Civil Rights & New York

Civil and political rights are a class of rights that protect individuals' freedom from unwarranted infringement by governments and private organizations, and ensure one's ability to participate in the civil and political life of the state without discrimination or repression. New York (locally ) is a state in the Northeastern region of the United States. New York is the 27th-most extensive, the 3rd-most populous, and the 7th-most densely populated of the 50 United States. 5.0/5

Civil Rights New York African American United States South Carolina Civil Rights Act Montgomery Bus Boycott National Council John Gotti Attorney General Jim Crow World History Cultural History Freedom Summer Williamson County Methodist Church Joe Walcott

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I believe it was some Greek philosopher who said"given the choice between anarchism and suppression the people will choose suppression. " i think its time. I may be losing my mind but i believe we must resort to playing dirty to achieve some results in this war on terror. During ww2 we called on Lucky Luciano to help root out fifth columnists on the New York docks. In1984 three civil rights workers disappeared in Mississippi, the F B I was at a loss in their search to find them. They employed the services of a Brooklyn wise guy who went to Mississippi ,kidnapped the local clan leader and the next day located the graves of the three young men. Get my point? Am i nuts or what?
This morning I was asking myself, "what does anyone accomplish by burning down their own community?" The answer surprised me and will be an unpopular presentation of fact. New York, Philadelphia, Rochester, N.Y., and Jersey City, N.J. (1964); Atlanta and Chicago (1966); Detroit and Tampa, Fla. (1967); and Washington (1968) After the riots, investigations by the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, the President's Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders, and the National Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice came to the obvious conclusion that police misconduct had been a major cause of the riots. Local and federal officials were determined to prevent a renewal of the violence that had already cost billions of dollars in property damage. Reforms included the appointment of larger numbers of black police officers; the promotion of black officers to command positions, including the highest ranks of urban departments; police-community relations programs; and rules and regulations designed to ...
cle) Below is an excerpt from Malcolm X Speaks. At the end of 1964, a delegation of 37 teenagers from McComb, Mississippi, visited New York. Their trip was sponsored by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee for youth active in the civil rights struggle in their hometowns. Toward the end of their stay, on Jan. 1, 1965, the McComb youth visited the Hotel Theresa in Harlem to learn what Malcolm X stood for. The following is a portion of what he told them. Copyright © 1965 by Pathfinder Press. Reprinted by permission. BY MALCOLM X One of the first things I think young people, especially nowadays, should learn is how to see for yourself and listen for yourself and think for yourself. Then you can come to an intelligent decision for yourself. If you form the habit of going by what you hear others say about someone, or going by what others think about someone, instead of searching that thing out for yourself and seeing for yourself, you will be walking west when you think you’re going east, and you wi ...
Truman Capote "IN COLD BLOOD" Bruce Davidson PRESS PHOTO TRIO. Lot of three 9x13.5" silver gelatin photos by famed photographer Bruce Davidson, a member of the Magnum Photos agency since 1958. From 1961 to 1965, Davidson produced one of his most famous bodies of work, chronicling the events/effects of the Civil Rights Movement around the country. In support of his project, Davidson received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1962, and his finished project was displayed at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. For his documentation of the Civil Rights Movement, Davidson received the first ever photography grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. These photos show noted author Truman Capote holding one copy of his critically-acclaimed true crime book "In Cold Blood." One photo shows him holding several copies in hand. Pictures were taken in 1965 in the offices of Random House Publishing, who first published "In Cold Blood" in 1966. The photos show Capote w/David and Albert Maysles, who (along w/Charlotte Zwe ...
CAIRO – America’s largest Muslim civil rights group has welcomed President Barack Obama’s remarks about Islam and Muslims in his address to the UN General Assembly in New York, though expressing...
I'm in New York, working with a group of students who will soon head into the American heartland to help organize Walmart workers for better jobs and wages. Almost exactly fifty years ago a similar group headed to Mississippi to register African-Americans to vote, in what came to be known as "Freedom Summer." That civil rights struggle is echoed in the current struggle of low-wage workers across America-- who are denied the dignity of decent wages and working conditions, threatened and intimidated for exercising their legal rights, and treated as voiceless and disposable. And although Walmart is no Bull Connor, it's the poster child for keeping low-wage workers down. America’s largest employer refuses to provide a living wage, won’t allow workers to organize, stands accused by the NLRB of unlawfully threatening or retaliating against workers who have taken part in strikes and protests, and has a long record of labor law violations and abuses. It can certainly afford to give its workers a raise. Walmar ...
