First Thoughts

Confederate Gen

The general officers of the Confederate States Army (CSA) - the army of the Confederate States of America - were the senior military leaders of the Confederacy and served during the American Civil War between 1861 and 1865. They were often former officers from the United States Army (the regular army) prior to the Civil War, while others were given the rank based on merit or when necessity demanded.

Civil War Nathan Bedford Forrest Stonewall Jackson New Orleans New York American Revolution American Civil War Union Army United States Shenandoah Valley Robert E Lee New Hampshire Tabor City Ambrose Burnside James Longstreet


Counter-protesters outnumbered the KKK at a rally for Gen. Lee statue
Supporters of Confederate Gen. Winder plaque rally in Salisbury
"Hands Off Our History" reads sign of protest against proposal to remove marker for Confederate Gen. Win…
still exist?Wow... On the other hand, why on earth remove a statue at all? And a statue of Confederate Gen. Ro…
I think Gen Sherman ate Confederate soldiers & their families as he destroyed the South on his march to the Sea to…
Confederate Flag is flown by racists throughout the world (Germany, N. Ireland, S. Africa, etc.)
No Confederate was more faithful to the principles for which he fought, and to his comrades, than was Gen. John Ech…
Protests rattle Charlottesville, VA, over plans to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from a park
Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest killed 31 men in combat & had 30 horses shot from under him. He said he was "a horse up."
Yes, the ones they bused in. Some had Confederate flags commemorating the Polish Brigades who fought…
Gen. George S. Patton - for one - was the grandson of a Confederate veteran. Gen. John S. Mosby was…
7 a.m. workers remove offensive "Confederate Heroes" plaque from front of Gen. Lee, just in time fo…
Today in 1863, Union Maj. Gen. accepts the surrender of the second Confederate Army he has defeated,…
Today, in 1863, the Confederate losses were great; a day after Gen. Lee lost at Gettysburg the city of Vicksburg su…
Lt. Gen John C. Pemberton’s Confederate Army of Mississippi consisted of 4 divisions. They were all inside the line.
One of my Union Rock Stars, Maj. Gen.John Gibbon & his 2nd Division of the II Corps will face Confederate division of G…
Today in 1863 Gen. of Confederate forces at MS-asks Union Maj. Gen. for…
Poor, brave Gen. Leonidas Polk who must be spinning in his grave to have begat. (a lousy writer too).
Analysis | The truth about Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee: He wasn’t very good at his job
NOLA has removed its statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. People chanted 'hey hey, goodbye' as it came down. https:…
Our Attorney General is Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III -- what will he do? NO Removes Statue of Gen Beauregard -
New Orleans has taken down the statue of confederate Gen Beauregard. Now it's just Jefferson (this space available) Sessions.
Workers in New Orleans have begun removal of third Confederate-era monument, a statue of Confederate Gen. Beauregar…
There's just 1 more Confederate monument to take down in NOLA, after Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard's was removed overnight. http…
Confederate Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard statue is 3rd New Orleans monument to be taken down
Watch as the Confederate Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard statue is taken down in New Orleans:
At DOJ, recused Atty Gen Jeff Sessions is in mourning as New Orleans removes his namesake Gen. Beauregard Statue
New Orleans -The bronze equestrian statue of Confederate Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard at the entrance to City Park has been remo…
Masked city workers in New Orleans dismantle horseback statue of Confederate Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard. https…
Arkansas gov signs bill moving holiday for Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee so that it's not the same day as Martin L…
Arkansas will no longer commemorate Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee and Martin Luther King Jr. on the same day
Did you know Confederate Gen. Stonewall Jackson was a Conservative fighting for the Constitution? Learn more here! https…
Gen. Thomas Benton Smith enlisted in the Confederate service in May, 1861, as a member of Company B, 20th...
"They couldn't hit an elephant at this dist---." Union Gen. John Sedgwick underestimating Confederate snipers just before he was shot dead.
racist monument of confederate gen. albert pike in Washington DC should be taken down and disposed of.
racist monument of confederate gen. albert pike should be taken down in Washington and disposed of.
Did Robert Byrd "repent" his involvement in the Klan? So did KKK founder & Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest https:…
On July 30, 1864, Confederate Gen. John McCausland ordered the burning of Chambersburg, Pa.
Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest, responsible for the murder of US Colored Troops at Ft. Pillow was the founder of the KKK
All black students protesting MS State Flag in front of Lee Hall named after Confederate Gen. SD Lee. 😂😂😂.
This debate has centered on Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest. Calls to remove his markers have intensified in recent years.
Martin Luther King Jr. and Confederate Gen. on the same day. Speaking to reporters, Hutchinson
Today in 1863, Lincoln confides to a friend that Mary's half-sister Emily Todd Helm is staying with them. She is widow of Confederate Gen.
The Life of Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston: Embracing His Services in the Armies of the ... -
Confiscation Acts: passed early in Civil War by Gen. Benjamin Butler when he refused to return captured slaves to the Confederate.
actually applied only to Confederate occupied territory not 1 slave was freed. Gen Grant kept his St Louis slaves 'till '65
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On November 30, 1864, Corkman and Confederate Gen. Patrick Cleburne, one of the finest generals produced by...
Lee Marvin. Named after Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, who was his second cousin three times removed.
