Constitutional Convention & Civil War

A constitutional convention is now a gathering for the purpose of writing a new constitution or revising an existing constitution. A civil war is a war between organized groups within the same nation state or republic, or, less commonly, between two countries created from a formerly-united nation state. 5.0/5

Constitutional Convention Civil War United States George Washington American Revolution Babe Ruth Supreme Court Vice President National Football League Warren Burger New Orleans Nobel Peace Prize Star Wars Alexander Hamilton Andrew Jackson Ulysses Grant Old Hickory

TIME TRAVELING, SEPTEMBER 17 1787 The Constitution of the United States of America is signed by delegates at the Constitutional Convention. 1862 At the Battle of Antietam during the Civil War, Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia and Union General George B. McClellan’s Army of the Potomac fight to a standstill along a Maryland creek on the bloodiest day in American history. More than 23,000 men are killed, wounded, or missing. Lee ends his invasion of the North and retreats back to Virginia. 1908 An airplane crashes during a demonstration in Arlington Heights, Va., Thomas Selfridge is killed, becoming the first person to be killed in an airplane accident. Orville Wright, the pilot, survives with multiple hip and leg fractures. 1916 The German air ace Manfred von Richthofen – known to history as the “Red Baron” – shoots down his first enemy plane over the Western Front during World War I, a British craft piloted by British Second Lt. Lionel Morris. By the time he is sho ...
THIS IS UNACCEPTABLE! The College Board, the company that issues the SAT and the various Advanced Placement (AP) exams, has created an elaborate new framework for the AP U.S. History Exam that will effectively force nearly all American high schools, public and private, to transform the way they teach U.S. History." So. "How bad is the new AP U.S. History Framework? Via (State Board of Education) Ken Mercer Here are a few key items verified with Larry Krieger (retired teacher and author recognized by the College Board as one of the best AP teachers in 2004 and 2005) and Jane Robbins (Senior Fellow at the American Principles Project): ~ In the period of the American Revolution up to the 1787 Constitutional Convention, almost every Founding Father is omitted – no Jefferson, Adams, Madison, or Franklin. The Framework excludes Lexington, Concord, Bunker Hill, Valley Forge, Saratoga, and Yorktown. The commanders and heroes of these pivotal battles are all omitted. ~ The lessons on the Civil War omit the Linc ...
In the 225 years of the Republic's existence, there have been several attempts made by the states to contravene or otherwise oppose the policies of the President of the United States and the federal government. Each of these attempts ended in disaster for those in the in the minority. 1. In 1787 Rhode Island and Providence Plantations refused to send delegates to the Constitutional Convention as a show of its opposition to the Convention. The subsequent failure of North Carolina in 1788 and the unwillingness of Rhode Island to ratify the Constitution until 1790 nearly rendered both states bankrupt. 2.In 1814-1815 the Federalist dominated Hartford Convention opposed the foreign policies of the Democratic Republican Party and advocated the secession of New England from the Union which effectively destroyed the Federalist Party. 3. The opposition of Southern Democrats to Jacksonian and Lincolnian policies led to the Nullification Crisis and the Civil War. In each of these instances the resistance of the sta ...
Today: On September 17, 1787, the United States Constitution was signed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania after the weeks of debate and compromise that had been the Constitutional Convention. The battle to ratify the document had been rough. Every time the delegates thought they had the Constitution ironed out, another subject was put up for debate. But the delegates were steadfast and the Constitution was narrowly ratified. The minimum amount of states, nine out of thirteen, actually voted to ratify the document. Also, on September 17, 1862 during the Civil War, the Battle of Antietam was fought near Sharpsburg, Maryland. The battle itself actually consisted of three smaller battles, the first beginning when Union troops under General Joseph Hooker assaulted Confederate General Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson’s men near the Dunker Church, Miller’s Cornfield, and the West Woods. The Yanks attacked repeatedly, but each time the Confederates forced them back with their own counterattacks. The second phase of ...
