Justice Department & Voting Rights Act

The United States Department of Justice (DOJ), also referred to as the Justice Department, is the United States federal executive department responsible for the enforcement of the law and administration of justice, equivalent to the justice or interior ministries of other countries. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 is a landmark piece of national legislation in the United States that outlawed discriminatory voting practices that had been responsible for the widespread disenfranchisement of African Americans in the U.S. 5.0/5

Justice Department Voting Rights Act Supreme Court South Carolina Shelby County North Carolina African Americans Attorney General Eric Holder Voter Registration Act George W. Bush African American General Eric Holder District Court Jim Crow Justice Antonin Scalia

10 Things You Should Know About Selma Before You See the Film By Emilye Crosby In this 50th anniversary year of the Selma-to-Montgomery March and the Voting Rights Act it helped inspire, national media will focus on the iconic images of "Bloody Sunday," the words of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the interracial marchers, and President Lyndon Johnson signing the Voting Rights Act. This version of history, emphasizing a top-down narrative and isolated events, reinforces the master narrative that Civil Rights activists describe as "Rosa sat down, Martin stood up, and the white folks came south to save the day." But there is a "people's history" of Selma that we all can learn from—one that is needed especially now. The exclusion of Blacks and other people of color from voting is still a live issue. Sheriff's deputies may no longer be beating people to keep them from registering to vote, but in 2013 the Supreme Court ruled in Shelby v. Holder that the Justice Department may no longer evaluate laws passed in th ...
In July 2013, the deeply divided United States Supreme Court gutted the Voting Rights Act in Shelby v. Holder, a case coming out of Alabama. Arguing in part that it is arbitrary and no longer necessary to focus exclusively on the former Confederacy, the Court’s majority eliminated the pre-clearance requirement for nine southern states. This means that the Justice Department is no longer responsible for (or allowed to) check new laws for racial bias. Given widespread efforts to block voting access, it may well be arbitrary to hold the former Confederate states to a different standard. But the response of those states–along with other forms of voter suppression throughout the country–makes it crystal clear that we still need robust, proactive tools to protect voting rights for all citizens, but particularly African Americans and others who are still targeted. Rather than being curtailed, the Voting Rights Act should be extended. No doubt future historians will look back at today’s voter ID laws and ...
The Justice Department announced today it has published a new technical assistance publication about federal laws that protect the rights of voters with disabilities, including the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Voting Rights Act, the National Voter Registration Act and the Help America Vote A…
Finding Legal History in the Charleston School of Law, Sol Blatt Jr. Library Martin Luther King Jr.’s life was ended on April 4, 1968, by a bullet fired from a Remington hunting rifle by James Earl Ray. Born in 1929, King was just 39 years old when he died. From his position as pastor of a Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama, King led the boycott of segregated city buses which resulted in their desegregation in 1956. Subsequently, King organized the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, an organization dedicated to Civil Rights. King’s philosophy of nonviolent resistance gained adherents as the protest King led in Birmingham and the March on Washington helped assure the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Also in 1964, King won the Nobel Peace Prize. The American public was outraged when marchers in a nonviolent march in support of voter registration were beaten and gassed, and this outrage translated into passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Throughout King’s career, he was subjected t ...
DOJ ORDERS NC REPUBLICANS TO TURN OVER ELECTION EMAILS - Is it just us, or is the phrase "certain areas" going to come up quite a bit in these documents? Ryan Reilly: "Any race-related emails that North Carolina Republicans may have sent in connection with the voter restrictions they passed last summer could soon be public, thanks to a ruling by a federal judge. Before the Supreme Court's decision to strike down a key portion of the Voting Rights Act, simply demonstrating a discriminatory impact could be enough to overturn a discriminatory law. Now, in order to have North Carolina's voting law struck down, Civil Rights groups and the Justice Department have to demonstrate that state lawmakers deliberately engaged in racial discrimination against voters. The sweeping law requires voters to show certain forms of photo identification, eliminates same-day registration and reduces early voting -- all measures which voting rights advocates say are intended to make it harder for Democratic-leaning minorities to ...
