First Thoughts

Ms Yingluck

Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra Yingluck Shinawatra Thaksin Shinawatra Democratic Reform Committee Suthep Thaugsuban Election Commission


The actions against Ms Yingluck indicated selective use of laws, undermined the rule of law and destroyed democracy.
Yingluck 'in court' for rice case trial: Norawich Lhalaeng said Ms Yingluck would be at the Supreme Cour...
I go with Mr Joko and Mr Prabowo - following local custom. Same as Ms Yingluck (Yingluck Shinawatra) and Mr Najib (Najib Razak)
today is Yingluck Shinawatra's birthday.. Happy b'day for Ms. Yingluck.
BBC NEWS Thailand army continues crackdown after coup Six of Thailand's most senior military officers were appointed to run the country Thailand's military has ordered 35 more people, including prominent academics, to report to them by Saturday afternoon as the post-coup crackdown continues. The move comes a day after the army ordered more than 100 politicians, including ex-PM Yingluck Shinawatra, to come to the military council. Ms Yingluck was detained in Bangkok on Friday and spent the night in custody. Meanwhile, the US has suspended $3.5m (£2.1m) in military aid to Thailand and told the army to restore civilian rule. Washington also urged tourists to cancel trips and halted non-essential visits by US government officials, following Thursday's coup. Officials said Ms Yingluck would not be held for more than a week but insisted that her detention was necessary while matters in the country were organised. Ms Yingluck, who had been PM until being removed by the judiciary this month, was ordered to repor ...
8 May 2014 6:08pmThai elite cannot fight the political tide When Thailand’s counter-corruption agency called for the impeachment of Yingluck Shinawatra on Wednesday, the news had a surreal quality: the prime minister was already gone. The country’s conservative establishment, having dithered since November about how to respond to a wave of anti-government street protests, has finally turned on Ms Yingluck’s Puea Thai party. This week the constitutional court removed Ms Yingluck and most of her key ministers from office; the acting administration is struggling for credibility as the remaining members try to cover multiple cabinet roles. In the absence of a foreign minister, no one is sure who will represent Thailand at a meeting of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations this weekend. Consumer confidence is at its lowest level in more than 12 years, and foreign investors are eyeing the country with growing wariness. For decades Thailand was managed by a “network monarchy” – an alliance of se ...
Breaking news: The Yingluck Shinawatra cabinet as of Sept 6, 2011 must leave office after Ms Yingluck's prime minister status ends.
Ms Yingluck, who is facing several legal challenges, remains popular in rural areas Thailand’s prime minister has appeared before the Constitutional Court in Bangkok to defend herself against allegations of abuse of power.The complaint was filed by senators who said Yingluck Shinawatra’s party benef…
SUTHEP THE OPPOSITION LEADER, YOU WILL NOT CONTINUE BEING A STUMBLING BLOCK TO THE WAYS OF PEACE IN THAILAND KINGDOM, FOR HER EXCELLENCY Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra HAS VOLUNTEERED TO BE A PEACE MAKER OF HER PEOPLE, SO AM EXPECTING THAT YOU WILL STEP DOWN AND DO THE SAME THING BY DIALOGUE WITH YINGLUCK, FOR THE PEACE AND FUTURE OF THAILAND KINGDOM. EVERYDAY DEMONSTRATION CAN NEVER ACHIEVE ANYTHING, JUST LOOK FOR A WAY TO STOP THE CONFLICT. Yingluck says she is ready to quit politics if it’s the need of majority BANGKOK: -- Caretaker Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra said Tuesday that she has not discussed with her family and elder brother Thaksin Shinawatra on taking a break from politics, but she said she is ready to do so if it is the need of the majority of the people. Ms Yingluck made her remarks following reports that her self-exiled brother announced that he and the Shinawatra family will consider pulling out of politics. She said that she did not cling to power or any political position. ...
