Constitutional Convention & Electoral College

A constitutional convention is now a gathering for the purpose of writing a new constitution or revising an existing constitution. An electoral college is a set of electors who are selected to elect a candidate to a particular office. 5.0/5

Constitutional Convention Electoral College Vice President Jesse Jackson Jr Thomas Jefferson Barack Obama George Bush Al Gore Alexander Hamilton Andrew Jackson French Revolution Mob Rule Roman Catholic Church Voting Rights Act Majority Rule Aaron Burr United States

This must have been what the Constitutional Convention felt like - except for no horse flies. Remember the CC gave us Electoral College
Do the political parties really want a Constitutional Convention? Doesn’t seem in their best interest.
Author Ray Raphael chronicled the debate at the Constitutional Convention over who should elect the U.S. president. He also described the arguments made by George Washington, James Madison, and lesser-known delegates on the scope of the president's power. He also responded to questions from the audi...
Questions of voter fraud are floating around. The electoral collages have ultimately come into question stipulations on the roles they play within the voting community are to say the least not very trusted by many voters since there's many that want to electoral collages abolished. Remember this the elites game is ALL about control, and that control can very well be hidden in plan site and since the electoral collage itself is a process and not an actual place. But in different times it was harder to bribe votes we have the Internet and a more connected world the processes of the electoral collage may not follow the same rules and can be more easily corrupted then the times before ours. Given the fact that rules in politics always change who's to say control has been taken away from the people? Here is a referendum of how electoral collages work: Origins of the Electoral College: The Constitutional Convention considered several possible methods of selecting a president. One idea was to have the Congress . ...
I received my first response concerning the Electoral College. Here is what was said: November 20, 2012 Dear Mr. Satterfield, Thank you for contacting me regarding our nation's Electoral College. I appreciate hearing from you, and I welcome the opportunity to respond. As you know, American voters elect the President and Vice President of the United States under a complex arrangement of constitutional provisions, federal and state laws, and political party practices known as the Electoral College system. After lengthy debate at the Constitutional Convention of 1787, our nation's framers compromised on the Electoral College as a way to balance power between the most populous and the smaller states. However, since the creation of the Electoral College, there have been calls to abolish it in favor of a direct popular election. Voting is the core of our democracy. In order for our democracy to function smoothly, we must have an electoral system that provides every voter the opportunity to cast a vote and g ...
Majority Rule at Last How to dump the Electoral College without changing the Constitution By Michael Waldman t was the end of a long, sweltering summer at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787. Delegates were anxious to finish, but a looming question remained: How would the new office of president be filled? Some delegates wanted Congress to choose. Others wanted popular election. That idea was overwhelmingly voted down—it would be "unnatural," warned one foe. Southern states had extra representation in Congress because slaves were counted in the population, under the grand compromise that allowed the Constitution to move forward; a popular vote would wipe out that advantage, since slaves didn't vote. The delegates referred the mess to the Committee on Detail, which wrote a draft of the Constitution with the Electoral College as a rather convoluted solution. The states would each choose electors, with one electoral vote per senator and House member. That way small states, especially slav ...
At Brunch today Zia asked about the Electoral College. I was directionally correct with my answer. Noah served up some knowledge about why 'College'; also directonally correct. So I look it up and learnt some things. Direct election was rejected not because the Framers of the Constitution doubted public intelligence but rather because they feared that without sufficient information about candidates from outside their State, people would naturally vote for a "favorite son" from their own State or region. At worst, no president would emerge with a popular majority sufficient to govern the whole country. At best, the choice of president would always be decided by the largest, most populous States with little regard for the smaller ones. Finally, a so-called "Committee of Eleven" in the Constitutional Convention proposed an indirect election of the president through a College of Electors. The function of the College of Electors in choosing the president can be likened to that in the Roman Catholic Church o ...
Learning history of the Electoral College which was decided on and implemented in the 1787 Constitutional Convention. After much discussion and debate, the delegates agreed that "ordinary citizens" would have a say in each election, but the final decision would be made by people who were better informed about the candidates and the issues. It makes sense considering that the majority of citizens at that time were farmers, merchants, etc. Most could not read or write. And there was not exactly television or the internet to stay "in the loop." So my question. are Americans citizens as a whole better informed, and more educated on the issues today than they were in 1787? Sometimes I have to wonder.What do you think?
Why did the founders establish the Electoral College? Two reasons: 1. To give extremely small states some say in the election. 2. To place a check on the 'uneducated' masses. At the time of the Constitutional Convention, many voters could not read and did not have access to accurate information. The framers of the Constitution felt that a check was needed. Not much changes.
Know Your U.S. Government/ The Electoral College was created in the U.S. Constitution in order to prevent "Mob Rule", according to Alexander Hamilton. During the Constitutional Convention (1787) the French Revolution was in full throttle with the Reign of Terror placing undesirable aristocrats under the blade of the guillotine. To the Constitutional Framers this was democracy gone mad! The Framers of the U.S. Constitution were frightened of this French form of Majority Rule. Subsequently, the Framers insisted that a "Council of Wise Men" selected within each State would directly elect the U.S. President. This would prevent 'Mob Rule' from selecting the wrong person for President. [Notation: Andrew Jackson changed the Electoral College during the 1830's from a "Council of Wise Men" to a strictly political process. Electors are now selected by the political party. When voting for President the list of names (Electors) listed under the candidate's name are in reality who the voter is voting for in the elect ...
U.S. Sen. *** Durbin originally co-sponsored legislation to abolish the Electoral College in 1993 and renewed his call shortly before the presidential election of 2000. He argued the following: The Electoral College is an anachronism badly in need of retirement. Created during the Constitutional Convention in 1787, the Electoral College was thought to add stability to 13 loosely knit states where communications and travel were slow and illiteracy high. The debate over how to choose a president was perhaps the most contentious one of the Convention and involved a number of fundamental issues: federal vs. state powers, balance of powers between the branches of government, big state vs. small state rivalries, and slavery. Delegates were concerned that voters would lack sufficient knowledge of the candidates to make an informed choice and only local favorites would receive popular support. Proponents of the Electoral College wanted the most knowledgeable citizens from each state to select a president based o ...
In Part I of this series I pointed out that although some of the founders felt the people could be trusted in the direct election of the executive officers, most did not.  During the Constitutional Convention of 1787, many ideas were floated as to how to effect their election.
This is one of those rare books that gives even more than it promises. Novelist and history buff, E.E. Murdock, predicts that the 2012 presidential election will have a surprising and disturbing outcome: Barack Obama will win the popular vote by as much as a million votes, but Romney will be named president because of the biased design of the Electoral College system. Dr. Murdock makes his case by analyzing every presidential election in U.S. history, carefully ferreting out historical details that reveal just how the Electoral College has influenced election results since it was created at the Constitutional convention in 1787. Though few people realize it, the Electoral College gives an unfair advantage to the smaller states. It was the reason Al Gore won 543,895 more votes than George Bush in 2000, but did not get to be president.
What Were They Thinking?! The Founding Fathers Compromise If you think the Electoral College system is confusing and unfair, you are not alone. Many Americans share your opinion. In fact, over 700 proposals have been introduced in Congress over the last 200 years intending to either reorganize or eliminate the Electoral College. Even Thomas Jefferson wrote that he considered the Electoral College to be “the most dangerous blot in our Constitution.” So, why do we elect our presidents this way? The simple answer is that the Electoral College was the best solution to selecting the president that the delegates at the Constitutional Convention could agree on. And this solution was a compromise.
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