Native American & United States

Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the United States Census Bureau, are self-identification data items in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify, and indicate whether or not they are of Hispanic or Latino origin (ethnicity). The United States of America (USA), commonly referred to as the United States (US), America, or simply the States, is a federal republic consisting of 50 states, 16 territories, a federal district, and various overseas extraterritorial jurisdictions. 5.0/5

Native American United States Native Americans Indian Removal Act North America American Indians Indian Territory Mississippi River American Indian Choctaw Nation South Dakota African American Five Civilized Tribes New World American Revolutionary War New York

Thanksgiving: Celebrating the Genocide of Native Americans By Gilbert Mercier NEWS JUNKIE POST Nov 25, 2010 at 8:22 am The sad reality about the United States of America is that in a matter of a few hundreds years it managed to rewrite its own history into a mythological fantasy. The concepts of liberty, freedom and free enterprise in the “land of the free, home of the brave” are a mere spin. The US was founded and became prosperous based on two original sins: firstly, on the mass murder of Native Americans and theft of their land by European colonialists; secondly, on slavery. This grim reality is far removed from the fairytale version of a nation that views itself in its collective consciousness as a virtuous universal agent for good and progress. The most recent version of this mythology was expressed by Ronald Reagan when he said that“America is a shining city upon a hill whose beacon light guides freedom-loving people everywhere.” In rewriting its own history about Thanksgiving, White America ...
I'm currently studying the history of the so-called Native American people. It amazes me that we are never taught in school about what was happening in the other parts of the country before the colonies/states decided to expand westward. The indigenous population had rebuilt their society with their own government, school districts, and newspapers. They had farms, and were totally self-sufficient. The so-called "Indian Land" even became a safe haven for runaway slaves. All of this while the Americans were still debating as to whether or not they were human beings, and had souls. But, unfortunately, the American settlers eventually broke the treaties created by the US government, and expanded west, destroying everything that the indigenous people had rebuilt, and erasing its memory from United States history in the process.
Koch Industries was indicted for and pled guilty (!) to 24,000 (yes, thousand, not hundred) counts of theft by taking for underreporting the number of barrels of oil or cubic yards of natural gas taken from Federal and State public lands, from landowners, from Native American nations, and from other corporations over periods spanning decades. The practice was known among Koch employees as "Koching the books". Do you think Charles and David Koch didn't know about this practice? (They were given a "slap on the hand" by the Bush administration, paying some $300 million in fines, a very small fraction of what they profited by stealing, and were not required to pay restitution.) Their father was run out of business in the United States after WWII for infringing on patents for oil refining technology. He subsequently went into business with Erich Koch, a high ranking German Nazi and probable distant relative, selling that patented refining technology and oil to Soviet Russia. He only stopped and fled back ...
The Trail of Tears is a name given to the forced relocation of Native American nations from southeastern parts of the United States
. is a widely-recognized expert in our field, connecting Palestinian & studies to Native American Studies in the United States
Every time the conquerors tell this story, the Native Americans are the bad guys. Scalping started with the European colonists. "This excerpt from "An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States," is useful for teaching about the campaign regarding the Washington football team and other sports mascots. “Redskins” (from Chapter Four: Bloody Footprints) Indigenous people continued to resist by burning settlements and killing and capturing settlers. As an incentive to recruit fighters, colonial authorities introduced a program of scalp hunting that became a permanent and long-lasting element of settler warfare against Indigenous nations. During the Pequot War, Connecticut and Massachusetts colonial officials had offered bounties initially for the heads of murdered Indigenous people and later for only their scalps, which were more portable in large numbers. But scalp hunting became routine only in the mid-1670’s, following an incident on the northern frontier of the Massachusetts colony. The prac ...
An incredible Ottoman map of the United States from 1803. Includes state names & Native American Tribes in the West. ht…
The Battle of Fallen Timbers (August 20, 1794) was the final battle of the NorthWest Indian War, a struggle between American Indian tribes affiliated with the Western Confederacy, including minor support from the British, against the United States for control of the Northwest Territory (an area bounded on the south by the Ohio River, on the west by the Mississippi River, and on the northeast by the Great Lakes). The battle, which was a decisive victory for the United States, ended major hostilities in the region until Tecumseh's War and the Battle of Tippecanoe in 1811 The Ohio River boundary line established with Britain by the Treaty of Fort Stanwix in 1768 recognized certain lands as belonging to the Native American nations. After the American Revolution, however, the United States maintained that the Indian nations no longer owned the lands in the Ohio area, citing an article in the Treaty of Paris of 1783 in which Britain agreed to cede the lands owned by indigenous nations. Native Americans rejected ...
Over 90% of the United States' indigenous languages face extinction before the end of this century. Take a few...
Osceola and the Great Seminole War: A Struggle for Justice and Freedom by Thom Hatch At the time of his death in 1838, Seminole Warrior Osceola was the most famous and respected Native American in the world. Born a Creek, young Osceola was driven from his home by General Andrew Jackson to Spanish Florida, where he joined the Seminole Tribe. Years later, President Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act, which was not only intended to relocate the Seminoles to hostile lands in the West but would force the return of runaway slaves who had joined that tribe. Osceola -- outraged at the potential loss of his people and homeland -- did not hesitate to declare war on the United States. Osceola and the Great Seminole War vividly recounts how one warrior with courage and cunning unequaled by any Native American leader before or after would mastermind battle strategies that would embarrass the best officers in the United States Army. Employing daring guerrilla tactics, Osceola initiated and orchestrated the longest, ...
What about Alaska and the rest of the Native American lands of the United States, Canada and Mexico?
Treatment of Native Americans Throughout History of Americas Throughout colonization of New World, Native Americans have been treated ambivalently. Some tribes have been respected and treated like humans, while others have been treated like savages and less than human. Settlers and explorers occasionally treated Native Americans well, but later treated them poorly in order to access supply on Native American's lands. After much bloodshed and trickery, white people forced Native Americans to leave their lands and travel hundreds of miles to new reservations all over United States. English settlers of Virginia Colony greatly mistreated Powhatans, Indian tribe that inhabited area that is now Virginia and Chesapeake Bay coast. Spanish massacred Incas and Aztecs, while Christopher Columbus caused destruction of Natives in Caribbean Islands. When Columbus sailed across Atlantic Ocean in search of easier passage to India, he discovered Americas and landed on shores of Caribbean Islands. His expedition brought wi ...
Coxsackie is a town in Greene County, New York, United States. The population was 8,918 at the 2010 census.[1] The name of the town is said to be derived from a Native American term, but it has various translations ("owl's hoot" is locally common).
Here an interesting fact: July’s Full Moon on the 12th is called a Full Buck Moon. Does anyone know why? The moniker is from the Native American Tribes that once lived in the north eastern part of United States. How Ironic, that we will be at Indian Tower during this Full Moon.
Let's go over a little linguistics; And American discovery Indian. Indian was first coined by the Vile Columbus during his first journey of 1492, Columbus was under the illogical impression that when he arrived in the Bahamas he was in the East Indies, wasn't an intelligent man just a murderer, when Columbus murdered and conquered the Arawak's, he referred them to Indians because their skin color and hair texture was similar to that of the Hindu people of Asia, India only implies to the inhabitants of the country of India, not the indigenous people of America, today the term Indian is a term of determination officially used by the United States Federal Government as Native American however there is no clear and concise definition of the term when it deals with the classification and tribal determinabilty; Now Native American. is from the middle English word "Natif" which means "Belonging to particular place by birth" , It is a MIS CONCEPTION that the term "Native American" belong to the so-called Amer ...
Many in Washington think "Redskins" is offensive and should be changed? Even President Obama waded in with this: “If I were the owner of the team and I knew that there was a name of my team — even if it had a storied history — that was offending a sizeable group of people, I’d think about changing it,” Yet, in 2011 the leaders of several Native American Indian tribes urged President Obama to retroactively rename the military code name "Geronimo" used by the SEALS during the killing of bin Laden. Fort Sill Apache Tribal Chairman Jeff Houser sent a letter to President Obama, decrying the linking of "the legendary Apache warrior" to a "mass murder and cowardly terrorist...Unlike the coward Osama bin Laden, Geronimo faced his enemy in numerous battles and engagements. He is perhaps one of the greatest symbols of Native American resistance in the history of the United States." Questions to the White House about the code name were referred to the Defense Department, which stated no disrespect was mean ...
Diamonesk Personalized Engagement Ring And Wedding
Between 1776 and 1887, the United States seized over 1.5 billion acres from America's indigenous people by treaty and Executive Order. Explore how in this interactive map of every Native American land cession during that period.
sports team names and mascots derived from Indigenous Peoples Main article: Native American mascot controversy There is considerable controversy over these team names and mascots because various groups, including some representing Indigenous Peoples, view them as disrespectful and offensive. The National Congress of American Indians, the largest organization representing enrolled tribal citizens in the United States, issued a resolution opposing continued usage of Native American team names, mascots, and logos by non-Native teams. Numerous educational, academic, civil rights, athletic, and religious organizations have done the same. Some teams that are themselves Native American continue to use the names Indians, Braves, and Redskins; while certain tribes have granted permission to use their specific names, as in the case of the Saginaw Chippewa Tribal Nation[1] and the Seminole Tribe of Florida[2] for Central Michigan University and Florida State University, respectively. Many teams and fans support the ...
"If there is anyone out there who still doubts that America is a place where all things are possible, who still wonders if the dream of our founders is alive in our time, who still questions the power of our democracy, tonight is your answer. "It's the answer told by lines that stretched around schools and churches in numbers this nation has never seen, by people who waited three hours and four hours, many for the first time in their lives, because they believed that this time must be different, that their voices could be that difference. "It's the answer spoken by young and old, rich and poor, Democrat and Republican, black, white, Hispanic, Asian, Native American, *** straight, disabled and not disabled, Americans who sent a message to the world that we have never been just a collection of individuals or a collection of Red States and blue states. "We are, and always will be, the United States of America. "It's the answer that led those who've been told for so long by so many to be cynical and fearful . ...
Check out this list (A - Z) of famous people I came across on Wikipedia that have confirmed or are known to have links with Bipolar. I wonder how many don't know they have it or wont admit to it in case of stigma. A Sherman Alexie, Native American poet, writer, and filmmaker Rigoberto Alpizar, fatally shot by United States federal air marshals after exclaiming that he had a bomb on board a plane. Sophie Anderton, British model. Adam Ant, British musician Emilie Autumn, American musician. B Maria Bamford, American comedian. Andy Behrman, author of the book Electroboy: A Memoir of Mania. Max Bemis, frontman of the band Say Anything, spoke about his diagnosis in an interview with Spin magazine in 2006. Maurice Benard, actor. He has discussed his diagnosis with Oprah Winfrey, and has since become active in promoting bipolar awareness. Mary Kay Bergman, voice actress Ludwig Boltzmann, physicist and mathematician. He "suffered from an alternation of depressed moods with elevated, expansive or irritable moods. A ...
May 28, 1830, President Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act into law, intending to move Native Americans from their ancestral land in the eastern portion of the United States, across the Mississippi to lands the government deemed worthless in what was considered the Great American Desert. Jackson, known as Old Hickory for being a tough *** having killed lots of Creeks, Choctaws, Chickasaws and Cherokees, was the hero of two wars within a two-year period, The War of 1812 at New Orleans in 1814, and the associated Red Stick War in 1813, with the hot-blooded younger Creek braves who were tired of White Settlement on their lands and, after consulting with the great Shawnee chief Tecumseh who was building a confederation of tribes in the Midwest and South to fight European settlement, began to fight a Civil War with the older chiefs who wanted to accommodate the white settlers. As one of the Five Civilized Tribes who had welcomed European tools, weapons, farming techniques, clothing and even lifes ...
In light of the reported fact that half the Senators of the United States were able to tear themselves away from the hard work of determining just what in the *** is going on in the Veterans Administration and send a letter to the NFL objecting to the name of the Washington NFL team, perhaps others, simple citizens, ought to help them out. Since I am retired, with plenty of time (albeit, unlike Congress, unpaid) I suggest that Congress go further than merely objecting to "Redskins" and order the NFL to change the name to the "Foreskins" to better represent their community and thereby pay tribute to the *** heads who populate our Congress. Here are some other politically correctness issues to consider: I agree with our Native American population. I am highly insulted by the racially charged name of the Washington Redskins. One might argue that to name a professional football team after Native Americans would exalt them as fine warriors, but no, we must be careful not to offend, and in the spirit of pol ...
Native American is a government term to describe the indigenous prisoners of the United States. American Indian is the pro…
Our Children Are Dying! This is the cry of the parents, elders and leaders of the Native American and First Nations People of the United States and Canada. The suicide rate among First Nations People is three times the national average for ages 15-24, and exceeds that in many areas, such as Alaska, where it soars to 12 times the national average. For ages 10-14, the rate is an alarming four times that of the general population. The Native American youth are killing themselves in record numbers. Filled with despair, confusion and hopelessness, they see suicide as the only answer to the hurt inside of them. These feelings are brought on by all of the introduced behaviors, physical abuse, mental abuse, sexual abuse, etc. In addition, there is extreme poverty, alcoholism and drug addictions that lead to a life of loneliness and a feeling of absolutely no self-worth. A generation that feels so unloved, misplaced and rejected by society is searching desperately for an answer to the pain in their inner being. ...
210 years ago today, Lewis and Clark Departed. One year after the United States doubled its territory with the Louisiana Purchase, the Lewis and Clark expedition leaves St. Louis, Missouri, on a mission to explore the Northwest from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean. Even before the U.S. government concluded purchase negotiations with France, President Thomas Jefferson commissioned his private secretary Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, an army captain, to lead an expedition into what is now the U.S. Northwest. On May 14, the "Corps of Discovery"--featuring approximately 45 men (although only an approximate 33 men would make the full journey)--left St. Louis for the American interior. The expedition traveled up the Missouri River in a 55-foot long keelboat and two smaller boats. In November, Toussaint Charbonneau, a French-Canadian fur trader accompanied by his young Native American wife Sacagawea, joined the expedition as an interpreter. The group wintered in present-day North Dakota before cr ...
OSU-Oklahoma City adjunct writing instructor Russ Tallchief was recently asked to present at the University of Arizona’s 20th anniversary “A Day of Diversity” forum where he spoke about his great aunt, Maria Tallchief, who was the first Native American prima ballerina.   As a writer and researcher, Russ Tallchief, of the Osage Tribe, was contracted to write a book about Maria’s life. He has spent the last several years visiting her in Chicago gathering information, but more importantly, establishing an even closer family tie than ever until her death a little over a year ago.    “A Day of Diversity” forum was something Russ had wanted to do for quite some time. He felt Maria’s story was more than just unique to the Osage Tribe. “My aunt was really an ambassador for all Native American people in the United States,” said Russ. “It was more, I think, a tribute since it was the 20th anniversary to someone who was emblematic in our history, not only for Native American history, but also ...
Cliven Bundy, the Nevada rancher who has refused to pay more than 1 million dollars in grazing fees that he owes United States taxpayers, has apparently urged his supporters to join San Juan County Commissioner, Phil Lyman in Utah this weekend to engage in a federally illegal all-terrain vehicle ride through Recapture Canyon, an excursion that will place Native American (Navajo) burial sites at risk.
