Constitutional Convention & New York

A constitutional convention is now a gathering for the purpose of writing a new constitution or revising an existing constitution. New York (locally ) is a state in the Northeastern region of the United States. New York is the 27th-most extensive, the 3rd-most populous, and the 7th-most densely populated of the 50 United States. 5.0/5

Constitutional Convention New York United States West Point Alexander Hamilton James Madison John Rutledge Civil War Baton Rouge South Carolina Mississippi River American Revolutionary War George Washington American Revolution American Civil War Rufus King Fort Stanwix

NEW Proceedings of the Constitutional Convention of the State of New York by Pap
This day from the past, September 17th, is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 105 days remaining until the end of the year. → 1778 - Indians and Loyalists burn German Flats, New York. At 6 a.m. on this day in 1778, Mohawk Indian chief and British Loyalist leader Joseph Brant leads a force of 150 Iroquois Indians and 300 British Loyalists under the command of Captain William Caldwell in a surprise attack on the area of German Flats, New York. German Flats, now known as Herkimer, New York, was left virtually undefended by Patriot troops prior to the raid. → 1787 - The Constitution of the United States of America was signed by delegates from twelve states at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, PA. The U.S. Constitution is the world’s oldest working Constitution. → 1814 – Francis Scott Key finishes his poem "Defence of Fort Mchenry", later to be the lyrics of "The Star-Spangled Banner". → 1822 - Rosetta Stone deciphered → 1854 – Davi ...
Today in History, August 6: 1284 – The Republic of Pisa is defeated in the Battle of Meloria by the Republic of Genoa, thus losing its naval dominance in the Mediterranean. 1661 – The Treaty of The Hague is signed by Portugal and the Dutch Republic. 1777 – American Revolutionary War: The bloody Battle of Oriskany prevents American relief of the Siege of Fort Stanwix. 1787 – Sixty proof sheets of the Constitution of the United States are delivered to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 1806 – Francis II, the last Holy Roman Emperor, abdicates ending the Holy Roman Empire. 1862 – American Civil War: The Confederate ironclad CSS Arkansas is scuttled on the Mississippi River after suffering catastrophic engine failure near Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 1870 – Franco-Prussian War: The Battle of Spicheren and the Battle of Wörth are fought, resulting in Prussian victories. 1890 – At Auburn Prison in New York, murderer William Kemmler becomes the first person to be executed by ...
This Day in History - March 16th, 1751: "James Madison, drafter of the Constitution, recorder of the Constitutional Convention, author of the Federalist Papers and fourth president of the United States, is born on a plantation in Virginia." --History. 1802: "The United States Military Academy--the first military school in the United States--is founded by Congress for the purpose of educating and training young men in the theory and practice of military science. Located at West Point, New York, the U.S. Military Academy is often simply known as West Point." --History. 1850: "The Scarlet Letter, Nathaniel Hawthorne's story of adultery in colonial times, is published." --Bio. Today's "This Day in History" was provided by HISTORY and BIO. If you'd like to learn more, we can help!
1789; The first session of the U.S. Congress is held in New York City as the U.S. Constitution takes effect. However, of the 22 senators and 59 representatives called to represent the 11 states who had ratified the document, only nine senators and 13 representatives showed up to begin negotiations for its amendment. In 1786, defects in the Articles of Confederation became apparent, such as the lack of central authority over foreign and domestic commerce and the inability of Congress to levy taxes, leading Congress to endorse a plan to draft a new constitution. On September 17, 1787, at the conclusion of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, the new U.S. Constitution, creating a strong Federal Government with an intricate system of checks and balances, was signed by 38 of 41 delegates to the convention. As dictated by Article VII, the document would not become binding until it was ratified by nine of the 13 states. The Constitution was thus sent to the state legislatures, and beginning on December ...