Thailand - political unrest - some comments from one of our next distinguished speakers Dr. Michael Nelson in the up-coming Chairman Circle on 7th May 2014 Experts lash PDRC’s sovereign power bid 9 Apr 2014 Academics have derided anti-government protesters' plans to "reclaim sovereign power" as absurd, while warning that threats by pro-government groups to mobilise after Songkran were adding to the risk of bloodshed. Thamrongsak Petchlertanan, assistant professor of history at Rangsit University, said People's Democratic Reform Committee (PDRC) leader Suthep Thaugsuban's proposal to personally nominate an interim prime minister and countersign His Majesty the King's endorsement was unprecedented. "This could be considered treason," he said. "We all know the idea has been floated to test the waters to see how society reacts, but it could cause damage if Suthep really proposed it and the King signed it off." Mr Suthep earlier said "the people would reclaim sovereign power" if Ms Yingluck's status as caret ...
Is this her last Songkran? Yingluck's game of 'political musical chairs' explained. Bangkok Post: Yingluck now faces harsh reality (Opinion/Commentary excerpts, 7 Apr. 2014) It appeared to be a perfectly designed plan. Now it is getting close to becoming a political disaster for caretaker Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra. The plan revolved around three people in a game of political musical chairs — Thawil Pliensri, Wichean Potephosree and Priewpan Damapong. It started with the shift of Mr Thawil from the top job at the National Security Council on Sept 30, 2011 to the post of prime minister’s adviser so that Pol Gen Wichean could take over the vacant spot. Then Pol Gen Priewpan could be promoted from deputy to chief of police. Mr Thawil launched a battle for fair play, and had he given up at any stage, Ms Yingluck would not have been put in the position she’s in today with the future of her caretaker cabinet on the line. “I didn’t even bother printing business cards for that position,” said ...
Thailand's The Nation is reporting that the door for negotiations to resolve the political crisis is slammed shut after caretaker Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra announced that her government would not nominate 10 individuals to mediate talks with the People's Democratic Reform Committee or P-D-R-C. Six independent organisations called on both sides to name ten people who could help facilitate talks and move toward ending the political impasse. The six agencies which includes the Election Commission, made this decision at a meeting on Monday to look for a way out of the deadlock. But Ms Yingluck said she would not nominate mediators because PDRC secretary-general Suthep Thaugsuban had turned down the proposal as well. However, Ms Yingluck backed the idea of mediators holding talks, provided they lead a way out. Asked about the PDRC's continued push for reforms before an election and the government's insistence on holding a poll first, Ms Yingluck replied that holding elections first was not a conditio ...
Suthep calls two-day rally for Friday Tue, February 11, 2014 10:17 PM Protest leader Suthep Thaugsuban has set Friday as the date to kick-off another major attempt to unseat caretaker Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra. He called the two-day push to oust Ms Yingluck in a speech to People's Democratic Reform Committee (PDRC) supporters at his Pathumwan rally site on Wednesday. ''We will gather to announce that we love Thailand,'' he said. The PDRC is staging rallies at Pathumwan, Asok, Ratchaprasong, Lumpini and the Chaeng Wattana Government Complex. The caretaker government is under pressure from anti-government demonstrators who have been rallying since October and also from disgruntled farmers protesting to demand outstanding payments under the rice-pledging scheme. Caretaker Commerce Minister Niwatthamrong Bunsongphaisan said after a cabinet meeting on Tuesday that 120 billion baht is still needed to pay farmers who have sold rice into the scheme since November. Mr Suthep claimed that with Ms Yingluck ...
The fight tearing the country in two Sun, February 09, 2014 12:00 AM Since the crackdown on the red shirts at Bangkok's Ratchaprasong intersection almost four years go, the once-cheerful Lung Gong has become a jittery man, jumping at the sound of a car backfiring or a firecracker being let off. Talk of a separate red-shirt state was reignited when the South China Morning Post (SCMP) newspaper of Hong Kong published an article ("Red-shirts 'ready to resist' Thai army coup, set up capital in Chiang Mai") on Jan 29 prior to last Sunday's poll. The article was widely reprinted in Thai media and on websites. In the article, red-shirt supporters in the North declared they were willing to resist any attempt by the military to stage a coup and some urged Ms Yingluck to retreat to Chiang Mai and set up government there. Red shirt activist Mahawang Kawang, who attended the same Chiang Mai school as Ms Yingluck, claimed that in the event of a coup it was likely "the government" would relocate to northern city. Anoth ...
