Constitutional Convention & Continental Congress

A constitutional convention is now a gathering for the purpose of writing a new constitution or revising an existing constitution. The Continental Congress was a convention of delegates called together from the Thirteen Colonies that became the governing body of the United States during the American Revolution. 5.0/5

Constitutional Convention Continental Congress United States Benjamin Franklin Alexander Hamilton James Madison New Jersey Thomas Jefferson John Hancock Postmaster General Provincial Congress George Washington Washington Irving First Amendment John Jay Federalist Papers Revolutionary War

John Hancock 1737-1793 Representing Massachusetts at the Continental Congress by Ole Erekson, Engraver, c1876, Library of CongressBorn: January 12, 1737 Birthplace: Braintree (Quincy), Mass. Education: Graduated Harvard College (Merchant.) Work: Elected to the Boston Assembly, 1766; Delegate to, and President of, the Provincial Congress of Massachusetts, circa 1773; Elected to Continental Congress, 1774; Elected President of the Continental Congress, 1775; Member of Massachusetts state Constitutional Convention, elected Governor of Massachusetts, through 1793. Died: October 8, 1793 The signature of John Hancock on the Declaration of Independence is the most flamboyant and easily recognizable of all. It is perhaps no surprise that the story of his part in the revolution is equally engaging. Few figures were more well known or more popular than John Hancock. He played an instrumental role, sometimes by accident, and other times by design, in coaxing the American Revolution into being. Born in Braintree, Mas ...
George Washington, General of the Revolutionary Army, president of the Constitutional Convention, First President of the United States of America, Father of our nation, " Religion and morality are the essential pillars of civil society." Benjamin Franklin, Signer of the Declaration of Independence "[O]nly a virtuous people are capable of freedom. As nations become corrupt and vicious, they have more need of masters." "Whereas true religion and good morals are the only solid foundations of public liberty and happiness . . . it is hereby earnestly recommended to the several States to take the most effectual measures for the encouragement thereof." Continental Congress, 1778
"O sir, we should have fine times, indeed, if, to punish tyrants, it were only sufficient to assemble the people! Your arms, wherewith you could defend yourselves, are gone..." (Elliot p.3:50-52, in Virginia Ratifying Convention demanding a guarantee of the right to bear arms.) Ben Franklin (member, Continental Congress, signed Declaration of Independence, attended Constitutional Convention, 1st Postmaster General) "Those who would give up essential Liberty to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety." (Respectfully Quoted, p. 201, Suzy Platt, Barnes & Noble, 1993) NOAH WEBSTER (Served in Revolutionary Army, Printed dictionary; a federalist) "Before a standing army can rule, the people must be disarmed; as they are in almost every kingdom in Europe. The supreme power in America cannot enforce unjust laws by the sword; because the whole body of the people are armed." (An Examination of the Leading Principles of the Federal Constitution, Webster1787) "A people can never be depr ...
Born in Ireland, Pierce Bulter came to the United States as an officer in the British Army. During the Revolutionary War he fought for American independence. After the war, he served in the Continental Congress. Later, he, like Charles Pinckney, served as one of South Carolina's four delegates to the Constitutional Convention. At the Convention, he advocated for a strong, central state that could adequately defend itself. He also defended the institution of slavery, advocating for the Fugitive Slave Clause and encouraging other delegates to accept a provision that would count all slaves in the population when determining how many representatives each state would have (instead, the Convention adopted the 3/5 compromise, counting each slave as 3/5 of a person). He also served in the Senate. Through his time in the Senate, Butler made several abrupt political changes. He begun as a Federalist, split to join the Jeffersonian Republicans in 1795, and ultimately declared himself a political independent in ...
a Part of their Continental Congress or Party to the Constitutional Convention would have Give Him (2) Choices→ 1.) To be
The Founding Fathers Delegates to the Constitutional Convention On February 21, 1787, the Continental Congress resolved that: ...it is expedient that on the second Monday in May next a Convention of delegates who shall have been appointed by the several States be held at Philladelphia for the sole and express purpose of revising the Articles of Confederation... The original states, except Rhode Island, collectively appointed 70 individuals to the Constitutional Convention, but a number did not accept or could not attend. Those who did not attend included Richard Henry Lee, Patrick Henry, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Samuel Adams and, John Hancock. In all, 55 delegates attended the Constitutional Convention sessions, but only 39 actually signed the Constitution. The delegates ranged in age from Jonathan Dayton, aged 26, to Benjamin Franklin, aged 81, who was so infirm that he had to be carried to sessions in a sedan chair. biographical overview of all the delegates Biographical Index of America's Founding ...
