Constitutional Convention & James Madison

A constitutional convention is now a gathering for the purpose of writing a new constitution or revising an existing constitution. James Madison, Jr. (March 16, 1751 (O.S. March 5)  – June 28, 1836) was an American statesman and political theorist, the fourth President of the United States (1809–1817). 5.0/5

Constitutional Convention James Madison Alexander Hamilton United States Federalist Papers Thomas Jefferson George Washington New Jersey Patrick Henry Princeton University Founding Fathers Continental Congress Religious Freedom Virginia Declaration James Wilson John Jay

On this day at the Constitutional Convention of 1787, James Madison declared that if the federal…
OK Senate hearing about how Dolly Madison published James Madison's secret notes of the Constitutional Convention
THE FAITH OF OUR FOREFATHERS CHAPTER SIX Gunning Bedford Jr. 1747 – 1812 Military Officer; Member of the Contiental Congress; Signer of the Constitution and Federal Judge. Bedford was born in 1747 at Philadelphia and reared there. The fifth of seven children, he was descended from a distinguished family that originally settled in Jamestown, VA. He usually referred to himself as Gunning Bedford, Jr., to avoid confusion with his cousin and contemporary Delaware statesman and soldier, Col. Gunning Bedford. In 1771 signer Bedford graduated with honors from the College of New Jersey (later Princeton), where he was a classmate of James Madison. Apparently while still in school, Bedford wed Jane B. Parker, who bore at least one daughter. After reading law with Joseph Read in Philadelphia, Bedford won admittance to the bar and set up a practice. Subsequently, he moved to Dover and then to Wilmington. He apparently served in the Continental Army, possibly as an aide to General Washington. Following the war, Bedf ...
"A knowledge of mankind and of legislative affairs cannot be presumed to belong in a higher degree to the Judges than to the Legislature." - Luther Martin, United States Founding Father, Member of the Constitutional Convention, Non Signer of the Constitution, Madison, "The Papers of James Madison", Henry D. Gilpin, editor (Washington: Langtree & O’Sullivan, 1840), Vol. II, p. 1166, Luther Martin during the debates of Saturday, July 21, 1787. Commenting that Congress had a right to determine what was Constitutional as much as the Supreme Court.
This Saturday (June 28), marks the 227th anniversary of Founding Father Benjamin Franklin calling the Constitutional Convention to prayer after several weeks of difficult discussions and frequent impasses. The Founders well understood the need to seek God and the important part that God played both in establishing this nation and in the writing of the Constitution. As Alexander Hamilton reported after its completion: For my own part, I sincerely esteem it a system which without the finger of God [Luke 11:20] never could have been suggested and agreed upon by such a diversity of interests. James Madison agreed, and reported: It is impossible for the man of pious reflection not to perceive in it the finger of that Almighty Hand which has been so frequently and signally extended to our relief in the critical stages of the Revolution. As far as these delegates were concerned, the finger of God – that is, His Divine power – had guided their writing of the Constitution. Benjamin Franklin also believed this ...
On this day in 1836, James Madison, drafter of the Constitution, recorder of the Constitutional Convention, author of the "Federalist Papers" and fourth president of the United States, dies on his tobacco plantation in Virginia. Madison first distinguished himself as a student at the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), where he successfully completed a four-year course of study in two years and, in 1769, helped found the American Whig Society, the second literary and debate society at Princeton (and the world), to rival the previously established Cliosophic Society. Madison returned to Virginia with intellectual accolades but poor health in 1771. By 1776, he was sufficiently recovered to serve for three years in the legislature of the new state of Virginia, where he came to know and admire Thomas Jefferson. In this capacity, he assisted with the drafting of the Virginia Declaration of Religious Freedom and the critical decision for Virginia to cede its western claims to the Continental Congr ...