Today is Friday, January 31, 2014 Today in American Revolutionary War History 1752 - Patriot Gouverneur Morris was born in New York. At the Constitutional Convention of 1787 he represented Pennsylvania. He served as an ambassador to France from 1792-1794 and was a senator from New York from 1800-1803. Revolutionary War Quotes "I think the first duty of society is justice." Alexander Hamilton
On This Day In History. On this day in 1752, future Patriot Gouverneur Morris is born to the wealthy Morris family of New York. Gouverneur Morris began his political activities in support of the Patriot cause as a representative to New York's Provincial Congress beginning in 1775, seven years after his graduation from King's College (now Columbia University). An early supporter of independence, Morris began to shape the new national government in 1781, when he assumed the post of assistant superintendent of finance for the Confederation. In that capacity, Morris worked with Superintendent Robert Morris (no relation) to urge an expansion of federal powers and proposed that the new nation adopt a new decimal currency modeled on the Spanish dollar. The two men urged Congress to create the Bank of North America, which would allow them to issue new money. Morris' passion for a strong Federal Government found frequent voice during the Constitutional Convention of 1787, at which he represented Pennsylvania. Morr ...
January 26, 1814...Rufus King (January 26 or July 26, 1814, New York, NY – October 13, 1876, New York, NY) was a newspaper editor, educator, U.S. diplomat, and a Union brigadier general in the Civil War. King was the grandson of Rufus King, delegate for Massachusetts to the Continental Congress and the Constitutional Convention. After graduation from Columbia College, where his father, Charles King, served as president, King enrolled in the United States Military Academy at West Point. King graduated near the top of his class, and was appointed to the engineer corps in 1833. He resigned his commission in 1836. After a short time with the New York and Erie Railroad, King served as the associate editor for two newspapers, the Albany Evening Journal and the Albany Advertiser (1841–45). At this point, he left New York and moved to the Wisconsin Territory, accomplishing a mixture of politics (member of the 1848 Wisconsin constitutional convention), journalism (part owner of the Milwaukee Sentinel and Gaze ...
Wyman Menzer From someone elses status, but I like it! Anyone hear about the *** Democrat from, I think New York, who has introduced some bill that, if passed, will do away with term limits? Is this true? Help me on this one. And they keep poking at the snake... 35 States so Far... Governors of 35 states have filed suit against the Federal Government for imposing unlawful burdens upon them. It only takes 38 (of the 50) States to convene a Constitutional Convention. This will take less than thirty seconds to read. If you agree, please pass it on. This is an idea that we should address. For too long we have been too complacent about the workings of Congress. Many citizens had no idea that members of Congress could retire with the same pay after only one term, that they specifically exempted themselves from many of the laws they have passed (such as being exempt from any fear of prosecution for sexual harassment) while ordinary citizens must live under those laws. The latest is to exempt themselves from ...
Q. Who actually wrote the Constitution? A. In none of the relatively meager records of the Constitutional Convention is the literary authorship of any part of the Constitution definitely established. The deputies debated proposed plans until, on July 24, 1787, substantial agreement having been reached, a Committee of Detail was appointed, consisting of John Rutledge, of South Carolina; Edmund Randolph, of Virginia; Nathaniel Gorham, of Massachusetts; Oliver Ellsworth, of Connecticut; and James Wilson, of Pennsylvania, who on August 6 reported a draft which included a Preamble and twenty-three articles, embodying fifty-seven sections. Debate continued until September 8, when a new Committee of Style was named to revise the draft. This committee included William Samuel Johnson, of Connecticut; Alexander Hamilton, of New York; Gouverneur Morris, of Pennsylvania; James Madison, of Virginia; and Rufus King, of Massachusetts, and they reported the draft in approximately its final shape on September 12. The actu ...
