Civil Rights & African Americans

Civil and political rights are a class of rights that protect individuals' freedom from unwarranted infringement by governments and private organizations, and ensure one's ability to participate in the civil and political life of the state without discrimination or repression. African Americans (also referred to as Black Americans or Afro-Americans, and formerly as American Negroes) are citizens or residents of the United States who have at least partial ancestry from any of the native populations of Sub-Saharan Africa. 5.0/5

Civil Rights African Americans Voting Rights Acts Andrew M. Manis Macon State College Macon Telegraph Martin Luther King Bobby Kennedy African American Civil Rights Act United States Voting Rights Act Civil War Civil Rights Movement Black History Month President Obama

One thing about African Americans, we never came here illegally, we were slaves who fought for Civil Rights, alongside some Whites Amer.
One of African Americans biggest ally in our fight for civil rights was the white Jewish people. Liberals don't want black…
This summarizes my thoughts as well. An open letter to Eric Holder, racist: K. Dee McCown College Station, Texas December 28, 2014 Attorney General Eric Holder U.S. Department of Justice 950 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20530-0001 Dear Attorney General Holder, It is unlikely that we met while I served in the FBI. That being said, we served at the Department of Justice (DOJ) during the same years and on the same "team" conceptually speaking. During my service in the FBI I worked with a number of U.S. Attorney Offices in the United States to include a tour at FBIHQ where I worked with the Department of Justice (Main) on a daily basis. I begin my letter with this comment to highlight that I am not a bystander on the topic of law enforcement in the United States. I worked and managed a variety of federal investigations during my 12 years of service in the FBI, to include the management of several Civil Rights cases in the State of Texas. In fact, during my last tour in the Bureau, I was an FBI Super ...
Malcolm X (d.1965). American Muslim revolutionary, public speaker, and Civil Rights Activist. His contributions to the Civil Rights struggle in the US are well known and require no elaboration and he has continued to exercise a huge influence on African Americans, American Muslims (and others) until this day. Malcolm X was an African-American Muslim minister and a Human Rights activist. To his admirers he was a courageous advocate for the rights of blacks, a man who indicted white America in the harshest terms for its crimes against Black Americans; detractors accused him of preaching racism and violence. He has been called one of the greatest and most influential African Americans in history. Malcolm X was effectively orphaned early in life. His father was killed when he was six and his mother was placed in a mental hospital when he was thirteen, after which he lived in a series of foster homes. In 1946, at age 20, he went to prison for larceny and breaking and entering. While in prison he became a membe ...
Democrat Party endorsed Racism for last 50+ years exposed... Lyndon Baines Johnson, a 'Dixiecrat' hailing from the great state of Texas, succeeded John F. Kennedy as the 36th President of the United States. During most of his tenure in Congress, spanning from 1937 to 1956, Johnson railed against every Civil Rights Bill introduced by Republicans. Johnson quickly accepted the "writing on the wall" and realized, like his KKK Democrat predecessors in Lincoln's day, that the black vote must be secured. For a little background on the subject- After the Civil War, Democrats attempted to scare African Americans by using "Vote or Die" propaganda, designed to instill a sense of fear for those living in the southern states. Despite heavy opposition against the Civil Rights Act of 1957 by Democrats, including John F. Kennedy, Johnson was convinced that if his party could steal the 'thunder' from the Republican lead Civil Rights efforts, support among black voters would shift . "These Negroes, they're getting pretty u ...
Although the Mike Brown verdict was not what his family friends and nation wanted to hear, but the people of Ferguson need to realize what they are doing will get no positive results. They're screaming racism but destroying businesses that other African Americans worked their *** off to get. You're not only hurting yourselves you're hurting people that are innocent with this nonsense. WAKE UP PEOPLE... Racism is bred in every culture and sadly this is what you're teaching your children. Look to your ancestors and you will find the answers you're seeking. I must confess, my friends, the road ahead will not always be smooth. There will be still rocky places of frustration and meandering points of bewilderment. There will be inevitable setbacks here and there. There will be those moments when the buoyancy of hope will be transformed into the fatigue of despair. Our dreams will sometimes be shattered and our ethereal hopes blasted. We may again with tear-drenched eyes have to stand before the bier of some ...