Press Release: LaDonna Jessie BlueEye, an enrolled member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, is used to being the “only”. The only family member to reside outside of Oklahoma. The only female military veteran in her family. One of only four female paratroopers and the only Native American in her unit with the elite U.S. Army 82nd Airborne Division. The only female in this region to carry the U.S. flag into the powwow arena, an honor usually reserved for males. She was the only person to run to the aid of a police officer who was being attacked by four people, which led to the return of a prison escapee and an award from the Police Chief and Mayor of Oklahoma City. When she earned her Masters of Public Health degree from the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center she was the only student to win three graduate awards and the Public Health Excellence Award from the State of Oklahoma. In 2012, PhDs were awarded to 51,008 graduates in the United States and of these, only 107 were Native American, a ...
Norma Smallwood - Born Norma Des Cygne Smallwood, she was a full blood Cherokee Indian from Tulsa, Oklahoma. While as a student at Oklahoma State University, she entered the Miss America Pageant in 1926 and was crowned the first Native American to win the title. During the year of her reign, she had an acute business sense demanding a fee for appearances. She reportedly made over 100,000 dollars, more than either Babe Ruth or the President of the United States.
On This Day (5/5/1877): In 1877 Hunkpapa Lakota Sioux Sitting Bull refused to surrender to US troops and led his band across the border into Saskatchewan, Canada. He remained in exile for many years near Wood Mountain, refusing a pardon and the chance to return. In 1881 hunger and cold eventually forced Sitting Bull, his family, and nearly 200 other Sioux in his band to return to the United States and surrender. He is notable in American and Native American history for his role in the major victory at the Battle of the Little Bighorn against Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer and the U.S. 7th Cavalry Regiment on June 25, 1876, where Sitting Bull's premonition of defeating the cavalry became reality.
History St. Ignace is the 3rd oldest continuous city in the United States. Established in 1671. Native American and French heritage are brilliantly depicted at the Museum of Ojibwa culture, Fort DeBuade Museum and at Father Marquette Memorial park. A self guided historic walking tour is available with guide book and signage allowing visitors to tour St. Ignace at their leisure. All of the above are experienced by donation only. There are no set fees. Nearby, Mackinac Island, Sault Ste. Marie and other communities are home to numerous historic sites and museums as well. St. Ignace was at the center of Michigan's fur trading economy in the 1600's.
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One Arrow Traveling the southwest, Arielle and I became very interested in Native American culture, specifically their traditions and art. Together we visited the the Table Indians of New Mexico, the Ancestral Puebloans, who dwelled in Mesa Verde where these people carved a wonderful civilization in the cliffs. On the north rim on the Grand Canyon, we sat together, thousands of feet above the Colorado, and as one, we watched the moon overtake the sun, while painting the rocks with bright greens, browns, and gold. We hiked out, hand in hand, through the moonlight wind created monolith of earth. In the Four Corners of Colorado, Utah, Nevada and Utah you can meet the Hopi Indians who were completely encircled by the much large Navajo. They may owe their survival to the green and blue colors of a single eagle father arrow. From the trees of that camouflaged the Dakota Indians at Little Big Horn or to the Badlands of Crazy Horse. Or Fort Laramie, Wyoming, where you can walk the exact trails of United States .. ...
The Battle of Fallen Timbers The Battle of Fallen Timbers was a conflict between Native American Indians and the United States on August 20, 1794. The Native American forces were an alliance of Chippewa, Ottawa, Potawatomi, Shawnee, Delaware, and Mingo forces led by the Shawnee leader Weyapiersenwah (Blue Jacket). He was an important predecessor of the famous Shawnee leader Tecumseh. Little is known of Blue Jacket’s early life. Many years after his death, a story appeared that he was in fact a white man. This was one of the strongest Native American alliances to date. They had previously achieved several major victories over the United States in a series of insurrections (suspected to have been incited by the British), but when they found themselves face-to-face with a full sized army, they failed to mount an effective resistance. The United States troops, led by General Anthony Wayne, crushed the Native American forces and then proceeded down the Maumee River, razing Native American villages and crops ...
Even though the United States government is holding millions of acres of mineral rich land hostage from the Native American Tribes of this nation, they are showing
The Five Civilized Tribes were not indicative of First Peoples. One glaring point is that they called them "civilized" because they shared the European's views regarding enslavement of Blacks. What about the First People in Florida who fought with the Blacks against the Europeans? Also this is interesting: "On this day in 1809, Tecumseh began a concerted campaign to persuade the Indians of the Old Northwest and Deep South to unite and resist. Together, Tecumseh argued, the various tribes had enough strength to stop the whites from taking further land. Heartened by this message of hope, Indians from as far away as Florida and Minnesota heeded Tecumseh's call. By 1810, he had organized the Ohio Valley Confederacy," Quickly becoming the dominant Native American leader in the northwestern United States, Tecumseh turned his attention to the south. In 1811 he traveled to meet with leaders of the Five Civilized Tribes in the hope of uniting them with him in the confederacy in the north. With their help he believ ...
Texas in 1519 was populated with Native American Tribes, the French came in 1682 and were overrun after three years. The Spanish conquistadores arrived with Spanish Settlers, build Missions and Colonies and gained independence from Mexico in 1836. Thousands of immigrants arrived in 1845 and became the 28th State of the United States. The United States gave land to the Native American and they self governed, now AG Abbott wants to fight the battle again. There were thousands of Hispanics living in Texas, and we were forced to live under the rules of the US Government. It is time to stand up for our rights, Vote Wendy White for Governor, and lets get the Hispanic population out of poverty, and prove we are not third world Texas Border cities.
A Native American group is asking the international community to charge the United States with human rights violations in hopes of getting help with a land claim.
The Hopi are a federally recognized tribe of Native American people, who primarily live on the 2,531.773 sq mi (6,557.26 km2) Hopi Reservation in northeastern Arizona. As of 2010, there were 18,327 Hopi in the United States, according to the 2010 census.[1] The Hopi language is one of the 30 of the Uto-Aztecan language family. The Hopi Reservation is entirely surrounded by the much larger Navajo Reservation. The two nations used to share the Navajo-Hopi Joint Use Area, but this was a source of conflict. The partition of this area, commonly known as Big Mountain, by Acts of Congress in 1974 and 1996, has also resulted in long-term controversy.[2][3][4] History The Hopi are one of many Native American cultures in the Southwestern United States. When first encountered by the Spanish in the 16th century, these cultures were referred to as Pueblo people because they lived in villages (pueblos in the Spanish language). The Hopi are descended from the Ancient Pueblo Peoples (Hopi: Hisatsinom or Navajo: Anasazi) ...
Events[edit] 1 – Henry V is crowned Holy Roman Emperor. 1204 – Constantinople falls to the Crusaders of the Fourth Crusade, temporarily ending the Byzantine Empire. 1598 – Henry IV of France issues the Edict of Nantes, allowing freedom of religion to the Huguenots. (Edict repealed in 1685.) 1612 – Miyamoto Musashi defeats Sasaki Kojirō at Funajima island. 1613 – Samuel Argall captures Native American princess Pocahontas in Passapatanzy, Virginia to ransom her for some English prisoners held by her father. She is brought to Henricus as hostage. 1699 – Guru Gobind Singh Ji, the Tenth Sikh Guru, Created Khalsa on this day at Anandpur Sahib, Punjab. 1742 – George Frideric Handel's oratorio Messiah makes its world-premiere in Dublin, Ireland. 1777 – American Revolutionary War: American forces are ambushed and defeated in the Battle of Bound Brook, New Jersey. 1796 – The first elephant ever seen in the United States arrives from India. 1829 – The Roman Catholic Relief Act 1829 gives Roman C ...
I would like to share a little bit of well know facts. We see show like Dog the Bounty Hunter, Durango, Doc Holiday etc. The Greatest Bounty Hunter in the United States was and still is, a man by the name Bass Reeves, Look it up, Now another know point. Do you remember "The Long Ranger show" The ideal came from Bass Reeves who had Native American scout to help track fugitives. REEVES, BASS (1838-1910) Deputy U.S. Marshal Bass Reeves, born as a slave in Arkansas Territory, grew up in Lamar and Grayson counties, Texas, where he belonged to Col. George R. Reeves, later to become the speaker of the house in the Texas legislature. As a young man Reeves escaped north into the Indian Territory, where he became acquainted with the Cherokee, Creek, and Seminole Indians. It is believed he served as a soldier with the Union Indian Home Guard Regiments during the Civil War. After the war Reeves settled down in Van Buren, Arkansas, as a farmer. On occasion he would serve as a guide for deputy U.S. marshals who worke . ...
When white settlers first landed in America and encountered Native Americans, there were some friendly meetings, some skirmishes and a few massacres as the two sides mixed, but eventually the settlers’ superior numbers and fireproof drove them from their lands along the Eastern Seaboard. Later, the United States government offered Native Americans treaties, guaranteeing them land further west if they would vacate their homeland. Time and time again, such treaties were broken by the United States, but most tribes continued signing new ones, trusting they would be honoured. Then there were the Native Americans who wanted no part of treaties, reservations or coexistence with the white man. Warriors such as Geronimo, Crazy Horse and others waged war against the U.S. in a bid to retain their homelands. Following is a list of the 10 fiercest Native American chiefs. It’s purely subjective and open to debate, yet this list highlights the warriors who were persistent in fighting settlers and/or the U.S. milita ...
Barack Obama, who is usually so careful in his rhetoric, let a rather unfortunate phrase escape a few days ago. Criticizing the annexation of Crimea by Russia, he declared before the press: “We [the United States] have considerable influence over our neighbors. We generally don’t need to invade them in order to have a strong cooperative relationship with them.” Generally not? The United States has invaded its neighbors on the American continent at least 29 times in its short history of something more than two centuries, beginning with their defeated tentative annexation of Canada in 1812 (although they had already eyed Mexico and Haiti, following the slave revolts). And that is just a count at first glance, starting after the years dedicated to extermination of the interior enemy, the Native American Tribes. Starting with the proclamation of the Monroe Doctrine regarding the divine right of the United States to command the entire hemisphere, the first large-scale invasion was of Mexico in 1846, addi ...
What's on my mind? That is what "it" asked.hum.Pretty sure, as millions of other folk, "they" don't want to know! I.YES...I am a CHRISTIAN! I am a struggling White/Caucasian woman, who I believe I am more Native American...I have never been singled out, like our "neighbors" the American African American", otherwise the "Black and GOD FORBID the 'other name".What is THAT!? May I ask WHY??? I AM A PROUD AMERICAN.Many generations of soldiers PROUD to defend the Country of the United States of America.Many Past.Present and ...Future! How can any of MY FRIENDS and FAMILY enjoy their freedom...how can they wave the flag freely and be proud...Yet, they are dis-respectful and.Who has been raised//reared like us??? We ARE the GOD FEARING, neighbor loving, and caring, individuals that will ultimately pass down this nation to our children and grandchildren.OK. Thank you, my friends and family! I don't do this often, Thank Goodness, "Somebody...Hurry...Knock me off my SOAPBOX"!
BORN ON THIS DAY: Etta Baker (March 31, 1913 – September 23, 2006) was an American Piedmont blues guitarist and singer from North Carolina, United States. [] John Henry Carolina Breakdown was born Etta Lucille Reid in Caldwell County, North Carolina, of African American, Native American, and European American heritage.She played both the 6-string and 12-string forms of the acoustic guitar, as well as the five-string banjo. Baker played the Piedmont Blues for ninety years, starting at the age of three when she could not even hold the guitar properly. She was taught by her father, Boone Reid, who was also a longtime player of the Piedmont Blues on several instruments. Etta Baker was first recorded in the summer of 1956 when she and her father happened across folk singer Paul Clayton while visiting Cone Mansion in Blowing Rock, North Carolina, near their home in Morganton, NC. Baker's father asked Clayton to listen to his daughter playing her signature "One Dime Blues". Clayton was impressed and arrived a ...
"You might as well expect rivers to run backwards as any man born free to be contented penned up." --Chief Joseph, Nez Perce Leader Hin-mah-too-yah-lat-kekt, popularly known as Chief Joseph (March 3, 1840 – September 21, 1904) succeeded his father Tuekakas (Chief Joseph the Elder) as the leader of the Wal-lam-wat-kain (Wallowa) band of Nez Perce, a Native American tribe indigenous to the Wallowa Valley in what is today the State of Oregon in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. credit: Lower Lewis River Falls in Washington State’s Gifford Pinchot National Forest.
If it offends you, you can bugger off to some other place. Only exception being American Indians. I refuse to call American Indians "Native Americans" for two reasons. 1) *** Sapiens Sapiens are NOT indigenous to either North or South America and 2) I am also a Native American as I was born in the United States of America.
Our SALTQuarters Fall 2013 National Artist in Residence, Peter Edlund, shared his work and Forgotten New York Stencil Series with students from the Syracuse Academy of Science Last December, who were learning about the Native American peoples of the United States of America.
The north-Central Region of Oklahoma became part of the United States with the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. In 1832, author, storyteller, and traveler Washington Irving provided the first recorded description of the area around Stillwater in his book A Tour on the Prairies. He wrote of “a glorious prairie spreading out beneath the golden beams of an autumnal sun. The deep and frequent traces of buffalo, showed it to be a one of their favorite grazing grounds.” According to one legend, local Native American Tribes — Ponca, Kiowa, Osage, Pawnee — called the creek “Still Water” because the water was always still. A second legend states that cattlemen driving herds from Texas to railways back east always found water "still there". A third legend holds that David L. Payne walked up to Stillwater Creek and said, “This town should be named Still Water”. Members of the board thought he was crazy, but the name stuck. Stillwater Creek received its official name in 1884 when William L. Couch establish ...
Happy Birthday to Zitkala-Sa! Thanks for the good work you did. Today's a good day to learn about how long the good ole USA denied it's native people the right to vote. The Voting Rights Act of 1965! "..it wasn't until 1924, with the passage of the Indian Citizenship Act-in which Congress granted citizenship to all Native Americans born in the United States-that Native Americans began exercising their right to vote. Even so, Native Americans participated at the polls on a very limited basis, since state law governed suffrage, and many states prohibited them from voting. In 1948, the Arizona Supreme Court struck down a provision of its state constitution that prohibited Indians from voting. Other states followed suit, and in 1962 New Mexico became the last state to fully enfranchise Native Americans. Like African Americans, Native Americans became the brunt of unfair voting mechanisms, such as poll taxes and literacy tests. With the passage of the Voting Rights Act in 1965, Native American voting rights .. ...
Hey everyone, there are multiple groups meeting tonight to discuss oppression and my suggestion is to merge those discussions to get the most out of them. What's happening with Pub is not an isolated controversy. It's an expression of the logic of US racism. The last few "controversies" at the 5C's (this, the Israeli Apartheid Week hate-crimes, the disgust over the Colonial Bros and Navajos party) have all centered around white students expressing outrage over students of color daring to speak about settler colonialism. Settler colonialism, the system of oppression that makes the United States possible, demands the complicity of people of color, and it impacts us all but most of all Native American students, who are currently resisting these systems of oppression by fighting for a Native American and Indigenous Studies department. What is settler colonialism? "The United States has been defined by indigenous scholars as a settler colonial nation, which means that a "logic" of colonialism is woven througho ...