1862 - Union troops led by Brig. Gen. James Blunt clash with John Marmaduke’s Confederate army at the Battle of Cane Hill
Florida House panel votes to remove statue of Confederate Gen. Edmund Kirby Smith
Since ¡Jeb! is nicknamed after Confederate Gen. J.E.B Stuart, does he have to change his name? Or is the Confederate purge over now?
Memphis City Council Votes to Dig Up Grave of Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest A great military man
'Black Lives Matter' painted on statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee in Virginia
Memphis Mayor wants to dig up the bodies of Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest & his wife from city park
I bet Confederate sympathizers are proud that the modern *** rights movement began at *** Confederate Gen. Stonewall Jackson's bar.
interesting pice of history. Confederate Gen. N B Forest was kicked out of the KKK because he tried to disband it.
Black inventor Garrett Morgan, creator of early gas mask, was the grandson of Confederate Gen. John Hunt Morgan of Morgan's Raid fame.
Confederate Gen Albert Sydney Johnston was KIA during Battle of Shiloh in 1862
1865 - Lt Gen Ewell loses Battle of in Lee's last major fight against Gen Grant
'When Gen. E. surrendered to Lt. Gen. S. in a farmhouse parlor...
OTD in 1915, Mary Anna Morrison Jackson, widow to Confederate Gen. Stonewall Jackson, dies in her hometown Charlotte.
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TONIGHT: an evening of The Civil War At 8 pm, a look at notable Civil War events in late 1864, including the Franklin-Nashville Campaign in Tennessee, in which the Union Army decimated a force under Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood. Also, the Fall of Savannah on December 21, 1864, to Union troops under William Tecumseh Sherman, marking an end to Sherman’s “March to the Sea.”
Pickett's Charge was an infantry assault ordered by Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee against Maj. Gen. George G. Meade's Union positions on Cemetery Ridge on July 3, 1863, the last day of the Battle of Gettysburg during the American Civil War. Its futility was predicted by the charge's commander, Lt.…
photograph of an enslaved woman who helped save Confederate Gen. Robert E.Lee's home in Arlington.
Samuel H. Lockett Confederate Engineer at Shiloh and the Egyptian Venture Samuel H. Lockett’s career in the U.S. Army had just started when the Civil War broke out and he was asked by Governor Andrew Moore of Alabama to resign his commission and join his State. Lockett had been raised in Marion, Alabama where he graduated from Howard College before being appointed to West Point. Graduating 2nd in the class of 1859 at the age of 21, Lockett looked forward to a career in the engineers under his supervisor, Captain William Whiting. After making the difficult decision to resign, Lockett joined Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg’s staff as his Chief Engineer with the rank of Captain. On the morning of April 6, 1862 Lockett was sent with a cavalry squad to reconnoiter the Union left. There he observed what appeared to be a Union Division threatening the Confederate line. Lockett delivered the message to Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston, who deployed two brigades to deal with what turned out to be the single Uni ...
"All this has been my fault—it is I that have lost this fight" -Confederate Gen. Robert E Lee to Gen. Wilcox 7/3/1863
Gettysburg Battlefield Preservation Association Founded, 1959 -- The nation’s oldest battlefield preservation organization P.O. Box 4087, Gettysburg, PA 17325 Registered 501 3C NEWS RELEASE Speakers for GBPA opening of Gettysburg HQ GETTYSBURG (July 2) – The resurgent Gettysburg Battlefield Preservation Association will officially open its headquarters in the heart of Gettysburg at 33 York Street with a ribbon-cutting ceremony at 1 p.m. Thursday, July 3. Headlining the speakers will be Gettysburg National Military Park Superintendent Ed Clark and actor and historian Patrick Falci, who portrayed Confederate Gen. Ambrose Powell Hill Jr. in the motion picture “Gettysburg” and was a historical consultant to the film’s director, Ron Maxwell. James Getty, considered the nation’s foremost portrayer of President Abraham Lincoln will also offer remarks, along with Randy Phiel, Chairman of the Adams County Board of Commissioners and Licensed Town Historian Gerald Eak. If the House schedule permits him t ...
Confederate Gen. Edmund Kirby Smith signed the Union Army's surrender terms, ending the Civil War on this day in 1865
2day 1862: Confederate Gen. Rob't E Lee assumes command of the Army of Northern Virginia! He'll bedevil Union armies!
QUICK FACTS ABOUT MEMORIAL DAY It started with the Civil War Memorial Day was a response to the unprecedented carnage of the Civil War, in which some 620,000 soldiers on both sides died. The loss of life and its effect on communities throughout the North and South led to spontaneous commemorations of the dead. • In 1864, women from Boalsburg, Pennsylvania, put flowers on the graves of their dead from the just-fought Battle of Gettysburg. The next year, a group of women decorated the graves of soldiers buried in a Vicksburg, Mississippi, cemetery. • In April 1866, women from Columbus, Mississippi, laid flowers on the graves of both Union and Confederate soldiers. It was recognized at the time as an act of healing regional wounds. In the same month, up in Carbondale, Illinois, • On May 30, 1868, President Ulysses S. Grant presided over the first Memorial Day ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery -- which, until 1864, was Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's plantation. Some 5,000 people attended on a sp ...
