. Cloud Cathedral Center Conor Voss liked what he saw of New York City and committed to Columbia University. A division 1 school competing in the Ivy League. Congratulations Conor!!!
The Pat Tillman Foundation, Columbia University and Pace University invite you to the opening session of the Forum on Sacrifice and Service at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts at Pace University in New York City. After September 11, 2001, Pat Tillman proudly put his NFL career on hold to ser...
a New York City bicycle messenger picks up an envelope at Columbia University, a dirty cop becomes desperate to get his hands on it and chases the messenger throughout the city. Opens Friday at select locations...
Elizabeth Hardwick (July 27, 1916 – Dec 2, 2007) American literary critic, novelist, and short story writer. She was born in Lexington, Kentucky, and graduated from the University of Kentucky in 1939. She was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1947. In 1959, Hardwick published in Harper's, "The Decline of Book Reviewing," a generally harsh and even scathing critique of book reviews published in American periodicals of the time. The 1962 New York City newspaper strike helped inspire Hardwick, Robert Lowell, Jason Epstein, Barbara Epstein, and Robert B. Silvers to establish The New York Review of Books, a publication that became as much a habit for many readers as The New York Times Book Review, which Hardwick had eviscerated in her 1959 essay. In the '70s and early '80s, Hardwick taught writing seminars at Barnard College and Columbia University's School of the Arts, Writing Division. She gave forthright critiques of student writing and was a mentor to students she considered promising. From 1949 to 1972 ...
Dr. Albert Ellis, Ph.D. (Sept 27, 1913 – July 24, 2007) American psychologist who in 1955 developed Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT). He held M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in clinical psychology from Columbia University and American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP). He also founded and was the president emeritus of the New York City-based Albert Ellis Institute. He is generally considered to be one of the originators of the cognitive revolutionary paradigm shift in psychotherapy and the founder of cognitive-behavioral therapies. Based on a 1982 professional survey of USA and Canadian psychologists, he was considered as the second most influential psychotherapist in history (Carl Rogers ranked first in the survey; Sigmund Freud was ranked third). Prior to his death, Psychology Today described him as the “greatest living psychologist.”
Columbia University is an American private Ivy League research university located in New York City
If not, then why do photographs of him at Occidental College and in New York City in the years when he was supposed to have attended Columbia University show him wearing a ring on the ring finger of his left hand?
Con Ed Locks Out Workers During NYC Heat Wave! July 2012 July 2, 2012 At 2am on July 1st Con Ed chose to take the extreme action of locking out Local 1-2 UWUA New York Utility workers. A lock out means that Con Ed is Refusing to allow workers to report to work and be available to respond to all The Utility Emergencies. This Dangerous action will leave New Yorkers Residents’ more vulnerable to Brown outs and Blackouts over the coming Heat Wave. This Summer! & The Update of ** Kevin Burke, CEO of Con Edison {He Doesn’t Care about The People of New York City or New York State Power Authority or The Public Image of the company} He also sit’s on the Executives board of Columbia University & Mt Sinai Hospitals’ in New York This is the excuse of the supervisor’s gave me on my Termination date of this May 24,2012 for making a Honest Mistake! I made doing My Job. The Public Image of Con Edison Was Violated. as a Con Ed worker in a Customerservice line of Business of support. See, THEY DON’T CARE ABO ...
Alicia Augello Cook (born January 25, 1981), better known by her stage name Alicia Keys, is an American recording artist, musician and actress. She was raised by a single mother in the *** s Kitchen area of Manhattan in New York City. At age seven, Keys began to play classical music on the piano. She attended Professional Performing Arts School and graduated at 16 as valedictorian. She later attended Columbia University before dropping out to pursue her music career. Keys released her debut album with J Records, having had previous record deals first with Columbia and then Arista Records. Keys' debut album, Songs in A Minor, was a commercial success, selling over 12 million copies worldwide. She became the best-selling new artist and best-selling R&B artist of 2001. The album earned Keys five Grammy Awards in 2002, including Best New Artist and Song of the Year for "Fallin'". Her second studio album, The Diary of Alicia Keys, was released in 2003 and was also another success worldwide, selling eight mill ...
