Constitutional Convention & Alexander Hamilton

A constitutional convention is now a gathering for the purpose of writing a new constitution or revising an existing constitution. Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757  – July 12, 1804) was a Founding Father, soldier, economist, political philosopher, one of America's first constitutional lawyers and the first United States Secretary of the Treasury. 5.0/5

Constitutional Convention Alexander Hamilton United States James Madison George Washington United States Constitution Andrew Jackson Continental Congress New Jersey American Revolution Gouverneur Morris John Jay New York Federalist Papers Federalist Party Elbridge Gerry

This is an email which I received from our Lt Governor, the Honorable Dan Forest. Re: Ruling of a federal judge to overturn the ban on same sex marriages in North Carolina. This is well worth the read. Friday, an unelected federal judge violated the foundational principles of this great nation. In 1787, at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia and later by ratification, the states relinquished a limited amount of power to a federal government. The document we call the Constitution set out a detailed and enumerated list of powers to be held by the federal government, and in the Tenth Amendment the states left a reminder that “the powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.” In his 1788 speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, Alexander Hamilton said, “The state governments possess inherent advantages, which will ever give them an influence and ascendancy over the National G .. ...
On this day in 1836, James Madison, drafter of the Constitution, recorder of the Constitutional Convention, author of the "Federalist Papers" and fourth president of the United States, dies on his tobacco plantation in Virginia. Madison first distinguished himself as a student at the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), where he successfully completed a four-year course of study in two years and, in 1769, helped found the American Whig Society, the second literary and debate society at Princeton (and the world), to rival the previously established Cliosophic Society. Madison returned to Virginia with intellectual accolades but poor health in 1771. By 1776, he was sufficiently recovered to serve for three years in the legislature of the new state of Virginia, where he came to know and admire Thomas Jefferson. In this capacity, he assisted with the drafting of the Virginia Declaration of Religious Freedom and the critical decision for Virginia to cede its western claims to the Continental Congr ...
If you really want to know how the United States started to develop a monolithic government you should look from the beginning of this nation. When the Constitutional Convention was taking place there were the federalists and the anti-federalists. They debated back and forth on what nation they would set up. The anti-federalists like Patrick Henry were vehemently against The Constitution and had said that it would let government grow. The federalists like Alexander Hamilton said The Constitution will not let government grow. Turns out the anti-federalists were right! Now the United States has a government that is leviathan in nature and out of control. Not only that, but during the Lincoln administration government grew the most, and instead of freeing all the slaves, the Emancipation Proclamation made everyone a slave to the United State Federal Government while launching the most unnecessary war amongst the people. Then as the progressive era came with FDR's administration, Woodrow Wilson's administrat ...
I have been studying the evil genius of Alexander Hamilton. I don't regard him as a Founding Father ... but a very clever, power seeking scoundrel ... whose actions served only to undermine our Free Republic. Hamilton fought hard to free us from British tyranny so he could establish his own tyranny ... as Emperor of the United States. During the Constitutional Convention ... Hamilton embarrassed himself and frightened the other delegates by proposing a monarchy and aristocracy based on the British model ... which he considered the perfect form of government. Thankfully the majority of our Founding Fathers ignored Hamilton and gambled on a Free Republic. Despite his imperial sentiments ... Hamilton had been Washington's trusted aide de camp in the Revolution (possibly a spy) and was known for his financial brilliance ... so Washington appointed him as our nation's first Secretary of the Treasury. From this powerful position Hamilton immediately went to work to centralize and concentrate power into the hand ...
Call a Constitutional Convention, Already! Article V: A gift from the founders. By Allen Mendenhall – 3.14.14 We've talked endlessly about using a Constitutional convention to wrest the reins of government from entrenched interests and put them back in the hands of the people. Enough talk: It's time to put the theory into action. To recap, the Constitution may be amended in two ways: by a two-thirds vote of Congress, or by a convention called by two-thirds (34) of the (50) state legislatures. All amendments to date have arisen through the first mechanism, although conservatives and libertarians increasingly are calling for state lawmakers to pursue the second. If 34 states pass convention measures, Congress must convene a convention to discuss amending the constitution. In the words of James Madison, who was instrumental to the drafting of Article V, "If two thirds of the States make application, Congress cannot refuse to call one." Even the centralizer Alexander Hamilton conceded that the wording of Ar ...