After the Constitutional Convention the Constitution still needed to be ratified by the states. At the time of the ratification process in Virginia it was pretty apparent that the Constitution was going to be adopted if Virginia ratified it. Patrick Henry was either dead set against it. He felt that our rights would be forfeit quickly under what was presented. He railed against it for days, while many pushed for it, particularly James Madison. When the vote was counted it was ratified. Madison was celebrating. And yet all Henry's arguments along with all the amendments that that Henry said were necessary at a minimum to preserve our rights reverberated in Madison's head. Thus was born the Bill of Rights. Even though it was added as the first 10 amendments instead of drafted to the original Constitution.
Don't forget it was Baptist Preachers who gave us our Bill of Rights ! Men like Isaac Baacus, John Leland, Roger Williams and others They got tired of when they were Preaching Jesus and the Word of God with passion that the authorities were putting them in jail. they appealed to James Madison and Thomas Jefferson and the Delegates to the Constitutional Convention to add the Bill of Rights !
Who did not attend the Constitutional Convention in 1787? On May 27, 1787 there were enough delegates in attendance to begin the convention. There were fifty-five delegates from twelve states that would attend at one time or another. However, not in attendance were some notable names in American history. Thomas Jefferson and John Adams did not attend. Each was abroad on missions for the country. Also missing were Patrick Henry who "smelled a rat" and stayed home, Virginia orator Richard Henry Lee did not attend, pamphleteer Thomas Paine failed to appear and Samuel Adams remained away. Of the participants only one was a full-time, articulate, continually influential participant in the convention that wrote the nation's Constitution: James Madison. * Miller, William Lee, The Business of May Next bj
Excerpted from Jim Geraghty, Morning Jolt ... Why, it's almost as if the Founding Fathers wanted it to be tough to pass broad, sweeping laws that make dramatic changes without a broad consensus! A key goal of the framers was to create a Senate differently constituted from the House so it would be less subject to popular passions and impulses. "The use of the Senate," wrote James Madison in Notes of Debates in the Federal Convention of 1787, "is to consist in its proceedings with more coolness, with more system and with more wisdom, than the popular branch." An oft-quoted story about the "coolness" of the Senate involves George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, who was in France during the Constitutional Convention. Upon his return, Jefferson visited Washington and asked why the Convention delegates had created a Senate. "Why did you pour that tea into your saucer?" asked Washington. "To cool it," said Jefferson. "Even so," responded Washington, "we pour legislation into the senatorial saucer to cool it." W ...
A More Perfect Union: The Creation of the U.S. Constitution May 25, 1787, Freshly spread dirt covered the cobblestone street in front of the Pennsylvania State House, protecting the men inside from the sound of passing carriages and carts. Guards stood at the entrances to ensure that the curious were kept at a distance. Robert Morris of Pennsylvania, the "financier" of the Revolution, opened the proceedings with a nomination--Gen. George Washington for the presidency of the Constitutional Convention. The vote was unanimous. With characteristic ceremonial modesty, the general expressed his embarrassment at his lack of qualifications to preside over such an august body and apologized for any errors into which he might fall in the course of its deliberations. To many of those assembled, especially to the small, boyish-looking, 36-year-old delegate from Virginia, James Madison, the general's mere presence boded well for the convention, for the illustrious Washington gave to the gathering an air of importance ...
Call a Constitutional Convention, Already! Article V: A gift from the founders. By Allen Mendenhall – 3.14.14 We've talked endlessly about using a Constitutional convention to wrest the reins of government from entrenched interests and put them back in the hands of the people. Enough talk: It's time to put the theory into action. To recap, the Constitution may be amended in two ways: by a two-thirds vote of Congress, or by a convention called by two-thirds (34) of the (50) state legislatures. All amendments to date have arisen through the first mechanism, although conservatives and libertarians increasingly are calling for state lawmakers to pursue the second. If 34 states pass convention measures, Congress must convene a convention to discuss amending the constitution. In the words of James Madison, who was instrumental to the drafting of Article V, "If two thirds of the States make application, Congress cannot refuse to call one." Even the centralizer Alexander Hamilton conceded that the wording of Ar ...