How could tragic death of one Confederate Gen. plunge the South in the mourning? of Falling Waters 1863
David Waters: Family history shines light on Forrest's dishonorable past from Memphis Commercial Appeal. David Waters on Fri Apr 11, 2014 4:11 PM CDT A statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest stands in the middle of the park formerly named for him on Union between Manassas and Dunlap. (Dave Darnell/The Commercial Appeal) Until Thursday, I was ambivalent about Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest — a raucous war hero to some, a racist war criminal to others, a statue in a park to me. I’ve driven by Forrest’s impressive statue on my way to work for more than three decades and not thought much about the history it represents. I thought I had that privilege. Thursday, at an event marking Saturday’s 150th anniversary of the Fort Pillow Massacre, if not led then overseen by Forrest, I stopped being ambivalent about that shameful chapter of our collective history. The event included a showing of “Remember Fort Pillow,” a documentary produced Dr. Dee Garceau, a Rhodes College professor, and a number of he ...
Today is Wednesday, April 9, the 99th day of 2014. There are 266 days left in the year. Today's Highlight in History: On April 9, 1914, the Tampico Incident took place as eight U.S. sailors were arrested by Mexican authorities for allegedly entering a restricted area and held for a short time before being released. Although Mexico offered a verbal apology, the U.S. demanded a more formal show of contrition; tensions escalated to the point that President Woodrow Wilson sent a naval task force to invade and occupy Veracruz, which in turn led to the downfall of Mexican President Victoriano Huerta. On this date: In 1413, the coronation of England's King Henry V took place in Westminster Abbey. In 1682, French explorer Robert de La Salle claimed the Mississippi River Basin for France. In 1865, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee surrendered his army to Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House in Virginia. In 1913, the first game was played at Ebbets Field, the newly built home of the Brooklyn Dodgers, ...
TODAY IN U.S.MILITARY HISTORY 1813 – Off Guiana’s Demerara River, the American 18-gun sloop Hornet under Captain James Lawrence sinks the 20-gun British sloop Peacock. Hornet suffered few damages or casualties, but Peacock was so badly shattered that it sank during the transfer of prisoners. 1836 – Texan Colonel William Travis sends a desperate plea for help for the besieged defenders of the Alamo, ending the message with the famous last words, “Victory or Death.” 1863 – Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest made a raid on Brentwood, Tennessee. 1863 – C.S.S. William H. Webb and Queen of the West, with C.S.S. Beatty in company, engaged U.S.S. Indianola, Lieutenant Commander G. Brown, below Wartenton, Mississippi. The Confederate squadron, under Major Joseph L. Brent, CSA, had reached Grand Gulf just 4 hours behind the Northern vessel which was returning upstream to communicate with Rear Admiral Porter above Vicksburg. Knowing his speed was considerably greater than that of Indianola, Brent ...
Major General Benjamin Butler quickly departs for Hampton Roads, Virginia to explain his actions at Fort Fisher. Shortly before noon, Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg arrives at the Sugar Loaf Hill lines. Major General Robert F. Hoke reaches Sugar Loaf with Hagood's Brigade and the rest of Kirkland's men later in the afternoon.
Today in military history' 1783 – Annapolis, Md., became the US capital until June 1784. 1862 – Landing party from U.S.S. Ellis, Lieutenant Cushing, captured arms, mail, and two schooners at Jacksonville North Carolina. 1863: From the last days of September through October 1863, Gen. Braxton Bragg’s army laid siege to the Union Army under Maj. Gen. William Rosecrans at Chattanooga, cutting off its supplies. The battles of the Chattanooga campaign begin between newly appointed commander of the Western armies, Union Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, and Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg. Within days, Union Army forces will attack and capture Orchard Knob, Lookout Mountain, and the Confederate works on Missionary Ridge. The “Gateway to the Lower South” will open, and within a year, Union Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman will pass through the “gateway” enroute to Atlanta. 1934 – Japan declares its intention to withdraw from the terms of the 1922 Washington Naval Conference. 1943: Japanese-held Tarawa fall ...
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The marker will be placed near the scene of where Sansom assisted Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest in crossing flooded Black Creek.
1862 – Abraham Lincoln approves Gen Burnside's plan to capture the Confederate capital at Richmond, leading to the Battle of Fredericksburg.
150 Years Ago... November 13, 1863...“At this rate, the horses will die” ~ Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee
Majority-black h.s. in FL still named for ex-KKK & Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest. We discuss on w
I'll be on Roland S. Martin's show, News One Now, on TV One today at 9a. Talking about the heinous killing of unarmed 19-year-old Renisha McBride in Michigan and the Florida school named for former KKK member and Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest.
I keep seeing "boys of the sixties" re: Confederate gen. I wonder if it's simply about age, or if it's tied to masculinity?
Maj. Gen. N.B. Forrest's address to his command. :: Confederate Imprints
Another interesting note on Stonewall Jackson: Jackson, born in Tabor City, North Carolina, is the youngest of three children. Stonewall is not a nickname; he was named after (and claimed to be a descendant of) the Confederate Gen. Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson. His father died when he was two and his mother moved the family to South Georgia. Jackson grew up there working on his uncle's farm. Jackson enlisted in the Navy in 1950 and was discharged in 1954. He moved to Nashville, Tennessee in 1956.
DISCLAIMER: This page is not advocating neo-confederacy, we just don't believe the nonsense that Johnny Reb and his buddies ran into bayonets and musket fire to protect the "right" of a minority of the population to own slaves. Whenever I here people claim that the Civil War was fought to free the slaves, I can only shake my head. If we had to pick one reason why the Southern states seceded, it probably was because they perceived they had a right to be slave states. For the South, the war was fought against what they believed to be a Federal Government which did not respect State's Rights, including their right to be a slave state. In fact, it was a common belief that the US Constitution granted the states to decide whether or not they would allow slavery. Lincoln himself claimed: "I say that we must not interfere with the institution of slavery in the states where it exists, because the constitution forbids it, and the general welfare does not require us to do so." -Lincoln, September 17, 1859: Speech at ...