In a duel held in Weehawken, New Jersey, Vice President Aaron Burr fatally shoots his long-time political antagonist Alexander Hamilton. Hamilton, a leading Federalist and the chief architect of America's Political Economy, died the following day. Alexander Hamilton, born on the Caribbean island of Nevis, came to the American colonies in 1773 as a poor immigrant. (There is some controversy as to the year of his birth, but it was either 1755 or 1757.) In 1776, he joined the Continental Army in the American Revolution, and his relentless energy and remarkable intelligence brought him to the attention of General George Washington, who took him on as an aid. Ten years later, Hamilton served as a delegate to the Constitutional Convention, and he led the fight to win ratification of the final document, which created the kind of strong, centralized government that he favored. In 1789, he was appointed the first secretary of the treasury by President Washington, and during the next six years he crafted a sophisti ...
Today is Friday, January 31, 2014 Today in American Revolutionary War History 1752 - Patriot Gouverneur Morris was born in New York. At the Constitutional Convention of 1787 he represented Pennsylvania. He served as an ambassador to France from 1792-1794 and was a senator from New York from 1800-1803. Revolutionary War Quotes "I think the first duty of society is justice." Alexander Hamilton
“It is a general remark, that he who pays is the master.” - Alexander Hamilton at the Constitutional Convention.
Missouri Gov. Nixon seems confused about history... In his veto letter for the Second Amendment Preservation Act, he says the Supremacy Clause was "an idea derived from Alexander Hamilton's Federalist Paper No. 33 and James Madison's Federalist Paper No. 44". Humm... The Constitution was completed and signed by the delegates at the Constitutional Convention on Sept. 17, A.D. 1787 and Federalist 33 & 44 were published Jan. 2nd, & 25, 1788, respectively. How could they have gotten the idea for the Supremacy Clause from documents that didn't exist for another 3 1/2 to 4 months? What else might the governor be missing? How about the argument Hamilton used to convince the People to ratify the proposed constitution. He said, "the laws of Congress are restricted to a certain sphere, and when they depart from this sphere, **they are no longer supreme or binding**” (Alexander Hamilton, at New York’s ratifying convention).
I am a Theocrat and a Kinist. I Hate Democracy and Equality. MARCH 3, 2013 BY ADMIN 1 COMMENT I agree with John Randolph of Roanoke, whose most famous saying was: “I am an aristocrat. I love liberty, I hate equality.” Russell Kirk called Randolph “a genius, the prophet of Southern nationalism, and the architect of Southern conservatism.” “Inequality will exist as long as liberty exists. It unavoidably results from that very liberty itself.” ~ Alexander Hamilton at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, June 26, 1787 ”Equality can destroy liberty!” ~ R.J. Rushdoony “Democratism and its allied herd movements, while remaining loyal to the principle of equality and identity, will never hesitate to sacrifice liberty.” ~ Erik von Kuehnelt-Leddihn “[D]emocracies have ever been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property; and have, in general, been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths.” ~ James Madison “Democracy has nothing to ...
At the Constitutional Convention in 1787, James Madison explained the requirement for impeachment: “provision should be made for defending the community against the incapacity, negligence, or perfidy of the chief magistrate. He might pervert his administration into a scheme of peculation or oppression. He might betray his trust to foreign powers.” In the Federalist Papers (No. 65), Alexander Hamilton wrote that a president should be impeached for “offenses which proceed from the misconduct of public men, or in other words, from the abuse or violation of some public trust. They are of a nature which may with peculiar propriety be denominated political, as they relate chiefly to injuries done immediately to society itself.” Should Barack Hussein Obama, the 44th president of the United States, be impeached for high crimes and misdemeanors? It’s not a question yet being asked or debated in the Big Media. But it is a question being addressed by some members of Congress, by an increasing number of pun ...
by the way.a bill to explicity remove a prohibition against the federal government printing of paper money from the Constitution was voted in favor at the Constitutional Convention. In other words, it was in there originally, but was removed before final passage. James Madison mentions in one of the footnotes of his Federalist Papers that the states woudl be prevented from doing so, and that it was a great thing. Patrick Henry saw it as one of the greatest evils possible, and Alexander Hamilton, of course, as the nation's first banker and Treasury Secretary, was in favor of paper money. So we are left to infer today that since 9 states voted to remove the passage prohibiting the federal government from printing paper money, that they did not intend to put that restriction on; to leave it open to possibility. The authority today is deemed to derive from the Necessary and Proper clause: "To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the [enumerated] Powers, and all other P ...