Occupy Wall Street's anarchist roots "New York, NY - Almost every time I'm interviewed by a mainstream journalist about Occupy Wall Street I get some variation of the same lecture: "How are you going to get anywhere if you refuse to create a leadership structure or make a practical list of demands? And what's with all this anarchist nonsense - the consensus, the sparkly fingers? Don't you realise all this radical language is going to alienate people? You're never going to be able to reach regular, mainstream Americans with this sort of thing!" In-depth coverage of the global movement If one were compiling a scrapbook of worst advice ever given, this sort of thing might well merit an honourable place. After all, since the financial crash of 2007, there have been dozens of attempts to kick-off a national movement against the depredations of the United States' financial elites taking the approach such journalists recommended. All failed. It was only on August 2, when a small group of anarchists and other ant ...
Today marks the 20th anniversary of the NYS Civil Rights Law protecting women’s right to breastfeed in public. Here is the law and some relevant articles: 1. Breastfeeding Laws - Breastfeeding Protected by Law - blog article at Your Breastfeeding Rights in New York
New York Opt-Out surging. From Mark Naison today: "New York's Test Refusers, who will certainly number 20,000 by the end of today, are setting a powerful example of courage, and resistance, to the entire nation. Someday, these students and their families, who have sometimes faced threats and harassment from administrators and school personnel, will be honored for taking tangible action when something went terrible wrong with our nation's education policy. If you have an chance, please show your support for this great movement and the people involved in it, and encourage other to follow their example. We are now, according to Diane Ravitch, the most "over tested nation in the world" and this will not change without this remarkable form of Civil Disobedience which follows much more in the tradition of the Civil Rights Movement than the Education Reform policies which have claimed that mantle."
This is a man whose credits are so long, I don’t know where to begin! Let’s talk about this radio and TV talk show host, Civil Rights leader, and Baptist minister: ladies and gentlemen, the Reverend Al Sharpton! He was born in Brooklyn, New York on October 3, 1954. He gave his first sermon when he was 4-years-old, and then toured with singer Mahalia Jackson. He, of course, went on to graduate from college and dug even deeper in his work of ministry. But let’s look at some of his activism work: he founded the National Youth Movement in 1971 to raise basic needs for enervated young people. He led a march through the streets of Howard Beach, New York on December 27, 1986 after three young African-American men were assaulted and killed. Rev. Sharpton led another march in 1995 when a tenant, Fred Harari, was asked to evict a Black-owned business in New York, the Record Shack. In 2006, he led a peaceful protest through the major river crossings in New York City when a young Jamaican man, Sean Bell, was sh ...
I had a chance recently to hear Jonathan Kozol speak. If you ever get such a chance, take it. He is magical in person. Kozol is 60, a Boston native, and grew up along the well-trodden path of the Boston brahmin: Harvard University, Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University, four years writing in Paris, and ready to go to graduate school in 1964 when the Civil Rights Movement caught fire and inspired Kozol to join the battle. Thousands of young Northerners descended on Mississippi to fight segregation. At least three of them died there. But Kozol didn't go to Mississippi. He went across Boston, from Harvard Square, to Roxbury. He went to the A.M.E. church and asked what he could do to help. Soon he was teaching summer school reading to dozens of inner-city children. He went to work as a substitute teacher in Boston's public school system. He was fired two years later for reading Langston Hughes to fourth-graders. But he kept working, writing, and teaching in New York and Boston inner city public schools. A lifet ...
NY Civil Rights Spying on Muslims by New York police legal: lawyers: New York: A federal judge has ruled that ...
NY Civil Rights NYPD's surveillance of Muslims will still be challenged in New York lawsuit: Attorneys for cri...
Roughly 50 years after the Civil Rights Act of 1964, a museum in Florida is paying homage to one of the movement's most iconic photographers. Born in New York, B...
