New Deal & Democratic Party

The New Deal was a series of economic programs implemented in the United States between 1933 and 1936. They were passed by the U.S. The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party. 5.0/5

New Deal Democratic Party Republican Party African Americans Franklin Delano Roosevelt Great Depression United States Great Society John F. Kennedy Franklin Roosevelt Hyde Park Voting Rights Act Bill Clinton Woodrow Wilson Franklin D. Roosevelt New Democrats

Democratic Party, she built the New Deal, involved a great expansion of the planter class and fought in the fields of (2/3)
If the Democratic Party loses its commitments to New Deal and Great Society, it will have lost its soul. Not either/ or SW v MW
= . FDR would be laughed out of TODAY'S Democratic Party for pushing the New Deal and Social Security Act.
Real issue is media/Hollywood/academia's cover-up of the failure of the New Deal--and of the racist history of the Democratic Party.
July 18, 1940: FDR nominated for unprecedented third term On this day in 1940, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who first took office in 1933 as America's 32nd president, was nominated for an unprecedented third term. Roosevelt, a Democrat, would eventually be elected to a record four terms in office, the only U.S. president to serve more than two terms. Roosevelt was born January 30, 1882, in Hyde Park, New York, and went on to serve as a New York state senator from 1911 to 1913, Assistant Secretary of the Navy from 1913 to 1920 and governor of New York from 1929 to 1932. In 1932, he defeated incumbent Herbert Hoover to be elected president for the first time. During his first term, Roosevelt enacted his New Deal social programs, which were aimed at lifting America out of the Great Depression. In 1936, he won his second term in office by defeating Kansas governor Alf Landon in a landslide. On July 18, 1940, Roosevelt was nominated for a third presidential term at the Democratic Party convention in Chicago. The ...
THE BLACK VOTE Lyndon B. Johnson 94% (1964 signing Civil Rights Act) Bill Clinton 82% & 84% Al Gore 90% John Kerry 88% Barrack Obama 95% & 93% Things began to change during the “Great Depression” of the 1930s with Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal. The New Deal was a program that helped disadvantaged and minority communities find work. It was the association of civil rights legislation with John F Kennedy and Lyndon Banes Jonson that solidified Black loyalty to the Democratic Party for good. JFK proposed and LBJ signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 which outlawed public discrimination. LBJs Republican opponent, Barry Goldwater, opposed it garnering Johnson 94% of the black vote that year, which was a record until 2008. Johnson later signed the 1965 Voting Rights Act. The Source
PLEASE READ ALL DEMOCRATS BEFORE U VOTE The sixties. The New Deal Coalition began to fracture as more Democratic leaders voiced support for civil rights, upsetting the party's traditional base of conservative Southern Democrats and Catholics in Northern cities. After Harry Truman's platform gave strong support to civil rights and anti-segregation laws during the 1948 Democratic National Convention, many Southern Democratic delegates decided to split from the Party and formed the "Dixiecrats," led by South Carolina governor Strom Thurmond (who, as a Senator, would later join the Republican Party). Over the next few years, many conservative Democrats in the "Solid South" drifted away from the party. On the other hand, African Americans, who had traditionally given strong support to the Republican Party since its inception as the "anti-slavery party," continued to shift to the Democratic Party due to its New Deal economic opportunities and support for civil rights—largely due to New Deal relief programs, p ...
American labor unions benefitted greatly from the New Deal policies of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the 1930s. The Wagner Act, in particular, legally protected the right of unions to organize. Unions from this point developed increasingly closer ties to the Democratic Party, and are considered a backbone element of the New Deal Coalition. A common refrain from those who support the labor movement is that the power and success of labor unions continued to grow after World War II, but faced stiff resistance from conservative, free market business interests, represented politically by the Republican Party. Such an outlook ignores the role that union-imposed costs, inefficient work rules primary among them, played in pricing union labor out of many markets. Each side appeared satisfied to blame the other instead of developing economically sensible programs to help secure fairness and sustainability.