The James Gang Strikes Back! Friday, March 11, 1881 US Receiver of Materials Alexander G. Smith (1850-1900) was robbed of approx. $5200 payroll in US gold and greenbacks, a few miles west of Lock 5 on the Muscle Shoals Canal by three unknown, armed men. No one knew it at the time but Smith had been robbed by the infamous James Gang. Jesse and Frank and their families had been living in Nashville since 1878 under aliases. Smith, a native of Scotland, had earlier that day, a rainy day, been to Campbell & Co.'s Bank in Florence to procure the payroll as well as allegedly $50 to pay two men in Florence, and at 4 o'clock pm started back to the US Army Corps of Engineers camp headquarters at Bluewater. Smith had the money in saddlebags. At Douglass' Gate, near Lock 5, about 15 miles east of Florence and two miles from headquarters at Bluewater three armed, mounted strangers robbed him. According to period newspaper accounts in the *Florence Gazette* and Tuscumbia *North Alabamian* the outlaws, which turned out ...
Nov. 4th 1884 Election Day - Governor T. T. Crittenden lost his re-election bid & was replaced by former Confederate Gen. John S. Marmaduke. The new Governor advised the recently acquitted Frank James to keep a low profile, get a job & “stay away from fast horses.”
Brig. Gen. Andrew Porter was a grandson of Revolutionary War Andrew Porter; son of George Bryan Porter; and a second cousin of Mary Todd Lincoln. His younger first cousin, Horace Porter, also served as a Union general. He attended the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, for six months in 1836 and 1837. Gen. Horace Porter was the personal secretary of Pres. Grant. He served in the Mexican-American War as a first lieutenant in the 1st Mounted Rifles. Within a year, he was promoted to captain and cited for gallantry, being brevetted two grades to lieutenant colonel. Porter spent the next fourteen years serving at various posts and forts on the frontier. He fought a duel in Texas with future Confederate general James J. Archer, whose second was Thomas J. Jackson, later "Stonewall" Jackson. Porter married Margaretta Falconer (Margarite) Biddle Biddle (1825–1913) of the Biddle family. Her father was military officer and Michigan politician John Biddle (1792–1859). Her nephew was John Bid ...
October 19th: Feast of the North American Saints Isaac Jogues SJ, John de Brebeuf Priests and Companions, Martyrs. In 1765, the Stamp Act Congress, meeting in New York, drew up a declaration of rights and liberties. In 1781, British troops under Gen. Lord Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown, Va., as the American Revolution neared its end. In 1812, French forces under Napoleon Bonaparte began their retreat from Moscow. In 1864, Confederate Gen. Jubal A. Early attacked Union forces at Cedar Creek, Va.; the Union troops were able to rally and defeat the Confederates. In 1936, H.R. Ekins of the New York World-Telegram beat out Dorothy Kilgallen of the New York Journal and Leo Kieran of The New York Times in a round-the-world race on commercial flights that lasted 18 1/2 days. In 1944, the play "I Remember Mama," by John van Druten, opened at the Music Box Theater on Broadway. In 1951, President Harry S. Truman signed an act formally ending the state of war with Germany. In 1960, the United States began a limit ...
Second Manassas as it Happened:. 151 years ago at roughly 7 PM, Confederate Gen. James Longstreet sent Hood's...
Aug 22, 1862, Confederate Gen Albert Jenkins & 550 men set out on a sweeping raid of central WVa
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1864: US Civil War - a wary Confederate Gen. Jubal Early pulled out of Winchester, Va, as Union Gen. Philip Sheridan approached the city.
During the Second Day of the Battle of Gettysburg (July 2, 1863) Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee attempted to...
JULY 2, 1863 Morning - As Union Gen. George G. Meade brings up reinforcements, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee determines to move his troops into position and drive in both ends of the Union line.
This battle would be the last time Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee would try to invade the North.
GETTYSBURG, Pa. (AP) — On the second day of fighting at Gettysburg, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee listened to scouting reports, scanned the battlefield and ordered his second-in-command, James Longstreet, to attack the Union Army's left flank.
Six historic sites in northwest Alabama now offer cancellation stamps for the Passport to Your National Parks program, which encourages people to explore the history and natural resources in America’s national parks. All of the sites are in the Muscle Shoals National Heritage Area, one of the National Heritage Areas established by the Department of Interior and the National Park Service and are designated by Congress to recognize regions with historical, cultural or natural features. The MSNHA – Alabama’s only National Heritage Area --encompasses Colbert, Franklin, Lauderdale, Lawrence, Limestone, and Morgan counties. Cancellation stamps are at the W.C. Handy Home, Museum and Library, Florence; Ivy Green, birthplace of Helen Keller, Tuscumbia; Red Bay Museum, which offers historical displays and memorabilia from country music star Tammy Wynette; Pond Spring, home of Confederate Gen. Joe Wheeler, Courtland; Mooresville, the first town incorporated by the Alabama Territorial Legislature, on Nov. 16, 1 ...