War From Above: Domestic Drones Patrolling the Skies of America By Richard Hugus Global Research, January 02, 2014 richardhugus.wordpress.com Region: USA Theme: Militarization and WMD, Police State & Civil Rights drone Drone aircraft, which we first heard of as weapons of war used by the United States in foreign lands, are now poised for a full-scale invasion of the skies above the US itself. On December 30, 2013 the US Federal Aviation Administration announced its choices for drone testing in six states around the country — Alaska, Nevada, New York, North Dakota, Texas and Virginia. These six states may in turn do their testing in more than one location, For example, according to the Anchorage Daily News, drone testing centered in Alaska at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks will be called “the ‘Pan-Pacific Unmanned Aircraft Systems Test Range Complex.’ It includes six flight ranges in Alaska, four in Hawaii and three in Oregon.” According to the Honolulu Star Advertiser “the Pohakuloa Tra ...
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Just finished watching "1964" on PBS.Wow...what a program and what a year it was to live.the year following the assasanation of Kennedy--the Civil Rights Movement--the Freedom Riders and their toils in Mississippi--the escalation of the Viet Nam War--college campus protests--non-violent protest turning real violent across the country--Goldwater vs. Johnson for the Presidency--and the list goes on. Now I understand why my parents took 4 weeks off and carried my brothers and I through the south making stops in Mississippi and Alabama and finally to New York for the World's Fair and then on to Boston.I get it now and it shaped me into what I feel deeply today and that would include my love of travel--seeing what else is going on the world--and all that shaped this country into what it is today and what influences different opinions about where it ought to go in the future.
The African Odyssey: The African Heritage in World History and Human Biological and Cultural History, by Harold L Carter -- Footnote: The *** in Twentieth Century America : A Reader on the Struggle for Civil Rights, John Hope Franklin and Isidore Starr (Vintage Books: A Division of random House: New York), 1967, pp. 4-7, Part I: "What Is a *** " Section 1: "State Laws on Race and Color" (From States Laws on Race and Color, Pauli Murray, Editor, published by the Women's Division of Christian Service, Board of Missions and Church Extension, the Methodist Church, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1951: "State constitutions and laws concerning the *** made it necessary for the state to define *** (colored). This selection is concerned with the various legal definitions of *** ' agreed upon for the purpose of withholding and enforcing the state constitutions and laws: 1927: Alabama 'The word *** includes mulatto. The word 'mulatto' or the term 'person of color' means 'a person of mixed blood descende ...
Black History FACTS THAT HAPPEN ON THIS DATE DECEMBER 5TH: Cowboy Bill "Dusky Demon" Pickett, inventor of "bull dogging" (steer wresting), was born in Williamson County, TX, on this date in 1870. President Harry Truman issued Executive Order No. 9808 creating the Committee on Civil Rights on this date in 1946. Members of the committee included Channing H. Tobias and Attorney Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander. Phyllis Wheatley, one of the first Black female poets in America, died on this date in 1784. Mary McLeod Bethune, educator, founded the National Council of *** Women (NCNW) on this date in 1935. With over one million members, the group fought for social, economic, educational, and political justice for Blacks. Joe Louis and "Jersey" Joe Walcott fought in the first televised Heavyweight Boxing Championship in New York on this date in 1947. Louis won the fight in 15 rounds. Inspired by Rosa L. Parks' refusal to give up her seat in the front of a bus, the Montgomery Bus Boycott began on this date in 1955 . ...
this day in history On June 23 1860 The U.S. Secret Service was created to arrest counterfeiters. 1868 Christopher Latham Sholes received a patent for an invention that he called a "Type-Writer." 1904 The first American motorboat race got underway on the Hudson River in New York. 1938 Marineland opened near St. Augustine, Florida. 1947 The U.S. Senate joined the House in overriding President Truman's veto of the Taft-Hartley Act. 1964 Henry Cabot Lodge resigned as the U.S. envoy to Vietnam and was succeeded by Maxwell Taylor. 1966 Civil Rights marchers in Mississippi were turned away by tear gas. 1972 U.S. President Nixon and White House chief of staff, H.R. Haldeman, discussed a plan to use the CIA to obstruct the FBI's Watergate investigation. 1985 All 329 people aboard an Air-India Boeing 747 were killed when the plane crashed into the Atlantic Ocean near Ireland. The cause was thought to be a bomb. 1989 The movie, "Batman," was released nationwide. 1992 John Gotti was sentenced in New York ...
