Constitutional Convention & George Washington

A constitutional convention is now a gathering for the purpose of writing a new constitution or revising an existing constitution. George Washington ( – , 1799) was the first President of the United States of America, serving from 1789 to 1797, and the dominant military and political leader of the United States from 1775 to 1799. He led the American victory over Great Britain in the American Revolutionary War as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army from 1775 to 1783, and presided over the writing of the Constitution in 1787. Washington became the first president by unanimous choice, and oversaw the creation of a strong, well-financed national government that maintained neutrality in the wars raging in Europe, suppressed rebellion and won acceptance among Americans of all types. 5.0/5

Constitutional Convention George Washington United States Revolutionary War Continental Army Benjamin Franklin Alexander Hamilton James Madison Mount Vernon Independence Hall Founding Fathers New Hampshire United States Constitution Patrick Henry Samuel Adams John Adams

The fact that George Washington lived to the age of 67 is a miracle. While that wasn’t particularly old at that time for someone who survived childhood, Washington suffered dozens of life-threatening obstacles to get there. Although he was over six feet tall and physically strong, Washington was constantly beset by illness. Before reaching 21, he had diptheria, tuberculosis, smallpox, malaria, and dysentery, any which could have easily killed him. His brush with smallpox left him immune but helped prompt his push to have the troops inoculated during the Revolutionary War. Before the Constitutional Convention in 1787, he wrote in a letter: “I have, of late been so much afflicted with a rheumatic complaint in my shoulder that at times I am hardly able to raise my hand to my head, or turn myself in bed.”As president, he was bedridden for more than a month in 1789 with a tumor on his thigh that was so painful he told his aide, “I know it is very doubtful whether ever I shall arise from this bed and Go ...
George Washington- Washington was leader of the Continental Army and was the first U.S president and the Constitutional Convention.
Was Benjamin Franklin a Christian? If you want the entire 6 pg doc (large print) on this topic, let me know and I'll send it over to you). Franklin Calls the Constitutional Convention to Prayer On June 28, 1787, seventeen years after Whitefield's death, Franklin was attending the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia as one of the delegates. Much regional disagreement had surfaced and the convention was about to be suspended because of unresolved strife and dissension. It was at this critical moment that Franklin, now 81 years of age, rose to his feet, and addressed the Convention President, George Washington, with these words: How has it happened, sir, that we have not hitherto once thought of humbly appealing to the Father of lights to illuminate our understandings? In the beginning of the contest with Great Britain, when we were sensible to danger, we had daily prayers in this room for Divine protection. Our prayers, sir, were heard and they were graciously answered. I have lived, sir, a long time ...
Learn Our History Today: On April 30, 1789, George Washington was inaugurated as the first U.S. President. As the country’s top military leader during the Revolutionary War and President of the Constitutional Convention, it was only natural that General George Washington would be a leading contender for the job of the U.S.’ first President, and on April 6, 1789 during a joint session of Congress, Washington was unanimously elected President, with John Adams as Vice President. Washington was notified of the decision on April 14 at his Mount Vernon estate and he immediately set out for New York City, the Nation’s Capital. On his way, he passed through many of the eastern seaboard’s largest cities, including Baltimore, Philadelphia, and Trenton, at each he received a hero’s welcome, being greeted by cannon salutes and local cavalry troops, who escorted him through their towns. Finally, he arrived in New York City, where on April 30 he was given the oath of office by Chancellor of New York Robert Li ...
George Washington, General of the Revolutionary Army, president of the Constitutional Convention, First President of the United States of America, Father of our nation, " Religion and morality are the essential pillars of civil society." Benjamin Franklin, Signer of the Declaration of Independence "[O]nly a virtuous people are capable of freedom. As nations become corrupt and vicious, they have more need of masters." "Whereas true religion and good morals are the only solid foundations of public liberty and happiness . . . it is hereby earnestly recommended to the several States to take the most effectual measures for the encouragement thereof." Continental Congress, 1778
George Washington, "First in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of hi countrymen." Emerging as the most significant leader in the founding of the United States, he was an essentially, the American Moses, the Father of the Country. At the three crossroads in the establishment of the nation, he led our troops to victory in the Revolutionary War, superintended the Constitutional Convention and was unanimously elected the first President . How can such greatness be embodied in one man? Washington was surrounded by a host of other courageous leaders, brilliant thinkers, passionate orators, and gifted writers -- Franklin, Jefferson, Patrick Henry, Samuel Adams, Hamilton, Madison -- almost all of whom were far more privateers he. Yet Washington always led the way. While much has often been made of his physical stature (six feet two) And his courage, charisma, energy, vision, and calm demeanor, it was his moral character most historical sources commonly cite as the reason for his emergence. Combine his ...