4th U.S. President James Madison At his inauguration, James Madison, a small, wizened man, appeared old and worn; Washington Irving described him as "but a withered little apple-John." But whatever his deficiencies in charm, Madison's buxom wife Dolley compensated for them with her warmth and gaiety. She was the toast of Washington. Born in 1751, Madison was brought up in Orange County, Virginia, and attended Princeton (then called the College of New Jersey). A student of history and government, well-read in law, he participated in the framing of the Virginia Constitution in 1776, served in the Continental Congress, and was a leader in the Virginia Assembly. When delegates to the Constitutional Convention assembled at Philadelphia, the 36-year-old Madison took frequent and emphatic part in the debates. Madison made a major contribution to the ratification of the Constitution by writing, with Alexander Hamilton and John Jay, the Federalist essays. In later years, when he was referred to as the "Father of t ...
Republics and Democracies (V) By Robert Welch The Founders Knew the Difference Let's look at some of the things they said to support and clarify this purpose. On May 31, 1787, Edmund Randolph told his fellow members of the newly-assembled Constitutional Convention that the object for which the delegates had met was "to provide a cure for the evils under which the United States labored; that in tracing these evils to their origin every man had found it in the turbulence and trials of democracy ..." The delegates to the Convention were clearly in accord with this statement. At about the same time another delegate, Elbridge Gerry, said: "The evils we experience flow from the excess of democracy. The people do not want (that is, do not lack) virtue; but are the dupes of pretended patriots." And on June 21,1788, Alexander Hamilton made a speech in which he stated: It had been observed that a pure democracy if it were practicable would be the most perfect government. Experience has proved that no position is mo ...
The Founding Father of Constitutional Subversion by Thomas J. DiLorenzo by Thomas J. DiLorenzo DIGG THIS Upon learning that my new book on Alexander Hamilton (Hamilton's Curse: How Jefferson's Archenemy Betrayed the American Revolution — And What It Means for Americans Today) will be published in October, a law student from New York University emailed to say how excited he was to hear of it. He wrote of how sick and tired he was listening to one of his NYU law professors, Nadine Strossen, constantly invoking Hamilton's judicial philosophy (and that of his political descendants) to promote bigger and bigger government, day in and day out, in class. Being schooled in the classical liberal tradition, this student understood that bigger and bigger government always means less and less individual liberty. Hamilton was indeed the founding father of constitutional subversion through what we now call "judicial activism." That's why leftist law professors like Strossen lionize him in their classrooms while barel ...
OUR “FRAMERS” AND “Founding Fathers”: Of the 55 original delegates to the last Constitutional Convention leading up to the signing of the Constitution of the United States of America on September 17, 1787, only 38 delegates and one secretary (William Jackson) were present for the signing. Three of the delegates who were present refused to sign but eventually came back in the fold (George Mason, Edmund Randolph, and Elbridge Gerry). That would be 100% of the delegates present if they had it to do over again. John Dickinson of Delaware wasn’t able to attend but had George Read sign his name in absentia, for a total of 39 delegate signatures plus one signature by Secretary William Jackson. The 40 signatures on the final Constitution are: George Washington, President & Deputy from VA: Benjamin Franklin, PA: James Madison, VA: Alexander Hamilton, NY: Gouverneur Morris, PA: Robert Morris, PA: James Wilson, PA: Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, SC: Charles Pinckney, SC: John Rutledge, SC: Pierce Butler, ...
The Constitution, it is often remarked, establishes a government of limited powers -- an unobjectionable truth -- but the fact that its powers are limited does not negate the mountain of evidence that those venerable lions who invented American democracy were far more concerned with corporate usurpations of freedom than by any threat posed by a government fairly elected by the people. "The power of all corporations ought to be limited," wrote James Madison, the framer whose influence echoes most resoundingly in the Constitution, as "the growing wealth acquired by them never fails to be a source of abuses." Madison's preference for a strong national government was borne of a distaste for the debtor relief laws being passed by state legislatures during the post-war economic downturn of the 1780s. Like fellow Federalists James Wilson and Alexander Hamilton, he saw the Constitutional Convention as an opportunity to craft a central government powerful enough to serve as an effective check on the states -- an e ...
Q. Who actually wrote the Constitution? A. In none of the relatively meager records of the Constitutional Convention is the literary authorship of any part of the Constitution definitely established. The deputies debated proposed plans until, on July 24, 1787, substantial agreement having been reached, a Committee of Detail was appointed, consisting of John Rutledge, of South Carolina; Edmund Randolph, of Virginia; Nathaniel Gorham, of Massachusetts; Oliver Ellsworth, of Connecticut; and James Wilson, of Pennsylvania, who on August 6 reported a draft which included a Preamble and twenty-three articles, embodying fifty-seven sections. Debate continued until September 8, when a new Committee of Style was named to revise the draft. This committee included William Samuel Johnson, of Connecticut; Alexander Hamilton, of New York; Gouverneur Morris, of Pennsylvania; James Madison, of Virginia; and Rufus King, of Massachusetts, and they reported the draft in approximately its final shape on September 12. The actu ...