This Day in History...September 17th 1787 The U.S. Constitution was completed and signed by a majority of delegates attending the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. On Sept. 17, 1862, Union forces hurled back a Confederate invasion of Maryland in the Civil War battle of Antietam. With 23,100 killed, wounded or captured, it remains the bloodiest day in U.S. military history. 1907 Warren Burger, the 15th chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, was born in St. Paul, Minn. 1920 The American Professional Football Association - a precursor of the National Football League - was formed in Canton, Ohio. On Sept. 17, 1934, Maureen Connolly, the first woman to win the tennis Grand Slam, was born. Following her death on June 21, 1969, her obituary appeared in The Times 1939 The Soviet Union invaded Poland during World War II. 1947 James V. Forrestal was sworn in as the first U.S. secretary of defense. 1972 The comedy series "M.A.S.H." premiered on CBS. 1976 NASA unveiled the space shuttle Enterprise. 1980 Fo ...
Are you even qualified to be a citizen, much less vote? Voter Registration Quiz (given in writing, verbal, or braille ENGLISH ONLY) Must get at 21 correct in order to vote for the people that will control the government that is supposed to serve US! 1. The idea of self-government is in the first three words of the Constitution. What are these words? Congress shall make We the British We the Colonists We the People 2. What is one thing Benjamin Franklin is famous for? youngest member of the Constitutional Convention third President of the United States inventor of the airplane U.S. diplomat 3. Name one problem that led to the Civil War. sugar westward expansion slavery oil 4. If both the President and the Vice President can no longer serve, who becomes President? the President Pro Tempore the Speaker of the House the Secretary of State the Secretary of the Treasury 5. Who was President during the Great Depression and World War II? Herbert Hoover Calvin Coolidge Franklin Roosevelt Harry Truman 6. How many j ...
ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY IN 1977: Star Wars opens; 1787: Constitutional Convention convenes in Philadelphia; 1994: Pennsylvania man buried with his beloved Corvette; 1862: Confederates score a victory at Final Battle of Winchester; 1977: Chinese government removes ban on Shakespeare; 1861: President Lincoln suspends the writ of habeas corpus during the Civil War; 1895: Oscar Wilde is sent to prison for indecency; 1979: DC-10 crashes, killing all aboard; 1660: The English Restoration; 1793: Catholic priest ordained in America; 1979: Worst air crash in U.S. history; 1911: Thomas Mann visits the Lido in Venice; 1927: International best-selling thriller writer Robert Ludlum is born; 1878: HMS Pinafore premieres in London; 1975: Grizzly Bear is classified as "threatened" species; 1961: JFK asks Congress to support the space program; 1935: Babe Ruth hits last home run; 1968: Communist launch new offensive; 1969: National Democratic Front formed in Saigon; 1915: Large-scale deportations of Armenians begin in Turke ...
George Washington was born FEBRUARY 22, 1732. Washington was unanimously chosen as the Army's Commander-in-Chief, unanimously chosen as President of the Constitutional Convention, and unanimously chosen as the first U.S. President. As General, Washington acknowledged God after victories throughout the Revolution and as President thanked God for the Constitution, October 3, 1789: “Whereas it is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the Providence of Almighty God...I do recommend...rendering unto Him our sincere and humble thanks, for...the favorable interpositions of His Providence...we experienced in the course and conclusion of the late war...for the peaceable and rational manner in which we have been enabled to establish constitutions of government.” Washington was Anglican, and after the Revolution, Episcopalian. His great-great-grandfather, Rev. Lawrence Washington, was an Anglican minister in Essex, England, who lost his position when the Puritans won the Civil War. Washington's great-grandfathe ...