Excerpted from Jim Geraghty, Morning Jolt ... Why, it's almost as if the Founding Fathers wanted it to be tough to pass broad, sweeping laws that make dramatic changes without a broad consensus! A key goal of the framers was to create a Senate differently constituted from the House so it would be less subject to popular passions and impulses. "The use of the Senate," wrote James Madison in Notes of Debates in the Federal Convention of 1787, "is to consist in its proceedings with more coolness, with more system and with more wisdom, than the popular branch." An oft-quoted story about the "coolness" of the Senate involves George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, who was in France during the Constitutional Convention. Upon his return, Jefferson visited Washington and asked why the Convention delegates had created a Senate. "Why did you pour that tea into your saucer?" asked Washington. "To cool it," said Jefferson. "Even so," responded Washington, "we pour legislation into the senatorial saucer to cool it." W ...
A More Perfect Union: The Creation of the U.S. Constitution May 25, 1787, Freshly spread dirt covered the cobblestone street in front of the Pennsylvania State House, protecting the men inside from the sound of passing carriages and carts. Guards stood at the entrances to ensure that the curious were kept at a distance. Robert Morris of Pennsylvania, the "financier" of the Revolution, opened the proceedings with a nomination--Gen. George Washington for the presidency of the Constitutional Convention. The vote was unanimous. With characteristic ceremonial modesty, the general expressed his embarrassment at his lack of qualifications to preside over such an august body and apologized for any errors into which he might fall in the course of its deliberations. To many of those assembled, especially to the small, boyish-looking, 36-year-old delegate from Virginia, James Madison, the general's mere presence boded well for the convention, for the illustrious Washington gave to the gathering an air of importance ...
The "Father of His Country", George Washington was born on February 22, 1732. He became commander in chief of the Continental Army in 1775, and fought a long and arduous war for freedom from British rule. The war was finally over in 1781, when the Continental Army with the help of the French, forced British General Cornwallis to surrender at Yorktown. In 1787, Washington was unanimously elected president by the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. He took the oath of office in 1789. He served two terms of office from 1789 until 1797. After the presidency, Washington retired to his home in Mount Vernon, Virgina where he died on December 14, 1799 of a throat infection. Quiz: What is George Washington's most famous quote? "I Can not tell a lie. I chopped down the Cherry Tree!"
George Washington "There has been a huge controversy, to put it mildly, about Washington's religious beliefs. Before the Revolutionary War he was Anglican – Church of England – which meant after the war, he was Episcopalian. So, he was clearly Christian ... He was quite intensely religious, because even though he uses the word Providence, he constantly sees Providence as an active force in life, particularly in American life. I mean, every single victory in war he credits to Providence. The miracle of the Constitutional Convention he credits to Providence. The creation of the federal government and the prosperity of the early republic, he credits to Providence ... I was struck at how frequently in his letters he's referring to Providence, and it's Providence where there's a sense of design and purpose, which sounds to me very much like religion ... Unfortunately, this particular issue has become very very politicized." - Ron Chernow Very interesting.
From the Heritage Foundation Though the peopling of America began much earlier, the American Founding can be said to begin with the end of the French and Indian War in 1763, after which the British began to more actively govern their American colonies. The founding period encompasses two pivotal events in the history of liberty. The American Revolution opens at the Battle of Lexington in 1775 and concludes with the Treaty of Paris in 1783. The creation and establishment of the Constitution begins in earnest in 1785 (the Constitutional Convention was held in the summer of 1787) and can be said to conclude with the passage of the Bill of Rights in 1791, or perhaps at the end of Washington’s formative presidency in 1797. The centerpieces of those events are two monumental documents, the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution. The Founders are the generation of statesmen who led America through the Revolutionary War and the creation of the U.S. Constitution. They also established the ...
The U.S. Constitution established America's national government and fundamental laws, and guaranteed certain basic rights for its citizens. It was signed on September 17, 1787, by delegates to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, presided over by George Washington. Under America's first governing document, the Articles of Confederation, the national government was weak and states operated like independent countries. At the 1787 convention, delegates devised a plan for a stronger federal government with three branches--executive, legislative and judicial--along with a system of checks and balances to ensure no single branch would have too much power. The Bill of Rights--10 amendments guaranteeing basic individual protections such as freedom of speech and religion--became part of the Constitution in 1791. To date, there have been a total of 27 constitutional amendments.