Black History Month/www.apluszips.com The Seminoles are a Native American people originally of Florida. Today, most Seminoles live in Oklahoma with a minority in Florida. During their early decades, the Seminoles became increasingly independent of other Creek groups and established their own identity. The Seminoles of Florida call themselves the "Unconquered People," descendants of just 300 Indians who managed to elude capture by the U.S. army in the 19th century. Run-ins with white settlers were becoming more regular by the turn of the century. Settlers wanted Indian land and their former slaves back. In 1817, these conflicts escalated into the first of three wars against the United States. Future U.S. President Andrew Jackson invaded then-Spanish Florida, attacked several key locations, and pushed the Seminoles farther south into Florida. After passage of the Indian Removal Act in 1830, the U.S. government attempted to relocate Seminoles to Oklahoma, causing yet another war -- the Second Seminole War. . ...
This date in 1887, The Dawes Act authorizes the President of the United States to survey Native American tribal land and divide it into individual allotments. The Act was named for its creator, Senator Henry Laurens Dawes of Massachusetts. The stated objective of the Dawes Act was to stimulate assimilation of Native Americans into mainstream U.S. society. Individual ownership of land was seen as an essential step. The act also provided that the government would purchase Native American land "excess" to that needed for allotment & open it up for settlement by non-Native Americans.
Historical Fact: Columbus reached the Americas in 1492. Here's the catch. Viking runestones, Welsh claim stones, and Irish rock engravings have been found in the United States. A forensic geologist has looked at these and believes them to be authentic. Also, Knights Templar artifacts have been found dating to the 900s. In Latin. Now...Merriwether Lewis noted that the Native American Tribes he encountered in the present day Dakotas spoke some Welsh. Later, he "committed suicide" by shooting himself twice with a flintlock pistol. Columbus may have been the first to have documented his journey, but he in NO WAY discovered the Americas. Rant. Over.
Um, a few things for the racist *** complaining about the Coke commercial last night : 1. "America the Beautiful" is not the National Anthem. 2. Unless you are a member of a Native American tribe, you or your ancestors are immigrants. 3. Although our predominant language is English, the United States of America does not have an Official Language. 4. If you're going to be a proponent of "English only" then perhaps you should learn the simple rules of grammar that accompany said language. 5. Having familial roots in a Middle Eastern country does not make one a terrorist.
Ok so there has been a lot of heated debate over the Coca~Cola commercial that aired last night with America the beautiful being sung in other languages. First off and everyone can look this up. English is not the Official Language of the United States. There is no Official Language for the United States. Unless your bloodline is that of the Native American indigenous to this country.then your ancestry is that of an immigrant plain and simple and your "roots" did not come from this land. The song that was sung is not the National Anthem and it's called "America the beautiful" not "United States" the beautiful. In addition to that I am pretty *** sure that no where in the Constitution of this great country does it state that if you are or become a citizen.you are required to speak English. The hypocrisy, close mindedness and ignorance of some citizens is mind blowing, everyone wants to say this is a free country etc. etc. and heaven forbid if someone attempts to infringe upon your own individual freedom. . ...
Born: c. 1723 Died: 5 March 1770 (shot to death) Birthplace: ? Best known as: African-American Revolutionary War hero Crispus Attucks is remembered as the first American to die in the colonists' fight for freedom from Britain. Attucks was an escaped slave of African and Native American descent, but not much else is known about him. He was part of an angry mob that surrounded eight British soldiers on 5 March 1770 outside the Boston customs house. The soldiers fired on the crowd and Attucks was killed, along with four others. The shootings were quickly dubbed the "Boston Massacre" and held up by angry colonists as a case of British brutality. John Adams, later the second president of the United States, defended the soldiers and won an acquittal, arguing that Attucks and the others were common thugs, not political freedom-fighters. After the trial, patriots said it proved that even a British soldier could get a fair trial in independence-minded Boston, and Attucks was called a martyr for defending political ...
Indian removal was a 19th-century policy of ethnic cleansing by the government of the United States to relocate Native American Tribes living east of the Mississippi River to lands west of the river. The Indian Removal Act was signed into law by President Andrew Jackson on May 26, 1830.
American Indians have participated with distinction in United States Military actions for more than 200 years. Their courage, determination, and fighting spirit were recognized by American military leaders as early as the 18th century. I think they [Indians] can be made of excellent use, as scouts and light troops. --Gen. George Washington, 1778 Many tribes were involved in the War of 1812, and Indians fought for both sides as auxiliary troops in the Civil War. Scouting the enemy was recognized as a particular skill of the Native American soldier. In 1866, the U.S. Army established its Indian Scouts to exploit this aptitude. The Scouts were active in the American West in the late 1800s and early 1900s, accompanying Gen. John J. Pershing's expedition to Mexico in pursuit of Pancho Villa in 1916. They were deactivated in 1947 when their last member retired from the Army in ceremonies at Ft. Huachuca, Arizona. Native Americans from Indian Territory were also recruited by Teddy Roosevelt's Rough Riders and sa ...
** FAMOUS HOUSE ON FIRE RUIN ** In this fantastic capture by John Fowler, we see the famous House on Fire Ruin in Mule Canyon, Utah. Located in the ‘South Fork’ of Mule Canyon, House on Fire is about a 3 mile (4.8km) round trip to reach. At certain times of the day (apparently late morning is best), when the sun hits the ruins just right, it lights up the rock above, making it look like flames. While House on Fire is the first and most spectacular ruin, you can find more as you continue to hike into the canyon. The ruins are the remains of buildings constructed by the Ancient Pueblo peoples, an ancient Native American culture centered on the present-day Four Corners area of the United States. The Four Corners area comprises southern Utah, northeastern Arizona, northern New Mexico, and southwestern Colorado. The Ancient Pueblo peoples lived in a range of structures, including pit houses, pueblos, and cliff dwellings. Visit:
In the history of the United States' interactions with Native American Tribes, most Americans have at least heard of the Trail of Tears. Over 15,000 Indians were forcibly removed from their ancestral homes in the southeast and relocated to the "Indian Territory" of Oklahoma with at least 25% of the Indians dying along the way. But most Americans have never heard of the Navajo Long Walk, and fewer still know about the Pomo Death Marches in California. Pomo Background The Pomo are not one single tribe but are comprised of about 21 independent communities who speak seven dialects of related languages, loosely referred to as "Pomo." Historically, their territories included what is now Sonoma, Lake and Mendocino counties in California. Like most hunter-gatherer societies, their lifestyle depended on seasonal travel to follow food sources of regional plants, game and fish. Federal Indian Policy Since 1776, the U.S. has engaged multiple Indian policy strategies that can be thought of in terms of eras. Yet some p ...
The history of Florida can be traced back to when the first Native Americans began to inhabit the peninsula as early as 14,000 years ago. They left behind artifacts and archeological evidence. Written history begins with the arrival of Europeans to Florida; the Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de León in 1513 made the first records. The state was the first mainland realm of the United States to be settled by Europeans. Thus, 1513 marked the beginning of the American Frontier. From that time of contact, Florida has had many waves of immigration, including French and Spanish settlement during the 16th century, as well as entry of new Native American groups migrating from elsewhere in the South, and free blacks and fugitive slaves, who became known as Black Seminoles. Florida was under colonial rule by Spain and Great Britain during the 18th and 19th centuries before becoming a territory of the United States in 1822. Two decades later, in 1845, Florida was admitted to the union as the 27th US state. Since the 19 ...
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The Mount Rushmore National Memorial is a sculpture carved into the granite face of Mount Rushmore near Keystone, South Dakota, in the United States. Sculpted by Danish-American Gutzon Borglum and his son, Lincoln Borglum, Mount Rushmore features 60-foot (18 m) sculptures of the heads of four United States presidents: George Washington (1732–1799), Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826), Theodore Roosevelt (1858–1919) and Abraham Lincoln (1809–1865).[2] The entire memorial covers 1,278.45 acres (5.17 km2)[3] and is 5,725 feet (1,745 m) above sea level.[4] South Dakota historian Doane Robinson is credited with conceiving the idea of carving the likenesses of famous people into the Black Hills region of South Dakota in order to promote tourism in the region. Robinson's initial idea was to sculpt the Needles; however, Gutzon Borglum rejected the Needles site because of the poor quality of the granite and strong opposition from Native American groups. They settled on the Mount Rushmore location, which also has ...
Now I go the religions of circumcision in some hiistories and countries and find out why. But I don't see any animals do perfom any that kind of rite or ceromony, they still live peacefully and happily and have a healthy living than humans. Religious male circumcision generally occurs shortly after birth, during childhood or around puberty as part of a rite of passage. Circumcision is most prevalent in the religions of Judaism and Islam, and as such is most common in Muslim countries and Israel,but the highest percentages of circumcised males is in the USA, for health, hygiene and aesthetic reasons. The practice is also widely practiced in some predominantly Christian areas such as the United States, the Philippines, South Korea, Ethiopia, Kenya and West Africa, as well as among Christians in Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Palestine and Israel. Circumcision was also practiced by some Native American Tribes and it is also common in several African tribal groups. It is less common in Europe and Latin Ameri ...
The Apache Wars were a series of colonial conflicts fought during the nineteenth century between American settlers, the United States and or Confederate States Army against many Apache tribes in what is now the Southwestern United States. The first conflicts between Apaches and Americans began in 1847 during the Taos Revolt of the Mexican-American War. The Apaches were fighting in defense of Mexico with their New Mexican allies. The first campaigns specifically against the Apache came in 1851 and would end with the surrender of Geronimo in 1886. However, Apache attacks on white and Mexican settlers would continue as late as 1900. Apaches were not new to warfare, they had fought the Spanish and Mexicans for decades before conflict with Americans. The major campaigns of the period occurred around present day Tucson, Arizona. The Apache failed to drive the Spanish and Mexicans off areas conquered from other Native American Tribes, and eventually from their homeland itself. This led to the later Apache confli ...
The Langan's John Deere's Junkyard Dog & Thundeere and the old LSS Specimen of Mark Hanson as well as and Erv Hake's Wild Fire calls Columbus, Nebraska home. Don't ever count out these tough running John Deeres. Columbus is a city in and the county seat of Platte County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 22,111 at the 2010 census. Pre-settlement In the 18th century, the area around the confluence of the Platte and the Loup Rivers was used by a variety of Native American Tribes, including Pawnee, Otoe, Ponca, and Omaha.The Pawnee are thought to have descended from the Protohistoric Lower Loup Culture; the Otoe had moved from central Iowa into the lower Platte Valley in the early 18th century;[8] and the closely related Omaha and Ponca had moved from the vicinity of the Ohio River mouth, settling along the Missouri by the mid-18th century.[9] In 1720, Pawnee and Otoe allied with the French massacred the Spanish force led by Pedro de Villasur just south of the present site of Columbus.[10][11] In t ...
Anti-Racists - Quiz the questions and decide on your answers. Almost all the information you need is in the "Anti-Racists" section of this web site. Other information is easily available on the Internet. We'll send you back your score. If you get them all correct, we'll send you a certificate celebrating that accomplishment. Click the button beside your answer to each question. 1. Who is the current Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), who has significantly expanded their membership and activities? The ACLU is now involved in issues of racial justice, privacy, *** and *** rights, and civil liberties. Their director is a Puerto Rican *** man, who is a lawyer. Cesar Chavez Anthony Romero Rigoberto Nunez Bill Richardson 2. What is the name of the Native American woman who was the Green Party candidate for Vice President of the United States in 1996 and 2000? She graduated from Harvard University , has been a high school principal, and is currently helping the Ojibwe n ...
Scientists identify gene that renders East Asians more susceptible to type II diabetes An international team of researchers in Mexico and the United States has uncovered a new genetic clue that contributes to an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, particularly the elevated risk among Mexican and other Latin American populations. The team, known as the SIGMA (Slim Initiative in Genomic Medicine for the Americas) Type 2 Diabetes Consortium, performed the largest genetic study to date in Mexican and Mexican American populations, discovering a risk gene for type 2 diabetes that had gone undetected in previous efforts. People who carry the higher risk version of the gene are 25 percent more likely to have diabetes than those who do not, and people who inherited copies from both parents are 50 percent more likely to have diabetes. The higher risk form of the gene has been found in up to half of people who have recent Native American ancestry, including Latin Americans. The variant is found in about 20 ...
List of Native American Tribes in the United States with links to articles and information.
THEY STOLE OUR LAND The Yamasee War (also spelled Yemassee War) (1715–1717) was a conflict between British settlers of colonial South Carolina and various Native American Tribes, including the Yamasee, Muscogee, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Catawba, Apalachee, Apalachicola, Yuchi, Savannah River Shawnee, Congaree, Waxhaw, Pee Dee, Cape Fear, Cheraw, and others. Some of the Native American Indian groups played a minor role while others launched attacks throughout South Carolina in an attempt to destroy the colony. Native Americans killed hundreds of colonists and destroyed many settlements. Traders "in the field" were killed throughout what is now Southeastern United States. Abandoning settled frontiers, people fled to Charles Town, where starvation set in as supplies ran low. The survival of the South Carolina colony was in question during 1715. The tide turned in early 1716 when the Cherokee sided with the colonists against the Creek, their traditional enemy. The last of South Carolina's major Native American ...
Did you know? "The American Bible Society was founded in 1816 by people who were committed to the word of God and to the end of slavery. The first President was Elias Boudinot, who was also President of the Continental Congress from 1782 to 1783 and later Director of the U.S. Mint. John Jay, the first Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, was named President in 1821 and a number of illustrious individuals like Frederick Theodore Frelinghuysen, Johns Hopkins University President Daniel Coit Gilman and Edwin Francis Hyde, a former president of the Philharmonic Society of New York, headed up the organization over the years. Francis Scott Key, the writer of the United States' National Anthem, was a Vice President of the organization from 1817 until his death in 1843. The American Bible Society provided the first Bibles in hotels and the first pocket Bibles for soldiers (during the American Civil War). The first translation by the Bible Society was in 1818 into a Native American language.""The American Bibl ...
Fascinating history. "Word Power: How Code Talkers Helped to Win Wars" Over the static of crackling radios and phone lines, a little-known group of dedicated Native American warriors joined the call to arms in both World Wars with what would prove to be among the United States’ most powerful weapons: language. Known as Code Talkers, Native Americans learned early on the advantages of their tribal tongues, using indecipherable messages to confuse the enemy and bring combat victory to the United States. The code talker mission remained classified for decades after World War II. In observance of National Native American Heritage Month, the collaboration between the Defense Department’s Office of Diversity Management and Equal Opportunity and the Smithsonian Institution recently brought “Native Words, Native Warriors” to the Pentagon for a two-day exhibit. Developed by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian and the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, the 15-panel ...
