Constitutional Convention & Independence Hall

A constitutional convention is now a gathering for the purpose of writing a new constitution or revising an existing constitution. Independence Hall is the centerpiece of Independence National Historical Park located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, on Chestnut Street between 5th and 6th Streets. 5.0/5

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On this day in 1787 was the opening of the Constitutional Convention at Independence Hall in Philadelphia. 55...
In 1787, the delegates to the Constitutional Convention signed the U.S. Constitution on Sept. 17 in the Assembly Room …
Today in 1787, delegates began arriving at Independence Hall in Philadelphia for the Constitutional Convention.
re·pub·lic rəˈpəblik/ noun a state in which supreme power is held by the people and their elected representatives, and which has an elected or nominated president rather than a monarch. The deliberations of the Constitutional Convention of 1787 were held in strict secrecy. Consequently, anxious citizens gathered outside Independence Hall when the proceedings ended in order to learn what had been produced behind closed doors. The answer was provided immediately. A Mrs. Powel of Philadelphia asked Benjamin Franklin, "Well, Doctor, what have we got, a republic or a monarchy?" With no hesitation whatsoever, Franklin responded, "A republic, if you can keep it."
When asked to relate the results of the Constitutional Convention of 1789 to a citizen as he left Independence Hall, Benjamin Franklin is reported to have replied, “A Republic, if you can keep it.” As the annual Conservative Political Action Conference ended last weekend, one might reply similarly t...
10 Facts About the Constitution: 1. The U.S. Constitution was written in the same Pennsylvania State House where the Declaration of Independence was signed and where George Washington received his commission as Commander of the Continental Army. Now called Independence Hall, the building still stands today on Independence Mall in Philadelphia, directly across from the National Constitution Center. 2. Written in 1787, the Constitution was signed on September 17th. But it wasn't until 1788 that it was ratified by the necessary nine states. 3. The U.S. Constitution was prepared in secret, behind locked doors that were guarded by sentries. 4. Some of the original framers and many delegates in the state ratifying conventions were very troubled that the original Constitution lacked a description of individual rights. In 1791, Americans added a list of rights to the Constitution. The first ten amendments became known as The Bill of Rights 5. Of the 55 delegates attending the Constitutional Convention, 39 signed ...
Perhaps some of you, who are history buffs can contribute or chime in. I found it to be an interesting historical information, maybe fact, maybe just a view of one man, who wrote this book. This is taken from "Shocking Secrets of American History" by Bill Coates. I am not too familiar with this fact, but wanted to post and post a question to those of you who are. I just found it fascinating and wanted to share with the rest of you. - JD "Horseflies on the Fourth of July!! The Fourth of July has become one of America's most celebrated holidays. Family barbecues, homemade ice cream, and fireworks consume the nation, as its citizens pay tribute to what they consider to be the birthday of the United States. It is a grand show of patriotism, but there is one small problem. Nothing very important happened on July 4th, 1776, except that they delegates of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia bad to cut their work short because of the horde of giant horseflies that invaded Independence Hall. First officia ...
Today in History: June 21, 1788, New Hampshire becomes the ninth and last necessary state to ratify the Constitution of the United States, thereby making the document the law of the land. By 1786, defects in the post-Revolutionary War Articles of Confederation were apparent, such as the lack of central authority over foreign and domestic commerce. Congress endorsed a plan to draft a new constitution, and on May 25, 1787, the Constitutional Convention convened at Independence Hall in Philadelphia. On September 17, 1787, after three months of debate moderated by convention president George Washington, the new U.S. constitution, which created a strong federal government with an intricate system of checks and balances, was signed by 38 of the 41 delegates present at the conclusion of the convention. As dictated by Article VII, the document would not become binding until it was ratified by nine of the 13 states. Beginning on December 7, five states--Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Georgia, and Connecticut- ...
September 17, 2013 should be a day for the next Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, PA - Independence Hall.