Four states — Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas — would again have to get approval from the Justice Department before making any changes in the way they hold elections under a bipartisan bill introduced Thursday to restore parts of the Voting Rights Act that the Supreme Court struck down as unconstitutional. More:
The Wall Street Journal: "The Supreme Court ruled in June that a section of the 1965 Voting Rights Act is no longer justified due to racial progress, but the U.S. Attorney General has launched a campaign to undo the decision state-by-state. ... Mr. Holder wants to haul North Carolina and Texas back into long-term federal supervision through a back door. Under Section 3 of the Act, states can be required to get federal preclearance if a court finds that the state has intentionally discriminated against minorities in its voting laws. That's a high legal bar that the Justice Department will find hard to prove, especially since many of the two states' voter ID provisions are widespread in other states. ... All the evidence suggests that Mr. Holder's real motive here is political. Portraying voter ID laws as racist helped to drive Democratic voter turnout among minorities in 2012, and the White House wants a repeat in 2014. Never mind if the suits eventually fail in court. The goal is to elect more Democrats i ...
President Obama heartily supports the Justice Department's efforts, saying that his administration "will use tools available through the Voting Rights Act to keep jurisdictions from enacting laws that have the effect of preventing people from voting," as reported by the AP via the Huffington Post. After being placed on hold approximately seventeen times, the nice ObamaCare lady said that if one does not have identification, one needs to provide a Social Security card. Of course, in order to obtain such a card, the ObamaCare enrollee needs two forms of identification, as noted by the Social Security Administration. President Obama made the (outrageous) statement that "Health Insurance is a right," during a weekly address last month. If voting is a right and Health Insurance is a right, why is it discriminatory to ask for identification to vote, but not to enroll in Health Insurance?
It was about a month ago that Attorney General Eric Holder announced that the Justice Department is taking Texas to court over the state's discriminatory voter-ID law, relying on what's left of the Voting Rights Act. It seemed like only a matter of time before Holder made a simi …
INBOX: Justice Department to monitor a municipal election in Hattiesburg, Mississippi tomorrow to comply with the Voting Rights Act.
Justice Department sues Texas over voter ID citing remainder of the Voting Rights Act
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 African Americans applaud Supreme Court decision on Voting Rights Act WASHINGTON, D.C. - Legal experts with the Project 21 black leadership network are hailing a ruling that was handed down by the U.S. Supreme Court today to bring American Civil Rights law into the 21st century by recognizing the evolving racial opinions of the American people and how increased fairness has come with such change. In its decision in the case of Shelby County, Alabama v. Eric H. Holder, Jr., the justices ruled that Section 4 "coverage" provisions within the Voting Rights Act of 1965 do not reflect an America that has changed for the better since the Act was signed into law almost 50 years ago. Up until now, Section 4 was used as a tool to establish certain areas of the country (all or part of 16 states) that needed federal approval to make any changes in their voting laws. "Federalism and state sovereignty are the big winners today -- and, once again, Eric Holder's Justice Department was the loser," s ...
We still have a Voting Rights Act: bad voting laws can still be taken to court & struck down.
Welcome support from coalition partners. - Julian Bond GLAAD, LGBT ADVOCACY GROUPS STAND WITH Civil Rights ORGS IN DISAPPOINTMENT AT Supreme Court RULING ON VOTING RIGHTS Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 11:58am by Ryan Houlihan, Programs and Communications Fellow at GLAAD Today, the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) ruled against a central piece of the Voting Rights Act. This removes major protections on voting rights passed by Congress in 1965 and reduces the Federal Government's ability to oversee voting discrimination in areas with a legal history of discriminatory voting standards against minorities, most specifically African-Americans. GLAAD joins several other LGBT advocacy organizations expressing concern over today's ruling. The act had been renewed four times previously and had been repeatedly reaffirmed by Congress. The NAACP, the American Bar Association, the Navajo Nation, the states of New York, California, Mississippi and North Carolina, numerous former Justice Department officials charge ...
