Constitutional Convention & Patrick Henry

A constitutional convention is now a gathering for the purpose of writing a new constitution or revising an existing constitution. Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was an orator and politician who led the movement for independence in Virginia in the 1770s. 5.0/5

Constitutional Convention Patrick Henry Thomas Jefferson United States Samuel Adams James Madison John Adams American Revolution George Washington Revolutionary War Richard Henry Lee Rhode Island John Hancock George Mason Alexander Hamilton Continental Congress Jonathan Dayton

Patrick Henry “smelt a rat in Philadelphia, tending toward the monarchy” and skipped 1787 Constitutional Convention.
Patrick Henry was elected as a delegate to the Constitutional Convention, but declined, because he “smelt a rat.”
Patrick Henry did not attend the Constitutional Convention because he feared its results would actually be a step away from Liberty...
Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Samuel Adams, and Patrick Henry did not attend the Constitutional Convention of 1787.
If you really want to know how the United States started to develop a monolithic government you should look from the beginning of this nation. When the Constitutional Convention was taking place there were the federalists and the anti-federalists. They debated back and forth on what nation they would set up. The anti-federalists like Patrick Henry were vehemently against The Constitution and had said that it would let government grow. The federalists like Alexander Hamilton said The Constitution will not let government grow. Turns out the anti-federalists were right! Now the United States has a government that is leviathan in nature and out of control. Not only that, but during the Lincoln administration government grew the most, and instead of freeing all the slaves, the Emancipation Proclamation made everyone a slave to the United State Federal Government while launching the most unnecessary war amongst the people. Then as the progressive era came with FDR's administration, Woodrow Wilson's administrat ...
After the Constitutional Convention the Constitution still needed to be ratified by the states. At the time of the ratification process in Virginia it was pretty apparent that the Constitution was going to be adopted if Virginia ratified it. Patrick Henry was either dead set against it. He felt that our rights would be forfeit quickly under what was presented. He railed against it for days, while many pushed for it, particularly James Madison. When the vote was counted it was ratified. Madison was celebrating. And yet all Henry's arguments along with all the amendments that that Henry said were necessary at a minimum to preserve our rights reverberated in Madison's head. Thus was born the Bill of Rights. Even though it was added as the first 10 amendments instead of drafted to the original Constitution.
“The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.” Fourth Amendment, United States Constitution After a long, arduous task where every word was examined from every angle and its relation or impact on every word(s) proceeding and following, an incredible document emerged that Summer of 1787: The Constitution of The United States. Two years later, ratification by the States was secured but not without concerns, questions and even strong objections. Most notable among those in opposition was Patrick Henry. Before accepting the premise of The Constitution, he agitated, as did others, for a bill of particulars that spelled out ‘rights’ for The People, for whom The Constitution was written. In securing his demand, The Bill o ...
Who did not attend the Constitutional Convention in 1787? On May 27, 1787 there were enough delegates in attendance to begin the convention. There were fifty-five delegates from twelve states that would attend at one time or another. However, not in attendance were some notable names in American History. Thomas Jefferson and John Adams did not attend. Each was abroad on missions for the country. Also missing were Patrick Henry who "smelled a rat" and stayed home, Virginia orator Richard Henry Lee did not attend, pamphleteer Thomas Paine failed to appear and Samuel Adams remained away. Of the participants only one was a full-time, articulate, continually influential participant in the convention that wrote the nation's Constitution: James Madison. * Miller, William Lee, The Business of May Next bj
George Washington, "First in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of hi countrymen." Emerging as the most significant leader in the founding of the United States, he was an essentially, the American Moses, the Father of the Country. At the three crossroads in the establishment of the nation, he led our troops to victory in the Revolutionary War, superintended the Constitutional Convention and was unanimously elected the first President . How can such greatness be embodied in one man? Washington was surrounded by a host of other courageous leaders, brilliant thinkers, passionate orators, and gifted writers -- Franklin, Jefferson, Patrick Henry, Samuel Adams, Hamilton, Madison -- almost all of whom were far more privateers he. Yet Washington always led the way. While much has often been made of his physical stature (six feet two) And his courage, charisma, energy, vision, and calm demeanor, it was his moral character most historical sources commonly cite as the reason for his emergence. Combine his ...
The Concerns Anti-Federalists have come to be. Patrick Henry refused to attend Constitutional Convention "I smell a rat"
"Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect every one who approaches that jewel. Unfortunately, nothing will preserve it but downright force. Whenever you give up that force, you are inevitably ruined." - Patrick Henry, Governor, Patriot Leader "...when the resolution of enslaving America was formed in Great-Britain, the British parliament was advised...to disarm the people. That it was the best and most effectual way to enslave them. But that they should not do it openly; but to weaken them and let them sink gradually." - George Mason, Delegate to the Constitutional Convention and 'Father of The Bill of Rights'
by the way.a bill to explicity remove a prohibition against the federal government printing of paper money from the Constitution was voted in favor at the Constitutional Convention. In other words, it was in there originally, but was removed before final passage. James Madison mentions in one of the footnotes of his Federalist Papers that the states woudl be prevented from doing so, and that it was a great thing. Patrick Henry saw it as one of the greatest evils possible, and Alexander Hamilton, of course, as the nation's first banker and Treasury Secretary, was in favor of paper money. So we are left to infer today that since 9 states voted to remove the passage prohibiting the federal government from printing paper money, that they did not intend to put that restriction on; to leave it open to possibility. The authority today is deemed to derive from the Necessary and Proper clause: "To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the [enumerated] Powers, and all other P ...
"He [Patrick Henry] boycotted the Constitutional Convention of 1787 because, as he so eloquently put it, "I smell a rat " and suspected the worst: that the i...
Patrick Henry refused to attend the Constitutional Convention, and genuinely democratic patriots such as George Mason, Luther Martin, John Francis Mercer, and Elbridge Gerry participated in the convention but refused to sign the new constitution because it lacked a Bill of Rights, provided ina...
George Mason IV (December 11, 1725 – October 7, 1792) was an American Patriot, statesman and a delegate from Virginia to the U.S. Constitutional Convention. Along with James Madison, he is called the "Father of the Bill of Rights."[1][2][3][4] For these reasons he is considered one of the "Founding Fathers" of the United States.[5][6] Like anti-federalist Patrick Henry, Mason was a leader of tho...
Enough already, Please study your American History before commenting: States versus federal rights. Since the time of the Revolution, two camps emerged: those arguing for greater states rights and those arguing that the federal government needed to have more control. The first organized government in the US after the American Revolution was under the Articles of Confederation. The thirteen states formed a loose confederation with a very weak federal government. However, when problems arose, the weakness of this form of government caused the leaders of the time to come together at the Constitutional Convention and create, in secret, the US Constitution. Strong proponents of states rights like Thomas Jefferson and Patrick Henry were not present at this meeting. Many felt that the new constitution ignored the rights of states to continue to act independently. They felt that the states should still have the right to decide if they were willing to accept certain federal acts. This resulted in the idea of nulli ...
The only problem I see with Southern "rights" under the US Constitution & expecting to be treated fairly & equitably as a matter of the rule of law is that Patrick Henry was right in "smelling the rat" at the Constitutional Convention. The statists were willing then, and especially now, to subvert the Constitution for the benefit of the ruling elite.
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