James Madison's birthday is on Sunday, March 16. Celebrate by reading his notes on the Constitutional Convention:
Unit One Study Guide: Constitutional Underpinnings • What does the text state is “inextricably intertwined with political purpose? • Individuals have power when they are able to … ? • How does the government’s involvement in the everyday lives of Americans in the 1990s Compare with role during 1950s, • Formal authority refers to a right to exercise power that is derived from ? • What is the primary source of legitimate political authority in the United States today? • The pluralist view of power believes that power is held by…? • With whom is the bureaucratic view of political elites most associated • Karl Marx is associated with the view of elites? • Under what circumstances would majoritarian politics normally not be effective? • In terms of goals, the American Revolution differs for the French and Chinese Revolutions because it focused on ? • Why was the Constitutional Convention of 1787 called? • Where did Shay’s Rebellion take place? • In which notable Federalist . ...
On this day in 1787, James Madison spoke at the Constitutional Convention and said, "All men having power ought...
Missouri Gov. Nixon seems confused about history... In his veto letter for the Second Amendment Preservation Act, he says the Supremacy Clause was "an idea derived from Alexander Hamilton's Federalist Paper No. 33 and James Madison's Federalist Paper No. 44". Humm... The Constitution was completed and signed by the delegates at the Constitutional Convention on Sept. 17, A.D. 1787 and Federalist 33 & 44 were published Jan. 2nd, & 25, 1788, respectively. How could they have gotten the idea for the Supremacy Clause from documents that didn't exist for another 3 1/2 to 4 months? What else might the governor be missing? How about the argument Hamilton used to convince the People to ratify the proposed constitution. He said, "the laws of Congress are restricted to a certain sphere, and when they depart from this sphere, **they are no longer supreme or binding**” (Alexander Hamilton, at New York’s ratifying convention).
I am a Theocrat and a Kinist. I Hate Democracy and Equality. MARCH 3, 2013 BY ADMIN 1 COMMENT I agree with John Randolph of Roanoke, whose most famous saying was: “I am an aristocrat. I love liberty, I hate equality.” Russell Kirk called Randolph “a genius, the prophet of Southern nationalism, and the architect of Southern conservatism.” “Inequality will exist as long as liberty exists. It unavoidably results from that very liberty itself.” ~ Alexander Hamilton at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, June 26, 1787 ”Equality can destroy liberty!” ~ R.J. Rushdoony “Democratism and its allied herd movements, while remaining loyal to the principle of equality and identity, will never hesitate to sacrifice liberty.” ~ Erik von Kuehnelt-Leddihn “[D]emocracies have ever been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property; and have, in general, been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths.” ~ James Madison “Democracy has nothing to ...
Rough Acres 'In the Federalist Paper "Number 10," James Madison warned that most political factions are caused by economic interests. In the notes he made as he prepared for the Constitutional Convention, Madison wrote: "If the minority happen to include all such as possess... the great pecuniary resources, one third only may conquer the remaining two thirds." 'In other words, the founders understood that the rich can be as much as threat to republican self-government as a standing army.' Interesting POV. Daily Kos: Why the rich act the way they do www.dailykos.com The past week I have seen a welcome development on progressive blogs: attacks on the rich for their unremitting war to shape public opinion in favor of austerity. On DailyKos, jamess directly ...
Some of you are watching the Oscars, some are watching other shows and some are reading great entertaining works. I think it's a curse that I am happily entertained re-reading James Madison's notes on the Constitutional Convention. I wish I could be entertained more normally.
All men having power ought to be distrusted to a certain degree. James Madison, speech at the Constitutional Convention, July 11, 1787
by the way.a bill to explicity remove a prohibition against the federal government printing of paper money from the Constitution was voted in favor at the Constitutional Convention. In other words, it was in there originally, but was removed before final passage. James Madison mentions in one of the footnotes of his Federalist Papers that the states woudl be prevented from doing so, and that it was a great thing. Patrick Henry saw it as one of the greatest evils possible, and Alexander Hamilton, of course, as the nation's first banker and Treasury Secretary, was in favor of paper money. So we are left to infer today that since 9 states voted to remove the passage prohibiting the federal government from printing paper money, that they did not intend to put that restriction on; to leave it open to possibility. The authority today is deemed to derive from the Necessary and Proper clause: "To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the [enumerated] Powers, and all other P ...