200 years ago today: Foiled at the battle of Craney Island, the British passed northward across Hampton Roads to attack the small town of Hampton, and the Americans could not hold out long against Col. John Beckwith's forces. The town was burned and left in ruins, and atrocities ensued, mostly committed by the Chasseurs Britannique, French prisoners enlisted in British service. A British officer wrote in his diary: "Every horror was perpetrated with impunity – rape, murder, pillage – and not a single man was punished." 150 years ago today: Pvt. David Lane of the 17th Michigan Infantry, besieging Vicksburg, penned something that I'm sure most soldiers away from home over the years have felt at one time or another: "But hark! What cry is this? Oh, joyful sound. The mail! the mail has come! Thank God, there is one for me!" Confederate Gen. Jubal Early marched his division east from Greenwood, Pennsylvania toward Gettysburg and York, with orders to burn the railroad bridge across the Susquehanna River at ...
150 years ago today: Col. William Lyon, commanding Ft. Donelson, Tennessee, wrote: "The rebels march with perfect impunity into the heart of Pennsylvania, and there is none to molest or make them afraid, and all this because Congress fooled away four months of precious time before they passed the Conscription Act, and nearly four months more have passed and no men are called out under it. . . . With bloody graves yawning at our feet, we can only bow our heads and exclaim in bitterness of spirit: ‘How long, O Lord, how long!’" Confederate Gen. Edward "Allegheny" Johnson’s division crossed the Potomac River at Shepherdstown, making it all the way to Sharpsburg, Maryland. Gen. Robt. E. Lee, unhappy that Gen. Richard "Old Bald Head" Ewell was dragging his feet, wrote that he regretted that his entire corps had not crossed the river: “Should we be able to detain General Hooker’s army from following you, you would be able to accomplish as much, unmolested, as the whole army could perform with General ...
The South fought for independence, for States rights, all of which our country was founded on. Sure the southerns states were not happy with Northern talk of stoping slavery in the new territory, but you have to understand, that would be like telling every farmer in the 1950s, that their tractors would soon be out lawed. The main reason for the War between the States was money, the South was paying close to 75% of all taxes (tariffs) that was supporting the Federal government. When Lincoln and his buddies saw that some southern states were fixing leave the union, they took what they thought would be and easy path, Lincoln was told it would be a quick war, but he soon learned that the south, made up of men dedicated to protect their families, their community and their state against this invading force, would not just lay down. Notice I did not say fighting to keep slavery, less than 5% of the 900,000 confederate soldiers had a slave. Confederate Gen. Lee freed all his slaves before the war. Union Gen. ...
Ten years prior to the founding of Cullman, America was at war. Union loyalists and Confederate secessionists were meeting on the field of battle to decide whether or not the country would continue as one or be broken in half over such issues as the rights of states and slave ownership. Following a major conflict in middle Tennessee, Union Col. Abel D. Streight of the 51st Indiana Infantry decided to make a daring raid that would lead his men across North Alabama and into Georgia with the intention of cutting the Western Atlantic Railroad that supplied Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg's army. On his way from Memphis, Tennessee, to Rome, Georgia, Streight was met by the famous Confederate Gen. Nathan B. Forrest, who engaged the Union leader in a number of battles, ultimately leading to Streight's surrender and imprisonment. Several of these conflicts, the Battle of Day's Gap and the Battle of Hog Mountain, took place in what was to become Cullman County. According to Streight's account of the journey, writte ...
Fearing envelopment, Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston withdrew his army to a new defensive position astride Kennesaw Mountain, to the north and west of Marietta. Johnston selected this position in order to protect his supply link to Atlanta, the Western & Atlantic Railroad. Prior to taking up th...
With morale flagging as the Civil War dragged into its second year, Abraham Lincoln and General-in-Chief Henry Halleck sought to unleash a strategic combination that would produce a decision in the bloody struggle. They sought to take advantage of their material superiority over the South, launching a three-pronged coordinated offensive that would overwhelm the Confederacy's ability to shift reinforcements along its interior lines. As Gen. Ambrose Burnside advanced in Virginia and Gen. Ulysses S. Grant advanced in Mississippi, the responsibility for Tennessee, the strategic central position, fell to Gen. William S. Rosecrans. On December 26, Rosecrans's army left Nashville and marched on Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg's position at Murfreesboro. The two armies met on a battlefield on the banks of Stones River on the evening of December 30. Both generals formed plans of attack for the next morning while their soldiers uneasily slept on their muskets--in some places the opposing lines were less than fou ...
The Mississippi division of the Sons of Confederate Veterans is proposing new license plate designs to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, including one featuring Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest. He was a heralded cavalry leader, but alsoa founding member of the Ku Klux Klan.
Today in History for May 14th 1607 – Jamestown, Virginia is settled as an English colony. 1804 – The Lewis and Clark Expedition departs from Camp Dubois and begins its historic journey by traveling up the Missouri River. 1863 – During American Civil War: The Battle of Jackson, MS takes place. Gen. Grant's army captures the capital city of Jackson, MS. Confederate Gen. Joseph Johnston had tried to hold the city but had been forced to retreat when his colleague Gen. Pemberton refused to send reinforcements from Vicksburg. Pemberton had been able to hold Vicksburg at all costs and did not wish to weaken the city's defenses. Grant turns west towards Vicksburg after driving Johnson from Jackson, MS. 1863 – During American Civil War: At Fort Meigs, in Readville, Massachusetts, the 54th Mass. Colored Infantry Regiment reaches its goal of 1,000 members. Plans are made for a procession through Boston, as the black soldiers begin their march to join the fight. At the request of John Andrew, Governor of Mas ...