Black Woman's Open Letter to Justice Clarence Thomas. This is a Black man who grew up in the Jim Crow era and resides in the Commonwealth of Virginia, where it will impact HIM: Dear Justice Clarence Thomas, It appalls me that you, a black man raised in Jim Crow's South, could rule parts of the Voting Rights Act unconstitutional. De-legitimizing Section 4 of the VRA dismantles the entire legislation. That gives policymakers and the Justice Department no legal authority to enforce Section 5, the core of the document. You and your comrades have opened the floodgates to polling discrimination again. It is breathtakingly disappointing to know that a black man like you could be misguided enough to support that. Justice Roberts wrote in the majority opinion, "Our country has changed." But it hasn't. The times are different, yes. But racism, while not written explicitly into our laws, is stealthily disseminated through the most covert channels: political rhetoric, media coverage, you name it. And the Court canno ...
SALON TUESDAY, JUN 25, 2013 04:07 PM EDT The Ugly SCOTUS Voting Rights Flim-Flam The fact that black voters beat back modern suppression efforts in 2012 must mean they don’t need protection! BY JOAN WALSH No good deed goes unpunished, I like to say. In striking down a key enforcement provision of the Voting Rights Act, Chief Justice John Roberts noted that African-American voter turnout in 2012 either exceeded or essentially matched white turnout in five of six Southern states governed by the act’s tough and controversial Section 5. Ironically, as anyone paying attention knows, that turnout surge was driven by anger over a wave of GOP efforts to suppress black votes in those and other states – and it was helped along by Section 5, which requires states with a history of voting rights suppression to pre-clear any voting changes with the Justice Department (Justice struck down 21 such proposals since 2006). Still, despite new voter identification laws, restrictions on early voting and Sunday voting an ...
Time for tonight's Topic at 10: Should Congress act? Head over to the Binghamton CW11 page to join TONIGHT'S conversation. The nation's High Court ruled today in a split decision that Congress must rewrite part of the Voting Rights Act to reflect the changing times and the weakening tide of racism in our country. But there is disagreement about whether the ruling is progress toward racial equality -- especially in states that traditionally supported discriminatory practices -- or whether it will have a negative impact on minority voters. From CBS News: "That section of the landmark 1965 law provides the formula for determining which states must have any changes to their voting laws pre-approved by the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division or the D.C. Federal Court. Nine states are required to get pre-clearance, as are certain jurisdictions in seven other states." QUESTIONS What do you think? Should Congress rewrite the law? Or, have we as a nation eliminated the need for such checks and balances beca ...
The Black Tea News Rundown: SCOTUS strikes down the section of the 1965 Voting Rights Act that made states clear any voter laws with Justice Department. Support Paula Deen FB page overflows with support. And the N-word: Bush champions immigration reform because, he says, immigrants are very "fertile": going on here? Dr. Peniel Joseph of Tufts University shared some ideas with us last week about what he's seeing: him tonight on The Colbert Report .
Reacting to the decision by the Supreme Court to invalidate portions of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 relating to the regions required to submit reapportionment plans to the Justice Department for preclearance, Rev. Al Sharpton expressed his disappointment with the Court on MSNBC. Sharpton said that...
Virginia Legislators Approve Voter ID Law, May Kill Chances for Federal Bailout Voting Rights Watch on February 22, 2013 - 1:34 PM ET Decrease text size Increase text size Earlier this week, the Virginia House of Delegates passed a photo voter ID law that narrows the list of identification voters are required to show on Election Day to vote. The bill, which now sits before Gov. Bob Mcdonnell to sign or veto, would allow only a driver's license or U.S. passport to vote. Without either of those, a voter would have to file a provisional ballot, and then bring the required photo ID to the election board by the Friday after Election Day. If McDonnell signs it, it wouldn't go into effect until 2014 -- when the mid-term congressional elections are held -- but it would have to be approved by the Federal Government first. Since Virginia is a covered jurisdiction under the Voting Rights Act's Section 5, any election law they make has to be pre-cleared by the U.S. Justice Department or the U.S. District Court in Was ...