When I was little I used to joke about the "Christians" who only prayed during hard times, but now it seems like everyone is too busy trying to look put for themselves to look up. African Americans have slipped back into the civil rights ear, but instead of practicing the peaceful, helpful protests of our ancestors we are destroying our selves by portraying the stereotypical Black Americans on tv. Instead of helping those we are fighting for we are reeking havoc on each other. Instead of helping our neighbors we are forming gangs, and dealing each other drugs. We have turned into the very people our ancestors fought against as we group each white person in one big category of racist, rich, spoiled people. Why do we continue to live in a world that shouts do as I say and not as I do to the younger generations. We are passing out hate and anger and belittling the very people who need us the most. Jesus came down to earth for the sinners not the people who were already believers. How is it we have the advant ...
World History students from Anderson HS recently visited the African American Museum in Detroit. They experienced exhibits on The Origin of Life; And Still We Rise, which chronicled the experiences of African Americans from their capture in Africa through the Middle Passage, enslavement, the Underground Railroad, Jim Crow & Civil Rights era to the present; African Americans in Theater, Literature, and on Film; and Inspiring Minds: African Americans in Science & Technology. Thank you Mrs. Furkas.
(Thanks to Taunya Latrice Daniels for taking me to Mary Ellen Pleasants house located in Glenn Ellen) It's the mid to late 1800's, She's got $30,000,000, She's helping Harriet Tubman escape and hideout slaves, she's an exclusive madam with the street handle the "Voodoo Queen", Suspected of killing several of her husbands with the use of Voodoo and here's the kicker, she's mulatto from Sonoma County and they named the city of Glenn Ellen after her. Here's her lowdown. The Early Years San Francisco Legacies Meet Mary Ellen Pleasant Called "the Mother of Civil Rights in California" from work begun in the 1860s, her achievements went unsurpassed until the 1960s. Pleasant was once the most talked-about woman in San Francisco. When other African Americans were rarely mentioned, she claimed full-page articles in the press. Her dramatic life was part of the story of slavery, abolition, the gold rush, and the Civil War; she helped shape early San Francisco, and covertly amassed a joint fortune once assessed at $3 ...
Attorney General Eric Holder announced his resignation today; Mr. Holder, thank you for your valuable service; your leadership was extraordinary, and your accomplishments, historic. You were brave, and strong in the face of so much hate from the right wingers. Their vitriol was despicable,, and vicious, but you faced it with grace and aplomb. Thank you for a job more than well done, it revealed your dedication, and your leadership in so many different spheres of our society; it could not have been easy. There will never be another attorney general as historic in my lifetime. I am sorry to see you go, but one must go forward, and do what is best in one's life. You have made a vast amount of positive contributions to our country, that will make America more equal, and more fair. So, thanks again. You will be missed. The best of luck to you and your family. Gracias, from the minority community for standing up to bigotry, and hate directed toward African Americans, Latinos, especially in civil rights and the ...
For those who might wonder why we shouldn't teach our history as a childhood bedtime story of our magnificence, a selection from an essay by Jack Jenkins in Think Progress: When American slaveowners cherry-picked Bible passages to justify the ownership of human beings, it was religious abolitionists who passionately condemned the sin of slavery with an alternative religious vision. When the systematic subjugation of women was explained away as part of “God’s order,” it was early feminists who dug into the scriptures to rediscover a theology that lifts up gender equality as a spiritual standard. And when the Ku Klux Klan lynched African Americans under burning crosses, it was Civil Rights pastors who preached, sang, organized, and marched until the flames of hatred were reduced to cinders. Granted, none of these movements are “finished,” and no human movement is perfect. But over and over again, past encounters show that horrific manipulations of religion are clearly best countered, first and f . ...