The Cuomos and "Plantation Politics" © By Alton H. Maddox, Jr. If I had walked into a courtroom armed with the U.S. Constitution like virtually all other attorneys in New York instead of the "Art of War", I would have left behind a lot of casualties in courtrooms. My mission was to save lives and not to make sure that my client only received due process of law. When I was in law school, I was told that the U.S. Constitution and all statutes should be construed according to "original intent". Black people were not allowed to enter polling booths en masse until 1965. The same was true of the jury box. In the meantime, Blacks in New York were subject to "Tammany Hall". The badges of "Tammany Hall" are still evident. In the 1821 Constitutional Convention, "Tammany Hall" gave white males universal suffrage while Black males were subject to a timocracy. This was unrealistic since Black males had just been emancipated but not liberated. They had no wealth. It has never been the intent of white males in N ...
Regarding states Rights and secession: Nowhere in the Constitution is there any mention of the union of the states being permanent. This was not an oversight by any means. Indeed, when New York, Rhode Island, and Virginia ratified the Constitution, they specifically stated that they reserved the right to resume the governmental powers granted to the United States. Their claim to the right of secession was understood and agreed to by the other ratifiers, including George Washington, who presided over the Constitutional Convention and was also a delegate from Virginia. In his book Life of Webster Sen. Henry Cabot Lodge writes, "It is safe to say that there was not a man in the country, from Washington and Hamilton to Clinton and Mason, who did not regard the new system as an experiment from which each and every State had a right to peaceably withdraw." A textbook used at West Point before the Civil War, A View of the Constitution, written by Judge William Rawle, states, "The secession of a State depends on ...
October 27, 1787 Anniversary of the first publication of the Federalist Papers The Federalist Papers, were a series of 85 essays written by Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison between October 1787 and May 1788. The essays were published anonymously, under the pen name "Publius," primarily in two New York state newspapers of the time: The New York Packet and The Independent Journal. They were written to urge citizens of New York to support ratification of the proposed United States Constitution. Significantly, the essays explain particular provisions of the Constitution in detail. It is for this reason, and because Hamilton and Madison were members of the Constitutional Convention, that the Federalist Papers are often used today to help understand the intentions of those drafting the Constitution. A bound edition of the essays, with revisions and corrections by Hamilton, was published in 1788 by printers J. and A. McLean. A later edition, published by printer Jacob Gideon in 1818, with revision ...
On this day in Black History: In 1868, B.F. Randolph was assassinated in South Carolina. Benjamin Franklin Randolph was born free in Kentucky in 1820. He attended school in Warren County, Ohio, then Oberlin College from 1857 to 1862. Randolph was ordained as a Methodist minister. In 1864 and became a chaplain of the 26th U.S. Colored Troops Regiment on Riker's Island, New York. His Regiment was quickly transferred to Hilton Head Island. After the war he remained in the state and worked for the American Missionary Association. Soon he was active in politics. He attended the Colored People's Convention in Charleston in 1865. He was employed as an assistant school superintendent for the Freedmen's Bureau and edited two black newspapers in Charleston. He was elected to represent Orangeburg County at the Constitutional Convention of 1868. He supported the right to vote for blacks, but would have denied the vote to people who were illiterate or who could not pay the poll tax. His fellow delegates, however, reje ...
The Iroquois nations' political confederacy and democratic government under the Great Law of Peace have been credited as influences on the Articles of Confederation and the United States Constitution.[14] Relations had long been close, as from the beginning the colonial English needed allies against New France. Prominent figures such as Thomas Jefferson in colonial Virginia and Benjamin Franklin in colonial Pennsylvania, two colonies whose territorial claims extended into Iroquois territory, were involved with leaders of the New York-based Iroquois Confederacy.[15] In the 1750s at the Albany Congress, Franklin called for "some kind of union" of English colonies to effectively deal with Amerindian tribes.[16] John Rutledge (SC) quoted Iroquoian law to the Constitutional Convention, "We, the people, to form a union, to establish peace, equity, and order..." [17] The Iroquois experience with confederacy was both a model and a cautionary tale. Their "Grand Council" had no coercive control over the constituent ...