Steve Flowers is Alabama’s premier political journalist and commentator. He is also considered by many to be the preeminent authority on Alabama politics and Alabama political history. February 21, 2013 Weekly Column This Week in Alabama Politics It is amazing how fast a year flies by, especially the older you get. This week marks the end of the first one-fifth of 2013. There are a potpourri of political happenings that have occurred recently, which we will discuss today. We are entering the opening days of the 2013 Regular Session of the Legislature. Just prior to the beginning of the session, Alabama received acknowledgement from the U.S. Department of Justice that under the auspices of the Voting Rights Act the new legislative districts drawn last year have been approved. The legislature drew new congressional lines in 2011, which were also approved by the Justice Department. They were actually enacted and our congressional delegation ran in their new districts in the 2012 elections. Legislators will ...
Selective offense: "I know the Obama campaign is ready to act on this. But I realized that there are two important federal laws, the Voting Rights Act, passed in the 60s, [and] the Voter Registration Act passed in the 90s, that have criminal and civil penalties for people who try to intimidate a voter. ... [A]nyone in this country who feels they're being intimidated can call their nearest FBI office because it is a federal offense to harass someone, to intimidate someone. Think about all the people that worked so hard and struggled and went to prison and put their life on the line for the right to vote." --Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-CA) who we don't recall making a peep when the Black Panthers intimidated Philadelphia voters and the Justice Department swept it under the rug
The 1965 Voting Rights Act placed election-related restrictions on all or parts of 16 states. As the Justice Department puts it, Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act notes that “any change with respect to voting in a covered jurisdiction — or any political subunit within it — cannot legally be enforce...
With the presidential election just a few weeks away, a panel of three federal judges this week questioned whether South Carolina should wait until 2014 to put its voter ID law into effect. As attorneys for South Carolina delivered closing arguments in the trial over the validity of a new state law in the state, the judges case is pondered whether the law would discriminate against minorities. Last December, the Justice Department refused to "preclear" the law — find it complies with the Voting Rights Act — so it could go into effect. Voter identification laws have become a major point of contention in this year's presidential election, given the close race between Republican nominee Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama, a Democrat. These laws could prevent key constituencies from voting, making a difference for Democrats in tight races. While supporters have pitched the laws as tools against voter fraud and to build confidence in the election system, the laws are in reality a Republican response ...
This seems reasonable wonder why anyone would argue ...unless .. well ... maybe ... they shouldn't be voting and someone needs the votes...WASHINGTON - South Carolina is in Federal Court arguing that its new law requiring people prove their identity at the polls won't make voting so tough that it reduces turnout of African-Americans, Hispanics and other minorities. A federal panel is to determine whether South Carolina's voter identification law violates the Voting Rights Act by putting heavy burdens on minorities who don't have the identification. Last December, the Justice Department refused to allow South Carolina to require the photo IDs, saying doing so would reverse the voting gains of the states' minorities. Closing arguments in the case — which went to trial in August and included several state officials as witnesses — were scheduled for Monday. South Carolina has said it would implement the law immediately if the three-judge panel upholds it, although a decision either way is likely to be app ...
Mississippi's new legislative districts earn Justice Department approval under the Voting Rights Act:
This Thursday is the deadline for the State of Texas, Justice Department, and other parties in the Texas voter ID case to submit a proposed schedule for taking up and addressing the state’s contention...
awmaker Admits to Responding to Racist E-mail: South Carolina state Rep. Alan Clemmons, who authored the state’s voter ID legislation that the Justice Department has called discriminatory, admitted to responding favorably to a racist e-mail he received in support of the law, McClatchy reports. A three-judge panel is considering whether the law, which forces residents to show a specific form of photo ID before voting, is in violation of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Clemmons admitted to replying through e-mail in agreeance with a supporter who used racially charged
As the Justice Department battles another yet state voter identification law - this time in South Carolina - a friend of the court brief from Arizona argues that the Voting Rights Act essentially denies some states the right to make laws that others are free to enact.