Look at the guy's face when she suggests using water cannons against demonstrators. As a reminder, government authorities used to use powerful firehoses and water cannons to brutalize African Americans protesting for civil rights in the US during the 1950s and 60s.
*BLACK HISTORY FACT* James L. Farmer Sr., an African-American educator, administrator, ministerand historian, was born on this date in 1886. Farmer acquired a working scholarship from Mary McCloud Bethune to the Cookman Institute in Daytona Beach, Florida because there were no High Schools for African Americans in his area of Georgia. Farmer earned his Bachelor of Sacred Theology in 1916, and in 1918 he became the first African American Texan to earn a PhD in Texas. A theological seminary in Atlanta conferred an honorary Doctor of Divinity on James Farmer, Sr. in 1929. In 1939, Farmer moved to Washington, D.C. to accept the position of Dean of the School of Religion at Howard University and became the second Ph.D on the faculty of the School of Religion. His son, civil rights leader James Leonard Farmer, Jr., founder of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), wrote extensively of his father in his book, Lay Bare the Heart: An Autobiography of the Civil Rights Movement. SiriusXM Urban View
Moses Weathers plays Private George Washington in the short film, The Battle of Island Mound. The film is based on real accounts from George, passed down to his great grandson, Dr. Jimmy Johnson, who was on hand for much of the film's production, and dedicated his life to the legacy of his great grandfather and the courageous 1st Kansas Colored Infantry. Sadly, Jimmy Johnson passed away just a week prior to the film's Kansas City premiere in February 2014. The battle, fought by escaped Missouri slaves who became the first ever African Americans to fight in the Civil War, set the stage for Civil Rights in America. The film makes its St. Louis Premiere at Webster University's Winifred Moore Theater May 28, at 7:30 PM.
Neighborhood Organized Workers’(NOW) Accomplishments Note: It has been said that there was no Civil Rights struggle in Mobile. Information below is intended not only to prove otherwise, but also give some easily accessible specifics regarding NOW and the results of the struggle. The wall of segregation did not rot down; it had to be knocked down by those courageous leaders who all too often became castigated and ostracized by many who reaped great benefits from the results of their struggle. NOW carved out new possibilities, not only for African Americans, but for women, those physically challenged, and many others downtrodden by society. Consider the following: ***1. NOW redefined boycotting as a strategy for economic change by initiating a program they termed “Operation Ghost-town”. Now asked Blacks in Mobile to make downtown a ghost-town until NOW’s demands regarding merchants employing Blacks as clerks and managers throughout downtown were met. Operation Ghost-town resulted in Blacks, for the ...
Today, May 18th we honor Mary Jane McLeod Bethune (1875- 05/18/1955). American educator and civil rights leader best known for starting a private school for African-American girls. Later it joined with a school for African- American boys, becoming Bethune-Cookman University in Daytona Beach, Florida. She was known as "The First Lady of The Struggle” because of her commitment to bettering African Americans.
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Fighting for Leisure: African Americans, Beaches, and Civil Rights in Early 20th Century L.A.
Civil Rights, and American Racism, by Kevin Powell It was Albert Einstein who said it best, long ago: insanity is saying or doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result. Well, American racism is a form of insanity, a mental illness, as central to this land as the genocide of Native Americans, the enslavement of African people, and everything from the Civil War to the Civil Rights Movement to apple pie and Coca Cola to the tragic murder of Trayvon Martin. That there is widespread outrage and condemnation of the Los Angeles Clippers’ owner for his alleged racist rants on a telephone call with his “girlfriend” (Mr. Sterling is married too) is not surprising. Mr. Sterling disses African Americans, Latinos, and we know for sure, that he has a lengthy track record around housing and other forms of racial discrimination as it concerns communities of color; and that former Clippers executive and NBA Hall of Famer Elgin Baylor documented, in his lawsuit against the owner, quite s ...
