Enrico Fermi & Manhattan Project

Enrico Fermi (29 September 1901 – 28 November 1954) was an Italian-born, naturalized American physicist particularly known for his work on the development of the first Nuclear Reactor, Chicago Pile-1, and for his contributions to the development of quantum theory, nuclear and particle physics, and statistical mechanics. The Manhattan Project was a research and development program, led by the United States with participation from the United Kingdom and Canada, that produced the first atomic bomb during World War II. 5.0/5

Enrico Fermi Manhattan Project United States Albert Einstein Robert Oppenheimer Edward Teller Julius Robert Oppenheimer Los Alamos New Mexico Nobel Prize Bhagavad Gita David Bohm Leo Szilard National Historic Landmark Benito Mussolini North America Prime Meridian

Creation of FERMIAC cemented Manhattan Project's Enrico Fermi's legacy as a hacker:
Olivia Fermi, granddaughter of Enrico Fermi the assistant director of the Manhattan Project, was our guest lecturer today.
29 Sep 1901: Birth of Enrico Fermi, physicist who studied the atom, worked w/radioactive isotopes, & on the Manhattan Project .
Who invented atom bomb? During World War II, the United States, with the assistance (collaboration) of physicists, mathematicians, and engineers from the U.S., Britain, Canada and Europe, completed the Manhattan Project to produce the first atomic bomb. (The project started as the "Manhattan District Engineers" and only became "The Manhattan Project" some time later). There was some early speculation about the possibility of what could be done if a nuclear chain reaction was unleashed in a way that would allow it to build without control. For a roll call, consider that Robert Oppenheimer was the head of "science" for the Manhattan Project, and (in alphabetical order) Felix Block, David Bohm, Niels Bohr, Enrico Fermi, James Franck, Otto Frisch, Klaus Fuchs, Rudolf Peierls, Emilio Segre, Leo Szilard, Edward Teller and Eugene Wigner all played crucial roles in getting the weapon designed and built. The physicist Albert Einstein did not participate directly in the invention of the atomic bomb-but was instrume ...
During a lunch at Los Alamos in 1950, physicist Enrico Fermi asked his colleagues working on the Manhattan Project, "Don't you ever wonder where everybody is?" Fermi argued that given the large number of stars and planetary systems in the Milky Way and their old age, life should have arose and acquired technology that would be far more advanced than ours.Don't miss this brilliant talk by
Feb 16th, Moment In Black History ATOMIC *** Ralph Gardner was a pioneer chemist whos research into plastics led to the development of so called hard plastics. His innovations in the manipulation of catalytic chemicals led to products for the petrochemical and pharmaceutical industries as well as plastics. Born in Cleveland, Ohio, on Dec 3rd, 1922, Gardner was the son of educated parents who provided him with the chemistry set that led to his career. After receiving a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Illinois in 1943, Gardner joined the University of Chicago Argonne National Laboratories and worked on development of the atomic bomb as part of the so called Manhattan Project. Two other African Americans who worked on the development of the first atomic bomb were William J. Knox and Ernest Wilkins. Even though Gardner worked directly under the famed nuclear scientist Dr. Enrico Fermi on the Manhattan Project, Gardner could not find employment when he left the project in 1947.
WHAT IS UNIQUE ABOUT BOLTLUBE??? While talking to the distributors at the SHOT Show (America's biggest vendor gun show), one question always came up. Back during WWII, Enrico Fermi and Joseph Lencki (yes, Fermi from the Manhattan Project) developed zMAX at the Dodge Chicago Plant where the 2,200 horsepower, 18 cylinder B-29 Superfortress engines were being developed. The product has been sold over time as Lenckite and Speedway Cocktail. What they figured out was how to take really high quality mineral oil, and break the molecules into little bitty pieces. This allows the oil to PENETRATE the metal pores, as the pores open and close with temperature changes. Forward to the mid 1990's, Slick 50 and the rest, including zMAX were sued by the FTC for making claims that their products would "penetrate the metal", "improve gas mileage", "reduce friction and wear", "reduce carbon and deposit buildup", and more. ONLY zMAX was able to prove to them that the product DOES WHAT THEY CLAIM. See their site for det ...