Charles "Charlie" Douglas Musselwhite (born January 31, 1944) is an American electric blues harmonica  player and bandleader, one of the non-black bluesmen who came to prominence in the early 1960s, along with  Mike Bloomfield  and Paul Butterfield. Though he has often been identified as a "white bluesman", he claims Native American heritage. Musselwhite was reportedly the inspiration for Dan Aykroyd's character in the Blues Brothers.Musselwhite was born in Kosciusko, Mississippi, United States. He has said that he is of Choctaw descent, and he was born in a region originally inhabited by the Choctaw. However, in a 2005 interview, he said his mother had told him he was actually Cherokee. His family considered it normal to play music, with his father playing guitar and harmonica, his mother playing piano, and a relative who was a one-man band. At the age of three, Musselwhite moved to Memphis, Tennessee. When he was a teenager, Memphis experienced the period when rockabilly, western swing, and electric ...
yesterday: In 1811 the Battle of Tippecanoe was fought between United States forces led by Governor William Henry Harrison of the Indiana Territory and forces of Tecumseh's growing Native American confederation led by his younger brother Tenskwatawa. In response to rising tensions with the tribes and threats of war, a United States force of 1,000 militia and regulars set out to launch a Preemptive Strike on the headquarters of the confederacy. The battle took place outside Prophetstown, at the confluence of the Tippecanoe and Wabash Rivers. Tenskwatawa and the Natives were able to repulse the troops until their ammunition ran low, when they abandoned Prophetstown and the area. Harrison ordered his troops to burn down Prophetstown and destroy the Native's cooking implements, without which the confederacy would be hard pressed to survive the winter. Everything of value was confiscated, including 5,000 bushels of corn and beans. Some of Harrison's soldiers dug up bodies from the graveyard in Prophetstown to ...
The National Day of Mourning is an annual protest organized since 1970 by Native Americans of New England on the fourth Thursday of November, the same day as Thanksgiving in the United States. It coincides with an unrelated but similar protest, Unthanksgiving Day, held on the West Coast. The organizers consider the national holiday of Thanksgiving Day as a reminder of the democide and continued suffering of the Native American peoples. Participants in the National Day of Mourning honor Native ancestors and the struggles of Native peoples to survive today. They want to educate Americans about history. The event was organized in a period of Native American activism and general cultural protests. The protest is organized by the United American Indians of New England (UAINE). Since it was first organized, social changes have resulted in major revisions to the portrayal of United States history, the government's and settlers' relations with Native American peoples, and renewed appreciation for Native American ...
GOOD MORNING - TODAY IS SUNDAY, November 3, the 307th day of 2013 with 58 to follow. Daylight Saving Time ended at two AM and we are now on Standard Time; abbreviated EST for this time zone. Sunrise in the Boston area is @ 6:20 and sunset is @ 4:35. The moon is new @ 7:51 AM. The morning stars are Mars and Jupiter. The evening stars are Mercury, Neptune, Saturn, Uranus and Venus. ON THIS DAY IN: 1493 - Christopher Columbus, on his second voyage, sighted Dominica in the West Indies. 1507 - Leonardo da Vinci was commissioned to paint Lisa Gherardini, the "Mona Lisa." 1631 - The first Protestant missionary, Reverend John Eliot, arrived in Boston. He was the first to try to convert Native Americans to Christianity. 1794 - Thomas Paine was released from a Parisian jail with the help of U.S. ambassador James Monroe. 1839 - The first Opium War between China and Britain began. 1868 - Ulysses S. Grant was elected 18th President of the United States of America. 1883 - The U.S. Supreme Court declared Native American ...
'Christopher Columbus, Revised' by Mitchell James Kaplan, author Please welcome Mitchell James Kaplan, author of By Fire, By Water which released May 18, 2010 to rave reviews. Christopher Columbus, Revised Every age needs its good guys and bad guys. In our day, the bad guys par excellence are the colonizers of times past who exploited Indigenous Peoples and extended empires. Who could fit the bill better than Christopher Columbus, who changed his name, upon moving to Spain, to "Colón" ("the colonizer") and proceeded to infect the virginal Western Hemisphere with European lust, aggression, and greed? In recent decades, a spate of revisionist historians have attempted to knock the Genoese discoverer from his timeworn pedestal. In Christopher Columbus and the Conquest of Paradise, Kirkpatrick Sale portrayed him as deluded and morally flawed, suggesting he was partially to blame for the subsequent annhilation of Native American peoples. Howard Zinn, in his People's History of the United States, carried the d ...
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  1)  Trip to Washington, D.C. on September 25th with Navajo Nation Human Rights Commission to meet with Eric Bruce Wilson (International Affairs Coordinator, U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs) to discuss and obtain update on World Conference on Indigenous Peoples 2014. Delegation from Navajo included: Steven A. Darden (NN Human Rights Commission Chair); Leonard Gorman (NNHRC Director); Calvin Lee (NNHRC Legal Counsel); Rodney L. Tahe (NNHRC Policy Analyst); and Delegate Dwight Witherspoon also met with the United States Department of Justice who brought out all the department representatives from: FBI Criminal Section to discuss DOJ’s role in enforcing Federal Civil Rights Laws in Indian Country and Threshold Evidentiary Requirements for Department of Justice Investigations/ Local law enforcement actions (abuse in power, Native American victims, legal elements, case study) with AUSA Pat Schneider; Special Litigation Section to discuss treatment of prisoners; Education & Employmen ...
The beginning of the United States Military lies in civilian frontier settlers, armed for hunting and basic survival in the wilderness. These were organized into local militias for small military operations, mostly against Native American Tribes but also to resist possible raids by the small military forces of neighboring European colonies. They relied on the British regular army and navy for any serious military operation.[5] In major operations outside the locality involved, the militia was not employed as a fighting force. Instead the colony asked for (and paid) volunteers, many of whom were also militia members.[6] Siege of Louisbourg (1758) In the early years of the British colonization of North America, military action in the Thirteen Colonies that would become the United States were the result of conflicts with Native Americans, such as in the Pequot War of 1637, King Philip's War in 1675, the Yamasee War in 1715 and Father Rale's War in 1722. Beginning in 1689, the colonies became involved in a se ...
Tuesday Morning Sports: * Today is Constitution Day * Today is Citizenship Day * Today is Time's Up Day * Today is VFW Ladies Auxiliary Day * Today is National Apple Dumpling Day This Day in History: 1778 - The United States signed its first treaty with a Native American tribe, the Delaware Nation. 1787 - The Constitution of the United States of America was signed by delegates at the Constitutional Convention. 1796 - President George Washington's Farewell Address was read before the U.S. Congress. 1920 - The American Professional Football Association was formed in Canton, OH. It was the precursor to the National Football League (NFL). 1937 - At Mount Rushmore, Abraham Lincoln's face was dedicated. 1962 - U.S. space officials announced the selection of Neil A. Armstrong and eight others as new astronauts. 1983 - Carl Yastrzemski (Boston Red Sox) broke Hank Aaron's major league record for games played when he started his 3,299th game. (MLB) Birthdays Today: 1896- Sam Ervin Jr., Key figure in the Senate Wate ...
In 1968 Banks co-founded the American Indian Movement (AIM) in Minneapolis. They were seeking to ensure and protect the civil rights of Native Americans living in urban areas, whom they believed were being discriminated against by law enforcement. Their related goals became to protect the traditional ways of Indian people and to engage in legal cases protecting treaty rights of Natives, such as hunting and fishing, trapping, and wild rice farming. Banks participated in the 1969–1971 occupation of Alcatraz Island, initiated by Indian students from San Francisco of the Red Power movement, and intended to highlight Native American issues and promote Indian sovereignty on their own lands. In 1972 he assisted in the organization of AIM's "Trail of Broken Treaties", a caravan of numerous activist groups across the United States to Washington, D.C. to call attention to the plight of Native Americans. The caravan members anticipated meeting with United States Congress leaders about related issues; but governmen ...
Lakota Sioux Nation secedes from the US admin | On 30, Sep 2012 The world seems to be moving from one power-shift to another, as revolutions and consolidations of power are occurring on a regular basis. On a smaller scale, one such revolt seems to have taken place in the US. The Lakota Sioux Nation, a Native American people group has just seceded from the USA. CNSNews.com has the story: We are no longer citizens of the United States of America and all those who live in the five-state area that encompasses our country are free to join us,” long-time Native American radical leader Russell Means said. The move potentially impacts the states of Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, Montana and Wyoming. Russell Means is a well-known Native American actor, who happens to dabble in radical politics. Means has also been involved in a notorious shootout at Wounded Knee. CNS News references a New York Times article: “In 1973, Mr. Means led a siege of Wounded Knee by Indians who alleged that the tribal lead ...
The Schaghticoke are a Native American tribe of the Eastern Woodlands consisting of descendants of Mahican (also called "Mohican", but not to be confused with the Mohegans), Potatuck (or Pootatuck), Weantinock, Tunxis, Podunk, and other people indigenous to what is now Connecticut, New York, and Massachusetts, who amalgamated after encroachment of white settlers on their ancestral lands. Their 400 acre (1.6 km²) reservation is located on the New York/Connecticut border within the boundaries of Kent in Litchfield County, Connecticut running parallel with the Housatonic River. One of the oldest reservations in North America, reserve land was granted to the Schaghticoke in the year 1736 by the General Assembly of the Colony of Connecticut, 40 years prior to the formation of the United States. The language/ culture base is Algonquian with Iroquois influence. Tribe members trace their heritage to the first sachem, Gideon Mauwee, through his grandson Truman Bradley. Schaghticoke is pronounced /skæt.ə.kok/ .. ...
Etymology (DEFINE) The study of the origin of words and the way in which their meanings have changed throughout history. Independent (DEFINE) a (1) : not subject to control by others : self-governing (2) : not affiliated with a larger controlling unit Independence (DEFINE) The state or quality of being independent; freedom from dependence; exemption from reliance on, or control by, others; self-subsistence or maintenance; direction of one's own affairs without interference. Sufficient means for a comfortable livelihood. United States (DEFINE) A country of central and northwest North America with coastlines on the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. It includes the noncontiguous states of Alaska and Hawaii and various island territories in the Caribbean Sea and Pacific Ocean. The area now occupied by the contiguous 48 states was originally inhabited by numerous Native American peoples and was colonized beginning in the 16th century by Spain, France, the Netherlands, and England.
A Sad Anniversary for Native Americans Last updated: 22 April 2013 Native American activist Leonard Peltier, who has been imprisoned for 37 years, still awaits justice. "I think I can explain beyond serious doubt, that Leonard Peltier has committed no crime whatsoever," said former US Attourney General Ramsey Clark. "But that if he had been guilty of firing a gun that killed an FBI Agent, it was in defense of not just his people but the integrity of humanity from domination and exploitation." A new effort is underway on the anniversary of Native American activist Leonard Peltier's conviction to urge President Barack Obama to grant clemency to a man Amnesty International considers to be a "political prisoner" in the United States. This effort is spearheaded by the Leonard Peltier Defense Offense Committee and joined by his supporters worldwide. "We no longer have to convince the world of his innocence," Peltier attourney John Privitera told Al Jazeera at a press conference in New York City this past Decemb ...
Spanish conquistadors (conquerors) first arrived in the region now known as Texas in 1519, finding the region populated by various Native American Tribes. During the period from 1519 to 1848, all or parts of Texas were claimed by six countries: France, Spain, Mexico, the Republic of Texas, the United States of America—as well as the Confederate States of America in 1861–65. The first European base was established in 1682, when René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle established a French colony, Fort Saint Louis, near Matagorda Bay. The colony was killed off after three years, but its presence motivated Spanish authorities to begin activity. Several missions were established in East Texas; they were abandoned in 1691. Twenty years later, concerned with the French presence in neighboring Louisiana, Spanish authorities again attempted to colonize Texas. Over the next 110 years, Spain established numerous villages, presidios, and missions in the province. A small number of Spanish settlers arrived, in ad ...
* Today in Black History - June 25 * 1876 - The most famous Native American uprising, at Little Big Horn, begins in the Dakota territories (present- day Montana). General George Armstrong Custer leads three U.S. Army battalions to their deaths, including Isaiah Dorman, an African American cavalryman, scout, and intermediary between the Sioux and the United States government, who had warned Custer of the hostile Native American presence. 1933 - James Howard Meredith, the First African American student at the University of Mississippi, is born in Kosciusko, Mississippi. 1935 - Eddie Lee Floyd, rhythm and blues recording artist ("California Girl," "Knock on Wood") and songwriter is born in Montgomery, Alabama. His recording career did not keep him from being one of his label's most productive writers. Virtually every Stax artist will record his material, often co-written with either Steve Cropper or Booker T. Jones, including Sam & Dave's "You Don't Know What You Mean to Me", Rufus Thomas' "The Breakdown", . ...
I don't feel bad for the Bruins or their fans at all... *** to choke eh? Congrats to the Blackhawks . The team's first owner was coffee tycoon Frederic McLaughlin, who outbid grain magnate James E. Norris for the franchise. McLaughlin had been a commander with the 333rd Machine Gun Battalion of the 86th Infantry Division during World War I.[3] This Division was nicknamed the "Blackhawk Division", after a Native American of the Sauk nation, Black Hawk, who was a prominent figure in the history of Illinois.[3] McLaughlin evidently named the hockey team in honor of the military unit, making it one of many sports team names using Native Americans as icons. Black Hawk (1767 – October 3, 1838) was a leader and warrior of the Sauk American Indian tribe in what is now the United States. Although he had inherited an important historic medicine bundle, he was not one of the Sauk's hereditary civil chiefs. His status came from leading war parties as a young man, and from his leadership of a band of Sauks during .. ...
Iowa (i/ˈaɪ.əwə/) is a U.S. state located in the Midwestern United States, an area often referred to as the "American Heartland". Iowa was a part of the French colony of New France. After the Louisiana Purchase, settlers laid the foundation for an agriculture-based economy in the heart of the Corn Belt.[5] Iowa is occasionally known as the "Food Capital of the World".[6] In the latter half of the 20th century, Iowa's agricultural economy made the transition to a diversified economy of advanced manufacturing, processing, financial services, biotechnology, and green energy production (Iowa has the highest percentage of wind power of any state).[6][7] Iowa is the 26th most extensive in land area and the 30th most populous of the 50 United States. Its capital and largest city is Des Moines. Iowa has been listed as one of the safest states in which to live.[8]   Etymology[edit] Iowa derives its name from the Ioway people, one of the many Native American Tribes that occupied the state at the time of Europe ...
"Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. This is the essence of all the law and the prophets." Mathew 7:12. Celebrating women leaders globally: Celebrating women globally are 16 current female heads of state with 97 to date 33 elected and 54 appointed; in the United States we have 98 female Congresswomen: 20 female senators and 78 in the House of Representatives in the 113th US Congress. God intervened in 2009 to help women win the War on Women with the Rainbow Smile on 28 December 2009 giving the globe Rainbow Smile Prophet with signs and wonders to follow and global politial influence. To illustrate the journey of American women leaders we look back. Originally, Native American women populated America until the discovery by Christopher Columbus in 1492. Then came women from all over Europe. The British brought African Americans men and women and enslaved them starting in 1501. The US won the Revolution War and formed the United States of America on July 4 1776 creating the US Constitution f . ...
Tlingit-Haida 14,825 1,059 6,047 434 22,365 Other specified Alaska Native tribes 2,552 435 841 145 3,973 Alaska Native tribe, not specified 6,161 370 2,053 118 8,702 American Indian or Alaska Native tribes, not specified 3 511,960 (X) 544,497 (X) 1,056,457 Current legal status[edit] Main articles: Tribal sovereignty in the United States and Native American tribe There are 562 federally recognized tribal governments in the United States. These tribes possess the right to form their own governments, to enforce laws (both civil and criminal) within their lands, to tax, to establish requirements for membership, to license and regulate activities, to zone and to exclude persons from tribal territories. Limitations on tribal powers of self-government include the same limitations applicable to states; for example, neither tribes nor states have the power to make war, engage in foreign relations, or coin money (this includes paper currency).[104] Many Native Americans and advocates of Native American rights point ...