IN MEMORY-US Senator Frank Raleigh Lautenberg (Jan 23, 1924 – June 3, 2013) United States Senator from New Jersey and a member of the Democratic Party. He first served in the United States Senate from 1982 to 2001; after a brief retirement, he was re-elected to the Senate and served from 2003 until his death in June 2013. Lautenberg was the last serving veteran of World War II in the United States Senate. Before entering politics, he was the chairman and chief executive officer of Automatic Data Processing, Inc. He has been called "the last of the New Deal liberals" and was known for his legislative efforts against drunk driving, and his support of spending for Amtrak and urban public transportation, for stronger environmental regulations, greater consumer protections and investigations of wrongdoing by Wall Street.
Ted Nuggent a premier *** Lyle A. Waisman/Getty Images Ted Nugent Dubs Next Tour 'Black Power 2013' By Rolling Stone | February 22, 8:20 AM ET That's one way to mark Black History Month: When Ted Nugent hits the road this year, he's calling his tour "Ted Nugent Black Power 2013," he writes on the conservative website World Net Daily. In a column that describes "dirty Democrat politicians" as the enemies of black Americans, the right-wing rocker reels off a string of statistics he says demonstrate how ineffective Democratic policies, including Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal and Lyndon Johnson's Great Society, have been at helping African-Americans overcome poverty, crime and a lack of education. A Pocket Guide to Republican Rockers "The truth is that the Democratic Party has been the engineer of the destruction of black Americans, and everyone knows it except the very people who need to know it the most – black Americans," he writes. Nugent, on the other hand, says he celebrates Black History Month " ...
Weird Washinton (State and D.C.): Marion Zioncheck's Zany Misfortune Political lunacy is nothing new. Let's face it: holding public office probably requires a few loose screws to begin with. But even today's nuttiest politicians would be hard-pressed to top one of Washington State's depression-era congressmen, Representative Marion Anthony Zioncheck. General summaries of his life are rather bland: The son of Polish immigrants, Zioncheck was born in 1901 and grew up in Seattle. He earned a law degree at the University of Washington while distinguishing himself in the Democratic Party. After successfully orchestrating a recall of Seattle Mayor Frank Edwards, he decided to run for representative of Washington's first congressional district in 1932. He won the election and went on to become a zealous supporter of FDR's New Deal. He would have served at least one complete term in Congress had he not taken his own life in August of 1936. But brief biographies simply do not suffice for Congressman Zioncheck. Col ...
"It is best not to straddle ideals" by digby ... In 1940, as most of the world was fighting and the US was still struggling to come out of the depression, Roosevelt was heading for an unprecedented third term. He wanted to dump his conservadem VP John Nance Garner because of his hostility to the New Deal and nominate his Secretary of Agriculture, the liberal Henry Wallace. The conservadems tried to block Wallace at the convention and an exasperated Roosevelt wrote a letter to be read to the gathered delegates. This is that letter: Franklin D. Roosevelt Letter to the Democratic Convention July 18, 1940 Members of the Convention: In the century in which we live, the Democratic Party has received the support of the electorate only when the party, with absolute clarity, has been the champion of progressive and liberal policies and principles of government. The party has failed consistently when through political trading and chicanery it has fallen into the control of those interests, personal and financial, w ...
MISS ANN THROPE Take 7 A Compassionate Conservative is someone who wants to make drastic cuts in Medicare, S.S., and Medicaid, but is very, very, very sorry about it. The above has been attributed to former President Bill "Slick Willie" Clinton. However, ol' Slick Willie himself isn't exactly in the clear on this: As he and his "New Democrats" in the DLC scrapped the Democratic Party's New Deal legacy in their campaign to move the party "to the center," didn't he sign Newt Grinch's "welfare 'reform'" of 1996 into law? Indeed, he himself once said to the many Americans who were being left out of his "recovery" that, "I feel your pain"... as he and his "New[t] Democrats" inflicted more of it. ~
I like Elizabeth Warren, but I have to mention to that in relation to her campaign, the endless love song to the middle class alone has long lost its charm. That was never what the Democratic Party was about until Bill Clinton's "New Democrats" (anti-New Deal/Great Society). Before Clinton, the Dem Party was about ordinary people -- the middle class, post-middle class and poor. For many, this was a matter of both basic human decency and patriotism (you can't be pro-America but anti-American). It was about serving the best interests of the country. Those New Deal programs were precisely what enabled the US to become the powerful, wealthy nation that it was following WWll. Today, we are dealing with the consequences of incrementally wiping out the New Deal agenda, and the results are a disappearing middle class, growth of poverty. The US has fallen far behind the modern nations, and focusing exclusively on the middle class, the better off, blocks us from rebuilding the country.