James Madison AND THE MAKING OF AMERICA Author: Kevin Gutzman. Page 97: Alexander Hamilton at the Philadelphia Convention/Constitutional Convention: "Let one branch of the legislature hold their places for life or at least during good-behaviour." This recorded historical discussion during the creation and framing of the United States Constitution provides proof that those creating the United States' foundational document specifically distinguished between term limits of "life" and "good-behaviour". That the "good-behaviour" terminology did not imply then and does not imply today to the provision of or guarantee to a "life" tenure as has traditionally and erroneously been granted to United States Supreme Court Justices.
America's Founding Fathers - We need men like these to restore the principles of limited government, personal responsibility, individual liberty, private property rights and free markets . . . Samuel Adams, (1722-1803), signed the Declaration of Independence, lieutenant governor, and was known as the “Father of the American Revolution”. John Adams, (1735-1826), was vice president under George Washington, president, minister to France, minister to Britain, recommended Washington for commander in chief of the Continental Army, and wrote A Defense of the Constitutions of the Government of the United States. John Quincy Adams 1767-1848 Fisher Ames 1758-1808 Abraham Baldwin was a chaplain in the Continental Army, signed the Constitution, a U.S. senator, and founded the University of Georgia. Richard Bassett, (1745-1815), signed the Constitution, was a U.S. senator, and was also a governor. Gunning Bedford, (1747-1812), signed the Constitution and attended the Constitutional Convention. John Blair, (1732-18 ...
In a speech to the Constitutional Convention in Philedelphia on June 18, 1787, Alexander Hamilton said this."Give all power to the many, they will oppress the few. Give all power to the few, they will oppres the many. Both, therefore ought to have power that each may defend itself aginst the other." This I think is reflected 225 years later in President Obama's statement that."We are all in this together. We are all Americans, and we all rise or fall together."
October 27, 1787 Anniversary of the first publication of the Federalist Papers The Federalist Papers, were a series of 85 essays written by Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison between October 1787 and May 1788. The essays were published anonymously, under the pen name "Publius," primarily in two New York state newspapers of the time: The New York Packet and The Independent Journal. They were written to urge citizens of New York to support ratification of the proposed United States Constitution. Significantly, the essays explain particular provisions of the Constitution in detail. It is for this reason, and because Hamilton and Madison were members of the Constitutional Convention, that the Federalist Papers are often used today to help understand the intentions of those drafting the Constitution. A bound edition of the essays, with revisions and corrections by Hamilton, was published in 1788 by printers J. and A. McLean. A later edition, published by printer Jacob Gideon in 1818, with revision ...
Know Your U.S. Government/ The Electoral College was created in the U.S. Constitution in order to prevent "Mob Rule", according to Alexander Hamilton. During the Constitutional Convention (1787) the French Revolution was in full throttle with the Reign of Terror placing undesirable aristocrats under the blade of the guillotine. To the Constitutional Framers this was democracy gone mad! The Framers of the U.S. Constitution were frightened of this French form of majority rule. Subsequently, the Framers insisted that a "Council of Wise Men" selected within each State would directly elect the U.S. President. This would prevent 'Mob Rule' from selecting the wrong person for President. [Notation: Andrew Jackson changed the Electoral College during the 1830's from a "Council of Wise Men" to a strictly political process. Electors are now selected by the political party. When voting for President the list of names (Electors) listed under the candidate's name are in reality who the voter is voting for in the elect ...
Ben Franklin, Founding Father & American Inventor "I therefore beg leave to move that henceforth prayers imploring the assistance of Heaven, and its blessing on our deliberations, be held in this Assembly every morning..." - Ben Franklin "A Bible and a newspaper in every house, a good school in every district; all studied and appreciated as they merit; are the principal support of virtue, morality, and civil liberty." - Ben Franklin - George Washington Carver 'The secret of my success? It is simple. It is found in the Bible', "In all thy ways acknowledge Him and He shall direct thy paths." - George Washington Carver, 1939 - Thomas Jefferson, Founding Father "I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just; that His justice cannot sleep forever." - Thomas Jefferson, 1871 "I have sworn upon the altar of god eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man." - Thomas Jefferson (inscribed around the inside of the dome of the Jefferson Memorial in Washington) - Alexander Hamilton " ...