The Cherokee are an Iroquoian-speaking people aboriginally occupying the southern Appalachians of North America. Western North Carolina was the heart of their farming/hunting lands but they also lived in portions of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, West Virginia, and Virginia. In 1838-1839 a major portion of the Cherokee were forcedly removed from their homeland by the United States government to the present state of Oklahoma along the infamous “Trail of Tears.” In the early twenty-first century there are two main groups of Cherokee--the Oklahoma Cherokee are the larger group and are known as the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma and United Keetoowah Band; the Eastern Band is considerably smaller. Based on self-identification in the 2000 census, the Cherokee are the largest Native American group in the United States. Learn more about the Cherokee in eHRAF World Cultures, an ethnographic online database with information on Native North Americans and other cultures, indigenous people, an ...
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The St. Lawrence Iroquoians were a prehistoric First Nations/Native American indigenous people who lived from the 14th century until about 1580 concentrated along the shores of the St. Lawrence River in present-day Quebec and Ontario, Canada, and New York State, United States, although their territory extended east. They spoke Laurentian languages, a branch of the Iroquoian family. They were believed to have numbered up to 120,000 people in 25 nations.[1] The traditional view is that they disappeared because of late 16th century warfare by the Mohawk nation of the Haudenosaunee, who wanted to control fur trade in the valley.[2] But other possibilities, including climate change and exposure to European diseases, may have been equally important. Knowledge about the St. Lawrence Iroquoians has been constructed from the studies of surviving oral accounts of the historical past from the current Native people, writings of the French explorer Jacques Cartier, earlier histories, and anthropologists' and other sch ...
Who are American Muslims? Previous Poster Poster Index Next Poster There are over 8 million Muslims who live in the United States, representing every race, ethnicity and culture. They come from all social demographics, and contribute to American society as entrepreneurs, engineers, industrialists, physicians, scientists and teachers. Many were born in the United States; others migrated to America seeking a better life. The first Muslims in America were West Africans who traded with Native American Tribes prior to Columbus. Later, large numbers of African Muslims were forcibly brought to the US to work on plantations as slaves. Very few retained their Islamic identity. Today, many African Americans are rediscovering their Islamic heritage. From the 1930's onward, the Nation of Islam (a different faith, not related to Islam) played a major role in bringing African Americans to mainstream Islam. Many who joined the Nation, such as Malcolm X, left it after realizing that the true teachings of Islam were u ...
Cayuse people The Cayuse Tribe has no descendants since its interbreeding with the Umatilla Tribe. The Cayuse are a Native American tribe in the state of Oregon in the United States. The Cayuse tribe shares a reservation in northeastern Oregon with the Umatilla and the Walla Walla tribes as part of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. The reservation is located near Pendleton, Oregon at the base of the Blue Mountains. The Cayuse call the Tetawken Themselves, Which Means "we, the people". Originally located in northeastern Oregon and southeastern Washington, they lived adjacent to territory covered by the Nez Perce. Like the Plains tribes, the Cayuse Placed a high premium on warfare and were skilled horsemen, using Often Their horse-riding prowess to intimidate other tribes. Skilled horsemanship proved beneficial to the Indians and the neighboring cowboys who cushion adopted the Cayuse pony. The Cayuse moved to the Umatilla Reservation after signing a treaty with the U.S. federal gov ...
FORCED REMOVAL The “Indian Removal” policy was implemented to “clear” land for white settlers. Removal was more than another assault on American Indians’ land titles. Insatiable greed for land remained a primary consideration, but many people now believed that the removal was the only way of saving American Indians from extermination. As long as the American Indians lived in close proximity to non-Native American communities, they would be decimated by disease, alcohol, and poverty. The Indian Removal Act began in 1830. Forced marches at bayonet-point to relocation settlements resulted in high mortality rates. The infamous removal of the Five Civilized Tribes — the Choctaws, Creeks, Chickasaws, Cherokees, and Seminoles — is a dismal page in United States history. By the 1820′s the Cherokees, who had established a written constitution modeled after the United States Constitution, a newspaper, schools, and industries in their settlements, resisted removal. In 1938 the federal troops evicted ...
Blackfoot Confederacy The Blackfoot Confederacy or Niitsítapi (meaning "original people" is the collective name of three First Nations bands in Alberta, Canada and one Native American tribe in Montana, United States. Historically, the member of the Confederacy peoples were nomadic bison hunters, who ranged across large areas of the northern Great Plains of Western North America, Specifically the semi-arid short-grass prairie ecological region. They later cushion adopted horses and firearms acquired from European-Descended traders and their Cree and Assiniboine resellers. With These New tools expanded the Blackfoot Their territory at the expense of neighboring peoples. Through the use of horses, Blackfoot and other Plains peoples harvested bison at a much accelerated rate. However it was the systemic commercial bison hunting by European-American hunters That permanently changed the paradigm of the Great Plains. Periods of starvation and deprivation for the Blackfoot Followed. They were then forced to end ...
United Nations HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION UPR SUBMISSION UNDER General Assembly RESOLUTION 60/251 _ CHIEF :Nanya-Shaabu:El, :At-sik-hata Nation of Yamassee Moors UPR SUBMISSION RE United States of America _ Right Under the Declaration to Claim Indigenous Rights 15. The United States of America / United States has consistently fought and resists, to this day, AfricanAmericans claiming their Indigenous Status. We from the At-sik-hata Nation of Yamassee Moors in accord with International Law have declared and proclaimed our Indigenous Rights. Our documentation has been legally recognized, acknowledged certified, authenticated and confirmed as correct, yet we still face persecution, apartheid, genocide, rape and kidnapping for manifesting our Indigenous Rights as we are entitled to by law. It is well known that Africans in America who claim their Indigenous Status as Native American / Indian are subjected to persecution, ridicule, discrimination, genocide, abuse and scorn as if that is not possible they could be ...
Leaders from 11 Native American Tribes stormed out of a meeting with US federal officials in Rapid City, South Dakota, to protest the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, which they say will lead to ‘environmental genocide.’ Native Americans are opposed to the 1,179-mile (1,897km) Keystone XL project - a system to transport tar sands oil from Canada and the northern United States to refineries in Texas - for various reasons, including potential irreversible damage to sacred sites, pollution, and water contamination. Although the planned pipeline would not pass directly through any Native American reservation, tribes in proximity to the proposed system say it will violate their traditional lands and that the environmental risks of the project are simply too great. Russ Girling, CEO of TransCanada, the company that hopes to build the pipeline, has promised in the past that Keystone XL will be “the safest pipeline ever built.” The Indian groups, as well as other activist organizations, doubt the claim, say ...
Archaeological research indicates that Florida was first inhabited by Paleo-Indians, the first human inhabitants of the Americas, perhaps as early as 14 thousand years ago. The region was continuously inhabited through the Archaic period (to about 2000 BC). After about 500 BC the previously relatively uniform Archaic culture began to coalesce into distinctive local cultures. By the 16th century, the earliest time for which there is a historical record, major Native American groups included the Apalachee (of the Florida Panhandle), the Timucua (of northern and central Florida), the Ais (of the central Atlantic coast), the Tocobaga (of the Tampa Bay area), the Calusa (of southwest Florida) and the Tequesta (of the southeastern coast). Florida was the first part of what is now the continental United States to be visited by Europeans. The earliest known European explorers came with the Spanish conquistador Juan Ponce de León. According to the "500TH Florida Discovery Council Round Table", on March 3, 1513, ...
Given that the United States government was responsible for expelling them from their land - and that many white Southern Unionists drew inspiration from the ate president who did more than anyone else to expel them (Andrew Jackson) - most Native American Tribesmen in "Indian Territory" (present-day Oklahoma) were understandably drawn to the Confederacy. However, there were tribesmen who stayed loyal to the Union, forming three regiments of the Indian Home Guard, which served in Arkansas, Kansas, and the Territory. More information on these units can be found from the US Army Center of Military History: is Southern Unionist History Month.
VERONA — Tiger Woods is included in the 12-player field for the sixth annual Notah Begay III (NB3) Foundation Challenge scheduled to be held at Turning Stone Resort Casino’s Atunyote Golf Club this summer. The field for the event was announced by Oneida Nation Representative Ray Halbritter during a news conference today. The event will be held on Wednesday, Aug. 28. The event supports the NB3 Foundation, whose mission is to raise awareness and funding for the improved health and wellness of Native American youth nationwide. While Woods, a 14-time major champion and 78-time PGA Tour champion, headlines the field, some of the world’s other best golfers will also be on hand. PGA Tour stars Lee Westwood, Rickie Fowler, Charl Schwartzel, K.J. Choi and Henrik Stenson are also among those included in the field. The 12 players will represent three teams in a combined best-ball format. Team USA will be comprised of golfers from the United States, Team Asia will include golfers from Asian nations and Team Int ...
The Navajo Nation (Navajo: Naabeehó Bináhásdzo) is a semi-autonomous Native American-governed territory covering 27,425 square miles (71,000 km2), occupying portions of northeastern Arizona, southeastern Utah, and northwestern New Mexico. It is the largest land area assigned primarily to a Native American jurisdiction within the United States. Name In English, the initial name for the area was "Navajo Indian Reservation", governed since 1923 by the "Navajo Tribal Council". On April 15, 1969, the official name on the seal used by the government was changed to "Navajo Nation", stating that from that day on "all correspondence, stationary [sic], letterheads [...] of the Navajo Tribe use the designation 'Navajo Nation' to locate the tribe".[1] In 1994, a proposal to change the official designation from "Navajo" to "Diné" was rejected by the council. They said the name Diné represented the time of suffering before the Long Walk, and that Navajo is the appropriate designation for the future.[2] In Navajo, ...
Fish emulsion, another liquid fish fertilizer, is the third main category. It is made from the slurry that is left of fish after the oil, fats, and proteins are removed. Through a heating process, some of the liquid is removed, creating the syrupy emulsion that is sold as fertilizer product. Like the other fish fertilizers, phosphoric acid is added to lower the pH level; however, sometimes urea is added, too, to increase the amount of nitrogen. While it has fewer nutrients than cold-processed hydrolyzed fish, it is also less expensive. Using fish as fertilizer has a long history, dating back to ancient Egypt and pre-Columbian societies. In the United States, school children learn about Squanto, a Native American who taught the technique to the pilgrims at Plymouth Rock. Today, fish fertilizer is attractive to gardeners because it is organic, though some manufacturing processes do introduce inorganic chemicals. For the most part, these fertilizers have slower release rates and do not leach easily from the ...
Mary Fields, also known as Stagecoach Mary, was the first African-American woman employed as a mail carrier in the United States, and just the second American woman to work for the United States Postal Service. Fields stood 6 feet (182 cm) tall and weighed about 200 lbs (90kg), liked to smoke cigars, and was once said to be as "black as a burnt-over prairie." She usually had a pistol strapped under her apron and a jug of whiskey by her side. Born a slave circa 1832 in Hickman County, Tennessee, Fields was freed when American slavery was outlawed in 1865.[2][3] She then worked in the home of Judge Edmund Dunne. When Dunne's wife died, Fields took the family's five children to their aunt, Mother Mary Amadeus, a nun at an Ursuline convent in Toledo. Mother Amadeus was sent to Montana Territory to establish St. Peter's Mission, a school for Native American girls. Word came back that Amadeus was ill, and Fields hurried to Montana to nurse her. After Amadeus recovered, Fields stayed at St. Peter's hauling freig ...
During the 1830s Pennsylvanian-born artist George Catlin (1796-1872) made five trips to the western United States to document the disappearing Native American peoples and their way of life. The resulting portraits have become one of the most extensive, evocative and important records of indigenous p...
Sunday, March 3, 2013 A Terrible Normality Written by Michael Parenti Through much of history the abnormal has been the norm. This is a paradox to which we should attend. Aberrations, so plentiful as to form a terrible normality of their own, descend upon us with frightful consistency. The number of massacres in history, for instance, are almost more than we can record. There was the New World holocaust, consisting of the extermination of indigenous Native American peoples throughout the Western Hemisphere, extending over four centuries or more, continuing into recent times in the Amazon region. There were the centuries of heartless slavery in the Americas and elsewhere, followed by a full century of lynch mob rule and Jim Crow segregation in the United States, and today the numerous killings and incarcerations of Black youth by law enforcement agencies. Let us not forget the extermination of some 200,000 Filipinos by the U.S. military at the beginning of the twentieth century, the genocidal massacre of 1 ...
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John Bennett Herrington (born September 14, 1958) is a retired United States naval aviator and former NASAastronaut. With his single Space Shuttle mission in late 2002, Herrington became the first enrolled member of a Native American tribe to fly in space. (William R. Pogue is of Choctaw ancestry an...
Film Screening: Casino Jack and the United States of Money - 2/28 Lobbyists have long played a powerful role in American politics, but it wasn't until Jack Abramoff became the center of a 2006 corruption scandal with ties to leading members of Congress (and even the White House) that many became aware of just how deep and pernicious their influence truly was. The son of a wealthy businessman, Abramoff became a Republican activist in college, involved in programs to raise funds for GOP candidates and supporting political movements in Angola and South Africa that he believed promoted a free-market ideology. In 2001, Abramoff took control of a profitable gaming empire after the murder of casino owner Gus Boulis, while also operating a lobbying business that curried political favor among Republican politicians through money and expensive gifts (one of his leading allies was GOP party whip Tom DeLay). However, when Abramoff was discovered to have defrauded a number of Native American groups hoping to open gamb ...
In the pre-settlement days some 10 million turkeys roamed the eastern region of what is now the United States. The big birds played a key role in the physical and spiritual well being of our country’s early inhabitants. Turkeys were a major food source of American Indians, though some tribes, including the Cheyenne and Apache, reportedly would not eat the fowl. Many tribes used turkey feathers to make robes, blankets and fletching for hunting arrows. Native American hunters sometimes tipped their arrows with the sharp spurs of old gobblers. Tools were carved out of turkey bones. Indians learned to yelp through the small wing bones of turkeys to call other turkeys into bow range. Indians fashioned ceremonial headdresses of turkey feathers. Some tribes revered beards, spurs and feathers as religious and spiritual symbols. When Europeans arrived in the New World, they found wild turkeys in parts of what are now 39 states. Early settlers wrote, “flocks of hundreds and thousands of the fowl.” Unlike toda ...
In 1869 the widow Mary Patterson Leary married again, into the elite, politically active Langston family. Her second husband was Charles Henry Langston, of African American, Native American, and Euro-American ancestry. He and his younger brother John Mercer Langston worked for the abolitionist cause and helped lead the Ohio Anti-Slavery Society in 1858. Charles Langston later moved to Kansas, where he was active as an educator and activist for voting and rights for African Americans. Charles and Mary's daughter Caroline was the mother of Langston Hughes. Langston Hughes was born in Joplin, Missouri, the second child of school teacher Carrie (Caroline) Mercer Langston and James Nathaniel Hughes (1871–1934). Langston Hughes grew up in a series of Midwestern small towns. Hughes's father left his family and later divorced Carrie, going to Cuba, and then Mexico, seeking to escape the enduring racism in the United States. After the separation of his parents, while his mother travelled seeking employment, youn ...