Thailand elections: How events might unfold BANGKOK (REUTERS) - Thai demonstrators are consolidating efforts to bring down Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra and have rejected an election held on Sunday that could renew her mandate. Due to disruption of the vote, Ms Yingluck could be a mere caretaker premier for months, exposing her to the prospect of intensified protests, legal cases or military intervention. Following are scenarios for how events might unfold. ELECTION DECLARED VOID, NEW POLL DATE SET Opponents could lodge a raft of complaints with the Election Commission, from fraud and obstruction of voting to the failure to register candidates and the holding of balloting on several dates, which could be deemed unconstitutional. The Constitutional Court might invalidate the election and order a new one. Ms Yingluck would stay on as caretaker premier with no authority to make decisions on policy or state spending without a parliament to approve them. The country might be in limbo for months. Protests ...
Thailand election: Country goes to polls 2 February 2014Last updated at 03:26 Millions of Thais are voting in a general election boycotted by the opposition and blighted by protests. Anti-government protesters are trying to disrupt the vote across Thailand and continue their campaign to force Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra to resign. Ms Yingluck voted soon after polls opened on Sunday near her Bangkok home. The prime minister, who won the last election in 2011, called the vote to head off mass protests that began in November. Her opponents took to the streets after her government tried to pass an amnesty law that would potentially have allowed her brother, Thaksin, to return from exile. Thailand's troubles *.Sep 2006:Army ousts Thaksin Shinawatra *.Dec 2007:Pro-Thaksin party wins election *.Aug 2008:Thaksin flees Thailand *.Dec 2008:Huge anti-Thaksin protests; court bans ruling party; Abhisit Vejjajiva comes to power *.Mar-May 2010:Huge pro-Thaksin protests; dozens killed in army crackdown *.Jul 2011: ...
State of emergency Posted on Thursday, 23 January 2014, 19: 17 GMT The government's decision to invoke the emergency decree to push for Feb 2 election is likely to backfire with protests set to expand and the Constitution Court expected to rule on an election postponement soon, political observers say. Anti-government protesters, in defiance of the decree which took effect on Wednesday, surrounded the Office of the Defence Ministry's permanent secretary after Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra went to work there yesterday morning. After protesters arrived, Ms Yingluck and Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister Surapong Tovichakchaikul left the compound through the back gate. The Election Commission (EC) took steps in an apparent attempt to delay the poll by asking the charter court to rule who between the agency and the government has the authority to defer the election. The EC is likely to go for a delay if the court says it has the power to do so. There is also a question of whether the government c ...
Thai lawmakers face Senate probe Thailand’s anti-corruption body says it will bring charges against more than 300 politicians, mostly from the governing party, for trying to change the constitution. A court ruled in November that the government move to make the Senate fully elected was unconstitutional. The graft body said PM Yingluck Shinawatra would not face charges. The move comes as Thailand heads for a general election on 2 February, amid opposition protests. Ms Yingluck called the polls last month in a bid to end demonstrations by opposition supporters in Bangkok. The protesters want Ms Yingluck’s government replaced with an unelected “People’s Council”. They say her government’s populist policies – which they allege are controlled by her brother, ousted former PM Thaksin Shinawatra – have created a flawed democracy. Ms Yingluck’s party draws considerable support from rural voters and would likely win the polls – which the opposition is now boycotting. The National Anti-Corruptio ...
