National League & American Association

The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs, known simply as the National League (NL), is the older of two leagues constituting Major League Baseball, and the world's oldest extant professional team sports league. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is an international non-profit organization with the stated goals of promoting cooperation among scientists, defending scientific freedom, encouraging scientific responsibility, and supporting scientific education and science outreach for the betterment of all humanity. 5.0/5

National League American Association Major League Baseball Red Sox Cincinnati Reds World Series Louis Browns Boston Beaneaters Major League Jackie Robinson American League Moses Fleetwood Walker Washington Senators Opening Day Cincinnati Red Stockings Ban Johnson

Evolution of Baseball Equipment Introduction A minimum of equipment was employed in 19th century baseball, and changes in its regulation were infrequent. No batter wore a helmet during the 19th century. "Gloves" did not become common until the late 1880s and the baseball has retained the same dimensions, weight and leather pattern since 1872. Only one attempt to regulate uniforms was made by the National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs in 1882. This was due to the emergence of the American Association of Base Ball Clubs, which began play in 1882 and attempted to differentiate themselves from the six-year old National League. The Bat 19th century bats looked and felt different than today's bats. They were generally heavier and considerably thicker in the handle and had more of a gradual taper from the handle to the barrel. They were made with or without knobs on the handle and on various parts of the bat would be painted "rings" that would reflect the team color. At the first baseball convention in ...
Year In Review : 1890 Players League In the National League… On Labor Day, the Pittsburgh Alleghenys were swept in a rare triple-header by the home team Brooklyn Bridegrooms 10-9, 3-2 and 8-4. The trio of winning pitchers included Bob Caruthers, Tom Lovett and Adonis Terry. New York Giants slugger Mike Tiernan became the first player ever to hit a home run from one ballpark into another after launching a thirteenth inning blast off the Boston Beaneaters' Kid Nichols that traveled over the centerfield wall at the Polo Grounds into the adjacent Brotherhood Park. In the American Association… The Brooklyn Bridegrooms and Cincinnati Reds moved from the American Association to the National League who had also dropped the Washington Senators. The American Association's Kansas City franchise folded, but the Rochester Hop Bitters, Syracuse Stars, Toledo Maumees and Brooklyn Gladiators were added in their place. Ledell "Cannonball" Titcomb tossed a 7-0 no-hitter against the Syracuse Stars on September 15th. In ...
June 6, 1920 - 94 years-ago today, the St Louis Cardinals played their last game at Robison Park, formerly known as Cardinal Field, completing a sweep of the Chicago Cubs, 5-2. Christian Friedrich Wilhelm von der Ahe had purchased the bankrupt St. Louis Brown Stockings baseball franchise in 1882 for $1,800 and joined the American Association baseball league. He named the team the Browns and hired future Chicago White Sox owner Charles Comiskey to manage the team and play first base.The Browns would dominate the American Association, winning four straight league championships starting in 1885, and with the low ticket price of of 25 cents, the Browns also led the league in attendance. Because of this, Von der Ahe is often credited with coining the term which he used to describe those in the stands, "fans", short for fanatics. After the American Association folded, the Browns joined the National League in 1892, moved into a larger ballpark the following year, & quickly became a last-place team. Trying to sti ...
H/T Lee Fischer for finding this on Vintage St. Louis: 1876 The first National League game in St. Louis took place. A crowd of 4,000 was on hand at the Grand Avenue Baseball Grounds to see the Brown Stockings face the Chicago White Stockings. The game was rained out in the 3rd inning. Management refused to make refunds or allow fans to use their tickets for the make up game the next day. The Browns disbanded after a game fixing scandal in 1877. The team was resurrected when the American Association was founded in 1881. 1910 President William Howard Taft visited St. Louis. Mindful of the political fallout if he offended fans of either team, he attended parts of both the Cardinal game at Robison Field and the Browns game at Sportsmen's Park. A month earlier, he had inadvertently started a baseball tradition at a Washington Senators game. In the 7th inning Taft rose from his seat to stretch. The crowd thought he was leaving and rose as well to show their respect. The Seventh Inning Stretch was born.
Looked up a little Cincinnati Reds history in honor of the the Cards playing them on Opening Day today... Apparently they were charter members of the National League in 1876, only to be kicked out in 1880 for refusing to stop selling beer at the ballpark and playing games on Sundays - both of which were used to draw in the city's large German population (good tactics). Spurned from the league they went to a meeting in Pittsburgh in 1881 which was supposed to have a number of other team executives in order to setup a rival American League. No one showed up, not even the organizer of the meeting himself, aside from the owners of the Reds. Undaunted, they hatched a scheme to call each of the absent owners, telling them that they were the only one who didn't show up and the rest of the owners were incredibly enthusiastic. Through this they were able to organize a second meeting in Cincinnati, get everyone there, and successfully created the American Association. So here's to drinking at ballparks and games .. ...
March 5, 1889 - Both the National League and American Association hold their spring meetings to adopt their schedules. The NL also hires a fifth umpire at a salary of $200 per month. The AA, to the surprise of many, does not adopt the NL's salary classification system.