1942 The world’s first artificial, self-sustaining fission reaction is produced by Enrico Fermi, as part of the Manhattan Project
Dec. 2, 1942: Enrico Fermi and a team initiate the first-ever self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction during the Manhattan Project.
December 2, 1942 a team of scientists led by Italian refugee Enrico Fermi, working on the Manhattan Project, conducted the first ever small-scale fission reaction. Fermi had theorized that if you could split an atom with a neutron, it would produce more neutrons that would split other atoms eventually creating a chain reaction. Using a pile of uranium bricks and graphite bricks with cadmium rods in a squash court on the University of Chicago campus, his experiment worked, forever changing the world.
On December 2nd, 1942: Manhattan Project: A team led by Enrico Fermi initiates the first self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction.
Enrico Fermi (1901-1954) was an Italian physicist who made significant discoveries in nuclear physics and quantum mechanics. In 1938, he received the Nobel Prize in physics for his discovery of nuclear reactions caused by slow neutrons. This mechanism led directly to the development of atomic bombs and nuclear fission reactors. After receiving his Nobel Prize, he emigrated with his family to the United States to escape the fascist regime of Benito Mussolini, where he soon began contributing to the Manhattan Project. Fermi was famous for being able to make good estimates in situations where very little information was known. When the first nuclear bomb was tested, Fermi was nearby to observe. To get a preliminary estimate of the amount of energy released, he sprinkled small pieces of paper in the air and observed what happened when the shock wave reached them. (Being so close to the bomb on this and many other occasions exposed Fermi to dangerous radiation that led to his death by stomach cancer at the age ...
The "Speedway Cocktail's" Sixty Year History With more than sixty years of history, the "Speedway Cocktail," as it was originally called, was developed by Joe Lencki, Indy race engine and chasis design engineer and car owner. In 1936, this "cocktail" was under development for use in engines for the Indy 500. While disassembling race engines for inspection, Lencki found that certain internal parts were scuffed due to a lack of proper lubrication, especially upon start-up. Lencki's Speedway Cocktail solved his internal lubrication problems and created a whole new category of lubrication. Early racing legends eagerly embraced the qualities of Lencki's new micro-lubricant and used it regularly for maximum race engine performance and maximum protection of vital engine parts. During World War II, Lencki was supervisor in the Dodge plant in Chicago where aircraft engines for large B-29 bombers were constructed. In Chicago, he met Manhattan Project director Enrico Fermi and he perfected his zMAX formula. In 1947, ...
Julius Robert Oppenheimer[note 1] (April 22, 1904 – February 18, 1967)[1] was an American theoretical physicist and professor of physics at the University of California, Berkeley. Along with Enrico Fermi,[2][3] he is often called the "father of the atomic bomb" for his role in the Manhattan Project, the World War II project that developed the first nuclear weapons.[4] The first atomic bomb was detonated on July 16, 1945, in the Trinity test in New Mexico; Oppenheimer remarked later that it brought to mind words from the Bhagavad Gita: "Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds."[note 2] After the war he became a chief advisor to the newly created United States Atomic Energy Commission and used that position to lobby for international control of nuclear power to avert nuclear proliferation and an arms race with the Soviet Union. After provoking the ire of many politicians with his outspoken opinions during the Second Red Scare, he had his security clearance revoked in a much-publicized hearing in 19 ...
80 years ago today Hungarian-American Leo Szilard conceived the idea of the nuclear reaction while waiting at a traffic light. While many received much more notoriety following up his ideas, his importance cannot be minimized. Along with Enrico Fermi he patented the idea of the first Nuclear Reactor. He authored the letter [ and had his former professor Einstein co-sign] that lead to the founding of the Manhattan Project, and was the first to conceive of the electron microscope. the linear accelerator and the cyclotron.