Naturalization The Congress shall have Power To...establish an uniform Rule of Naturalization.ARTICLE I, SECTION 8, CLAUSE 4 Teacher's Companion Lesson (PDF) Few powers are more fundamental to sovereignty than the control over immigration and the vesting of citizenship in aliens (naturalization). According to the Declaration of Independence, "obstructing the Laws for the Naturalization of Foreigners" was one of the grievances that led the American colonists to break with Britain. Under the Articles of Confederation, each state retained authority over the naturalization of aliens. This resulted in widely varying state practices, which James Madison in The Federalist No. 42 called a "fault" and "defect" of the Confederation. At the Constitutional Convention, there was virtually no opposition to moving the naturalization power from the states to the new national government, and in the ratification debates only a handful of Anti-Federalists even raised the issue. James Madison seemed to speak the sentiment ...
4th U.S. President James Madison At his inauguration, James Madison, a small, wizened man, appeared old and worn; Washington Irving described him as "but a withered little apple-John." But whatever his deficiencies in charm, Madison's buxom wife Dolley compensated for them with her warmth and gaiety. She was the toast of Washington. Born in 1751, Madison was brought up in Orange County, Virginia, and attended Princeton (then called the College of New Jersey). A student of history and government, well-read in law, he participated in the framing of the Virginia Constitution in 1776, served in the Continental Congress, and was a leader in the Virginia Assembly. When delegates to the Constitutional Convention assembled at Philadelphia, the 36-year-old Madison took frequent and emphatic part in the debates. Madison made a major contribution to the ratification of the Constitution by writing, with Alexander Hamilton and John Jay, the Federalist essays. In later years, when he was referred to as the "Father of t ...
Tea Party Tribune *** You, Why Don’t You Lay Down Your Arms!’ Posted 2013-01-13 18:03:02 - by Tim Selaty Sr. - Admin “Ye villains, ye rebels, disperse; *** you, disperse! Lay down your arms, *** you, why don’t you lay down your arms!” ~ British officer to American Minute Men assembled at Lexington, April 19, 1775, as recalled by the Reverend Jonas Clarke in his diary. By Mr. Curmudgeon: Of England’s King Charles II, John Trechard wrote in A Short History of Standing Armies in England (1698), “… He came in with the general applause of the people, who in a kind fit gave him a vast revenue for life. By this he was enabled to raise an army, and bribe the Parliament, which he did to the purpose.” “The purpose,” of course, was the maintenance of King Charles’ royal power. Standing before the delegates at the Constitutional Convention at Philadelphia in June of 1787, James Madison said, “A standing military force, with an overgrown Executive will not long be safe companions to lib .. ...
Special thanks to Geeks With Guns long time member Mikey for sending us this one! Mikey writes "With all the pundits ranting about the 2nd Amendment lets take a deeper look at, so that as a people we can grasp the meaning of it! This is the full version and then I will do a breakdown of it from a logical common sense way! “A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.” 1. A well regulated militia, first let us look at the comma which means a punctuation mark used to indicate the separation of elements within the grammatical structure of a sentence so when ever we have a comma we have a ending of a element or thought! Second militia, not the National Guard this is a creation of the Federal government created by the Militia Act of 1903, the Amendment was written by James Madison, at the Constitutional Convention in 1787 so his idea of a militia would be a body of citizens called out periodically as citize ...
OUR “FRAMERS” AND “Founding Fathers”: Of the 55 original delegates to the last Constitutional Convention leading up to the signing of the Constitution of the United States of America on September 17, 1787, only 38 delegates and one secretary (William Jackson) were present for the signing. Three of the delegates who were present refused to sign but eventually came back in the fold (George Mason, Edmund Randolph, and Elbridge Gerry). That would be 100% of the delegates present if they had it to do over again. John Dickinson of Delaware wasn’t able to attend but had George Read sign his name in absentia, for a total of 39 delegate signatures plus one signature by Secretary William Jackson. The 40 signatures on the final Constitution are: George Washington, President & Deputy from VA: Benjamin Franklin, PA: James Madison, VA: Alexander Hamilton, NY: Gouverneur Morris, PA: Robert Morris, PA: James Wilson, PA: Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, SC: Charles Pinckney, SC: John Rutledge, SC: Pierce Butler, ...