Bacon Bit from Wikipedia: In 1777, Springfield's [MA] location at numerous crossroads led George Washington and Henry Knox to found the fledgling United States' National Armory at Springfield, which produced the first American musket in 1794, and later the famous Springfield rifle. From 1777 until its closing during the Vietnam War, the Springfield Armory attracted skilled laborers to Springfield, making it the United States' longtime center for precision manufacturing. The near-capture of the U.S. Arsenal at Springfield during Shays Rebellion of 1787 led directly to the formation of the U.S. Constitutional Convention.
This is an article she sent me from Forbes. Yvette is mentioned in it at the bottom. The Big Political Story Of 2016 Will Not Be About Who Replaces Obama English: Painting, 1856, by Junius Brutus Stea... English: Painting, 1856, by Junius Brutus Stearns, Washington at Constitutional Convention of 1787, signing of U.S. Constitution. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Last Saturday, December 7th, nearly 100 state legislators, many distinguished, representing 32 states, assembled at Mount Vernon. They gathered at the homestead of George Washington, 15 miles from the capital city named for him. The purpose? To discuss how, safely, to revive an overlooked, but invaluable, provision in the United States Constitution to allow a supermajority of states to rein in a power-drunk federal government. According to a press release issued after the Assembly’s adjournment, “They emphasized the importance of any convention being done in a way that accomplishes the will of the people while protecting the sanctity of the Cons .. ...
Our Lives Our Fortunes Our Sacred Honor It is important that we take a step back and look at the cost in terms of personal sacrifice by the signers of the Constitution. These men warts and all rose to be giants the moment they decided to embrace the Constitutional principle they were willing to die for. This is the only recorded time in history when upon victory they could have made George Washington a king but they chose to put the power in the hands of the people who supported their glorious quest with a Constitutional Republic. “ Benjamin Franklin was the gray eminence at the Constitutional Convention in 1787 — wise and famous, but a feeble 81 years old, suffering from gout and kidney stones, and fearful for the future of the nation he had helped found. Once the proceedings were concluded, he was asked what sort of government we would have. His reply was, “A republic, madam, if you can keep it.” I shed tears and felt a great emotional feeling of awe and respect for these Heroes of Human Rights ...
Shout out to Thomas Jefferson, author of the Declaration of Independence, and George Washington, Benjamin Franklin,John Jay, and all the other men from the Constitutional Convention that helped our country declare freedom from Britain on July 4, 1776!!! Running. Pool time. BBQ. Boston. See ya!
Today in History: June 21, 1788, New Hampshire becomes the ninth and last necessary state to ratify the Constitution of the United States, thereby making the document the law of the land. By 1786, defects in the post-Revolutionary War Articles of Confederation were apparent, such as the lack of central authority over foreign and domestic commerce. Congress endorsed a plan to draft a new constitution, and on May 25, 1787, the Constitutional Convention convened at Independence Hall in Philadelphia. On September 17, 1787, after three months of debate moderated by convention president George Washington, the new U.S. constitution, which created a strong federal government with an intricate system of checks and balances, was signed by 38 of the 41 delegates present at the conclusion of the convention. As dictated by Article VII, the document would not become binding until it was ratified by nine of the 13 states. Beginning on December 7, five states--Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Georgia, and Connecticut- ...
Today in History: May 25: George Washington presided over the opening of the Constitutional Convention of Philadelphia (1787); the gasoline engine was patented by Stuart Perry (1844); Ford Motor Company discontinued the Model T and announce the Model A would replace it (1927), the news reel, Movietone News, was shown for the 1st time in theaters. In 1967, they were discontinued due to competition with TV (1927), Jesse Owens broke 2 world sprint records, tied a third, and broke a long jump record in a single meet (1935); Cassius Clay (Muhammad Ali) knock out Sonny Liston in 1 minute, 56 seconds in the 1st round (1965); “Star War” opened in theaters (1977); Dan Goodwin scaled the Sears Tower as Spiderman and was arrested for trespassing when he reached the top (1981); “Return of the Jedi” opened in theaters (1983); more than 11,000 people died as a hurricane and tidal wave hit Bangladesh (1985); Mark Mcgwire made baseball history by hitting his 25th home run (1998); NASA’s Phoenix Mars Lander land ...