Delegates of the Constitutional Convention Richard Dobbs Spaight, Sr. (1758-1802) – North Carolina He was born in New Bern, NC, and was orphaned at the age of 8. His guardians sent him to Ireland where he studied and graduated from Scotland’s Glasgow University. Spaight returned to North Carolina in 1778 and immediately joined the state's militia. He served in the state militia as an aide to General Richard Caswell. He served in the North Carolina House of Commons (1781-1783, 1785-1787), and the Continental Congress (1783-1785). At the Constitutional Convention, he spoke on several occasions and attended every session. After the convention, he worked hard for ratification of the Constitution. Spaight served as governor of North Carolina (1792-1795), and served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1798-1801). In 1802, Spaight was killed in a duel with political opponent John Stanly. Very little is known about his religious views. He is listed as an Episcopalian.
June 28, 1836, James Madison, drafter of the Constitution, recorder of the Constitutional Convention, author of the "Federalist Papers" and fourth president of the United States, dies at his home in Montpelier, Virginia. Madison first distinguished himself as a student at the College of New Jersey, where he successfully completed a four-year course of study in two years and, in 1769, helped found the American Whig Society, the second literary and debate society at College of New Jersey, to rival the previously established Cliosophic Society. Madison returned to Virginia with intellectual accolades but poor health in 1771. By 1776, he was sufficiently recovered to serve for three years in the legislature of the new state of Virginia, where he came to know and admire Thomas Jefferson. In this capacity, he assisted with the drafting of the Virginia Declaration of Religious Freedom and the critical decision for Virginia to cede its western claims to the Continental Congress. Madison is best remembered for his ...
Benjamin Franklin (1706-90) was a printer, author, inventor, scientist, philanthropist, statesman, diplomat, and public official. He was the first president of the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery (1774); a member of the Continental Congress (1775-76) where he signed the Declaration of Independence (1776); a negotiator and signer of the final treaty of peace with Great Britain (1783); and a delegate to the Constitutional Convention where he signed the federal Constitution (1787); Franklin was one of only six men who signed both the Declaration and the Constitution. He wrote his own epitaph, which declared: “The body of Benjamin Franklin, printer, like the cover of an old book, its contents torn out, stripped of its lettering, and guilding, lies here, food for worms. But the work shall not be lost; for it will, as he believed, appear once more in a new and more elegant edition, revised and corrected by the Author.” This letter is Franklin's response to a manuscript Thomas Pai ...
January 26, 1814...Rufus King (January 26 or July 26, 1814, New York, NY – October 13, 1876, New York, NY) was a newspaper editor, educator, U.S. diplomat, and a Union brigadier general in the Civil War. King was the grandson of Rufus King, delegate for Massachusetts to the Continental Congress and the Constitutional Convention. After graduation from Columbia College, where his father, Charles King, served as president, King enrolled in the United States Military Academy at West Point. King graduated near the top of his class, and was appointed to the engineer corps in 1833. He resigned his commission in 1836. After a short time with the New York and Erie Railroad, King served as the associate editor for two newspapers, the Albany Evening Journal and the Albany Advertiser (1841–45). At this point, he left New York and moved to the Wisconsin Territory, accomplishing a mixture of politics (member of the 1848 Wisconsin constitutional convention), journalism (part owner of the Milwaukee Sentinel and Gaze ...
Public prayer has always been part of government and life in America. Ever since the first Continental Congress, legislative meetings have always opened in prayer. Benjamin Franklin supported a call for prayer when the Constitutional Convention became bogged down in controversy. When America became involved in World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt took to the airwaves himself to offer a prayer for the nation. So why are some in America now trying to ban legislative and public prayers? Listen to Law Talk Live this week as Attorney David Gibbs discusses public prayer in America. Saturdays from 11 AM - 12 CST on the Moody Radio Network.