On September 17, 1787 the Constitutional Convention came to a close in the Assembly Room of Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. There were seventy individuals chosen to attend the meetings with the initial purpose of amending the Articles of Confederation. Rhode Island opted to not send any delegates. Fifty-five men attended most of the meetings, there were never more than 46 present at any one time, and ultimately only [thirty-nine ]actually signed the Constitution. While offering incredible contributions [George Mason of Virginia, Edmund Randolph of Virginia, and Elbridge Gerry of Massachusetts] refused to sign the final document because of basic philosophical differences. Mainly, they were fearful of an all-powerful government and wanted a bill of rights added to protect the rights of the people. 39 signers and 3 refusals = 42
The Constitution and Law Foundation invites you to attend a National Informational Conference Call with host Historian Nathan Peachey Call Date: Saturday, November 10, 2012 Call Time: 9pm Eastern Time Zone, 8pm Central, 7pm Mountain, and 6pm Pacific Conference call in line:530-881-1300 Access code: 954787# TOPICS This call is for every American living within the continental United States, all territories and Island States, and any "Expatriates" who left this nation due to the corporate US Government control in Washington, D.C. There are many Tea Party groups, and other concerned Americans from all walk of life who have a true desire to bring back a republican form of government as referenced by Benjamin Franklin as he left Independence Hall at the close of the Constitutional Convention. This call is not being promoted by any one group or association, it is for all. You are welcome to join us this Saturday evening and invite your friends to enjoy an evening of Constitution, law and we will present updates ...
As Benjamin Franklin left Independence Hall after the Constitutional Convention, he was reportedly asked by a...
September 17, 1787, brought a world-changing event: the signing of the United States Constitution. The day dawned clear and chilly in Philadelphia, where delegates from the thirteen states had spent a long, hot summer writing and debating the new Constitution for their young country. They assembled in Independence Hall and listened as their work was read aloud one last time. Then they heard an address from old Benjamin Franklin, who urged them all to sign the document. Franklin was too frail to make his speech, so another delegate read it for him. Thirty-eight delegates filed forward to put their names at the bottom of the Constitution. George Washington signed first as president of the convention. The other delegates signed in geographical order from north to south, starting with New Hampshire and ending with Georgia. Franklin was helped forward from his seat, and it was reported that he wept as he signed. Their work done, the delegates closed the Constitutional Convention, and the document was sent to t ...
On August 18, 1797, throngs of Philadelphians lined the wharves to welcome a Revolutionary War hero back to the United States. The mob carried him on their shoulders while bands played and cannons fired fusillades of homage. The object of this adoration, Thaddeus Kosciuszko-engineering genius, was called by Thomas Jefferson, "as pure a son of liberty as I have ever known."Upon his return to Philadelphia, Kosciuszko moved to the humble boarding house run by Mrs. Ann Relf. Here the feted Kosciuszko convalesced while receiving admirers daily. Vice President Jefferson came by frequently for political parley. Philadelphia ladies, taken by the handsome hero, had their pictures sketched by Kosciuszko himself. Those who visited make up a veritable Who's Who of the capital in 1798: eminent architect Benjamin Latrobe, Joseph Pemberton, Constitutional Convention statesman William Paterson, and numerous military figures including Chief Joseph Brant. Perhaps the most compelling visitor to call upon Kosciuszko was Chie ...
June 28th Ben Franklin’s Reminder In the summer of 1787, the Constitutional Convention met at Independence Hall in Philadelphia to decide how to set up a new government. At times the arguments grew bitter, and tempers flared in the summer heat. Some delegates verged on quitting when they reached an impasse over whether representation was to be based on the population of each state or if each state should be given one vote. Historians have called this period the “critical juncture” in the Convention. The country was brand-new, and already it looked as though it might fall apart. On June 28, 1787, eighty-one-year-old Benjamin Franklin, the oldest delegate, rose from his seat and made a simple but profound suggestion: they should pray for guidance. He reminded the others that the Continental Congress had asked for divine aid at the start of the Revolutionary War. “Our prayers, sir, were heard, and they were graciously answered,” he said. “And have we now forgotten that powerful Friend? Or do we i ...
May 25, 1787 was the day it all began in Philadelphia, as the Constitutional Convention started in earnest and the first votes were taken at what is now called Independence Hall.
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