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In his autobiography, Dreams From My Fathers, Barack Obama writes of taking a job at some point after graduating from Columbia University in 1983. He describes his employer as "a consulting house to multinational corporations" in New York City, and his functions as a "research assistant" and "financ...
he image presaged no celebration: a child barely alive, a vulture so eager for carrion. Yet the photograph that epitomized Sudan's famine would win Kevin Carter fame - and hopes for anchoring a career spent hounding the news, free-lancing in war zones, waiting anxiously for assignments amid dire finances, staying in the line of fire for that one great picture. On May 23, 14 months after capturing that memorable scene, Carter walked up to the dais in the classical rotunda of Columbia University's Low Memorial Library and received the Pulitzer Prize for feature photography. The South African soaked up the attention. "I swear I got the most applause of anybody," Carter wrote back to his parents in Johannesburg. "I can't wait to show you the trophy. It is the most precious thing, and the highest acknowledgment of my work I could receive." Carter was feted at some of the most fashionable spots in New York City. Restaurant patrons, overhearing his claim to fame, would come up and ask for his autograph. Photo ed ...
New York — On a gray day in New York City, about 600 young women gathered under tents to receive their diplomas from Barnard College, the all-female liberal arts school affiliated with Columbia University, and to hear from President Barack Obama. And they certainly let him know.
This has been Brendan's job at Human Impacts Institute ... organizing the event listed below as well as preparing to go to Rio +20 in June to represent Human Impacts! WAY TOO COOL! He actually coordinated this particular event at the Ford Foundation. MobilizeUS! Action Tour: NYC+20 The Columbia University Coalition for Sustainable Development is sending a delegation to the Rio+20 Conference this June to increase the presence of youth in the process. In preparation for this important conference, we are organizing an event called "NY+20" that will bring together students from New York and beyond to explore the UN Rio+20 processes first-hand. Simulations of the conference are happening across the world as a part of the MyCity+20 movement, and the goal is teach everyone about the structure and significance of Rio+20. With the unparalleled diversity of universities, environmental groups, and United Nations agencies located in New York City, NY+20 will be an exciting day of learning and activity. We are curren ...
It's official, my daughter, Heather, will be attending Barnard College, a partner with Columbia University in New York City this fall! We are so proud of her! :)
yep I can find articles like this all day . Maybe we should post a bounty on these killers and demand justice. would that be cdonsidered racist or just free speech.?This is hard to take, and you should wait until the right time to read it, but you should read the story in the New York Daily News about the trial in New York City of Robert Williams, who in April 2007 seized and held captive for 19 hours, tortured in every way imaginable and unimaginable, and scarred and disfigured a 23 year old Columbia University journalism student. The race of the young woman whose life he has blasted is not mentioned. Of course she is white. The worst he faces is life in prison, not death.
Comic New York was a two-day symposium held March 24 and 25, 2012 at Columbia University's Low Memorial Library, to examine the intertwined histories of New York City and the American Comic Book Industry. The keynote session was a discussion with writer Chris Claremont, who wrote the X-Men for 17 co...
my website: misfit parapsychology professors are booted out of their cushy jobs at New York City's Columbia University. Despite their relative lack of funding, they start an enterprise called Ghostbusters, a spectral investigation and removal service. One of the men has a plan to catch and contain supernatural entities, though it has never been properly tested. Undeterred, they obtain a former fire station as a base and begin advertising on local television. At first, their clients are few and far between, and the Ghostbusters have to depend on their individual talents to keep the business alive: Dr. Egon Spengler is a scientific genius, Dr. Raymond "Ray" Stantz is an expert on paranormal history and metallurgy, and Dr. Peter Venkman has charm and business savvy, although he is in some ways a charlatan. Although he initially comes off as a bit of a goof and sleaze, Venkman eventually finds a subtly heroic side to himself when he learns that a creature called Zuul is haunting the apartment of Dana Barrett, ...
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