Black Agenda 2012 _ _ Alton H. Maddox, jr. Tel.: (718) 834-9034 Acting Chairman Fax : (718) 884-8241 P.O. Box 35 Bronx, NY 10471 Obama and Romney Snub NAACP© By Alton H. Maddox, Jr. After President Barack Obama and his Republican challenger, Mitt Romney, made an appearance last month before the Latino community on Univision, the NAACP, Rev. Al Sharpton, MSNBC and the Griot asked the two main presidential candidates to appear before the Black community on October 9 at Lincoln University. Both Romney and Obama gave a “no” to the invitation and for good reason. Latinos are switch hitters. Blacks only bat left-handed. Switch-hitters not only cause problems in baseball but also in politics. As long as Blacks bat from the left-side, only, they will always be short-changed politically. Before the New Deal, most Blacks were under the Republican tent. During the New Deal, Blacks in the North switched to the Democratic Party. Blacks in the South remained in the “Party of Lincoln”. JFK’s call to Ms ...
"From the end of the Civil War, African Americans favored the Republican Party. However, they began supporting the Democratic Party in the 1930s, as Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal programs gave economic relief to all "Americans" including African Americans and Hispanics. Support for the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s by Democratic presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson helped give the Democrats even larger support among the African American community, although their position also alienated the Southern white population and led to a split in the parties, with most liberals going to the Democratic Party and most conservatives, such as the "Dixiecrats" moving towards the Republicans. In addition, recent Caribbean and African immigrants have voted solidly Democratic."
In their bid for reelection, President Obama and the Democratic Party have decided to focus their efforts on the "middle class". They want the government to do for the "middle class", what the government has done for African Americans. Some 80 years ago, with the "New Deal", democrats began to fo...
Phony populism from a party of corporate America By Patrick Martin 5 September 2012 The opening night of the Democratic National Convention provided a grossly distorted picture of the Obama administration, presenting a right-wing, pro-corporate, anti-working-class government as though it was the second coming of the New Deal. Speaker after speaker bashed Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney as the candidate of wealth and privilege and portrayed Obama as the advocate of working people and his reelection as the key to social and economic progress. The utter cynicism of this claim was demonstrated by the continual references to Obama’s bailout of the auto industry as the high point of his concern for the working class. This action supposedly “saved a million jobs,” but there was no examination of the actual impact of the government intervention into General Motors and Chrysler on autoworkers. Using the threat of imminent liquidation of the two companies, Obama’s auto task force, drawn from t ...
America’s National Debt – Why Republicans and Democrats Are to Blame Since the Great Depression, Democrats and Republicans have defined themselves as the new version of Santa Claus. Saint Nick brings wonderful things to children for free. There’s no cost. When there are no strings attached, no payment, children love Santa Claus all the more. Democrats and Republicans want that love — need that love. That kind of love brings votes, and votes translate into power. The power depends on the amount of money in government. The amount of money depends on taxes. Democrats — Angels of the Poor The various components of the New Deal, created under Democrat President Franklin Roosevelt, gave the Democratic Party a voting bloc of the poor, which it still has to this day. The devastated underclass in America during the Depression saw its fortunes improved by the hand of government. Their fortunes never vastly improved, but they managed to survive. Roosevelt was praised for his New Deal programs, and he was l ...
Why the switch between the Republican Party and Democratic Party of African-Americans; During two waves of massive migration within the United States in the first half of the 20th century, more than 6 million African Americans moved from the South to northern and midwestern industrial cities. Some were elected to national political office from their new locations. During the Great Depression, many black voters switched allegiances from the Republican Party to the Democratic Party, in support of the New Deal economic, social network, and work policies of Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration. This trend continued in the 1960s. At the same time, there was a different movement among whites in the South, who began to vote for Republican candidates for national and then state offices.