Today is the birthday of Nicholas Constantine Metropolis (June 11, 1915 – October 17, 1999), a Greek American physicist who worked on the Manhattan project. Metropolis received his PhD from the University of Chicago (1941), where he worked with Enrico Fermi and Edward Teller on Nuclear Reactors. He was one of the first 50 scientists recruited to work at Los Alamos National Laboratory. After World War II, and a short spell in academia, he went back to Los Alamos in 1948 to lead the group in the Theoretical Division that designed and built the MANIAC I computer in 1952. Among his team included John von Neumann and Stanislaw Ulam. The group developed the Monte Carlo method (named in reference to a colleague's relative's love for the casinos of Monte Carlo). Monte Carlo methods are a popular class of computational algorithms that rely on repeated random sampling to compute their results. In 1953 Metropolis co-authored the first paper on a technique that was central to the method now known as simulated annea ...
Today I am remembering my father, Arthur Roberts, who died at age 92 of Alzheimer's 8 years ago. Bill Butler is unaware that his father's chance of survival on D-Day was boosted by my father's wartime top-secret research, which got me thinking that I should post this remembrance today. A high-energy physicist, he knew everyone working on the Manhattan Project during WWII. He considered himself lucky to be assigned to another top-secret military project, with none of the anguish suffered by his friends, like Robert J Oppenheimer and Enrico Fermi, after the A-bomb was dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. My father worked on improving radar to help protect Great Britain from Nazi invasion, and succeeded in inventing "Radar Beacons", which actually may have been pivotal in the success of the Normandy Invasion. For most of the war, radar was so imperfect that aircraft were blind during nighttime without moonlight. The radar beacons were ready for deployment just before D-day. We dropped them to the French ...
I'm just finishing "The Manhattan Project" by Stephane Groueff. It's full of what to me are fascinating "details" of the work of the Manhattan Project. One example to share is the engineering for the atomic "piles" that were used to produce the plutonium for what ultimately became the Nagasaki bomb. The scientists ("longhairs") such as Enrico Fermi had calculated exactly how much uranium was needed to get the chain reaction needed for the plutonium production. However, when the contract for the design of the plant was given to DuPoint, their lead engineer, George Graves, loudly refused to follow the exact specs for the pile and instead added a typical engineer's "fudge factor". As it turned out when the pile was first set critical, it started up fine, but then shortly shut itself down with what was later determined to be 'poisoning' by xenon-125. The ultimate work around that got things going was adding yet more uranium to the pile, making use of the fudge factor that George Graves had put into plac ...
In 1943 Oppenheimer was appointed director of the Manhattan Project where he worked with Edward Teller, Enrico Fermi, David Bohm, James Franck, Emilio Segre, Felix Bloch, Rudolf Peierls, James Chadwick, Otto Frisch, Eugene Wigner, Leo Szilard and Klaus Fuchs in developing the atom bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
THE LITTLE BOY; WAS THE MOST POWERFUL BOY OF THE WORLD. NO MORE HIROSHIMA Deadly Mushroom Cloud over Hiroshima On August 6, 1945, during World War II, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, a Japanese city and military center. About 130,000 people were reported killed, injured, or missing. Another 177,000 were made homeless. It was the first atomic bomb used against an enemy. Nuclear explosives, on the other hand, involve energy sources within the core, or nucleus, of the atom. The A-bomb gained its power from the splitting, or fission, of all the atomic nuclei in several kilograms of plutonium. A sphere about the size of a baseball produced an explosion equal to 20,000 tons of TNT. The A-bomb was developed, constructed, and tested by the Manhattan Project, a massive United States enterprise that was established in August 1942, during World War II. Many prominent American scientists including the physicists Enrico Fermi and J. Robert Oppenheimer, and the chemist Harold Urey, were associate ...
Absolute genius! Enrico Fermi (Rome, September 29, 1901 - Chicago, November 29, 1954) was an Italian physicist, born American [1]. It is one of the most famous scientists in the world mainly for theoretical and experimental studies in quantum mechanics and, more generally, of nuclear physics. Among the most important contributions we can mention the theory of β decay, the Fermi-Dirac quantum statistics and results for nuclear interactions. In his honor, was given the name to an element of the periodic table, fermium (symbol Fm), to a sub-meter commonly used in atomic and nuclear physics, the device [2], as well as one of the two classes of particles of statistics quantum fermions. He designed and led the construction of the first nuclear fission reactor, which produced the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. Was one of the technical directors of the Manhattan Project, which led to the creation of the atomic bomb in Los Alamos. It was also among the first to become interested in the potential of nume ...