Brief History lesson for my friends in Virginia. Contrary to popular belief Slavery was NOT the main reason behind the Civil War. Since the time of the Revolution (1776), two camps emerged: those arguing for greater states rights and those arguing that the Federal Government needed to have more control. The first organized government in the US after the American Revolution was under the Articles of Confederation. The thirteen states formed a loose confederation with a very weak Federal Government. However, when problems arose, the weakness of this form of government caused the leaders of the time to come together at the Constitutional Convention and create, in secret, the US Constitution. Strong proponents of states rights like Thomas Jefferson and Patrick Henry were not present at this meeting. Many felt that the new constitution ignored the rights of states to continue to act independently. (Remember my earlier posting on autonomous States? Virginia was as New York was as France was as England?) They fe ...
1787 - Delegates to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia reached a critical day in the proceedings, which threatened to break up over the question of representation of states in the proposed national government. Days earlier, Georgia delegate Abraham Baldwin had played a pivotal role in arriving at a compromise where one house would be based on population and the other on equality of the states. 1828 - Georgia politician William Few died in Fishkill-on-the-Hudson, New York. In 1973, Few's body was returned to Georgia, where he was re-interred on the grounds of St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Augusta, with a marble monument marking his grave site. 1905 - Former Confederate Gen. Bryan Morel Thomas died in Dalton, Georgia.
today is Cookie Monsters Birthday (born in 1966), National Wigout Day , Nerd & Geek Pride Day. Mike Myers (waynes world & Shrek) is 49, Frank Oz (voice of Miss Piggy, Fozzie Bear & Yoda) is 68. on this day in 1787 George Washington presided over opening of Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. 1844 Stuart Perry patented the gasoline engine. 1927 Ford Motor Co. announced Model A would replace Model T. 1935 Babe Ruth hit his 714th & final homerun, a record that stood for 39 yrs. 1969 Midnight Cowboy (originally rated X) starring Dustin Hoffman had world premier in New York
It's peculiar and unnerving in a way to see so many young people walking around with so wrapped up in media. It robs them of their self-identity. Bob Dylan, 2009 May 14 Birthdays 1993 - Miranda Cosgrove 1984 - Mark Zuckerberg 1979 - Dan Auerbach 1976 - Martine McCutcheon 1969 - Cate Blanchett 1969 - Danny Wood 1965 - Jose Da Silveira 1961 - Tim Roth 1952 - David Byrne 1951 - Robert Zemeckis 1944 - George Lucas 1943 - Jack Bruce 1936 - Bobby Darin 1933 - Laszlo Kovacs 1885 - Otto Klemperer 1727 - Thomas Gainsborough May 14 In History 1973 - Skylab, the American space station and laboratory, is first launched into space. 1904 - The first Olympics in the US are held in St. Louis. 1796 - The first smallpox inoculation was administered by Edward Jenner. 1787 - Delegates convene for a Constitutional Convention, to write a new Constitution of the United States. 1643 - Louis XIV, at four years old, ascends to throne as King of France after death of his father. This Day in Business 1913 - The governor of New York ...
National Day of Prayer - May 3, 2012 Add your faith to ours and begin now praying this Prayer of Agreement over the Thursday, May 3, National Day of Prayer. I’ve included some history that the Holy Spirit brought to our remembrance regarding the foundation of our nation. It’s so relevant it could be a picture of our Congress today and the perplexing situations we find our nation in. This direction came by the Holy Spirit through Pastor Lynne Hammond and Pastor Vicki Shearin during a recent time of prayer together. It was such a good word that I want to use it as our point of agreement for the National Day of Prayer. David Barton's book, "America: to Pray or Not to Pray" says this about the Constitutional Convention of 1787: “The early portion of the Convention had been marred by dissension, hopeless deadlocks and each state's unyielding adherence to its own selfish desires. The Convention manifested all the markings of a complete failure. A portion of the New York delegation had already departed in ...
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