The Constitution, it is often remarked, establishes a government of limited powers -- an unobjectionable truth -- but the fact that its powers are limited does not negate the mountain of evidence that those venerable lions who invented American democracy were far more concerned with corporate usurpations of freedom than by any threat posed by a government fairly elected by the people. "The power of all corporations ought to be limited," wrote James Madison, the framer whose influence echoes most resoundingly in the Constitution, as "the growing wealth acquired by them never fails to be a source of abuses." Madison's preference for a strong national government was borne of a distaste for the debtor relief laws being passed by state legislatures during the post-war economic downturn of the 1780s. Like fellow Federalists James Wilson and Alexander Hamilton, he saw the Constitutional Convention as an opportunity to craft a central government powerful enough to serve as an effective check on the states -- an e ...
Q. Who actually wrote the Constitution? A. In none of the relatively meager records of the Constitutional Convention is the literary authorship of any part of the Constitution definitely established. The deputies debated proposed plans until, on July 24, 1787, substantial agreement having been reached, a Committee of Detail was appointed, consisting of John Rutledge, of South Carolina; Edmund Randolph, of Virginia; Nathaniel Gorham, of Massachusetts; Oliver Ellsworth, of Connecticut; and James Wilson, of Pennsylvania, who on August 6 reported a draft which included a Preamble and twenty-three articles, embodying fifty-seven sections. Debate continued until September 8, when a new Committee of Style was named to revise the draft. This committee included William Samuel Johnson, of Connecticut; Alexander Hamilton, of New York; Gouverneur Morris, of Pennsylvania; James Madison, of Virginia; and Rufus King, of Massachusetts, and they reported the draft in approximately its final shape on September 12. The actu ...
Author Ray Raphael chronicled the debate at the Constitutional Convention over who should elect the U.S. president. He also described the arguments made by George Washington, James Madison, and lesser-known delegates on the scope of the president's power. He also responded to questions from the audi...
George Mason IV (December 11, 1725 – October 7, 1792) was an American Patriot, statesman and a delegate from Virginia to the U.S. Constitutional Convention. Along with James Madison, he is called the "Father of the Bill of Rights."[1][2][3][4] For these reasons he is considered one of the "Founding Fathers" of the United States.[5][6] Like anti-federalist Patrick Henry, Mason was a leader of tho...
We'd like to provide a writing about James Madison by a contemporary; however a little background is needed. Be patient... Pierce Butler was a delegate to the Constitutional Convention and an aristocrat from South Carolina. Due to the laws of primogeniture, as a younger son he could not inherit his father's (Sir Richard Butler, Baronet, Member of Parliament) estate and, as many younger sons did, he chose a military career. As part of His Majesty's 29th Regiment, he was sent to quell the activities related to the "unrest" in Colonial Boston in 1768. He married Miss Mary Middleton in 1771, daughter of a wealthy South Carolinian and soon resigned his commission and took up the life of a planter in the Charleston area. The "War for Independence" cost him most of his property and was thus forced to travel to Amsterdam to seek a personal loan. He was elected to the Assembly in 1778 (through most of the 1780's) and served as adjutant general in the South Carolina militia. 1787-1788 he won election to both the Co ...
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The Virginia Ratifying Convention (also "Virginia Federal Convention" in the 19th Century) was a convention of 168 delegates from Virginia who met in 1788 to ratify or reject the United States Constitution, which had been drafted at the Philadelphia Convention the previous year. The Convention met and deliberated from June 2 through June 27 in Richmond at the Richmond Theatre, presently the site of Monumental Church. Judge Edmund Pendleton, Virginia delegate to the Constitutional Convention, served as the convention's president by unanimous consent. Delegates in favor of ratification ("Federalists") were led by James Madison, who had been a driving force behind the framing of the new Constitution. Other notable Federalists included Pendleton, George Wythe, chair of the Rules Committee at the Constitutional Convention, William Overton Callis and John Marshall. Though George Washington did not attend the Convention, he was a prolific letter writer during this time, and messengers carried his communications ...