A Republican state legislator in New Hampshire announced during a legislative debate Wednesday that she has a shrine to Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee in her house.
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Upcoming 150th anniversary of death of Confederate Gen'l Stonewall Jackson: The Roanoke Times
In 1864 - Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest captured Fort Pillow, in Tennessee and slaughters the black Union troops there.
True leaders from American history by Lt. Col. / Former U.S. Rep Allen West My years in the military taught me that leadership has five components: courage, competence, commitment, conviction and character. We studied many profiles in American leadership, and I would like to share a few with you. Could you see any of our current elected officials at Valley Forge, Pa., during the American Revolution, encouraging a ragtag Army to hang on as George Washington did? Do we even teach our kids about “The Swamp Fox” Francis Marion and his exploits during that war? How often do we study why Francis Scott Key wrote “The Star-Spangled Banner” because of the courage of the men at Fort McHenry, Md., who kept our flag flying despite the constant British naval barrage? Or what of the courage of those men who stood stalwart under the command of Gen. Andrew Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans? Do we know why Confederate Gen. Thomas Jackson received his nickname “Stonewall” at the First Battle of Bull Run (or ...
Braxton Bragg The Civil War battlefield generalship of Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg can best be described as a disastrous series of blunders, wasted opportunities, and senseless slaughter. His conduct in camp was equally dismal. Bragg possessed talent as an organizer and strategist, but his acerbic personality, strict approach to discipline, and mediocre intellect caused him to be thoroughly detested by many of the officers and men under his command. When Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest could stand the incompetence no longer, he addressed Bragg as follows: "I have stood your meanness as long as I intend to. You have played the part of a damned scoundrel, and are a coward, and if you were any part of a man I would slap your jaws and force you to resent it. You may as well not issue any orders to me, for I will not obey them, and I will hold you personally responsible for any further indignities you endeavor to inflict upon me... and I say to you that if you ever again try to interfere with me or cross my pat ...
Contestant on "Are You Smarter Than a Fifth-Grader," insisting that Confederate Gen. Stonewall Jackson's REAL name was "Andrew!" A little learning is a dangerous thing. Lee's right-hand man was named Thomas.
On the fourth floor of the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, on a top shelf just to the left of the map collection, lie more than a dozen books that profile one famous Memphian: Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest.
My AVI was an exception. He taught slaves to read & the christian faith. His name was Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, a Confederate Gen
February 5, 1825...Morton Craig Hunter (February 5, 1825, Versailles, IN - October 25, 1896, Bloomington, IN) was a U.S. Representative from Indiana, and a field officer in the Union Army during the Civil War. His father John Hunter was a soldier in the War of 1812 and his Irish immigrant grandfather served in the Revolutionary war. Morton Hunter graduated from the law department of Indiana University at Bloomington in 1849. After graduating he immediately married and practiced law in Bloomington. In 1858 he was elected to represent Monroe County in the State house of representatives. In the summer of 1862 in response to Lincoln's call for volunteers, he organized the 82nd Indiana Infantry. On August 27, 1862 he was commissioned a colonel by Governor Oliver Morton. At the Battle of Chickamauga when Confederate Gen. Longstreet routed the right wing of the Army of the Cumberland, Hunter on his own initiative was the first officer to form a new position on Horseshoe ridge that was to become the line that sav ...
(April 30-May 6, 1863) What a week! The BATTLE OF CHANCELLORSVILLE has proved to be Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's greatest victory in the Civil War. He faced an enemy force nearly twice the size of his own, Lee daringly split his troops in two, confronting and surprising Union Gen. Joseph Hooker. Though Hooker had a bigger army, he did use this to his advantage, and he went defensive. When Lee once again split his forces and attacked, Hooker was forced to retreat across the Rappahannock River. Lee's victory came at a high cost, however. Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, one of his most trusted generals, was mortally wounded by friendly fire during the battle.
Waltzing backward through the South By Gene Owens The morning was cold and wet as I set out for a closer look at Kennesaw Mountain, the modest elevation dominating the landscape above Marietta, Ga., a lively municipality beside I-75 running from Atlanta to Chattanooga. Marietta is the home of our daughter Kim, whose condominium sits within sight of the mountain and its adjunct, Little Kennesaw Mountain. The Battle of Kennesaw Mountain set the stage for the capture of Atlanta and therefore provided the overture for “Gone with the Wind.” It also was the penultimate swan song for Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, a man of frustrated promise among a galaxy of Southern stars. I visited the small museum at the foot of the mountain and then drove a mile, up 800 feet in elevation, to the summit. I drove because it was cold and I am old. I passed an aging man with a flowing white beard and khaki trousers, napping on a park bench by the roadway. He could have passed, I thought, for a straggler languishing af ...
Fort Gibson Fact: Did you know that Confederate Gen. William Lewis Cabell who served under the likes of P.G.T.
MEMPHIS, TN (CBS/WREG) -- A controversy continues in Memphis over a park named in honor of Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest.
- Confederate Gen. Thomas J. Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson born today in 1824 in Clarksburg, VA: RT
5 Fun Arlington Facts 1. Arlington's population of 370,450 makes it the nation's 49th-largest city. 2. Cowboys Stadium is visible 5 miles away on Interstate 30 and can be seen from tall buildings in Dallas, about 18 miles away. It often is called the "Death Star" because of its enormity, a tribute to the planet-destroying space station in "Star Wars.'' 3. Arlington was named after Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's Arlington House in Virginia. 4. The stadium fills up 73 acres, or 3 million square feet. 5. Six Flags Over Texas and Hurricane Harbor water park are in the vicinity of Cowboys Stadium and Rangers Ballpark, making Arlington the fun capital of Texas.