Nathaniel Gorham (father of Benjamin Gorham), a Delegate from Massachusetts; born in Charlestown, Mass., May 27, 1738; attended the public schools; engaged in mercantile pursuits; member of the provincial legislature 1771-1775; delegate to the Provincial Congress in 1774 and 1775; member of the board of war 1778-1781; delegate to the State constitutional convention in 1779; served in the State senate in 1780 and 1781; Member of the Continental Congress in 1782, 1783, 1786, 1787, and 1789, and was its president from June 6, 1786, to February 2, 1787; delegate to the Federal Convention at Philadelphia in 1787; delegate to the State constitutional convention which ratified the Federal Constitution in 1788; judge of the court of common pleas from July 1, 1785, until his resignation on May 31, 1796; interested in the purchase and settlement of lands in the Genesee Valley, N.Y.; died in Charlestown, Mass., June 11, 1796; interment in Phipps Street Cemetery.
On June 28, 1787, at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, following the historical address and appeal for prayer by Dr. Benjamin Franklin (which ended the heated debates over state representation), Edmund Jennings Randolph of Virginia (Revolutionary leader, member of the Continental Congress, Gov of Va, US Attorney General and U.S. Secretary of State) moved: That a sermon be preached at the request of the convention on the 4th of July, the anniversary of Independence & thenceforwrd prayers be used in ye Convention every morning. Prayers have opened both houses of Congress ever since.
Our Founding Fathers were successful businessmen. The Founding Fathers: A Brief Overview The 55 delegates who attended the Constitutional Convention were a distinguished body of men who represented a cross section of 18th-century American leadership. Almost all of them were well-educated men of means who were dominant in their communities and states, and many were also prominent in national affairs. Virtually every one had taken part in the Revolution; at least 29 had served in the Continental forces, most of them in positions of command. Political Experience The group, as a whole, had extensive political experience. At the time of the convention, four-fifths, or 41 individuals, were or had been members of the Continental Congress. Mifflin and Gorham had served as president of the body. The only ones who lacked congressional experience were Bassett, Blair, Brearly, Broom, Davie, Dayton, Alexander Martin, Luther Martin, Mason, McClurg, Paterson, Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, Strong, and Yates. Eight men (Cl ...
Documents from the Continental Congress and the Constitutional Convention, 1774-1789 - (American Memory from the Libra…
You confused me 20 years ago when I was a sophomore and now you've resurfaced while my kid asks for advice in his 10th grade year: trying to tell the difference in Constitutional Convention and the Continental Congress.
If Reported by Fox News: John Q. Adams, son of our 2nd President John Adams, was sworn into office today without swearing on a bible. Local groups are outraged at the blatant atheism plaguing Washington, D.C. and are fighting to put God back in the Oval Office where he belongs. Three people, speaking for the hundreds of thousands of Americans have already begun court filings for impeachment proceedings against the new President, arguing his lack of understanding of the Founding Fathers (of which his father is allegedly a member, having been part of the Continental Congress to declare independence) intent regarding church and state. However, Fox is now aware, that President Adams' father was not at the Constitutional Convention in which the great document was writ and crafted, but was instead exiled by the Congress to England under the liberal cloak of diplomacy. We have it on good authority, that being ourselves, that Adams was a communist, though 70 years before Marx and Engels will write their mani ...
On July 20, 1776, PA Constitutional Convention votes Benjamin Rush to be a delegate at the 2nd Continental Congress:
Happy Fake Birthday, America! Technically it's not today and it's not July 2, 1776 when the Continental Congress dissolved our political bands with the British. ACTUALLY, America was born on September 17, 1787 when the Constitutional Convention adopted the Supreme Law of the Land and set out to bring the people of the United States into a more perfect union. But oh well...Happy Birthday!
June 28th Ben Franklin’s Reminder In the summer of 1787, the Constitutional Convention met at Independence Hall in Philadelphia to decide how to set up a new government. At times the arguments grew bitter, and tempers flared in the summer heat. Some delegates verged on quitting when they reached an impasse over whether representation was to be based on the population of each state or if each state should be given one vote. Historians have called this period the “critical juncture” in the Convention. The country was brand-new, and already it looked as though it might fall apart. On June 28, 1787, eighty-one-year-old Benjamin Franklin, the oldest delegate, rose from his seat and made a simple but profound suggestion: they should pray for guidance. He reminded the others that the Continental Congress had asked for divine aid at the start of the Revolutionary War. “Our prayers, sir, were heard, and they were graciously answered,” he said. “And have we now forgotten that powerful Friend? Or do we i ...
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