HISTORY What is now the United States was initially populated by people believed to have migrated from northeast Asia. In the United States their descendants are known as Native Americans, or American Indians. While Native Americans are often portrayed living a singular, usually primitive lifestyle, in fact prior to European contact the continent was densely populated by many sophisticated societies. The Cherokee, for example, are descended from the overarching Mississippian culture which built huge mounds and large towns that covered the landscape, while the Anasazi built elaborate cliff-side towns in the Southwest. As was the case in other nations in the Americas, the primitive existence attributed to Native Americans was generally the result of mass die-offs triggered by Old World diseases such as smallpox which spread like wildfire ahead of the early European explorers. That is, by the time most Native American Tribes directly encountered Europeans, they were a post-apocalyptic people. During the 16th ...
Part 2:Now here comes the fun part-- putting the Second Amendment into context. Do you remember that the Bill of Rights was ratified in 1791? Yes? Good. Now, do you remember what the United States was like in the late 18th century? Here’s a refresher. We only had thirteen states: Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Georgia, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maryland, South Carolina, New Hampshire, Virginia, New York, and Rhode Island. There were a few large cities, but the new country consisted mostly of small, isolated towns and villages, and farm land. Now, if your town was attacked by bandits or the victim of a Native American raid (hey, it happened), the nearest help was sometimes days away. In the beginning, the U.S. didn’t really have a military (we were the rebels, remember?). And when the war was over, the military disbanded, leaving a standing army of a whopping 80 soldiers. So what were you going to do if your town needed help. Oh yeah. Call on your MILITIA. Once again, the Second Amendment states ...
History (wikpedia) Carlisle Yamacraw Creek Native Americans meet with the trustees of the colony of Georgia soon after its founding, July 1734. The Native American boy (in a blue coat) and woman (in a red dress) are portrayed in English clothing. From the earliest years of the republic, United States leaders struggled with the issues of integrating Native Americans into the European-based society, which they believed was superior and bound to dominate, especially with increasing immigration. Some leaders also hoped to protect the Indigenous Peoples and their distinct cultures. In the late 18th century, reformers, starting with George Washington and Henry Knox, supported educating native children, in efforts to "civilize" or otherwise assimilate Native Americans into the European-American society.[5] The Civilization Fund Act of 1819 promoted such policy by providing funding to societies (mostly religious) who worked on Native American improvement. Washington and Knox believed that Native Americans were eq ...
Native American and Indigenous Studies, the official journal of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association, invites submissions of original manuscripts for publication in its inaugural volume. NAIS is a peer-reviewed journal published by the University of Minnesota Press. Manuscript submission guidelines can be found here: should be no longer than 35 pages, double-spaced with one-inch margins and in 12-point font. Email submissions to co-editors Jean O’Brien (Ojibwe) and Robert Warrior (Osage) at journalthe attachment to view or download the Call for Submissions! Please forward the Call to your colleagues! To unsubscribe from mailings like this one, click here. To no longer receive mail from NAISA, click here. c/o David Chang 1110 Heller Hall 271 19th Ave. S Minneapolis, MN 55455 United States
Romanus Pontifex - a Papal Bull of 1455 by Pope Nicholas V. Gave the portugese God's authority to. '.. invade, search out, capture, vanquish, and subdue all Saracens and pagans whatsoever, and other enemies of Christ wheresoever placed, and the kingdoms, dukedoms, principalities, dominions, possessions, and all movable and immovable goods whatsoever held and possessed by them and to reduce their persons to perpetual slavery'. This served as the basis of legal arguments for taking Native American lands by "discovery". This continued under the Americans after they established the United States. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in the 1823 case Johnson v. M'Intosh that as a result of European discovery of lands not owned by Christians, the ownership and rights to the lands went from the original European conquerors to the Americans by treaties made with the European conquerors; the Native Americans had no say in these discoveries or treaties, nor any rights as non-Christians to the right of title to the land. T ...
HISTORY LESSON: The Government always tells the truth. If you do not believe the Government tells the truth as a Native American. LESSON FOR TODAY IS OVER YOU PASSED. Homeland Security and its Cache of Bullets Feb 15, 2013 Associated Press, by Alicia A. Caldwell WASHINGTON -- Online rumors about a big government munitions purchase are true, sort of. The Homeland Security Department wants to buy more than 1.6 billion rounds of ammunition in the next four or five years. It says it needs them - roughly the equivalent of five bullets for every person in the United States - for law enforcement agents in training and on duty. Published federal notices about the ammo buy have agitated conspiracy theorists since the fall. That's when conservative radio host Alex Jones spoke of an "arms race against the American people" and said the government was "gearing up for total collapse, they're gearing up for huge wars." The government's explanation is much less sinister. Federal solicitations to buy the bullets are known ...
Fordyce is a city in Dallas County, Arkansas, United States. The population was 4,799 at the 2000 census. The city is the county seat,[1] home to the 1911 Dallas County Courthouse (Arkansas). Contents 1 Geography 2 Demographics 3 Education 4 Notable natives 5 Industry 6 References 7 External links Geography According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 6.6 square miles (17 km2), all land. Demographics As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 4,799 people, 1,737 households, and 1,186 families residing in the city. The population density was 727.8 people per square mile (281.2/km²). There were 2,024 housing units at an average density of 307 square miles (800 km2). The racial makeup of the city was 48.61% White, 49.66% Black or African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.42% Asian, 0.75% from other races, and 0.38% from two or more races. 1.19% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 1,737 households out of which 32.0% had children under the age of 18 li ...
Sherri Mitchell, a Penobscot Tribal Member wrote an article on VAWA Native Briefs Native Condition Native Currents Native Challenges Native Health Entertainment Guest Commentary What does VAWA have to do with Dred Scott, Rehnquist and Apartheid? Sherri Mitchell in Native Condition. Discussion » Most of us know that South African Apartheid ended more than a decade ago. What most people don't know is that many of the policies of apartheid were modeled after US and Canadian Indian policy, and that many of these practices are still in effect. 86 percent of the sexual crimes perpetrated against Native American women are committed by non-native men Recently, the level of awareness surrounding these policies has begun to increase and opposition to them is beginning to grow. In both the United States and Canada an awakening is occurring. Ironically, this awakening has been facilitated by the boldly discriminatory action of political leaders in both countries. These political actions have begun to shed light on t ...
The Osage Nation is a federally-recognized tribe in the United States. Tribal headquarters and the majority of tribal members are located on the Osage Reservation (also boundary of Osage County) in north-central Oklahoma, but tribal members live throughout North America. The Osage were originally known by Ni-U-Kon-Ska, which means "Children of the Middle Waters." Today they call themselves Wah-Zha-Zhi, which was translated by French explorers as Ouazhigi, which later became the English name Osage. Early settlers have said that the Osages were the largest Native people in North America, with the Osage men averaging over 6 feet tall. In war, they were feared by neighboring tribes. The Osage language belongs to the Dhegihan branch of the Siouan stock of Native American languages, now spoken in Nebraska and Oklahoma. They originally lived among the Kansa, the Ponca, the Omaha, and the Quapaw in the Ohio Valley. History Many of the Osage had migrated to the Osage River in western Missouri by 1673, living near ...
The Oglala Lakota or Oglala Sioux (pronounced [oɡəˈlala], meaning "to scatter one's own" in Lakota language[5]) are one of the seven subtribes of the Lakota people, who along with the Nakota and Dakota, make up the Great Sioux Nation. A majority of the Oglala live on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, the eighth-largest Native American reservation in the United States. The Oglala are a federally recognized tribe whose official title is the Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation
oreans often used proverb "when whales fight, the shrimp's back is broken" to describe the victims of the country in the hands of larger, more powerful neighbors. China, as the biggest social and advanced technology and culture in East Asia has caused the most important influence outside Korea until modern times. In the twentieth century, Korea became the focus of interests between the rival neighbors China, Japan, and Russia, as well as beyond the United States. However, more than a thousand years, until the people of Japan in the twentieth century, the kingdom on the Korean peninsula can maintain a political independent social and cultural identity from the national around. Korea Before the twentieth century Stable, literate society on the Korean Peninsula appears in the record of China in the early fourth century BC. Gradually, the team competition and the kingdoms of the peninsula merged into a common national identity. After a period of conflict between the "Three Kingdoms" Koguryo in the north, Paek ...
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Born and raised in Upstate NY, which has its fair share of history and bumps in the night, Ryan has been independently studying the paranormal and unexplained from a very early age. He sought out and devoured any books that delved into the more esoteric layers of life. From Pyramids to Poltergeists, Ryan has always sought to learn more about the unseen world around him. An avid genealogist and amateur historian, Ryan draws much spiritual inspiration from his Native American, Celtic, French Canadian and Scandinavian lineage. He considers himself a sensitive with Empathic and Clairvoyant/Clairsentient tendencies.       A brief stint in Savannah, GA, one of the most haunted cities in the United States, led Ryan to pursue the paranormal on a level beyond that of a hobby. He worked with individuals from across various disciplines to build a fledgling paranormal group that investigated historic sites such as Fort Pulaski and Oatland Island. Since those humble beginnings he has been involved with numerous par ...
The wealthy class of Capitalists influence and the expansion of the United States towards the West Coast came at the cost of the Native American nations, and from the flesh of the working underclass. During the late 19th century the Capitalist economic theory of laissez-faire created an unfair economic system that undermines liberty. Common people during this era have jobs available, but they are extremely under paid. The Capitalist caste system is newly install and with the 2nd industrial age, but is worse than Mercantilism and comes with the cost of citizen’s economic and civil liberties. There were several rich capitalist that agree with this system and advocated for it and succeeded. The farmer has more luxuries than the landlord had, and is more richly clad and better housed. Andrew Carnegie stated in his article Wealth that “the landlord has books and pictures rarer, and appointments more artistic, than the King could then obtain.” (Carnegie, Andrew, Wealth North American Review. 1889.) He has ...
Business Tax Extenders $14.3 billion to subsidize research and development $119 million for companies to hire Native Americans $1.79 billion to promote business investment in low-income communities $331 million for railroads to perform track maintenance $5 million for mining companies to use for rescue training $222 million in accelerated depreciation for businesses located on Native American reservations $3.71 billion for “leasehold, restaurant, and retail improvements” $430 million over two years in tax breaks for film and television producers who incur production costs incurred in the United States, with a special bonus if the costs are incurred in economically depressed areas in the United States $358 million for “domestic production activities in Puerto Rico” $222 million for rum production in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands $62 million for economic development in American Samoa $78 million to retain an accelerated tax write-off for owners of NASCAR tracks Energy Tax Extenders $7 mill ...
Tecumseh Tecumseh, meaning Shooting Star, was born in 1768 near Chillicothe, Ohio to the Shawnee tribe; specifically he was the son of the reigning Chief, Pukeshinwau. Throughout his childhood Tecumseh experienced many malevolent, violent expansions by Americans which would later sustain his hatred towards the United States. Multiple times during his youth U.S militia would intersect whatever land the Shawnees were currently occupying. In many cases the Americans would set two tribes against one another through treaties with one party representing the land of the other. For example, during the Treaty of Fort Stanwix the Iroquois tribe claimed ownership to all of Ohio lands therefore they deemed it acceptable to sell the Shawnee territory to America in exchange for money. Americans were also very eager to claim any type of acreage so they plundered many Native American villages, including the Shawnee’s various home lands a multitude of times. These imperialistic tendencies created many confliction ...
Mass of Thanksgiving Celebrates Canonizations A special Mass of thanksgiving in honor of two new US-born saints is celebrated at the Basilica of the National Shrine in Washington. WASHINGTON (CNS) — For Herman Ray, a Native American from Arizona, and Franciscan Sister Margaret Christi Karwowski, currently living in the Washington Archdiocese, the canonization of two Americans last Oct. 21 — Sts. Kateri Tekakwitha and Marianne Cope — confirmed something they already knew: the holiness of two remarkable women. "She has been my guide in many ways," Sister Margaret Christi said about St. Marianne, a Sister of St. Francis of the Neumann Communities in Syracuse, N.Y., who ministered both in education and caring for the sick. While Ray explained his belief that St. Kateri "has made a big influence on my life — thanks to her I believe I can be a Native American and still be Catholic." About a thousand faithful joined Ray and Sister Margaret Christi, 11 bishops from across the United States and two from Ca ...
Henry Brandon (June 8, 1912 – February 15, 1990) was an American character actor in more than one hundred films, known for having portrayed Indian, Arab, Persian, Turkish, Native American, and East Asian roles, usually villains. Born Heinrich von Kleinbach in Berlin, Germany, his parents emigrated to the United States while he was still an infant. A stage actor, he performed on Broadway and continued to act on stage periodically throughout his acting career. He made his motion picture debut in 1932. His most famous acting roles were as "Chief Cicatrice" (Scar) in John Ford's The Searchers in 1956 and "Chief Quanah Parker" in Ford's Two Rode Together in 1961. In 1955, Brandon portrayed Nate Champion, the first casualty of the Johnson County War of Wyoming, in an episode of Jim Davis' syndicated western television series Stories of the Century. A second episode of that series dealing with the Johnson County War focuses on Ella Watson or "Cattle Kate" and her companion, Jim Averill, who were lynched by vig ...
The Pine Ridge nightmare. a reservation in duress . Native American children are facing many problems that make it difficult for them to grow up in happy, healthy lifestyles. Traditional Lakota values were replaced with non Indian values bringing about a life style that has led to the worst statistics in health, education, employment, housing, legal rights, etc. As one U.S. Attorney has stated, “Native Americans are the most victimized group in America”. The Child Protection Office of the State of South Dakota has stated that over 60% of the children in foster care are Native American. (State population of Native Americans is 10%) Similar statistics apply for the native youth in state criminal justice institutions. Alcohol and drugs are major causes for the breakdown of the family unit. Alcoholism affects 8 out of 10 families on most Reservations and has devastated Native Americans spiritually, culturally, emotionally, physically and politically for over a century. This ongoing generational sickness h ...
Montgomery Advertiser: Native American Activists to Protest New Poarch Creek Casino in Wetumpka January 24, 2013 By Sebastian Kitchen William Bailey began having concerns about the Poarch Band of Creek Indians digging up graves for construction at a site he considers sacred when he served on its Tribal Council years ago. Now, he is helping organize a protest of the council’s continued construction of a $246 million hotel and casino at the site. “I just wish they would stop. Not just there — but all across the United States — digging up Native American graves,” Bailey said. Bailey and other Native American activists will protest the expansion of the casino operated by the Poarch Creeks in Wetumpka from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday at Gold Star Park. Members of the Muscogee Creek Nation in Oklahoma have said the land in Wetumpka where the casino is being expanded is sacred land known as Hickory Ground, the last known capital of the Creek Nation before the Federal Government forced them west. They belie ...
Early Years The leader of one band of the Nez Percé people, Chief Joseph was born Hin-mah-too-lat-kekt in 1840 in the Wallowa Valley in what is now Oregon. His formal Native American name translates to Thunder Rolling Down a Mountain, but he was largely known as Joseph, the same name his father, Joseph the Elder, had taken after being baptized in 1838. Joseph the Elder's relationship with the whites had been unprecedented. He'd been one of the early Nez Percé leaders to convert to Christianity, and his influence had gone a long way toward establishing peace with his white neighbors. In 1855, he forged a new treaty that created a new reservation for the Nez Percé. But that peace was fragile. After gold was discovered in the Nez Percé territory, white prospectors began to stream onto their lands. The relationship was soon upended when the United States government took back millions of acres it had promised to Joseph the Elder and his people. The irate chief denounced his former American friends and dest ...
