National Transportation Safety Board & Malaysia Airlines

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is an independent U.S. government investigative agency responsible for civil transportation accident investigation. Malaysian Airline System Berhad , doing business as Malaysia Airlines (abbreviated MAS), is the government-owned flag carrier of Malaysia. 4.0/5

National Transportation Safety Board Malaysia Airlines Kuala Lumpur Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 Daniel Rose Philip Wood Peter King South China Sea Federal Aviation Administration Chief Executive Officer Fariq Abdul Hamid Indian Ocean Associated Press United States

THE 45 DAY RULE Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 has now been missing for 46 days - an important milestone as it allowed U.S. lawyers to pursue Boeing in U.S. courts. A 45-day rule, enforced by the National Transportation Safety Board, means that families can now file suits in U.S. courts against Boeing, an American manufacturer. 'We don't feel we have a whole lot of other choices because we're certainly not getting any answers without (legal action),' Sarah Bajc told CNN. Ms Bajc, whose partner Philip Wood was on the flight, said she hoped that pressure in the courts might lead to the Malaysian government releasing important data. One key problem however could bt the lack of any plane. 'If we don't have the "black box" with all the critical information on it, or we don't have any part of the wreckage, it would be very hard to maintain a claim against Boeing in any court in the United States,' Daniel Rose, an aviation attorney from Kreindler & Kreindler, told CNN.
Shutdown of communication systems Although the aircraft was flying virtually blind to air traffic controllers at this point, onboard equipment continued to send "pings" to satellites. U.S. aviation safety experts say the shutdown of communications systems makes it clear the missing Malaysia Airlines jet was taken over by someone who knew how the plane worked. To turn off the transponder, someone in the cockpit would have to turn a knob with multiple selections to the "off" position while pressing down at the same time, said John Goglia, a former member of the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board. That's something a pilot would know, but it could also be learned by someone who researched the plane on the Internet, he said. Malaysia Plane Piracy Investigators believe one or more people with flying experience deliberately steered the missing Malaysia Airlines jet off course after switching off communication devices. (Lai Seng Sin/Associated Press) The Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting Sys ...
TERRIBLE SECRETS ABOUT MALAYSIAN AIR?? The Boeing 777 continued to send signals to satellites for more than six hours after its last message: 'All right, good night.' As 14 countries continue the hunt, new questions are being asked Japan Coast Guard officer Japan Coast Guard officer searches for the missing Malaysia Airlines MH370 plane over the waters of the South China Sea. Photograph: Edgar Su/REUTERS After a week of false leads, U-turns, wild speculation and outright contradictions, it was hard to believe there could be any more surprises in the hunt for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight. But when Malaysia's prime minister, Najib Razak, finally appeared before the media on Saturday afternoon – almost 45 minutes later than scheduled and for the first time since flight MH370 went missing seven days before – his words were startling. Not only did investigators believe the plane had been deliberately diverted after its communication systems were switched off, but they believed it had been sending s ...
- - - - -8 lessons we need to learn from Malaysia Airlines tragedy- - - - - 5 hours ago - Yahoo News Summary: 1 Malaysia Airlines may be best remembered for its poor treatment of family members, culminating in the ludicrous decision to notify them via text message that all aboard were lost. 2 Despite tremendous progress in both technology and human factors, pilot error remains the leading cause. According to the extensive database compiled by PlaneCrashInfo.com, 3 However, news reports indicated Malaysian authorities were resentful of foreign intervention in their investigation, so it remains unclear how this affected the contributions of the NTSB and other international agencies. 4 Engineers proposed replacing the “black box” with a “glass box” — i.e., technology that would transmit data continuously and in real time to a ground-based system. This is more than a proposal — Star Navigation Systems of Canada already has developed such a product. But once again, cost is a factor. 5 One of t ...
Search Update for the Malaysian Jet. A British satellite company said today that it had indications that the missing Malaysia Airlines plane may have crashed into the Indian Ocean as early as two days after the plane's disappearance. The search for the jetliner did not move into the Indian Ocean until more than a week after the plane vanished in the middle of the night from Malaysian airspace on March 7. "This is very troubling, just thinking of the time wasted and what was ever on the water moving farther away," said ABC News consultant Tom Haueter, a former National Transportation Safety Board investigator. Inmarsat, the maker of satellites, told ABC News that they had an "initial idea" on March 9 and by March 10 were "fairly certain" that the search parties should look in the south Indian Ocean for the vanished plane. Inmarsat shared their data with a partner company the following day, on March 11, and with Malaysian investigators on March 12. It was not until three days later, on March 15, that Malays ...
Missing Jet's U-Turn Programmed Before Signoff, Sources Say COLLAPSE STORY BY TOM COSTELLO The missing Malaysia Airlines jet's abrupt U-turn was programmed into the on-board computer well before the co-pilot calmly signed off with air traffic controllers, sources tell NBC News. The change in direction was made at least 12 minutes before co-pilot Fariq Abdul Hamid said "All right, good night," to controllers on the ground, the sources said. The revelation further indicates that the aircraft's mysterious turnaround was planned and executed in the cockpit before controllers lost contact with Flight 370. But it doesn't necessarily indicate an ulterior motive. "Some pilots program an alternate flight plan in the event of an emergency," cautioned Greg Feith, a former National Transportation Safety Board crash investigator and NBC News analyst. "We don't know if this was an alternate plan to go back to Kuala Lumpur or if this was to take the plane from some place other than Beijing," the doomed flight's intended ...
Malaysia Airlines mystery revives black-box debate By Robert MacPherson (AFP) – 3 hours ago Washington — The search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 has rekindled a debate over the iconic "black box" flight recorder and whether it's time for aircraft to start live-streaming in-flight data in real time. Civil aviation industry sources agree the technology exists for commercial airliners to immediately relay via satellite vital technical information otherwise compiled by a flight data recorder in the course of a flight. But it's another question whether airlines, forever struggling to keep costs down in a highly competitive business, want to front up the money involved -- or even if it's truly worth the expense. "There are no technical barriers ... and the cost barriers can be addressed," said Peter Goelz, a former managing director of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), the US government agency that investigates major aviation accidents. "But the reality is that air carriers don't want to ...
US sends investigators to join search for missing Malaysia Airlines plane An FBI team has flown to Malaysia to join the search for the Malaysia Airlines flight that went missing over the South China Sea early on Saturday. Three Americans were among the 239 people on board flight MH370, from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. On Sunday Tony Blinken, President Barack Obama’s deputy national security adviser, confirmed that the US government was aiding the investigation into what caused the plane to come down. “The FBI, the National Transportation Safety Board, the [Federal Aviation Administration], all of them are heading to the area to help with the investigation,” he told NBC. “Lots of questions have been raised, we don’t have the answers yet. We’ll get them.” On Sunday, possible debris from the plane was found in the sea off Vietnam by a search team, according to a senior official, and Interpol confirmed that at least two stolen passports were used to board the flight at Kuala Lumpur’s internationa ...
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