Pt 1- James Madison; Constitutional Convention 1787: In a Republican Govt. the Majority if united have always an opportunity. >
FLASHBACK: Obama's 'Writ' Unleashed War Criminals When the Founding Fathers wrote the Constitution, they made it clear that the only time the president would have the authority to use military force without prior authorization from Congress was when, as James Madison recorded in his notes from the Constitutional Convention, it was necessary to "repel sudden attacks." It was thus symbolic that when Barack Obama announced he had ordered the U.S. military to intervene in Libya's civil war, he did not do so from the Oval Office or the well of the U.S. House of Representatives, but from the capital city of Brazil. In that speech, delivered March 19, 2011, Obama repeatedly used the first-person pronoun: "Today I authorized the Armed Forces of the United States to begin a limited military action in Libya ... I want the American people to know that the use of force is not our first choice, and it's not a choice that I make lightly." On what authority had "I, Barack Obama," taken America into war? He cited United ...
October 27, 1787 Anniversary of the first publication of the Federalist Papers The Federalist Papers, were a series of 85 essays written by Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison between October 1787 and May 1788. The essays were published anonymously, under the pen name "Publius," primarily in two New York state newspapers of the time: The New York Packet and The Independent Journal. They were written to urge citizens of New York to support ratification of the proposed United States Constitution. Significantly, the essays explain particular provisions of the Constitution in detail. It is for this reason, and because Hamilton and Madison were members of the Constitutional Convention, that the Federalist Papers are often used today to help understand the intentions of those drafting the Constitution. A bound edition of the essays, with revisions and corrections by Hamilton, was published in 1788 by printers J. and A. McLean. A later edition, published by printer Jacob Gideon in 1818, with revision ...
In The Federalist Papers, written in 1787-1788, James Madison argued for ratification of our Constitution. Throughout this fine piece of political philosophy, Madison reassured the American people that the Federal government was not something to be frightened of. This new federal apparatus that had just been created by the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, would never deprive the states or individual citizens of their hard earned freedom. After all, the people would most assuredly elect men to federal office who were the best and brightest from among our population. Well, James Madison was WRONG…! An analysis of our elections history reveals that quite often the American people have elected criminals, tyrants, buffoons and total incompetents to serve in office, primarily due to the overarching influence of campaign money. The latest examples of this are Barack Obama and Joe Biden. During the Vice Presidential Debate, each time Paul Ryan answered a question, Biden rudely laughed and cackled like ...
Quote for today: "The essence of Government is power; and power, lodged as it must be in human hands, will ever be liable to abuse." -- James Madison, speech in the Virginia constitutional convention Dec 2, 1829
James Madison, the "father of the Constitutions" was one of the first to arrive in Philadelphia for the Constitutional Convention. He arrive in early May, bearing the blueprint for the new Constitution.
Trying to understand the libertarian/Tea Party v. government activism conflict - I am reading James Madison's "Notes on the Constitutional Convention" and a small book on constitutional interpretation.
Yesterday's cool book discovery: Nine volumes of documents related to the Constitutional Convention of 1787, plus a volume of James Madison's reports about it. It's likely these will also become ten more reasons for me to get annoyed when someone tells me "We can't know what the Founding Fathers thought about (fill in the issue)".
James Madison and the Dynamics of the Constitutional Convention: James Madison was a Virginian. He had...
Today in 1787. James Madison's notes from the Constitutional Convention:
7/12/1787 in the Constitutional Convention: via and James Madison
James Madison said, "The belief in a God, all powerful, wise, and good, [is] essential to the moral order of the world, and to the happiness of man." (Signer of Declaration of Independence, Delegate to Constitutional Convention, Signer of Constitution)
Thomas Jefferson had not attended the Constitutional Convention, but in a December, 1787 letter to James Madison insisted that the omission of a Bill of Rights as an integral part of the Constitution a major mistake. He wrote, "A bill of rights is what the people are entitled to against every government on earth." Similarly, the Anti-Federalists (those opposed to a strong central government) were worried that without a defined list of basic rights, the United States would quickly find itself back in the same position that had originally led to the War; Madison, despite his questioning of the value of a Bill of Rights, set himself to the task of putting together what is now the first ten Amendments. Ultimately, even with those who argued against the Constitution (including such luminaries as Patrick Henry) raising the argument that such a 'Bill of Rights' would inherently restrict the rights of the Individual, the Bill of Rights was included and approved as protecting the principles of liberty. In the end, ...