June 21, 1966…The Rolling Stones filed a $4.9 million lawsuit against 14 New York City hotels for banning them, claiming that the ban was "injurious to the group's reputation and discriminatory in violation of New York's Civil Rights law." June 21, 1966…At the Marquee Club in London, guitarist Jimmy Page made his live stage debut as a member of the Yardbirds. June 21, 1966…At EMI's Abbey Road Studios in London, the Beatles recorded the John Lennon composition, "She Said She Said," the final track of the "Revolver" sessions. Reportedly, the song was based on a bizarre conversation that Lennon had with Peter Fonda while John and George Harrison were tripping on LSD. It took nine hours to rehearse and record the entire song, complete with overdubs. Paul Mccartney does not appear on the finished recording; the bass was played by George. June 21, 1966…Freddy Cannon, Paul Revere and the Raiders, and the Robbs guested on ABC-TV's "Where the Action Is." June 21, 1966…Simon & Garfunkel recorded "The Dang ...
Black History Month Moment comes from the area of Civil Rights. Today we will mark history as Rosa Parks will receive the honor of having full-length statue to be erected and unveiled in the Capitol's Statuary Hall. The statue of Parks joins a bust of another black woman, abolitionist Sojourner Truth, which sits in the Capitol Visitors Center. As many of us know, Rosa Parks became famous for refusing to give up her seat on a city bus in Alabama to a white man in 1955. Her stance led to the 1955-56 (381 Days) Montgomery Bus Boycott, and the resulting ordinance outlawing segregation on buses in Montgomery, Alabama. However, prior to Mrs. Parks taking her stance there were several others who took similar stances on city buses. One such person was a 24-year-old black school teacher in New York, Elizabeth Jennings. On Sunday, July 16, 1854. Ms. Jennings was on her way to the First Colored Congregational Church on Sixth Street and Second Avenue where she was to perform as the organist. You see, in the 1830s a . ...
In honoring Black History Month, the Knowledge Center is highlighting some scholarly books from our collection which illustrate evolving obstacles and successes in the history of medicine for African Americans. Links and descriptions to these documents can be located by searching the Knowledge Center Online Catalog. African American Medical Pioneers / Epps, C.H.; Johnson, D.G.; Vaughan, AL. Rockville, MD: Williams & Wilkins, 1994. 254 p. MH94D2118 Against the Odds: Blacks in the Profession of Medicine in the United States. / Watson, W. Somerset, NJ: Transaction Publishers, 1998. 257 p. MH99D3773 An American Health Dilemma: A Medical History of African Americans and the Problem of Race: Beginnings to 1900. / Byrd, W.M.; Clayton, L.A. New York, NY: Routledge, 2000. 588 p. MH01D4337 Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment (New and Expanded ed.) / Jones, J H. New York, NY: The Free Press, 1993. 297 p. MH97D3222 Beside the Troubled Waters: A Black Doctor Remembers Life, Medicine and Civil Rights in an Alab ...
’’By [1964], a clear majority of Americans had come to realize that racial discrimination was wrong and demeaning to everyone. There was still local support for certain kinds of discrimination, especially in housing, but the climate was right for Freedom Riders, peaceful sit–ins, and ’’I Have a Dream.’’ Though popular mythology dates all progress for blacks from the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, upward trends in black employment, income, and educational opportunities were already well established by then. [Thomas Sowell, Civil Rights: Rhetoric or Reality? (New York: William Morrow & Company, 1984), pp. 49-51. By 1916, America had already gotten its first black millionaire: Madam C. J. Walker, born just four years after emancipation, made a fortune selling beauty products for blacks. Audrey Edwards and Craig Polite, Children of the Dream (New York: Doubleday, 1992), p. 17.]’’