February 22nd. George Washington's Birthday. But very few people know that. With the advent of Presidents Day, or Presidents' Day or President's Day, George lost his special day. Washington set the tone for the presidency and helped build the foundation of our nation by presiding over the Constitutional Convention that wrote the Constitution. Happy Birthday, President Washington. Thank you for all your personal sacrifices through the Revolutionary War and during your Public Service to our infant nation.
First in War, First in Peace, First to Wet a Line - [...] Apparently Washington was quite the angler, whether standing on the banks of the Potomac River at his Mount Vernon, Va., home or traveling around the New Nation. “In his diary George Washington shares stories of several great catches that include a dolphin and shark in Barbados, a legendary catfish in the Ohio Country, and trout and perch during the recess of the Constitutional Convention in the summer of 1787,” s...
Borrowed from Delbert Bumpy Goodrich History lesson of the day: Benjamin Franklin requested prayers in the Constitutional Convention ! june 28th, 1787. In his speech to congress, as the many disputes arose he asked to set aside the the start of the day's precedings, for prayers ! The eighty one year old Franklin asserted that " The longer i live, the more convincing proof's i see of this Truth. That God govern's in the affairs of men." " I also believe ." Franklin continued that without God's concurring aid, we shall succeed in this political building no better than the builders of the tower of babel... President John Adams claimed that " States may plan and speculate for Liberty, but it is Religion and Morality alone, which can establish the Principles upon which Freedom can securely stand." In His farewell address of sept.1796, George Washington called Religion, as the source of Morality, " A necessary spring of popular Government." ( It is proven throughout history that " Morals are absent without God. ...
Alexander Hamilton Alexander Hamilton was born January 11 in either 1755 or 1757—the exact year is uncertain. An orphan from the Caribbean island of Nevis, he rose with astounding speed to become an aide-de-camp to George Washington, a hero of the Revolutionary War, and a member of the Constitutional Convention. As the first secretary of the treasury, he helped build the New Nation’s financial systems. As a leader of the Federalist Party, he helped create our political system. He was never president of the United States, but he shaped the new American nation as few other Founding Fathers did. Because he argued for a strong central government, Hamilton is often seen as an anti-democratic figure. But he could write as memorably of natural law and Human Rights as any of the Founders. “The sacred rights of mankind are not to be rummaged for among old parchments or musty records,” he wrote. “They are written, as with a sunbeam, in the whole volume of human nature, by the hand of the Divinity itself a ...
Author Ray Raphael chronicled the debate at the Constitutional Convention over who should elect the U.S. president. He also described the arguments made by George Washington, James Madison, and lesser-known delegates on the scope of the president's power. He also responded to questions from the audi...
I walked the walk and stepped down after two terms also. "For nearly 28 years [John] Kerry has been a senator. West Virginia sent Robert Byrd to the US Senate for 51 years, and Daniel Inouye has represented Hawaii in Congress since it became a state in 1959. Charleston, S.C., has had the same mayor since 1975. No matter how unpopular Congress is said to be, more than 90 percent of House members seeking re-election generally keep their seats; in that respect Nov. 6 was absolutely typical. ... Far better for officials to come and go, serving a spell in government, then heading back to real life. 'Representatives ought to return home and mix with the people,' Rhode Island's Roger Sherman argued during the Constitutional Convention in 1787. 'By remaining at the seat of government, they would acquire the habits of the place, which might differ from those of their constituents.' George Washington could have been president for life, but he voluntarily stepped down after two terms. He could be trusted with power ...
The Virginia Ratifying Convention (also "Virginia Federal Convention" in the 19th Century) was a convention of 168 delegates from Virginia who met in 1788 to ratify or reject the United States Constitution, which had been drafted at the Philadelphia Convention the previous year. The Convention met and deliberated from June 2 through June 27 in Richmond at the Richmond Theatre, presently the site of Monumental Church. Judge Edmund Pendleton, Virginia delegate to the Constitutional Convention, served as the convention's president by unanimous consent. Delegates in favor of ratification ("Federalists") were led by James Madison, who had been a driving force behind the framing of the new Constitution. Other notable Federalists included Pendleton, George Wythe, chair of the Rules Committee at the Constitutional Convention, William Overton Callis and John Marshall. Though George Washington did not attend the Convention, he was a prolific letter writer during this time, and messengers carried his communications ...