On this date in Black History: Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority became America's first Greek-letter organization established by African-American college women in 1908. The sorority was founded on January 15, 1908, at Howard University in Washington, D.C., by a group of nine students, led by Ethel Hedgeman Lyle. Forming a sorority broke barriers for African-American women in areas where little power or authority existed due to a lack of opportunities for minorities and women in the early 20th century. Alpha Kappa Alpha was incorporated on January 29, 1913. Consisting of college-educated women of many diverse backgrounds from around the world, including, but not limited to, African, Caucasian, Asian, Native American, Hispanic and Indian descent, the sorority serves through a membership of more than 250,000 women in over 900 chapters in the United States and several other countries. Women may join through undergraduate chapters at a college or university or they may also join through a graduate chapter after acqui ...
Tired of football: STREAMING LIVE from NYC NOW... Ramsey Clark 85th Birthday / IAC 20th Anniversary LIVE ON CPRmetro.org Please Join US for our live presentation of the International Action Center at the 85th Birthday/20th Anniversary Gala Celebrating the 85th Birthday of Ramsey Clark & the 20th Anniversary of the IAC: Saturday, Jan 12, 6pm to 8:30pm ET LIVE FROM RIVERSIDE CHURCH, NYC - PROGRAM WILL REPEAT SEVERAL TIMES OVER THE WEEKEND Ramsey Clark remains a unique political figure in the United States. At great sacrifice he has consistently opposed U.S. intervention abroad and fought for justice at home. He has defended countless individuals and organizations, targets of racism or repression, many who might have otherwise stood alone. From prisoners on Texas death row, to the Attica prison rebels, to Native American leader Leonard Peltier, to Jamil Al-Amin, the Plowshare defendants, Lori Berenson in Peru, to prisoners in the Philippines, Turkey, ­Pakistan, and Egypt — Ramsey Clark has been there for ...
** KEEP YOUR PROTEST ALIVE | THE HARPER SPIN PHOTO OPP ** ** PLEASE READ, THE CROSS BOARDER NATIVE TREATY INDUSTRY / UNILATERAL TREATY CORPORATION ** Native AmericaN FREE PASSAGE RIGHTS UNDER THE 1794 Jay Treaty: SURVIVAL UNDER United StateS STATUTORY LAW AND CANADIAN COMMON LAW Bryan Nickels* Abstract: Since 1794, Native American groups in both the United States (U.S.) and Canada have enjoyed the right of “free passage” across the U.S.-Canadian border per the provisions of the Jay Treaty. However, development and recognition of this right have taken decidedly different courses: while the U.S. has treated the right very liberally under statutory codification, the Canadian government has opted to develop, and restrict, the right under their courts’ common law. This Note discusses the origin and development of the “free passage” right under the Jay Treaty, and encourages both the continued recognition of the right, as well as a stronger Canadian common law effort to harmonize treatment of the righ ...
Super trail riding Bucky left Lincoln and moved onto Fort Stanton. This was when Pat and I became impressed with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). After having ridden down bar ditches all the way through Texas, to finally find open land that you can camp on and build a fire on, was awesome. The BLM oversees thousands of acres surrounding Fort Stanton with trails for hikers and horses and you can camp there for free!!! As we would trail ride, Pat would explain that early cultures settled along the Bonito River. The Spanish and Mexican settlers lived here long before the United States decided to set up a Fort to protect settlers from the Apache Indians who already claimed the land as their own. He was often watching the ground for some evidence of their existence, maybe an arrow head or something. As we would ride along in silence, I would imagine what it must have been like to be a Native American horse. The Pueblo Indians in this area were the first to start training and riding horses that had been b . ...
All-star concert will call for Obama to release Leonard Peltier "He's the Nelson Mandela of the Native American movement... We have millions of people from around the world that are looking at the United States as a beacon of human rights, and we've held this one, aging Native American, who even the government says, 'We have no idea what Mr. Peltier's involvement was.' And it's a shame on our national honor."
The National Guard, the oldest component of the Armed Forces of the United States and one of the nation's longest-enduring institutions, celebrates today its 376th birthday. The National Guard traces its history back to the earliest English colonies in North America. Responsible for their own defense, the colonists drew on English military tradition and organized their able-bodied male citizens into militias. The colonial militias protected their fellow citizens from Native American attack, foreign invaders, and later helped to win the Revolutionary War. Following independence, the authors of the Constitution empowered Congress to "provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining the militia." However, recognizing the militia's state role, the Founding Fathers reserved the appointment of officers and training of the militia to the states. Today's National Guard still remains a dual State-Federal force.
A blog about Native American culture (past and present), American Indian tribes, and humanitarian concerns for the most underserved group in the United States.
"Renelle grew up on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota. Living with her grandparents she always found ways to express herself creatively by drawing paper dolls, sewing, and embroidering with her grandma. Currently, Renelle is living in Los Angeles, CA after graduating from Iowa State University with a Bachelors of Fine Arts. She majored in Integrated Studio Arts, emphasizing in drawing. In the future, she is looking forward to exhibiting her artwork around the Los Angeles area and then expanding to all around the United States and also on an international level. Renelle also wants to educate others about her Native American heritage and the passion she has for art and her tribe"
The recent “Assembled in the USA” found on some iMacs was not a glitch. In an interview with NBC’s Brian Williams airing tonight, Image via CrunchBase Apple CEO Tim Cook announced that the company plans on manufacturing an existing line of computers exclusively in the United States. “We’ve been work...
November is Native American Heritage Month and it’s an important time to celebrate the current and historic role the Native American voice has played in the United States. It’s a time to celebrate the modern and traditional cultures, people, and societies of Native American peoples. It’s also an opp...
wow!! read what i found when i put in "mormon prophecy on Native Americans" then tell me what u think. Joseph Smith was a very audacious and ambitious individual. In 1844, in central Illinois at Nauvoo, he established a theocratic/political kingdom on the Mississippi. He envisioned himself as a king presiding over an empire that eventually would include not only America but the entire world. He organized a council of fifty men to help him realize his goal. Under his direction, this secretive body appears to have been given the responsibility of setting up satellite cells for this theocratic kingdom throughout the United States and the world. In this article I will explore the evidence for this idea In many of the churches based on the movement started by Joseph Smith, Jr., the Book of Mormon is upheld as canonized scripture. One of the salient themes in 3 Nephi, within the Book of Mormon, is that the Native Americans under the direction of God will destroy the gentiles (anyone not Native American) in Amer ...
Applied statistical mathematics for a sociology term paper! "Comparison of the United States census (2009-2011) and American Medical Association statistics (2008) indicates that Asian Americans are licensed as physicians at three times more than median average, per capita by race. Whites are only 75% as likely as the interracial median, calculated by dividing the percentage of doctors whom racialize themselves into a group by the percentage of that racial group in the total population. Being Black means being 29% as likely; whereas, doctors racializing themselves as “Other” are only 25% as likely, and the proportionality of Native American or Native Alaskan doctors is only 20% of the median average. Curiously, doctors whom identify as “Unknown” are nearly a quarter of all physicians while the census totals show only 2.7% of Americans racialize into mixes of two or more races (unidentified in the available data) and just under .16% of all Americans report Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander ancestry ...
David Behrens captures his audience with candid realism and a journey into Native American history. Born of Sicilian and German descent, he made his first connection with Native Americans and their history as an Illustration major at East Carolina University and seeks to use his art to bring forth a sense of healing. David resides in Charlotte, North Carolina and his artwork is displayed in galleries throughout the United States. Learn more about David's art:
White Buffalo DAY” AT EGYPT STATION Egypt Station Gallery & Studios and the daughters of Joe Parkin of the White Buffalo are pleased to announce "White Buffalo Day" at the gallery on Saturday, November 17, 2012, from 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Egypt Station is located at 201 N. Broadway St. in Manito, near Willett’s Winery & Cellar and The Ironstone Room restaurant. New Mexico-style snacks will be served. On display and for sale will be a portion of the remaining Native American jewelry and art collection of Joe Parkin and the White Buffalo. A native of Manito, Joe was introduced to Native American jewelry in the early 1970s, becoming his life-long passion. His appreciation for the Native American art and culture eventually led him and his family to Albuquerque, New Mexico in 1975 where he developed personal relationships with artists of varying tribes (Navajo, Zuni, Hopi, etc.) in New Mexico and Arizona. Joe spent many years travelling all over the United States selling jewelry to stores and individ ...
Native AmericaN OXYMORON: Indian Summer = Native American Post Equinox Phenomina "Kemo Sabe" means "soggy shrub" in Navajo. "Vegetarian" - Indian word for "lousy hunter" Sure you can trust the government! Just ask an Indian! Illegal aliens have always been a problem in the United States. Just ask any Indian. The frog does not drink up the pond in which he lives. -- Native American Proverb "The American Indians found out what happens when you don't control immigration." !:)
Lewis and Clark reached the western coast of the United States on a mandate from Thomas Jefferson to explore and map the new portion of the west while looking for a water passage from coast to coast. Upon reaching the West Coast they reached a difficult decision on whether to return during the winter or pick the southern or northern shore of the Columbia River to camp for the winter. After suffering through the arduous journey to the West Coast they made an unprecedented choice. They would allow everyone to vote on the choice of where to stay for the winter. This vote not only included the original Corp of Discovery but also a black slave 60 years before emancipation and a Native American woman 100 years before natives or women could vote. This was due to the bond they had formed from risking their lives and counting on each other to survive. The hardships they endured for this country were thought insurmountable and brought them together in ways we will likely never understand. It makes the pressures we ...
The candidate with a forked tongue! As the hour approaches for us to cast our vote for the next president of these United States! I bring to you words from the people who still love this land more than most of us! The original people of this land that Native Americans. To use some of their words in this warning! My brothers and sisters my fellow Americans I ask that you choose wisely tomorrow with your vote! So that Wednesday morning you do not wake up regretting that you voted for the one who as my Native American people say “Speaks with a forked tongue”! For if you make the wrong choice in the voting booth you will have the one leading this nation that has shown time and time again that he speaks with a forked tongue! And you will have regret! But as Chief Seattle said, “regret is useless” and even though regret is useless you will still have to live with your choice! Choose wisely my fellow Americans for just as the one speaks with a forked tongue he also has venom in his ways! -The GoldenEagle ...
“The United States is a fake country that has no culture. It’s easy to manipulate such a country, and to channel its people. The U.S. has a façade shown to the rest of the world, but few know of its reverse side as thoroughly as Indians do. The picture people see is not the reality of today’s United States. Even the President who’s in office today wasn’t really elected, like back in the year 2000. Young people certainly strive to get here to achieve their dreams. But really anyone coming only has one reason: they want to become rich and successful, and they want to get their opportunities [to succeed]. Once you talk to them you realize they don’t even dream of anything beyond money-making. This was the reason Europeans came here. This is the principle of the American Life. The world is sick and tired of American prosperity. The world is waking up.” — Native American activist & Lakotah citizen Russell Means who passed away on Monday October 22 2012
Did you know...there are currently 566 federally recognized Native American and Alaska Native tribes and villages and more than 100 state-recognized tribes across the United States? Thanks to Jacksonville District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for sharing.
Thought of the day, how about we just downsize government to department of state and defense. Do we really still need a Bureau of Indian Affairs isn't every "Native American" a citizen of the United States by now. What can the state governments not handle.
California’s Longest-Serving Death Row Inmate Sentence Overturned On October 29, the United States 9th Circuit Court of Appeals made waves with its 2-1 decision to overturn the death sentence of Douglas R. Stankewitz – the longest-serving death row inmate in California according to the Los Angele...
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The Statue of Freedom She’s not as famous as the Statue of Liberty, but she’s the crowning glory of a revered American symbol: the dome of the U.S. Capitol. 19½-foot bronze Statue of Freedom by Thomas Crawford depicts a woman in flowing draperies clasping a sheathed sword in her right hand. With her left hand she holds a thirteen-striped shield of the United States, along with a laurel wreath of victory. Her Roman helmet features an eagle’s head, feathers, and talons, said to be a reference to Native American culture. (The original design included the Phrygian cap worn by freed Roman slaves as a sign of liberty, but Secretary of War Jefferson Davis objected that it might incite Southern slaves to rebel.) The dome on which she stands appears to be stone but is really cast iron painted to look like white marble. Construction on the dome began in 1856 and continued for a decade, even during the Civil War. “If people see the Capitol going on,” Abraham Lincoln said, “it is a sign we intend the Uni ...
Peyote: I Wish We All Could Be Members of the Native American Church by In 1994, it became legal in the United States for Native Ame...
Native American Soldiers Native American soldiers have volunteered in every US war conflict in modern days, and assisted the US Army many times even in frontier times. Six Native American soldiers have won the Congressional Medal of Honor, the highest military award in the United States.
Columbus Day’ specials in S.D. should be a thing of the past Native American Day in South Dakota has once again come and gone, and are any of us really better off for it? Many South Dakotans – both white and Native American – seem to have forgotten the real reasons underlying the state-sanctioned holiday that comes every second Monday in October. Native American Day is supposed to be a day of recognition and celebration of South Dakota’s indigenous citizens – who were once on the verge of extinction because of their treatment by the United States and its white constituents – and all of their very real contributions, past and present, to the state. Natives, mostly Lakota, Dakota and Nakota, comprise a living, distinct and vibrant culture all throughout the state, yet they are the least understood and most disparaged ethnicity here and all across “America” as well. And instead of honoring and remembering all that South Dakota’s Natives have endured and survived – and continue to endur ...
This event is being held in celebration of Native American Heritage Month. There is no fees for your booth. You must be of Native American origin. You must be a member of a Federal, State or other designated tribe to participate. Event is open to the tribes of Canada, the United States, Mexico, C...
Our Native American inhabitants were incorrectly called Indians by early European explorers who mistakenly believed that they had reached India. Christopher Columbus was actually searching for India and when he saw dark colored people, his own ignorance believed that he had reached it and thus, he called them, "Indians." Christopher Columbus did NOT discover America. Columbus sailed into the Caribbean and never even set foot in what is now known as the United States. So, why do we, in the United States, give him one of our 8 Federal holidays? And How can you discover something that was already here? Why would Columbus be given credit for "discovering" the Americas anyway, when we all know those lands were already inhabited and had been for thousands of years? Didn't the inhabitants of those lands discover them? Look at any map of the US and see the many, many, many states, cities and towns that all bear the Native American names of people and peo ples who once populated those regions: Illinois, Oklahoma, ...
Why is that people who stand for humanity,fight against oppression , or risk their lives for civil rights are never honored, valued or have a National Day that we celebrate. Such as Mother Teresa, Ghandi, Malcolm X,Marcus Garvey,The Black Panther Party, Medgar Evers to name a few. But society values Christopher Columbus who murdered millions of Native American in the United States,and killed millions of Awark,Taino,and Carib Indians in the Caribbean.We are told that Christopher Columbus discovered America but he did not because the Native Americas lived on the land way before Columbus settled there.In order for u to discover something the land has to be unclaimed . We need to value people who value life not death. peace
In my prayer time this morning I was questioning my compassion and zealous over human rights! Why don't I just "shut up and sit down" And God brought this to my remembrance ! Could it be my Native American heritage, and the treatment of my people! The Civil War where my great great grandmother saw her two Son's fighting on different sides! My upbringing by a racist mother! Surviving the Civil Rights Movement and even as a child knowing how sad it made God! Serving during Viet Nam, having friends, family,die in a war that was never declared! Watching a great President assassinated , and now watching the president of our United States being so disrespected by those claiming to be Christians! absolutely God doesn't expect me to sit down and shut up!! Guess I know why Joan of Arc was always my childhood hero! I do respect your decision to delete me :•)
Kateri Tekakwitha, "The Lily of the Mohawks", will be declared a saint in the Catholic Church on October 21. She was born in 1656 in a village along the Mohawk River called Ossermenon, now called Auriesville, New York. She is the first Native American to be canonized in the United States.