Today in Baseball History -- Nov. 18 -- from Mary Landers ... 1886 -- The Pittsburgh Alleghenys leave the American Association to join the National League. After a few name changes, including the Innocents, the team will become known as the Pirates in 1891. 1914 -- The Cubs hire future Hall of Famer Roger Bresnahan to manage the team. The former Cardinal skipper will stay for just a year as Chicago finishes the season in fourth place with a 73-80 record. 1947 -- The Browns trade All-Star shortstop Vern Stephens and pitcher Jack Kramer to the Red Sox for six players and $310,000. The dealing will continue tomorrow as Ellis Kinder and Billy Hitchcock also go to Boston in exchange for three more St. Louis players and $65,000, making the total number of players traded 13 (4 Browns, 9 Red Sox) along with $375,000 going to the cash deprived Browns. 1949 -- Dodger second baseman Jackie Robinson (.342, 16, 124) becomes the first black player to win the MVP Award. Stan Musial, Ralph Kiner, and teammate Pee Wee Ree ...
On This Day In Baseball History: 1882 - In retaliation for the "theft" of Sam Wise and Dasher Troy by the National League, the American Association creates a loophole allowing all players either blacklisted or expelled by the NL to join AA clubs after appealing to a special commission. 1901 - The Cincinnati Enquirer reports that Baltimore Orioles manager John McGraw has signed a Cherokee Indian named "Tokohama" to play second base. In reality, Tokohama isn't a Native American; he is an African-American whose actual name is Charlie Grant, who McGraw is trying to pass off as an Indian, but the ruse does not work. Baseball's color line will prevent Grant from ever playing a game for the Orioles. 1933: • During an exhibition game in Los Angeles, CA, a significant earthquake sends the Chicago Cubs and New York Giants scurrying to second base until the tremors stop. • Rogers Hornsby, out of baseball since being fired as Cubs manager last August, joins the St. Louis Cardinals in spring training as a player. ...
On This Day In Baseball History: 1900 - In New York, the National League meets, voting to shrink to eight teams. They pay the Baltimore owners $30,000 for their franchise, with Charles Ebbets and Ned Hanlon reserving the right to sell the players. Cleveland, Louisville, and Washington receive $10,000 each, with Louisville owner Barney Dreyfuss sending most of his players to his Pittsburgh Pirates team. The circuit will remain the same until the Boston Braves move to Milwaukee, WI in 1953. 1913 - The Federal League is organized as a six-team outlaw circuit and elects John T. Powers president. It will play 120 games at a level equivalent to the lower minor leagues, but will enhance its status considerably in 1914 to challenge the Major Leagues. 1923 - Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis allows former New York Giants pitcher Rube Benton to return to the National League. Benton had admitted prior knowledge of the 1919 World Series fix, but remained active, winning 22 games for St. Paul (American Association). NL Pr ...
On This Day In Baseball History: 1860 - Sam Thompson is born in Danville, Indiana. An outstanding slugger and a fine right fielder in the deadball era, Thompson will collect 200 or more hits three times, finishing his 15-season Major League career with a lifetime mark of .336, 126 home runs, and 1299 RBI, including a batting crown (1887) and two home run titles (1889 and 1895). Thompson will be elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee in 1974. 1886 - A business wrangle in the National League ends in a weakening of the league's famous 50 cents admission standard. The St. Louis Maroons and Philadelphia Phillies, the two clubs facing rival American Association teams with an admission of 25 cents, are allowed to charge a minimum of a quarter. Newcomers Washington Nationals and Kansas City Cowboys are stuck with the 50 cents minimum, but are given the option of selling three tickets for a dollar. 1888 - The American Association meets in Brooklyn, New York, and votes to make use of turnsti ...
Moses Fleetwood Walker was the first African-American to play Major League Baseball (Jackie Robinson, considered the first to break the color barrier in the modern era). Moses played for the Toledo Blue Stockings in 1884. The Blue Stockings were members of the American Association. When the Toledo team folded in 1884, Walker played in the minor leagues in 1885 and 1886. In 1887, Walker played for the Newark Little Giants. The International League owners voted to exclude African-American players. In 1888, the International League modified its ban on Black players. Walker signed with Syracuse. Then the American Association and the National League both unofficially banned African-American players, making the adoption of Jim Crow in baseball complete. Major League Baseball remained segregated for 60 years, until Jackie Robinson joined and played for the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. Most people never heard of Moses Fleetwood Walker.
On This Day In Baseball History: 1887 - In preparation for the upcoming National Colored Base Ball League season, the Louisville Falls City sign Al Prater from Detroit and W.S. Purnsley from the Cuban Giants. In addition, they have recently started construction of a 2,000-seat park. 1888 - The Washington Nationals National League club leaves on its southern tour a day earlier than scheduled, due to a superstition against starting a trip on a Friday. 1889 - The Philadelphia Quakers head for Jacksonville, Florida, for spring training. No other Major League clubs will train in the Deep South this season. 1891 - The Pittsburgh Alleghenys and Cleveland Spiders are the two National League clubs making the heaviest raids against American Association player contracts, following the latter's denunciation of the National Agreement two weeks ago. Pittsburgh further earns its new nickname of "Pirates" by signing good-hitting outfielder Pete Browning and pitcher Scott Stratton away from the Louisville Colonels. 1892 - ...