150 years ago today: Elisha Franklin Paxton, who in November had been promoted from Major to Brigadier General and given command of Gen. Thos. J. Jackson's "Stonewall Brigade," included in a letter to his wife: "We have whipped the army in front of us very often, and I feel sure that we can do it any time . . . Our independence was secured in the last campaign when we proved our capacity to beat the finest army they could bring in the field . . . My only hope for a furlough is to get shot or get sick. This is the misfortune of my promotion. Before I could go and come when I pleased, but now I am fixed while the war lasts." Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston issued a general order regarding unauthorized army absentees from the departments of Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana, so as to grant them a full pardon provided they return to their proper commands by February 12. Lt. Cmdr. J.G. Walker and his USS Baron DeKalb, along with USS Forest Rose and Romeo and an Army transport, proceeded up the ...
Pressnall, 1st Lt. James S.; 63rd Indiana, Stile’s brigade Memoir, courtesy John Sheets, Omaha, Nebraska Editor’s notes: In an e-mail dated January 7, 2002, Sheets wrote that this memoir was written by his great-grandfather about 1930 in response to a request from the local Grand Army of the Republic post. Pressnall was born in 1839 and died in 1932. Pressnall was an acting company commander at Franklin. Pressnall seems to have mistaken Confederate Gen. John Adams for Gen. Patrick Cleburne. It was Adams who tried to ride his horse over the Federal works. Adams was mortally wounded, and, during a lull, Federals soldiers picked him up and carried him behind their works, where he died later. Cleburne was on foot when he was killed by a shot to the heart. “The last charge by the enemy was made about half past eight o’clock, following and in impressive contrast with the recent destructive roar of musketry. A quiet silence settled over the field; a silence broken only by the extremely distressing cries ...
"Lochlainn Seabrook's 'A REBEL BORN' is the definitive biography on Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest!" - Confederate Veteran magazine
Friday Jan. 3 1862 ROMNEY RUMBLE RUDELY REINED Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson was famous for moving his troops with great speed, enabling them to pop up where they were least expected, usually with dismal results for Union opponents. Today’s expedition, known as the “Romney Campaign,” should have been perfect for the task. Jackson was leading the way to Bath, Virginia (known today as Berkeley Springs, W. Va.), a region he knew well. The objective was to get to the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad as well as the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal, ripping up tracks of the first and destroying the locks of the second. Unfortunately for Jackson’s famed “foot cavalry”, they were discovered by a Union patrol and a brief skirmish broke out. The march was delayed. Saturday Jan. 3 1863 MURFREESBORO MILITARY MELEE MORE MUDDLED Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg had, for once, actually fought a fairly good battle at Murfreesboro, near Stone’s River, in Tennessee. He had gone so far as to send a telegraph to Jeffe ...
THIS DAY IN THE Civil War; THURSDAY DECEMBER 4, 1863 Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston assumed over all command in the West. Sporadic fighting continued n the major fronts. There was an engagement on the Rappahannock River near Port Royal, not far from Fredericksburg, VA; and skirmishing on the Franklin Pike and near Stewart's ferry n Stone's River, TN. In MS the action was near Oxford and Water Valley. There were operations about Cane Hill and Reed's Mountain, AR. and in Cherokee Country, Indian Terr. Citizens attacked Indian prisoners at Mankato, MN. At Prestonburg, KY, Confederates captured some supply boats with arms, ammunition, and uniforms. There also was a skirmish in Floyd County, KY.
November 22, 1864: American Civil War: Sherman's March to the Sea: Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood invades Tennessee in an unsuccessful att-
WALD-CAST HISTORY UPDATE--150 years ago. After a year of bungling, scapegoating and ineptitude, President Lincoln finally pulls the plug and dismisses Union General George McCellan from command of the Union Army. Even though he was beloved by his men, McCellan could never really commit them to giving battle with "Bobby" Lee in a sustained way that would destroy Lee's army and, ultimately, end the war. Lincoln now turns to Gen. Burnside-who is under intense pressure to pursue the Army of Northern Virginia (even in the depths of winter) and, as as he states pompously, to make Lee..."ingloriously fly." In December, he will get his wish as the armies will face off in a sleepy Virginia hamlet called Fredericksburg. Will Burnsides' dash and daring finally insure the crowning victory for the Federals or will the outnumbered Confederate Gen's Lee, Jackson and Longstreet pull another slight of hand on the world's greatest military entity..Lincoln's (far from legendary) Army of the Potomac. Stay tuned! www.waldcas ...
Today in 1864, Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest practiced his motto of "get there firstest, with the mostest" by any means necessary. Today was, however, the first occasion on which he could legitimately have taken the title "Admiral." Having captured a Union gunboat and two transports ships two days ago, he had intended to use them just to get his men, horses, artillery and supplies across the TN River. Having acquired the vessels, he reasoned, they may as well be put to further use. Ordering his no-doubt puzzled cavalrymen to learn the intricacies of gunboat operations as best they could, he loaded men and supplies on the ships and headed upriver to Johnsonville, TN. There was a Union supply depot there.