Regarding states Rights and secession: Nowhere in the Constitution is there any mention of the union of the states being permanent. This was not an oversight by any means. Indeed, when New York, Rhode Island, and Virginia ratified the Constitution, they specifically stated that they reserved the right to resume the governmental powers granted to the United States. Their claim to the right of secession was understood and agreed to by the other ratifiers, including George Washington, who presided over the Constitutional Convention and was also a delegate from Virginia. In his book Life of Webster Sen. Henry Cabot Lodge writes, "It is safe to say that there was not a man in the country, from Washington and Hamilton to Clinton and Mason, who did not regard the new system as an experiment from which each and every State had a right to peaceably withdraw." A textbook used at West Point before the Civil War, A View of the Constitution, written by Judge William Rawle, states, "The secession of a State depends on ...
The story goes that Benjamin Franklin was approached by a woman as he left the Constitutional Convention 1 She asked: “What have you given us?” Franklin is said to have replied: “A republic, if you can keep it.” This exchange was common knowledge 50 years or so ago, as commonly taught to schoolchildren as the story about George Washington’s boyhood experience practicing a woodcutter’s skill on his father’s prized cherry tree and, later, refusing to lie about it. It turns out, the tale about Washington was a lie. But Franklin’s conversation with Mrs. Powell really occurred. Why is it, then, that most people are still aware of the fiction about Washington but are ignorant of the fact about Franklin and, in particular, the truth of Franklin’s comment? Today many, if not most, people believe the Founders gave us a democracy, instead of a Constitutional Republic, or a hybridized version of the two, called a democratic republic. A Lincoln Journal Star reader recently took this latter position, ...
Where to Put president # 44 Where, oh where -- to put Obama's picture. George Washington, our nation's first president and leader of the American Revolution. Abe Lincoln, honorable leader who pulled our nation through its darkest time. Alexander Hamilton, founding father, first Secretary of the Treasury and leader of the constitutional convention. Andrew Jackson, "Old Hickory " fought the British in New Orleans . Ulysses Grant, Union army general, led the North through the Civil War. Ben Franklin, genius inventor, political theorist and leading author of the Constitution. Finally, we have someone to put on the food stamp Obama's policies have put more people on welfare than any president before him, so this placement is most appropriate. Unlike the Nobel Peace Prize, for which he did nothing, this is an "honor" he richly deserves.
George Washington & Benjamin Franklin on the Jews "Benjamin Franklin was already an elder statesman at the time of the American Revolution. And his years had certainly brought him wisdom, for he knew of the Jews' nature, and he had the courage to warn his fellows about them. Benjamin Franklin's warning to the Constitutional Convention in 1789 concerning the Jews has been called a marvel of prophecy. But, really, Franklin was only giving voice to an opinion, informed by his knowledge of the Jewish people. This prophecy was recorded by Charles Pinckney of Charleston, South Carolina, and the original notes of Mr. Pinckney are said to be held at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia. "I fully agree with General Washington, that we must protect this young nation from an insidious influence and impenetration. The menace, gentlemen, is the Jews. In whatever country Jews have settled in any great numbers, they have lowered its moral tone; depreciated its commercial integrity; have segregated themselves and have ...
by Geri Zabela Eddins Our first two presidents, George Washington and John Adams, both adamantly opposed the development of political parties. As early as 1780, seven years before the Constitutional Convention first met, Adams declared, “There is nothing I dread so much as a division of the Republic into two great parties, each arranged under its leader and converting measures in opposition to each other. This, in my humble apprehension, is to be dreaded as the greatest political evil under our Constitution.” Despite such trepidation, the Founding Fathers wrote nothing about political parties in the Constitution.
An excerpt from Steve Cook's interpretation of what Ben Franklin's seminal address to the Constitutional Convention might have looked and sounded like.