Where to Put president # 44 Where, oh where -- to put Obama's picture. George Washington, our nation's first president and leader of the American Revolution. Abe Lincoln, honorable leader who pulled our nation through its darkest time. Alexander Hamilton, founding father, first Secretary of the Treasury and leader of the constitutional convention. Andrew Jackson, "Old Hickory " fought the British in New Orleans . Ulysses Grant, Union army general, led the North through the Civil War. Ben Franklin, genius inventor, political theorist and leading author of the Constitution. Finally, we have someone to put on the food stamp Obama's policies have put more people on welfare than any president before him, so this placement is most appropriate. Unlike the Nobel Peace Prize, for which he did nothing, this is an "honor" he richly deserves.
We often forget that the main reason the Constitutional Convention met in 1787 was to resolve a financial crisis—one more serious even than ours of today.
Dissatisfied with the weaknesses of Articles of Confederation, in 1787 Washington presided over the Constitutional Convention that drafted the United States Constitution. Elected unanimously as the first President of the United States in 1789, he attempted to bring rival factions together to unify the nation. He supported Alexander Hamilton's programs to pay off all state and national debt, to implement an effective tax system and to create a national bank (despite opposition from Thomas Jefferson). Washington proclaimed the United States neutral in the wars raging in Europe after 1793. He avoided war with Great Britain and guaranteed a decade of peace and profitable trade by securing the Jay Treaty in 1795, despite intense opposition from the Jeffersonians. Although never officially joining the Federalist Party, he supported its programs. Washington's "Farewell Address" was an influential primer on republican virtue and a warning against partisanship, sectionalism, and involvement in foreign wars ... Con ...
The plan for enslavement was put into effect at the Constitutional Convention via Alexander Hamilton and his minions whom I will not include in this message. But please feel free to do so if you so desire. Thank you for your participation.
Is it sad that I just got excited I got assigned Alexander Hamilton for our "Constitutional Convention" in government?...
Alexander Hamilton suggestion at Constitutional Convention for 1st Gov't "a monarchy"
It is important to remember that our nation is a Republic, not a democracy as has been taught aggressively since the Progressive Movement. Thus, the government's job is to protect the individual liberties of each citizen regardless of the majority--the majority does not have the Constitutional right to infringe upon the rights of the minority. In fact, the Constitutional Convention was intended to "improve" the Articles of Confederation; however, because many of the founders were concerned with the excess of democracy the determined to create the Constitution and discard the Articles of Confederation. For instance, Alexander Hamilton specifically noted he was growing "tired of the excess of democracy." Meanwhile, many others identified the problem as "a headstrong democracy," a "prevailing rage of excessive democracy," a "republican frenzy," "democratical tyranny," and "democratic licentiousness." Likewise, James Madison believed the Founders had rescued white Americans from kingly despotism only to ...
President Trump Marine Le Pen White House Donald Trump Cuba Gooding Sr North Korea Supreme Court Jeremy Corbyn Theresa May Ugo Ehiogu South Korea Julian Assange Sarah Palin Middle East Aston Villa Ann Coulter Kid Rock Celta Vigo Wells Fargo Free Fire Serena Williams Earth Day Aaron Hernandez Hillary Clinton Unicorn Frappuccino Silicon Valley Champs Elysees President Nicolas Maduro Man Utd South Africa Manchester United Ivanka Trump General Election Harry Styles Len McCluskey Olive Garden New Song Riz Ahmed Sith Lord London Marathon Sean Spicer Will Smith New Orleans Saints Star Wars Mutual Fund Fox Mulder Adam Johnson Dana Scully Cardell Hayes Steve Irwin Health Law Carl Vinson Michael Bloomberg Gillian Anderson New Book Nicolas Maduro Ted Nugent St George Henrietta Lacks Katherine Heigl Real Madrid Great Britain Champions League New Zealand Justice Dept Bernie Sanders Tom Jones Bill Gates Borussia Dortmund Bill Murray Europa League Elvis Presley Le Pen Han Solo Galaxy Vol Capitol Hill Premier League Gavin Grimm Caitlyn Jenner Brooklyn Nets Attorney General Jeff Sessions Wall Street Daily News Iggy Pop Goldie Hawn Bette Midler Oak Lawn Islamic State Port Douglas Lib Dems Easter Sunday Ronda Rousey Jose Mourinho City Council Record Store Day Barack Obama Eddie Jones National Grid Rod Blagojevich Rolling Stones
© 2017