Joe Araipo is such a crazy racist that the US Justice Department has to go to AZ and make sure the Voting Rights Act of 1965 is followed.
It's not the strongest law on the books, but the commonwealth of Virginia will be allowed to enact its newly revised voter identification statute this fall. Because Virginia is one of 16 states covered in whole or in part by a provision of the Voting Rights Act requiring federal approval of state election law changes, the fact that Attorney General Eric Holder's Justice Department allowed this change on the eve of a presidential election indicates Virginia's new rules weren't worth the fight that may have ensued. The DoJ is already embroiled in contesting voter ID laws in South Carolina and Texas. Holder's office may have given Virginia a pass because the state accepts non-photo forms of identification, including utility bills, paychecks, bank statements and GOVERNMENT CHECKS. NO PHOTO ID REQUIRED HERE! Republican Gov. Bob Mcdonnell concurrently signed an executive order to send a new voter identification card to all active voters in the commonwealth. On the other hand, the new law eliminates the option o ...
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A Federal Court has rejected part of Florida's new election law that would have restricted the number of early voting days across the state. The court said the new law cannot take effect in five counties where the African-American vote could be key in November. The ruling ''' which was announced late Thursday ''' is a win for voting rights groups, who say the new law was meant to suppress minority voters in Florida in the Nov. 6 presidential election. Florida Public Radio's Trimmel Gomes reports that the ruling affects only the five counties that are covered by the federal Voting Rights Act. Because of a history of discrimination in those areas of the state, Florida must receive Justice Department or Federal Court approval to change voting laws in those areas. A three-judge panel said evidence presented in the case clearly shows black voters utilize early voting much more than white voters, as in 2008 when President Obama won Florida. The ruling blocks the new law from affecting these five Florida countie ...
(The Blaze/AP) — Lawyers for the state of Texas argued Friday that a contentious voter ID law should go forward because it doesn‘t limit minorities’ right to vote and, therefore, does not violate the federal Voting Rights Act. Justice Department attorneys argued just the opposite, saying the law r...
The Obama Administration blocked Texas s new law requiring voters to show government-issued photo identification at the polls, escalating a partisan dispute over voting restrictions.The U.S. Justice Department is using its power under the Voting Rights Act to halt the Texas...
Obama's DOJ Refuses to Prosecute Balck-on-White Crime News Item | July 18, 2010 | By Bartle Bull, a former Civil Rights lawyer and supporter of Robert F. Kennedy, declared this was "the most blatant form of voter intimidation I've ever seen." But the politicized Obama DOJ, Eric Holder, thought otherwise and decided not to press charges. That's when Adams quit and went public with this outrageous decision not to enforce the law. As John Fund, a reporter for The Wall Street Journal, who gave credited RNLA as "a primary organization exposing ACORN's crimes," wrote: In the first week of January, the Justice Department filed a civil lawsuit against the New Black Panther Party and three of its members, saying they violated the 1965 Voting Rights Act by scaring voters with the weapon, uniforms and racial slurs. When none of the defendants filed any response to the complaint or appeared in federal District Court in Philadelphia to answer the suit, it appeared almost certain Justice would have prevailed by default ...
6/18/12 - Under the National Voting Rights Act, the Justice Department should be forcing the states mentioned in my previous post, below, to clean up their voting rolls immediately. But it has failed to do so. A Former Justice Deaprtment official has testified that in November 2009, Obama political appointees informed the Voting Rights staff that NO PROSECUTIONS for failure to clean voter rolls would be brought by the Obama Administration. Evidence of corruption? You bet it is. Why? Because it is in the political interest of the Obama people to keep dead and ineligible voters on county voting rolls in key states, in order to multiply the opportunities for voter fraud this year.