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It was 225 years ago today that 55 delegates from twelve states (Rhode Island refused to attend) with widely varying ideas met in Philadelphia to reform the Articles of Confederation. Instead of reforming the Articles, however, the delegates came up with was a totally new form of government, the Constitution of the United States . The Articles of Confederation was so weak it couldn’t govern the New Nation. There was no executive or judicial branch of government, and no provision to regulate trade between the states or to levy taxes. Congress was little more than an assembly of thirteen independent states that acted like thirteen independent countries with little regard to the republic as a whole. Leaders like George Washington and Alexander Hamilton began to see the need for a strong national government under a new constitution. During the Constitutional Convention, the delegates fought continuously. The states were so independent that it was difficult to get any consensus at all. George Washingto ...
for the natural born citizen issue From Vattel: natural-born citizens, are those born in the country, of parents who are citizens There is good reason to believe that Vattel’s definition of natural born citizen played a central role in a letter that Founder John Jay wrote to George Washington, then Presiding Officer of the Constitutional Convention, on July 25th, 1787: “Permit me to hint, whether it would be wise and seasonable to provide a strong check to the admission of Foreigners into the administration of our national Government; and to declare expressly that the Commander in Chief of the American Army shall not be given to nor devolve on, any but a natural born Citizen.”
Here's some information some might find interesting. • September 3, 1783 – Treaty of Paris ending American Revolutionary War signed • September 14, 1814 – Francis Scott Key wrote the words to the Star Spangled Banner • September 16, 1620 – Pilgrims sailed from England on the Mayflower • September 19, 1796 – George Washington delivered his Farewell address • September 17, 1787 the US Constitutional Convention signed the Constitution. I suppose that paved the way to having a lot of taxpayers!
The phrase “natural born” was in early drafts of the Constitution. Scholars say notes of the Constitutional Convention give away little of the intent of the framers. Its origin may be traced to a letter from John Jay to George Washington, with Jay suggesting that to prevent foreigners from becoming commander in chief, the Constitution needed to “declare expressly” that only a natural-born citizen could be president. Ms. Duggin and others who have explored the arcane subject in depth say legal argument and basic fairness may indeed be on the side of Mr. McCain, a longtime member of Congress from Arizona. But multiple experts and scholarly reviews say the issue has never been definitively resolved by either Congress or the Supreme Court. Ms. Duggin favors a constitutional amendment to settle the matter. Others have called on Congress to guarantee that Americans born outside the national boundaries can legitimately see themselves as potential contenders for the Oval Office. “They ought to have the ...
Col Josiah Parker was born 11 May 1751 Carrollton, Isle of Wight Co VA and he died 18 March 1810 in Isle of Wight Co., VA. Military: Served as an Aide to Gen. George Washington during the Revolutionary War.8 Elected: 1788, Delegate to the Constitutional Convention ...
Historical trivia question on this July 4th. As you know George Washington served as president of the Constitutional Convention when our constitution was written in 1787. During a break (on July 30, 1787), in the convention debates, Washington took some time off, went to Valley Forge and participated in one of his favorite pastimes. What did he do?
May 25th In History With George Washington presiding, the Constitutional Convention formally convenes on this day in 1787. The convention faced a daunting task: the peaceful overthrow of the new American government as it had been defined by the Article of Confederation. The process began with the proposal of James Madison's Virginia Plan. Madison had dedicated the winter of 1787 to the study of confederacies throughout history and arrived in Philadelphia with a wealth of knowledge and an idea for a new American government. Virginia's governor, Edmund Randolph, presented Madison's plan to the convention. It featured a bicameral legislature, with representation in both houses apportioned to states based upon population; this was seen immediately as giving more power to large states, like Virginia. The two houses would in turn elect the executive and the judiciary and would possess veto power over the state legislatures. Madison's conception strongly resembled Britain's parliament. It omitted any discussion ...
today is Cookie Monsters Birthday (born in 1966), National Wigout Day , Nerd & Geek Pride Day. Mike Myers (waynes world & Shrek) is 49, Frank Oz (voice of Miss Piggy, Fozzie Bear & Yoda) is 68. on this day in 1787 George Washington presided over opening of Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. 1844 Stuart Perry patented the gasoline engine. 1927 Ford Motor Co. announced Model A would replace Model T. 1935 Babe Ruth hit his 714th & final homerun, a record that stood for 39 yrs. 1969 Midnight Cowboy (originally rated X) starring Dustin Hoffman had world premier in New York
May 14-1787 In Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, delegates convene a Constitutional Convention to write a new Constitution for the United States; George Washington presides./1889 The children's charity National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children is launched in London./1913 New York Governor William Sulzer approves the charter for the Rockefeller Foundation, which begins operations with a $100 million donation from John D. Rockefeller./1925 Virginia Woolf's novel Mrs Dalloway is published.
In the summer of 1787, just 94 years after the Salem witch trials, as paragons of the Enlightenment such as James Madison, George Washington and Benjamin Franklin deliberated in the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, a mob pelted and otherwise tormented to death a woman accused of being a wi...
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