Harry Truman on what's wrong with the Democratic Party today. And why Obama has a good chance of losing this November. Notice I did not say Rmoney & Ryan winning. “I’ve seen it happen time after time. When the Democratic candidate allows himself to be put on the defensive and starts apologizing for the New Deal and the fair Deal, and says he really doesn’t believe in them, he is sure to lose. The people don’t want a phony Democrat. If it’s a choice between a genuine Republican, and a Republican in Democratic clothing, the people will choose the genuine article, every time; that is, they will take a Republican before they will a phony Democrat, and I don’t want any phony Democratic candidates in this campaign. But when a Democratic candidate goes out and explains what the New Deal and fair Deal really are–when he stands up like a man and puts the issues before the people–then Democrats can win, even in places where they have never won before. It has been proven time and again. We are gett ...
He may be the patron saint of limited government, but Ronald Reagan started out as a registered Democrat and New Deal supporter. An F.D.R. fan, the Gipper campaigned for Helen Gahagan Douglas in her fruitless 1950 Senate race against Richard Nixon and encouraged Dwight D. Eisenhower to run for President as a Democrat in 1952. While he was working as a spokesman for General Electric, however, his views shifted right. "Under the tousled boyish haircut," he wrote Vice President Nixon of John F. Kennedy in 1960, "is still old Karl Marx." By the time it actually happened in 1962, Reagan's decision to cross over to the GOP didn't come as much of a surprise. "I didn't leave the Democratic Party," he famously said. "The party left me."
Thr GOP is declaring war on FDR, the New Deal, Social Security, Medicare, the poor, the elderly, and the working class, The Romney/Ryan budget plan will decimate what is left of the greatest achievements of the Democratic Party liberalism. Obama and the Democrats have been handed an opportunity to reclaim the kwgacy of FDR, I hope and pray thery don't blow it!
By the 1870s the South was heavily Democratic in national and presidential elections, apart from pockets of Republican strength. It was the "Solid South". The social system was based on Jim Crow, a combination of legal and informal segregation that made blacks second-class citizens with little or no political power anywhere in the South.[4] In the 1930s, the New Deal under President Franklin D. Roosevelt, a realignment occurred. Much of the Democratic Party in the South shifted towards economic intervention. Civil rights for blacks was not on the New Deal agenda, as Southerners controlled the key positions of power in Congress. Jim Crow was indirectly challenged as two million blacks served in the military during World War II, receiving equal pay in segregated units, and equally entitled to veterans' benefits. The Republican Party, nominating Governor of New York Thomas E. Dewey in 1944 and 1948, supported civil rights legislation that the Southern Democrats in Congress almost unanimously opposed
"Prior to Woodrow Wilson, the Democratic Party was usually the party of small, constitutional government, and it did a much better job of filling that role than the Republican Party ever has. By the 1930’s, the party completely changed its orientation, however. The GOP, on the other hand, has always been the party of major corporate conglomerates like railroads and major banking interests. At its founding, it was the party of easy money and federal meddling in the economic system. It wasn’t until the New Deal that the Republican Party, by virtue of being the opposition party during the long reign of FDR, found itself solidified as the party associated with free markets, and its record on that issue has been spotty at best. "
The president's new position is a bet on the future of the Democratic Party -- and an admission that the New Deal coalition isn't coming back.
In 1932 with the election of FDR and the introduction of his New Deal brought a new face and Ideal to the Democratic party.
I used to be idealistic about the Democratic Party, but I don't believe in them anymore. As a party without ideals, they act more like a pack of wild dogs. Better to stay away, because you don't know what they will do. Butch Morgan, indicted for election fraud felonies, pushed my manager out the door when he brought an ADA-compliant ramp for the HQ for FREE and labor to install it. Instead the answer was no. Rev. Greg Brown made the West Side Democratic Club, including the bathroom so people like his mom in a power wheelchair could participate as proud Democrats. Democratic HQ is still inaccessible even with the too-short ramp he bought with no railings and the Mullen doorbell. I honestly don't think Jackie would be as stupid as this. Go to the Republican HQ in SB. The entrance has no steps and is flush with the ground. They actually invite disabled people, and over time they come to know who wants them and who doesn't. Greens have a jobs platform called the Green New Deal, and that means something ...
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