In each case, the Justice Department blocked the new voter photo ID laws by not granting a clearance under Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act, first passed in 1965 and requiring mostly southern states with a historical pattern of discrimination to “pre-clear” changes in voting laws or political lines. The Democrats are desperate, they know that without illegals, felons and the dead, that they will LOSE in 2012, big time.
The Justice Department letter accuses the state of violating two laws. One, the Voting Rights Act, was put in place in 1965 to protect black and Latino voters who had faced poll taxes, literacy tests, alternative voting times or facilities. The law requires five Florida counties, along with a handful of mostly Southern states with histories of voter discrimination, to seek federal approval before changing voting policies or procedures. More than 60 percent of the voters declared suspect in Florida are black or Latino, according to a Miami-Herald analysis. A second federal law, the National Voter Registration Act, requires states to make efforts to maintain accurate voter rolls. It also forbids states from removing voters from their rolls within 90 days of a federal election. Florida holds a congressional primary in August and the presidential election in November. The 90-day window began May 16, according to the Justice Department.
Attorney General Eric Holder testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 7, 2012, before the House Judiciary Committee oversight hearing on the Justice Department. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
Attorney General Eric Holder told the House Judiciary Committee Thursday that the Justice Department will...
Ok, people: I'm seeing a lot of links/posts about the "voter purge" in Florida; guess what? there is no voter purge...that's correct: no voter purge; the reason? The 67 elections supervisors of the state are in charge of doing this, not Uncle Fester (Gov. Rickie Scott) or the Secretary of State; when USAG Holder sent the letter to Uncle Fester telling him to stop the voter purge, the elections supervisors immediately stopped going through the lists and didn't even purge any voters; the supervisors waited until Holder weighed in on the situation before proceeding; the state of Florida missed the deadline (which was in May) for a voter purge, therefore, the supervisors followed the law and told Uncle Fester that we're not doing it. As part of the Voting Rights Act in the 1960's, the Southern states, which were most at fault for voter suppression, were required to "pre-approve" any moves that regard voting with the US Justice Department; Every Southern state that passed the bills that dealt with needing an I ...
UPDATE: The U.S. Justice Department says it will monitor elections in Wisconsin and three other states this week to ensure compliance with the Voting Rights Act. The law prohibits discrimination in the election process.
Justice Department to watch Riverside County for Voting Rights Act ...: The monitoring sites are... News
Florida Governor Rick Scott is currently deploying a massive and systematic effort to purge up to 182,000 Floridians who are likely Democratic voters from the state's voting rolls. Tell him to comply with Justice Department's demand to suspend the voter purging immediately.
The Department of Justice demanded that Florida stop purging its voter rolls, Talking Points Memo reported Thursday. In a letter sent to Florida Secretary of State Ken Detzner, the Justice Department ordered the state to end the practice because it has not been approved under the Voting Rights Act.
Justice Department warns Florida Republicans that they are violating the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Demands they stop purging voters from records.
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At 10 PM on Wednesday night Georgia Republican Paul Brown rose on the House floor and tried to slip an amendment to an appropriations bill. His amendment would have prevented the Justice Department from spending any more money enforcing the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that applies to 16 states, including Georgia. Fortunately, Brown was called out by Democrat John Lewis, also from georgia, whose skill was fractured by a police baton in Selma, Alabama, during a 1965 voting rights march. The Justice Department is questioning voter ID laws enacted by Republican state houses in deliberate attempts to disenfranchise minorities, the poor and older Americans. Republicans are afraid they can't win fairly so they want to take way the rights of people to vote.
With Voter ID law investigations in South Carolina, Texas, and Florida, Holder assures that the Justice Department will work to protect the Voting Rights Act.
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