January 26, 1814...Rufus King (January 26 or July 26, 1814, New York, NY – October 13, 1876, New York, NY) was a newspaper editor, educator, U.S. diplomat, and a Union brigadier general in the Civil War. King was the grandson of Rufus King, delegate for Massachusetts to the Continental Congress and the Constitutional Convention. After graduation from Columbia College, where his father, Charles King, served as president, King enrolled in the United States Military Academy at West Point. King graduated near the top of his class, and was appointed to the engineer corps in 1833. He resigned his commission in 1836. After a short time with the New York and Erie Railroad, King served as the associate editor for two newspapers, the Albany Evening Journal and the Albany Advertiser (1841–45). At this point, he left New York and moved to the Wisconsin Territory, accomplishing a mixture of politics (member of the 1848 Wisconsin constitutional convention), journalism (part owner of the Milwaukee Sentinel and Gaze ...
West Virginia was a product of the Civil War. When Virginia seceded from the Union, Western Virginians soon formed a new state. Although Booker T. Washington and others made the journey across the mountains, West Virginia did not become a general refuge for slaves and free blacks. The state’s first ...
Regarding states Rights and secession: Nowhere in the Constitution is there any mention of the union of the states being permanent. This was not an oversight by any means. Indeed, when New York, Rhode Island, and Virginia ratified the Constitution, they specifically stated that they reserved the right to resume the governmental powers granted to the United States. Their claim to the right of secession was understood and agreed to by the other ratifiers, including George Washington, who presided over the Constitutional Convention and was also a delegate from Virginia. In his book Life of Webster Sen. Henry Cabot Lodge writes, "It is safe to say that there was not a man in the country, from Washington and Hamilton to Clinton and Mason, who did not regard the new system as an experiment from which each and every State had a right to peaceably withdraw." A textbook used at West Point before the Civil War, A View of the Constitution, written by Judge William Rawle, states, "The secession of a State depends on ...
Where to Put president # 44 Where, oh where -- to put Obama's picture. George Washington, our nation's first president and leader of the American Revolution. Abe Lincoln, honorable leader who pulled our nation through its darkest time. Alexander Hamilton, founding father, first Secretary of the Treasury and leader of the constitutional convention. Andrew Jackson, "Old Hickory " fought the British in New Orleans . Ulysses Grant, Union army general, led the North through the Civil War. Ben Franklin, genius inventor, political theorist and leading author of the Constitution. Finally, we have someone to put on the food stamp Obama's policies have put more people on welfare than any president before him, so this placement is most appropriate. Unlike the Nobel Peace Prize, for which he did nothing, this is an "honor" he richly deserves.
This Day In Wisconsin History • 1846 - First State Constitutional Convention Meets On this date Wisconsin's first state Constitutional Convention met in Madison. The Convention sat until December 16,1846. The Convention was attended by 103 Democrats and 18 Whigs. The proposed constitution failed when voters refused to accept several controversial issues:... • 1864 - (Civil War) Battle of Allatoona Pass, Georgia The 18th Wisconsin Infantry and 12th Wisconsin Light Artillery were among the outnumbered Union troops who held Allatoona Pass outside Atlanta, Georgia, when� attacked by a larger Confederate force. • 1892 - Gardner Robert Withrow Born On this date Gardner Robert Withrow was born in La Crosse, Wisconsin. He was elected to the Wisconsin assembly in 1926 and 1927 and went on to be elected as a Republican to the Seventy-second and Seventy-third Congresses and as... • 1918 - Allen Ludden Born On this date Allen Ludden was born in Mineral Point. Ludden hosted the TV gameshow Password and was m ...
This was part of the reason we had a Civil War, sound familiar? States versus federal rights. Since the time of the Revolution, two camps emerged: those arguing for greater states rights and those arguing that the federal government needed to have more control. The first organized government in the US after the American Revolution was under the Articles of Confederation. The thirteen states formed a loose confederation with a very weak federal government. However, when problems arose, the weakness of this form of government caused the leaders of the time to come together at the Constitutional Convention and create, in secret, the US Constitution. Strong proponents of states rights like Thomas Jefferson and Patrick Henry were not present at this meeting. Many felt that the new constitution ignored the rights of states to continue to act independently. They felt that the states should still have the right to decide if they were willing to accept certain federal acts. This resulted in the idea of nullificati ...
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