Super Congratulations to daughter Kimberly Young who survived an intense interviewing process to get a full time position working for a democratic congress woman from New York as a legislative analyst. She has 8 major issues to keep track of including Civil Rights, Foreign Affairs, Immigration and Armed Services. She loves living in our nation's capitol! Go Kim! (sorry for the 10 year old picture of kim and amber at least the capitol building where kim works now looks the same)
Vertner Woodson Tandy was the first African-American architect registered in the state of New York, was one of the first African-Americans to become a member of the American Institute of Architects, and also holds the distinction of being the first African-American to pass the military commissioning exam. Born in Lexington, KY, Vertner Woodson Tandy studied architecture at Tuskegee Institute under the tutelage of Professor Booker T. Washington. In September of 1905, he transferred to Cornell University to continue his architectural education and graduated from Cornell University’s Architect program in 1908. A few years after he graduated, Tandy, an outspoken advocate for Civil Rights, led a demonstration at Sage College to have African-American women admitted. During WWI, Tandy was commissioned First Lieutenant in the 15th Infantry of the New York State National Guard. After the war, Tandy returned to his passion. As the first licensed African-American registered architect in New York, he designed sever ...
A Black History: Malcolm X Born: May 19, 1925 Omaha, Nebraska Died: February 21, 1965 New York, New York African American civil rights leader African American civil rights leader Malcolm X was a major twentieth-century spokesman for black nationalism. Unlike many other African American leaders of this time, who supported nonviolent methods, Malcolm X believed in using more aggressive measures in the fight for civil rights. As a boy Malcolm X was born Malcolm Little on May 19, 1925, in Omaha, Nebraska. His father, a Baptist minister, was an outspoken follower of Marcus Garvey (1887–1940), the black nationalist leader. (A nationalist is a person who promotes one nation's culture and interests over all others.) Garvey supported a "back-to-Africa" movement for African Americans. During Malcolm's early years, his family moved several times because of racism (dislike and poor treatment of people based on their race). They moved from Omaha, Nebraska, after being threatened by the Ku Klux Klan, a group that bel ...
Sometime ago in early October 2012, after a painstaking investigation, my colleagues and I – as members of Young Patriots-USA – questioned why John Mahama met the New York based super-wealthy and most influential HOMOSEXUAL activism group, the "Power 50",when he was in New York for the UN General Assembly meeting which took place in September, 2012.   It is important to note that Andrew Solomon, the founder of the Solomon Research Fellowship for the rights of *** *** bisexual and transgender, and a friend of John Mahama – but who has found his way into the Ghana news media for the wrong reasons – is a member of the” Power 50” – a group whose objective is to promote rights of homosexuals across the globe.   Now, let me get back to my point. A statement was issued out on October 23, 2012 and published on www.ghananewsmedia.com with the heading; “why did John Mahama meet the “Power 50?” Read below the full statement.   “Impeccable evidence available to Young Patriots–USA ind ...
Well Wishers My name is Bishop William B. Caractor. I was born in Manhattan, New York in 1948. I was given to my grandmother to be reared on a farm in Edgefield, South Carolina. Those years were the roughest years that any child would have to endure. During my childhood, there was a law called Jim Crow (Separate but equal). Black men and women, no matter how much money they had, what social status or occupation, they were classified as *** Schools were segregated, black students were placed in non-regent classes because they were considered not college material. Most families lived on the white plantation master's land, and was subject to eviction, rapes, and any course of action that the taskmaster felt was appropriate. Later in life, due to Civil Rights legislation, things began to change. The white taskmaster can no longer keep children of school age in the cotton fields, corn fields, potato fields, etc., because of these laws. Black people no longer had to go to the back door of restaurants, got ...
School Closures Violate Civil Rights, Protestors Tell Arne Duncan January 30, 2013By Editor Joy Resmovits 01/29/2013 WASHINGTON — The standards-based Education Reform movement calls school change “the civil rights issue of our time.” But about 220 mostly African American community organizers, parents and students from 21 cities from New York to Oakland, Calif., converged on Washington Tuesday to tell U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan he’s getting it backwards on school closures. Members of the group, a patchwork of community organizations called the Journey for Justice Movement, have filed several Title VI civil rights complaints with the Education Department Office of Civil Rights, claiming that school districts that shut schools are hurting minority students. While most school closures are decided locally, the Education Department’s School Improvement Grant gives underperforming school districts money for shakeups or turnarounds, including closures. The meeting became heated at times. ...