On This Day In Baseball History: 1884 - P/IF Terry Larkin, released from prison after serving several months for beating his wife and shooting a policeman, is rearrested for threatening to shoot his father. Larkin will eventually be freed to conclude his Major League career this year, playing for the Washington Nationals and the Richmond Virginians in the American Association. 1891 - American Association owners dismiss league President Allen W. Thurman and replace him with Louis Kramer of Cincinnati. The owners also denounce the National Agreement, launching a new war with the rival National League. The owners are unhappy with Thurman's decision in the Lou Bierbauer case, in which, in his capacity as Chairman of the National Board of Control which decides disputes under the National Agreement, he ruled that the AA's Philadelphia Athletics no longer had reserve rights over Bierbauer, who jumped from the Athletics to the Players League in 1890, and then refused to return to his old team after the Players Le ...
On This Day In Baseball History: 1884 - At the annual meeting of the minor-league Northwest League, the first-place Toledo Blue Stockings are declared the league champion for 1883. But because Toledo has moved from the NWL to the Major League American Association for 1884, the NWL pennant is awarded to the second-place Saginaw Greys. The NWL also rescinds its prohibition of Sunday baseball and the sale of beer at its ballparks, thereby aligning itself with AA policy and against the National League policy. 1885: • At a National League meeting, St. Louis is admitted, Cleveland's registration is formally accepted, and Detroit has its request to remain in the NL granted, leaving only one opening for 1885. However, Cleveland will fail to complete formalities, leaving the league with 8 teams. • The New York Clipper reports that Paul Hines, a Providence Grays outfielder, and resident of Washington, DC, had been challenged to catch a ball dropped from the top of the Washington Monument, a distance of "over 53 ...
TODAY IN BASEBALL HISTORY: 1883 Washington, Indianapolis, Brooklyn and Toledo are added to the American Association bringing the number of teams in the league to twelve. 1953 At a gathering of stunned reporters in his office on Montague Street, team owner Walter O'Malley announces Chuck Dressen will be replaced as Dodger manager by Walter Alston, who will remain skipper of the club for the next 23 years winning seven pennants and four World Series. The leading candidate for the position was Pee Wee Reese, Brooklyn's popular shortstop. 1964 Ken Boyer (.295, 24, 119) is selected as the National League's MVP. The World Champion Cardinal third basemen easily outdistances Johnny Callison and Bill White for the honor. 1971 Atlanta's slugger Earl Williams receives 18 of 24 first place votes cast by the BBWAA to win the National League Rookie of the Year Award. The Braves' 23-year old catcher-infielder hit 33 home runs and drove in 87 runs for the third-place team this season. 1975 Gene Mauch is named the ne ...
On This Day In Baseball History: 1887 - The Joint Rules Committee does away with the four-strike rule and with the scoring of walks as hits. Five balls for a walk remains the rule. 1891 - The Louisville Colonels club is sold at auction to satisfy a $6,359.40 mortgage. The new ownership is headed by Dr. T. Hunt Stuckey. 1894 - Managers Al Buckenberger of the Pittsburgh Pirates and Billy Barnie of the Louisville Colonels and Louisville star second baseman Fred Pfeffer are expelled from the National League for planning with officials of the proposed "American Association" (previously called the National Association). The two managers will be reinstated before the end of the year, but Pfeffer must wait until the end of February 1895 before he will be welcomed back into the fold. 1908 - Julia Stahl, widow of Chick Stahl, is found dead in the doorway of a Boston tenement house. Stahl, the Boston Red Sox manager, committed suicide last year during spring training. 1912 - Detroit Tigers infielder Red Corriden is ...
On This Day In Baseball History: 1884 - Pitcher Tony Mullane violates an oral agreement to sign with the St. Louis Browns by signing a $5,000 contract with the Cincinnati Red Stockings. The American Association suspends Mullane for the 1885 season and fines him $1,000, but allows him to remain with Cincinnati. Over the next eight years Mullane will win 163 games with the Reds on his way to a career total of 285 victories. 1887 - The Washington Statesmen sell veteran outfielder Paul Hines to the Indianapolis Hoosiers for $5,000. 1889 - After a formal meeting of representatives from all National League chapters, the Brotherhood issues a "Manifesto" in which it claims that "players have been bought, sold and exchanged as though they were sheep instead of American citizens." This bold statement constitutes a declaration of war between the Brotherhood and Major League officials which will soon explode into the formation of the Players League. 1891 - Charlie Comiskey, having had enough of St. Louis Browns owner ...
The Reds have won two in a row for the first time this year. The win was 10,000th win in franchise history. The club has won 9,451 games in the National League. The Reds won another 549 in the American Association. Homer Bailey went seven innings and allowed four runs — only one of which [...]
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