Post by Gray Wolf . . . Dr. Jack Forbes, Professor of Native American Studies at the University of California at Davis and author of the brilliant book "Columbus and Other Cannibals," uses the Native American word w�tiko (pronounced WET-ee-ko) to describe the collection of beliefs that would produce behavior like that of Columbus. W�tiko literally means "cannibal," and Forbes uses it quite intentionally to describe these standards of culture: we "eat" (consume) other humans by destroying them, destroying their lands, taking their natural resources, and consuming their life-force by enslaving them either physically or economically. The story of Columbus and the Taino is just one example. We live in a culture that includes the principle that if somebody else has something we need, and they won't give it to us, and we have the means to kill them to get it, it's not unreasonable to go get it, using whatever force we need to. In the United States, the first "Indian War" in New England was the "Pequot War o ...
Klamath Tribes The Klamath Tribes, formerly the Klamath Indian Tribe of Oregon, are a federally recognized confederation of three Native American Tribes who traditionally inhabited Southern Oregon and Northern California in the United States: the Klamath, Modoc, and Yahooskin. The tribal government is based in Chiloquin, Oregon. History After signing the 1864 treaty, members of the Klamath Tribes moved to the Klamath Reservation. At the time there was tension between the Klamath and Modoc, and a band of Modoc left the reservation to return to Northern California. They were defeated by the US Army after the Modoc War (1872-1873), and were forced to return to Oregon. In 1954, the US Congress terminated federal recognition of tribal sovereignty of the Klamath, part of an effort to assimilate American Indians judged ready to be part of mainstream culture. With the growth of Indian activism in the late twentieth century, the tribes reorganized their government and, in 1986, regained federal recognition. By thi ...
"I actually agree with that law where a police office should be able to ask anybody at anytime to prove they are a legal resident of the United States, but I also believe that police officer should have to be a Native American." -- Bobcat Goldthwait
In many Native American languages, the translation for soldier, warrior, protector and helper are all the same word. Native American people who served in the United States armed services are greatly honored in the American Indian community.
Hampton University is a historically black and Native American university located in Hampton, Virginia, United States. It was founded by black and white leaders of the American Missionary Association after the American Civil War to provide education to freedmen. The campus looking south across the harbor of Hampton Roads was founded on the grounds of "Little Scotland", a former plantation in Elizabeth City County not far from Fortress Monroe and the Grand Contraband Camp that gathered nearby. These facilities represented freedom to former slaves, who sought refuge with Union forces in the first year of the war. The American Missionary Association (AMA) responded in 1861 to the former slaves' need for education by hiring its first mulatto teacher, Mary Smith Peake, who had secretly been teaching slaves and free blacks in the area despite the state's prohibition in law. She first taught for the AMA on September 17, 1861 and was said to gather her pupils under a large oak. After it was the site in 1863 of th ...
President Obama “There is not a Black America and a White America and Latino America and Asian America; there's the United States of America.” This is a description of my family; you will find Vietnamese, Filipino, Whites, Black, and Native American at my reunions and Holiday celebrations!! That is America. There is no pure race here or anywhere in this world, there is only the human race. Malcom X said I'm for truth, no matter who tells it. I'm for justice, no matter who it's for or against. We need a media that will point out all Misleading Assertions, or Lies. And call our leaders on these issues. James Baldwin said People who treat other people as less than human must not be surprised when the bread they have cast on the waters comes floating back to them, poisoned. Today we see, feel and hear a poisoned nation that is full of sickness and hate and crying out for deliverance. We are becoming a nation of rich verses poor. “Civil War IF OBAMA RE-ELECTED SAYS JUDGE TOM HEAD.” Tom Head, a county ...
We have heard a great deal from a good many corners of the American Experience and its citizens as we unfurl our political process yet again. As we head into the second night of the DNC I want to know how come there are no Native American voices being raised? Why are there no Native Americans taking the stage? I have never expected the current GOPers to even stop to consider this, but I expect more from the Dems. It is politically correct to speak about the many minorities that have found shelter upon theses shores yet not one amongst them has found the time to praise those nations who were here before the earliest Europeans found themselves in what was a new land to them. Everyone who lives here owes a debt of gratitude to the original citizens, their cultures and the contributions made by them to what has become the United States of America. Even now the wisdom of the elders, in my case grandparents and great-grandparents, leads many of us on. It is time all Americans stand up in honor of Native America ...
Minority Matters: A Case Study I conducted a qualitative study on how changing Texas Social Studies Standards to better suit a Christian-creationist perspective impacts Native American and Chinese American ethnic identities in one Texas grade school. The study considered if each minority student had cultural considerations addressed within the new curriculum. The study focused on two students in a 2nd grade class representing two minority ethnic backgrounds. While observing the children’s responses during a social studies lesson on the Founding Fathers of the United States, the child of Native American descent raised her hand and asked the teacher where her people’s point of view was in the history books. She shared that her grandmother and grandfather had told her that Native Americans were “here first and we are spiritual peoples without Christians and that Christopher Columbus was the first welfare case this country ever knew.” The teacher had no answer as to why the Native American perspective ...
Although Native Americans represent less than 1% of the U.S. population, their bones make up over 50% of the skeletal collection in the Smithsonian Institution. In 1988, some 43,000 Native American skeletons were on display in 163 museums in the United States! Many Native Americans were upset by the fact that so many of their ancestors' remains had been excavated. This brought about the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990, under which Native American graves on federal and tribal lands are protected. The act also better defines the ownership of remains that are unearthed and requires institutions to catalogue all human remains in their collections.
"Come and Get Your Love" is a 1974 hit single by the Native American rock band Redbone. The song was written by band member Lolly Vegas and produced by Lolly and his brother Pat Vegas, who was also a band member. It was originally featured on Redbone's album, Wovoka; later the song appeared on many "Greatest Hits" albums released by the band, as well as on numerous compilation albums of the 1970s. The song peaked at number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in April 1974. It spent 18 weeks in the Top 40 and landed as the 4th most popular song on the Hot 100 for 1974. The single was certified gold by the RIAA on April 22, 1974, which indicates that it had sold over a million copies in the United States. The song is Redbone's highest charting single and one of two Top 40 hits by the band (an earlier recording, "The Witch Queen of New Orleans", peaked at number 21 in 1972). The song "Come and Get Your Love" also exists in a longer version, with an introductory slow part, plus a longer repeated coda, however, m ...
Watched The Library of Congress on C-Span list the 88 most influential books, an interesting list but one of them should have been "A Key into the Language of America" by Roger Williams, composed in 1643 because it was the first examination of Native American languages in what became the United States. The other should have been "The Bloudy Tenant" by Roger Williams composed in 1644 about the seperation of church and state, which anticiaptes the actions of the Constitutional Convention by more than a century and a half.
"It's undeniable," writes Clayton Cramer, author of "Armed America: the Remarkable Story of How and Why Guns Became as American as Apple Pie." "Guns are at the center of much of America's history, its legends, and its horrors." There were guns in America long before the America we know today was even born. Early settlers in several states were required by law to own and maintain weapons as a matter of collective defense. By the time the United States was established, its citizens had taken up arms not only against their Native American neighbors but the army of their own king. Their new constitution reflected that in its Bill of Rights, declaring that "A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed." For more than two centuries, that remained an important but largely overlooked guarantee, subjected to a modest series of controls. But in 2008 and 2010, landmark Supreme Court rulings gave that constitutional righ ...
Here is an interesting fact: Forget Jamestown. The oldest settlement in the United States is Acoma Pueblo. It’s no revelation that Native American settlements predate European ones, but it may surprise some people that Acoma Pueblo, west of Albuquerque, New Mexico, has been continuously occupied since the 12th century. The Acoma still inhabit their “Sky City,” a settlement of about 4,800 people that sits atop a 365-foot high mesa. Traditionally hunters and traders, the Acoma people now make their income from a Cultural Center and casino complex. Coincidentally, the oldest state capital in the United States is Santa Fe, which recently celebrated its 400th anniversar
According to the National Women's Law Center in 2010, 10.4% of white non-Hispanic women lived in poverty while 25.6% of African American women, 25% of Hispanic women, 26.4% of Native American women, and 12.2% of Asian women lived in poverty in the United States.
Indians are from India. Indigenous people of the United States are Native American or American Indians.
Fighting Sioux no longer Updated June 24, 2012 07:30:00 The controversial use of Native American imagery in sport is back in the headlines in the United States. After a long and at times bitter debate, the University of North Dakota is moving closer to retiring the team name of the Fighting Sioux after a statewide vote overwhelming supported a change. But native rights campaigners are still fighting an uphill battle with professional sports teams like the Washington Redskins, whose brands are worth hundreds of millions of dollars.
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Okay, Now I'm upset!!! I've been fighting for the release of Leonard Peltier for over 20 years & now out of no where I get this LETTER FROM THE White House!...WHAT IS THIS CRAP?? Why We Can't Comment on Leonard Peltier Thank you for signing the petition "Grant Clemency to Native American activist Leonard Peltier without delay." We appreciate your participation in the We the People platform on WhiteHouse.gov. Article II, Section 2 of the Constitution gives the President the authority to grant "Reprieves and Pardons for Offences against the United States." For more than 100 years, Presidents have relied on the Department of Justice and its Office of the Pardon Attorney for assistance in the exercise of this power. Requests for executive clemency for federal offenses should be directed to the Pardon Attorney, who conducts a review and investigation, and prepares the Department’s recommendation to the President. Additional information and application forms are available on the Pardon Attorney's website. Th ...
Colorado Indians, Jews share genetic marker Israeli geneticists have linked a Native American population in Colorado to Jews expelled from Spain during the Inquisition. Geneticists at the Sheba Medical Center in Tel Aviv discovered the genetic mutation marker BRCA1 in a group of Mexican Indians who had emigrated from Mexico to the United States over the past 200 years and settled in Colorado, Haaretz reported Wednesday. Researchers say the mutation found in the Colorado Indians is identical to that of Ashkenazim, according to Haaretz, and dates to a period more than 600 years ago. Jews were expelled from Spain in the 15th century. Researchers say this offers genetic proof that some of the Jews expelled from Spain who reached South America intermarried with the indigenous population, whose descendants later migrated to Mexico and then the United States, Haaretz reported. Colorado’s Mexican Indians do not have any traditions that link them to Jews, according to Eitan Friedman, who headed the Sheba team.
Partial Eclipse of the Strawberry Moon By Dr. Tony Phillips, NASA Science News, May 30, 2012 On June 4th, 2012, there's going to be a Full Moon. According to Native American folklore it's the Strawberry Moon, so-called because the short season for harvesting strawberries comes during the month of June. This Strawberry's going to have a bite taken out of it. At 3:00 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time, not long before sunrise on Monday, June 4th, the Moon passes directly behind our planet. A broad stretch of lunar terrain around the southern crater Tycho will fall under the shadow of Earth, producing the first lunar eclipse of 2012. At maximum eclipse, around 4:04 a.m. (PDT), 37% of the Moon's surface will be in the dark. Because only a fraction of the Strawberry Moon is shadowed, astronomers call this a partial eclipse. But it's totally beautiful. The eclipse is visible in North and South America, Australia, eastern parts of Asia and all across the Pacific Ocean. On the Atlantic side of the United States, the ecli ...
IF YOU have ANY problem with THIS Native American's perspectives re: Memorial Day...KEEP THEM TO YOURSELF! Truth hurts. Don't like it? Too bad, so sad. Do not even TRY to pull the "thanks to the sacrifices made by the people of the United States Military you wouldn't be "free" to write what you're writing" angle either. Really? They did? SO...just let me try and get this straight...the United States' program of "Manifest Destiny" was really just to protect the American Indians and to guarantee our freedoms!? Wow! I think I can say that I and WE...NEVER knew that! *LOL* I guess you're "free" once you're dead...so it's true. From a certain point of view. 20+ MILLION DEAD=20+MILLION "FREE" *LOL* Nice try. WE WOULD BE FREE IF YOU NEVER CAME HERE! SO DON'T EVEN TRY PULLING THAT ONE! We WERE "free" until the "immigrants" came along! Telling a Native American, especially a member of a tribe that was hunted to near extinction (which is WHY you NEVER meet Mohawk) that "the military" guaranteed their freedoms is on ...
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Some little-known facts about American Indians honorable service: Did you know? - Native Americans Currently hold the distinction of having the highest record of military service per capita of any ethnic group in the United States. - 12,000 Native Americans served during WWI before Native Americans were granted citizenship. - During WWII, more than 44,000 Native Americans served in the military from 1941 - 1945, including 800 Native women. - 10,000 served in Korea. - 42,000 Native Americans served in Viet Nam; many of whom are tribal leaders and service providers in their communities. - Recently honored when Gov. Brad Henry signed legislation to name a stretch of highway in Oklahoma City after him, Billy Walkabout was a native Cherokee whose actions in Vietnam made him among the most decorated soldiers of the war. Walkabout received the Distinguished Service Cross, Purple Heart, five Silver Stars and five Bronze Stars. He was believed to be the most decorated Native American soldier of the Vietnam War, ac ...
Many words have been spoken. It does not require many words to speak the truth. When truth cannot make itself known in words, it will make itself known in deeds. Evil spreads with the wind; truth is capable of spreading even against it. The term 'White Man' or 'White People' is in use for a concept of materialism and greed, as the term 'Red Man' or 'Indian' is used for the concept of spirituality and deep relation to Mother Earth. There is no 'Red Man' or 'Indian' at all (except the one's with the dot on the forehead), just more than 500 nations with different languages, customs and beliefs. These terms do not describe a person, more likely a state of mind. The first people who lived on the northern plains of what today is the United States called themselves Lakota, meaning "the people", a word which provides the semantic basis for Dakota. The first European people to meet the Lakota called them "Sioux", a contraction of Nadowessioux, a now-archaic French-Canadian word meaning "snake" or enemy. And yes, ...
Mt. Rushmore Site Should Be Returned To Indigenous Native American Tribes, U.N. Official Says Nick Wing | May 07, 2012 01:13 PM EDT Comments (6,152) South Dakota's Black Hills, home to the granite faces carved into Mt. Rushmore, should be restored as Native American tribal lands, a United Nations official recently said. James Anaya, a U.N. Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous people, completed a fact-finding mission on Friday that included meetings with a number of Native American tribal leaders as well as White House officials. His investigation led him to suggest that the United States take additional steps to repair the nation's legacy of oppression against Native Americans. He'll officially propose the plan in an upcoming report. From the Associated Press: Anaya said land restoration would help bring about reconciliation. He named the Black Hills as an example. He said restoring to indigenous people what they have a legitimate claim to can be done in a way that is not divisive "so that the B ...
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