RE-POST. "I Have A Dream.." 1965 also saw the assassination of Brother Malcolm X. In ’66 New York rioted. In ’67 more riots erupted in Detroit and Newark. 1968 brought the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis and political unrest at Chicago’s Democratic Convention where Richard “The Boss” Daley instructed the CPD and National Guard troops fresh from Vietnam to kill Civil Rights Activists if need be. Then at last 1969 closed with a strange turn of events. For Goodman the culmination to a decade of violence arrived in the form a letter from the government. p. 6 MALCOLM X ASSASINATION. The Assasination of Malcolm X Assasination of Malcolm X (Movie version) on the morning of February 14, 1965, Malcolm and his family were peacefully asleep in their home in Elmhurst, New York. They were suddenly awakened by the sounds of shattering glass and explosions. Several Molotov cocktails had been thrown through their living room window, engulfing the house in roaring flames. Malcolm and his w ...
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Good Morning Colorado! A teacher in New York is fighting back after her school district forced her to remove two posters from her classroom. One of the posters was a quote from the New Testament, and another from Ronald Reagan speaking about the value of God to society and democracy. The teacher says, "I believe that my First Amendment rights were violated last June when I was asked to do some things, regarding taking some posters down, and to censor my speech in the classroom, and as a Christian, and as an American, I believe it's incredibly important to fight to protect the rights that people have died to give me." The teacher filed a federal Civil Rights lawsuit this week. We want to know what you think? Were the teachers rights violated? Do you see anything wrong with the posters?
0-06-2005 Edgar Ray Killen is arrested as a suspect for the 1964 murders of three Civil Rights workers. During the "Freedom Summer" of 1964, James Chaney, 21, a young black man from Meridian, Mississippi and Andrew Goodman, 20, and Michael Schwerner, 24, two Jewish men from New York, were murdered in Philadelphia, Mississippi. Killen, along with Cecil Price, then deputy sheriff of Neshoba County, was found to have assembled a group of armed men who conspired, pursued and killed the three civil rights workers. The Mississippi civil rights workers murders galvanized the nation and helped bring about the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act. At the time of the murders, the state of Mississippi made little effort to prosecute the guilty parties. The FBI, under the pro-civil-rights President Lyndon Johnson and Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, conducted a vigorous investigation. A federal prosecutor, John Doar, circumventing dismissals by federal judges, opened a grand jury in ...
Ms. Sheila Michaels will be our guest January 10th 2013 6:00pm to 7:00pm on WDIY 88.1 Lehigh Valley Community Public Radio program 'Lehigh Valley Discourse' She is an early pioneer of the feminist movement and Civil Rights leader who in 1961 joined the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) in New York and in 1962 was hired by Dave Dennis, CORE's field secretary in Mississippi, to work in Jackson, Mississippi, where, additionally, she found herself to be working with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) as a field secretary. She helped write John Lewis' "March on Washington" speech; then, she ran a newspaper in Knoxville, Tennessee, The Knoxville Crusader, which was a two-person project, headed by Marion S. Barry Jr. Ms. Michaels was in the group which founded the modern Women's Movement and, in 1961, originated the title, "Ms." (the honorific, the rationale, the pronunciation, and use). Her later career has been variously in public relations, journalism, criticism, editing, and for a decade i ...
visible Man By Ralph Ellison Book Summary Invisible Man is the story of a young, college-educated black man struggling to survive and succeed in a racially divided society that refuses to see him as a human being. Told in the form of a first-person narrative, Invisible Man traces the nameless narrator's physical and psychological journey from blind ignorance to enlightened awareness — or, according to the author, "from Purpose to Passion to Perception" — through a series of flashbacks in the forms of dreams and memories. Set in the U.S. during the pre-Civil Rights era when segregation laws barred black Americans from enjoying the same basic Human Rights as their white counterparts, the novel opens in the South (Greenwood, South Carolina), although the majority of the action takes place in the North (Harlem, New York). In the Prologue, the narrator — speaking to us from his underground hideout in the basement (coal cellar) of a whites-only apartment building — reminisces about his life as an invisi ...