Knew my uncle Bob worked on Manhattan Project. Never knew he worked at Hanford Site or personally knew Enrico Fermi! Cool. :)
Stagg Field Amos Alonzo Stagg Field is the name of two different football fields for the University of Chicago. The earliest Stagg Field is probably best remembered for its role in a landmark scientific achievement by Enrico Fermi during the Manhattan Project. The site of the first nuclear reaction received designation as a National Historic Landmark on February 18, 1965.[1] On October 15, 1966, which is the day that the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 was enacted creating the National Register of Historic Places, it was added to that as well.[2] The site was named a Chicago Landmark on October 27, 1971.[3] First nuclear chain reaction Main article: Chicago Pile-1 On December 2, 1942 about forty people watched Enrico Fermi and his team set off the first nuclear chain reaction at Chicago Pile-1 in a racquets court under the west stands of the abandoned stadium.[4] The old Stagg Field plot of land is currently home to the Regenstein Library. A Henry Moore sculpture, Nuclear Energy, in a small qua ...
Gregory or Dominic, did either of you ever meet Dr. Robert Christy @ the University of California ? He passed away on Wednesday. PASADENA, Calif. (AP) -- Robert F. Christy, a former California Institute of Technology professor who helped design the trigger mechanism for the atomic bombs used in World War II, died Wednesday. He was 96. Christy died of natural causes at his home in Pasadena, surrounded by his family, according to Caltech spokeswoman Deborah Williams-Hedges. Christy was one of the early recruits to the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos Laboratory, a U.S. government research project to develop atomic weapons during the war. He was hand-picked to join by his University of California, Berkeley, professor J. Robert Oppenheimer, with whom Christy studied quantum mechanics. The Canadian native devised what came to be known as the Christy bomb or Christy gadget, a plutonium implosion device. Born in Vancouver, Christy showed mathematical prowess early in his schooling and skipped grades to graduate ...
Who Invented the Atomic Bomb? Federal funding of science exceeds 70 billion dollars a year–$250 for every man woman and child in the United States. The almost blind acceptance of Establishment Science as the only right way to create inventions and discoveries is based in large part on the Manhattan Project and the invention of the Atomic Bomb. But how many people can name the maverick inventor of the Atomic Bomb and the Nuclear Reactor? I ask this question often; few know the answer. Some answers are: Robert Oppenheimer. This is the most common answer. Oppenheimer was the brilliant theoretical physicist who headed the Manhattan Project, but he did not invent the bomb. When Oppenheimer was told in 1939 that uranium had been split, releasing more energy than it absorbed, he gave a brilliant one-hour extemporaneous explanation of how it was impossible. He did change his mind when he later was faced with irrefutable evidence. No, it was not this establishment scientist. Enrico Fermi. This is a common answer ...
The Atomic Archive explores the complex history surrounding the invention of the atomic bomb. Follow a timeline that takes you down the path of our nuclear past to the present. Read biographies of A-bomb father Robert Oppenheimer and Enrico Fermi's dispassionate account of the Trinity Test. Examine ...
July 16, 1945 - This Day in Our History - Atom bomb successfully tested On this day in 1945, at 5:29:45 a.m., the Manhattan Project comes to an explosive end as the first atom bomb is successfully tested in Alamogordo, New Mexico. Plans for the creation of a uranium bomb by the Allies were established as early as 1939, when Italian emigre physicist Enrico Fermi met with U.S. Navy department officials at Columbia University to discuss the use of fissionable materials for military purposes. That same year, Albert Einstein wrote to President Franklin Roosevelt supporting the theory that an uncontrolled nuclear chain reaction had great potential as a basis for a weapon of mass destruction. In February 1940, the federal government granted a total of $6,000 for research. But in early 1942, with the United States now at war with the Axis powers, and fear mounting that Germany was working on its own uranium bomb, the War Department took a more active interest, and limits on resources for the project were removed. ...
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