Yingluck tells military: Stay neutral Fri, December 20, 2013 04:06 PM Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra has called on the armed forces to stay neutral throughout the current political conflict, Defence Ministry spokesman Thanatip Sawangsaeng said on Friday. Col Thanatip said the caretaker premier on Friday morning chaired a Defence Council meeting to discuss the overall political situation and the general election scheduled for Feb 2 next year, attended by armed forces commanders. Thaksin is afraid that the armed forces would turntable against his sister yingluck shiwanatra. If thing happen he will not be able to return to Thailand and chances of getting his money back is zero. This why the UDD and Yingluck Shiwanatra will not reform before election take place. After election they will push forward again the amnesty bill so that Thaksin Shiwanatra will have the chance to return to Thailand and get back his money as well as he don't have to go to jail to serve his 2year jail term. "Ms Yingluck asked armed ...
11.12.2013 (We are still learning: Also understanding why the Thai working masses didn’t and don’t come out for a general strike…) Q&A: Thailand elections – what does the opposition want? By Michael Peel in Bangkok Protesters in Thailand pushed again on Tuesday to oust the government of Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra as the political crisis tightened its grip on southeast Asia’s second-largest economy. The leaders of the demonstrations have rejected national elections called by Ms Yingluck on Monday, campaigning instead for an unelected council to run the country. So the protesters, including the main opposition Democrats, want to replace an elected government with a vaguely defined appointed assembly of grandees. That does not sound very, well, democratic, does it? Many Yingluck supporters and independent observers would agree that it does not. The opposition, broadly comprising the traditional urban elite and their south Thailand allies, counters that the electoral system has been corrupte ...
Yingluck breaks down in tears (Bangkok Post 10 Dec 2013 at 11.15) Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra broke down in tears on Tuesday and insisted that she will not step down as caretaker premier until a new cabinet has been formed. "We are fellow Thais. Why do we have to hurt one another? "I have retreated so far and I don't know where to retreat further. Do you (anti-government protesters) want me to not even set foot on Thai soil?" Ms Yingluck, also defence minister, said at the Thai Army Club where the weekly cabinet meeting was held and lasted about one hour. She called on the protesters to not condemn the Shinawatra clan, and asked the opposition Democrat Party to help preserve democracy by taking part in the Feb 2 general election.
The flooding began in late July and has killed 527 people, mostly by drowning. Some provinces north of Bangkok have been inundated for more than a month, although floodwater there has started to recede in recent days as massive pools of runoff flow south. The water has inexorably made its way into Bangkok, causing distress among the capital's more than 9 million inhabitants and heightening criticism of government's inefficiency in countering the problem. "Now it's time for all Thai people to help each other, so I've informed (the host) that I would not go," Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra said. The Asia Pacific Economic Co-operation summit, hosted by President Barack Obama, will bring together 21 leaders, including Chinese President Hu Jintao. It would have given novice politician Ms Yingluck diplomatic experience, but could also have exposed her to criticism of ignoring flooding at home where her rivals are keen to exploit any problems due to the waters. She came to office in August after a Pheu Thai ...
"The rally was organised by a group who accuse Ms Yingluck of being a puppet of her brother, Thaksin Shinawatra." BBC
Government invokes security law Pitak Siam rally national security threat, PM says Published: 23/11/2012 at 12:00 AM Tomorrow's Pitak Siam rally poses a threat to national security, which justifies the invocation of the Internal Security Act (ISA), Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra said yesterday. Crowd control police officers rest in hammocks in the compound of Government House. They have been assigned to deal with tomorrow’s Pitak Siam rally. CHANAT KATANYU Appearing on the TV pool in the evening, Ms Yingluck said intelligence reports indicated that the rally was aiming at toppling the democratically elected government in violation of the constitution. She said the reports indicated that the protesters would use violence, storm government buildings and instigate public disturbances to achieve their objective. The prime minister said the government is duty-bound to maintain law and order and to protect the lives and properties of its citizens. Constitution Court backs off: Judges refuse to ban rally O ...
The name Shinawatra has long been synonymous with Thai political marketing savvy and Ms Yingluck's government is no exception, having brought in Winkreative's Tyler Brule to ''brand'' Thailand.
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Thaksin Shinawatra Democratic Reform Committee