It's great to be back before the Council on Foreign Relations. I am looking forward to a spirited discussion with your members. I want to talk briefly today about my article in the forthcoming Foreign Affairs on education and international competitiveness, and then turn over the discussion to my good friend and moderator, New York's chancellor Joel Klein. His smarts, his passion, and his tenacity are an example for all of us of what courage and leadership can accomplish on behalf of children. I have learned a great deal from Joel over the years—New York is incredibly lucky to have him leading your effort to create a world-class school system. And I will continue to do whatever I can to support his work. I want to also thank Foreign Affairs, which has pre-released my essay specifically for today's event. I welcome the opportunity to talk about the relationship of education and international competition because it is a subject rife with misunderstanding. In a nutshell, my message is that policymakers and ...
Arrest of Green Party candidates outside second debate and lawsuit On October 16, 2012, Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein and vice-presidential nominee Cheri Honkala were arrested for disorderly conduct while trying to take part in the second presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York.[69][70][71] The two women claim they were taken to a warehouse, and strapped for eight hours to chairs with plastic wrist restraints before being released.[72] On October 22, 2012, the Stein campaign announced a lawsuit against the Commission on Presidential Debates claiming, "that the CPD, Democratic National Committee, and Republican National Committee, together with the Federal Election Commission and Lynn University, had deprived her of her constitutional rights to due process, equal protection, and free speech, as well as her statutorily protected civil rights."[73]
I just recieved an email from Miss Dominique Sharpton, The Rev. Al Sharpton's daughter. I have been invited to attend National Action Network Triumph Awards, where they will honor Sean "Diddy" Combs, Ingrid Saunders Jones and George Lucas. I want say I am honor and most humble. I will be at the Lincoln Center in New York. Next week is a busy week for me. The same week I will be recieving "The Chairman of Honor" award in Elizabeth, New Jersey, for my service to the communities in Civil Rights and Social Justice. Thank you Lord, TO MUCH IS GIVEN MUCH IS REQUIRED! Thank you Rev. Al Sharpton, NAN Family and Salaam Ismiall and National United Youth Council Family.
Did you know that In 1950, on the floor of the house in Washington D.C. one lone Congressman representing New York (Vito Marcoantonio) put up an amendment for Civil Rights and he said this on the record "white supremacy has to be challenged and it has to be beaten, otherwise our democracy can never live. It is a mere mockery, it is a sham, it is a fraud." Well up until today I didn't know that... This Congressman was also surprise surprise highly investigated. by Edgar Hoovers FBI. As a lawyer he also defended W.E.B. Du Bois and Pedro Albizu Campos in their respective trials for free. he routinely spoke out against US Imperialism and was a staunch supporter of Labor and Puerto Rican Independence
Letter from a professor I got today. * This might give you a good laugh, or not! We have entered the age of insanity. It's here. Upon us. Full blown. Many decades in the past were referred to in such colorful terms as the *** '90s" -- that was the 1890s, to clarify, not a parade of 90-year-old *** people. The 1920s was coined as the "Roaring '20s." The '50s, the "Fabulous '50s." The 1960s, "The Swinging '60s." Now "The Age of Insanity" is here with all of its ugliness, its madness, where truth no longer seems to exist. Where science is scorned. Where facts are turned into fiction. Where the crucial issues of our time are a daily form of entertainment. Even Donald Trump has fallen under the spell of the Age of Insanity. Here's a wealthy educated man. Influential. A New York icon. And yet, he believes that Barack Obama is some kind of Manchurian Candidate president. He keeps saying he's heard that he wasn't born here. That he was actually born in Kenya and that the birth certificate is a fraud. And he is n ...
Ruby Dee (born October 27, 1924) was born Ruby Ann Wallace in Cleveland, Ohio, the daughter of Gladys Hightower and Marshall Edward Nathaniel Wallace, a cook, waiter, and porter. After her mother left the family, Dee's father married Emma Amelia Benson, a schoolteacher. Dee grew up in Harlem, New York. She attended Hunter College High School and went on to graduate from Hunter College with degrees in French and Spanish in 1944. Dee is a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Ruby Wallace married blues singer Frankie Dee in the mid 1940’s but later divorced him. Three years later she married actor Ossie Davis. Together, Dee and Davis wrote an autobiography in which they discuss their political activism as well as insights on their open marriage. Together they had three children; son, blues musician Guy Davis, and two daughters, Nora Day, and Hasna Muhammad. Dee has survived breast cancer for more than 30 years. Dee and Davis were well-known Civil Rights Activists. Among others, Dee is a member of Co ...