What kind of economic order did the Founding Fathers intend building? "If I should ask you what kind of economic order the Founding Fathers contemplated when they established the constitutional order, you would doubtless reply capitalism or a market economy. If I addressed that question to a similar number of professional American historians, the answer would be the same, the difference being that most of you would add “Thank God” and most of them would add “unfortunately." "In certain important particulars, your answer is supported by the historical record. For one thing, Americans were committed to John Locke’s proposition that mankind has a God-given right to life, liberty, and property, and that legitimate governments are required to protect those rights. In the Constitutional Convention of 1787 James Madison, Gouverneur Morris, and others listed the protection of property rights as the primary reason for instituting government; the sole dissenter was James Wilson. For a second thing, the Cons ...
Homework done guess i will go home and read a book! Notes of James madison on the Constitutional Convention. See what they was really thinking when they made the most important document in U.S. history!
Education is the key to a respectful state where your vote will not misused and turn democracy to Tyranny “I consider the difference between a system founded on the legislatures only, and one founded on the people, to be the true difference between a league or treaty and a constitution.” — James Madison, at the US Constitutional Convention, 1787 “I know no safe depository of the ultimate powers of the society but the people themselves; and if we think them not enlightened enough to exercise their control with a wholesome discretion, the remedy is not to take it from them but to inform their discretion by education. This is the true corrective of abuses of Constitutional power.” --Thomas Jefferson A constitutional democracy is in serious trouble if its citizenry does not have a certain degree of education and civic virtue. --Phillip E. Johnson The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people, it is an instrument for the people to restrain the government." --Patrick ...
May 25th In History With George Washington presiding, the Constitutional Convention formally convenes on this day in 1787. The convention faced a daunting task: the peaceful overthrow of the new American government as it had been defined by the Article of Confederation. The process began with the proposal of James Madison's Virginia Plan. Madison had dedicated the winter of 1787 to the study of confederacies throughout history and arrived in Philadelphia with a wealth of knowledge and an idea for a new American government. Virginia's governor, Edmund Randolph, presented Madison's plan to the convention. It featured a bicameral legislature, with representation in both houses apportioned to states based upon population; this was seen immediately as giving more power to large states, like Virginia. The two houses would in turn elect the executive and the judiciary and would possess veto power over the state legislatures. Madison's conception strongly resembled Britain's parliament. It omitted any discussion ...
James Madison took detailed notes of the various discussions & debates during the Constitutional Convention -
Our Bill of Rights, written by James Madison, reveals just how forward-thinking the founders were. During the Constitutional Convention in 1787, the congress of the founders roughly split into two intellectual halves: the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists.
In the summer of 1787, just 94 years after the Salem witch trials, as paragons of the Enlightenment such as James Madison, George Washington and Benjamin Franklin deliberated in the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, a mob pelted and otherwise tormented to death a woman accused of being a wi...
It is important to remember that our nation is a Republic, not a democracy as has been taught aggressively since the Progressive Movement. Thus, the government's job is to protect the individual liberties of each citizen regardless of the majority--the majority does not have the Constitutional right to infringe upon the rights of the minority. In fact, the Constitutional Convention was intended to "improve" the Articles of Confederation; however, because many of the founders were concerned with the excess of democracy the determined to create the Constitution and discard the Articles of Confederation. For instance, Alexander Hamilton specifically noted he was growing "tired of the excess of democracy." Meanwhile, many others identified the problem as "a headstrong democracy," a "prevailing rage of excessive democracy," a "republican frenzy," "democratical tyranny," and "democratic licentiousness." Likewise, James Madison believed the Founders had rescued white Americans from kingly despotism only to ...
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