Historians examining cache of Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood's personal papers, never before seen in public:
"Pale Blue Light" is a book anyone who has an interest in Southern history should read. It has received numerous favorable reviews both in Alabama and beyond." Article in the Valley Times News By WAYNE CLARK VALLEY — A retired small town newspaper editor and publisher has gone from writing for a local paper to writing novels. Skip Tucker, formerly of The Daily Mountain Eagle in Jasper, Ala., now lives in Montgomery, where he's writing novels that are steeped in Southern history and culture. His first work, "Pale Blue Light," is both a straight historical narrative about the life of Confederate Gen. Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson and a murder mystery complete with a protagonist, a beautiful spy and lots of adventure. Those who are into Civil War history with the pro-Southern point of view will appreciate the first half of the book, and those who love to read James Bond will like the second part. Tucker's second novel, "Bloody Blue Moon," has the setting of contemporary New Orleans. He's come up with an idea ...
Let us cross over the river and rest under the shade of the trees. - Last words of Confederate Gen. Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson (1824-1863). Died of complications from pneumonia after being wounded by friendly fire at the Battle of Chancellorsville.
Stars and Stripes shared the following link and had this to say about it: Maybe it’s because they live just a few miles from a stone memorial to Confederate Gen. Stonewall Jackson’s severed left arm. But when a group of residents from Virginia’s Northern Neck heard that the cremated body parts of American troops had been dumped unceremoniously in a local landfill, they knew what to do: Mark the place — rotting ga...
Sept. 8th 1864 Confederate guerrilla George Todd received a message from Confederate Gen. Sterling Price, who was preparing to invade MO, asking for the help of all guerrillas in disrupting Union communications, defenses & supply lines. Accordingly, Todd reassembled his band north of the MO River, in Bill Anderson territory. Frank James would have been part of this group being called upon.
An Alabama town is debating whether Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest should be memorialized. 
The original bronze bust of Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest vanished in March from atop a 7-foot-tall granite monument at Live Oak Cemetery in Selma.
.:. 1866, Confederate Gen. and Scottish Rite Freemasons, Albert Pike and Nathan Bedford Forrest, founded the Ku Klux Klan
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A new monument being built to honor Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest is stirring up controversy in Selma.
Jus learned Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee was offered command of Union armies. Lee couldn't accept fighting against his home, the south.
2day 1975: The House of Representatives joins the Senate in restoring the citizenship of Confederate Gen. Robert E Lee
In 1975, the House of Representatives joined the Senate in voting to restore the American citizenship of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.
While many of you will be drunkenly commemorating the 228th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, I will be at my job, proudly wearing my American flag necktie and thinking about another glorious day in the history of this country: July 4, 1863. On that day, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee...
1826 and 1831: The Death of a President (or Three) For America's first five presidents, the Fourth of July was not only a celebration of their great achievement, but it was also, apparently, a prime day to die. Three of America's first five presidents died on Independence Day. John Adams, the second president, and Thomas Jefferson, the third president, were bitter rivals throughout their political careers, but nearly twins in their deaths. They died hours apart on July 4, 1826, Adams at age 90 in Massachusetts and Jefferson at age 83 in Virginia. James Monroe, the fifth president, also died on July 4, five years after Adams and Jefferson in 1831. The 30th president, Calvin Coolidge, was born on the Fourth of July in 1872. 1863: Vicksburg Victory After one month, 15 miles of trenches, countless battles, near-constant bombing, Confederate Gen. John Pemberton surrendered to Union forces at Vicksburg, Miss. That surrender, on July 4, 1863 would mark a turning point in the Civil War, when the scales tipped in ...
Wednesday June 25 1862 SMALL SKIRMISH STARTS SEVENDAYS SLAUGHTER It had been preceded by much planning and many maneuvers, but today U.S. Gen. George McClellan was ready to start his great push to Richmond. In the vicinity of the Chickahominy River in the tidewater of Virginia, the Army of the Potomac was ordered to begin moving forward. The left flank, commanded by Gen. Samuel Heintzelman, was ordered out first, in preparation for a general movement of the army. Heintzelman, however ran into men of Confederate Gen. Ben Huger. They fought ferociously enough to stall the entire advance, which was their job. Gen. Lee needed to stall the Federals long enough for Stonewall Jackson’s men to arrive from the Shenandoah Valley.
5/8/1945 Victory in Europe Day (VE Day) Allied forces defeat of the Nazi war machine – 1942 the Aircraft carrier Lexington is sunk by Japanese air attack at Coral Sea – 1862 the Civil War Valley Campaign begins when Confederate Gen. “Stonewall” Jackson’s lead the spring campaign through the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia – 5/8/1884 Harry S. Truman Born in Lamar, MO –1846 the 1st major battle of Mexican War is fought at Palo Alto Texas – 1792 Congress passes the second portion of the Militia Act, requiring that every free able-bodied white male citizen of the respective States, resident therein, who is or shall be of age eighteen years, and under the age of forty-five years be enrolled in the militia –
"Duty is ours; consequences are God's." -- Confederate Gen. Thomas J."Stonewall" Jackson (1824-63), outstanding Christian soldier and defender of the American South when it was brutally invaded
"All this has been my fault" Confederate Gen. Robert E Lee July 3 1863 Gettysburg, Pa. in aftermath of action at Cemetery Ridge
Find out why Confederate Gen. Forrest is loved the world over! Pick up our hit book "A Rebel Born: A Defense of Nathan Bedford Forrest."
Bust of Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest missing in Selma: Sons of Confederate Veterans members were outr...
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