On this day in Black History: Physician, Louis Tompkins Wright was born in 1924 Louis Tompkins Wright (1891–1952) was an American surgeon noted for his work in Harlem. The Spingarn Medallist played a major role in investigating the use of Aureomycin as a treatment on humans. Wright, a native of LaGrange, Georgia, received his bachelor's degree from Clark Atlanta University in 1911 before getting his medical degree from Harvard in 1915. His efforts related to Civil Rights began in college when he missed three weeks of school to join picket lines protesting The Birth of a Nation. He went on to graduate fourth in his class and was a Captain in the Army Medical Corps in France in World War I. During the war he introduced intradermal vaccination for smallpox, was gassed and won the Purple Heart. On returning to the United States he moved to New York, and in 1919 he became the first African American on the surgical staff of Harlem Hospital. In 1934 he became a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons. He wo ...
Office Clerk - Catholic League for Religious and Civil Rights - New York, NY
Police would have authority to stop and frisk for weapons or drugs people they deem "suspicious" under policy supported by Mayor Ed Lee, according to reports. The so-called "stop-and-frisk" policy has been controversial in cities like New York and Philadelphia, which Lee wants to use as a model for police activity in San Francisco, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. In those cities, minorities are most frequently targeted for the random searches, which can be conducted without a warrant. Eighty-eight percent of people targeted by police for a stop-and-search in New York "had done nothing wrong," according to a report by the New York Civil Liberties Union. Philadelphia's program is under court-ordered monitoring, the newspaper reported. Lee, a former civil rights attorney who calls himself progressive, admitted he may be criticized for advocating racial profiling. Police insisted that if implemented, stop-and-frisk would be "done right." Legal experts expressed doubts, however. "San Francisco for ye ...
Robert Francis "Bobby" Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also referred to by his initials RFK, was an American politician, a Democratic senator from New York, and a noted Civil Rights Activist. An icon of modern American liberalism and member of the Kennedy family, he was a younger brother of President John F. Kennedy and acted as one of his advisors during his presidency. From 1961 to 1964, he was the U.S. Attorney General.
Civil Rights Activists Reverend Jesse Jackson from Chicago and Al Sharpton from New York will be in Milwaukee to try to turn out the black vote in the state's largest city.
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After a successful Business Day in New York and New Jersey, I am now arriving into Washington, DC for a very special evening. I am a guest for tonight's Leadership Conference for Civil & Human Rights Annual Hubert Humphrey Awards Gala. This year's honorees are Congressman Barney Franks and National Council of La Raza (NCLR) President & CEO Janet Murguia. The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights is a national coalition of African American, Latino, Asian-American, Labor Movement, Jewish, Christian, Muslim, LGBT, Women rights, Social Justice and many other organizations that come together under one roof in the name of national unity to promote and advocate for civil rights for all Americans. I proudly serve on the boards of directors of NCLR and LatinoJustice PRLDEF which are member organizations and I'm a "Gold Life Member" of the NAACP, which is a founding member organization. Looking forward to a very special civil rights unity gala in our Nation's Capital.
Toni Morrison's latest novel revisits the story of the prodigal son as a Korean War veteran returns to his hometown in the pre-Civil Rights era South. Critic Heller McAlpin says Home is as accessible and visceral as anything Morrison has written.
Beah Richards' struggled to overcome racial stereotypes throughout her long career onstage and onscreen in Hollywood and New York, she also had an influential role in the fight for Civil Rights, working alongside the likes of Paul Robeson, W.E.B. DuBois and Louise Patterson.
Today in History - 1862 - The Aerosol bottle is patented by John Lynde of Philadelphia. 1873 - Alfred Paraf of New York obtains a patent for the process to make margarine. 1960 - The US Senate passes the first Civil Rights legislation. 1974 - Atlanta Braves baseball star Hank Aaron hits 715th home run at Atlanta Stadium, breaking Babe Ruth's 47 year record. 1986 - Clint Eastwood is elected Mayor of Carmel, California. 2001 - Tiger Woods' win at the Masters in Augusta makes him the first golfer to hold all four pro titles at once.
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