Did you know that Marvel Comics "The X-Men" was a concept born out of the Civil Rights Movement? The X-Men parallels with people of Color especially African Americans as we continue to struggle to find our place in society here in America and abroad. Open your mind and go see the Xmen: Days of Future Past
When will people realize that it is NOT okay to refuse services because of someone's sexual orientation? Why does it matter? Why is it anyone's business what they do with their personal lives? This is getting out of hand and just as bad when we denied African Americans civil rights. The god you serve is not the GOD I serve. He is full of compassion and love. Let HIM judge. Remember that Jesus spent time with tax collectors, prostitutes, etc. He just LOVED. Where is your love? **Ends rant**
By the 1950s, African Americans began to mobilize in earnest against discrimination. As the 1957 photograph makes clear, even baseball legend Willie Mays was touched by housing discrimination. They lived in the same culture as white Americans — as illustrated by the photographs of Oakland's McClymonds High School marching band and the group of young woman at an NAACP-sponsored social event — and they wanted to enjoy equal rights. The Struggle for Civil Rights (1950s-1960s) Civil rights groups demanded an end to segregation. They fought for equality in education, housing, and employment opportunities, and they made some headway. White-collar and professional sector jobs began to open up for African Americans, as shown by the photograph of commercial artist Berry Weeks working at his draft board in 1960. But not all white Americans welcomed change.
Do you See God in the Mirror? This inspiring Sabbath message was delivered by Elder Cheryl Sparks. This is our 2nd Sabbath black history message. Please enjoy, it was not only for most African Americans that feel as though they don't have any self worth or low self-esteem, but for anyone. We know this scripture real well. We're all part of Adam, but do you see God in the mirror? Do any of you remember the Black Liberation Theology by Jeremiah Wright, President Barack Obama's former Pastor? Say it, I'm black, and I'm proud. Fist pump and Afro pick. Some of us can't go that far. Or don't want to go back there again. Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton, and Andy Young, fighting for Civil Rights, and feeding the poor. Elohoim consists of the Father, Son, & Holy Spirit. We've had a problem, and we still have a problem. You may resemble the person next to you, but you don't look like them. There is no one on the earth like you, just like there is no one like God! Our problem isn't just our problem. We feel it worse b .. ...
Juanita Moore popularly known as "Annie" from the movie "Imitation of Life" died Jan. 1 2014 at the age of 99. She was the 3rd African American to be nominated Oscar. She never retired. Juanita Moore worked throughout the ages and did guest appearance on Judging Amy other recent shows. She was a beautiful African American woman. Her 1960's nomination is noteworthy because in 1960 the Civil Rights sit ins began so the climate wasn't perfect for African Americans. America was segregated. So through Juanita Moore I learned that if you keep trying, your obstacles can become your pedestals. May God rest her soul.
African Americans in the U.S. Military: From Tuskegee Airmen to Civil Rights: From the American Revolution to ...
What if Slaves wrote the history of Georgia? As the historian Melvyn Stokes has observed, “the traditional focus” of American history has been “on the centers of political, economic, and social power and the doings of elite white men.” He also observed that in the last several decades, historical study has turned its eyes on groups that had largely been “ignored and misinterpreted.” The history of the United States with respect to the role of enslaved people is a case in point. Much of US history, in our schoolbooks and popular culture, has been told from the perspective of white slaveholders and nonslaveholders; the viewpoint of slaves themselves was often ignored. There has been, though, a sea change in this since the 1950s, thanks to the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements, the growth of an educated African American middle class, and modern historians of all races and backgrounds. But it’s not as if, throughout history, African Americans have made no attempt at their own telling the st ...
Baseball season will soon be here, and just in time for it (hopefully) a new book" DB77756 "Southern League: A True Story of Baseball, Civil Rights, and the Deep South's Most Compelling Pennant Race" by Larry Colton. This book recounts the integration of the minor-league baseball team in Birmingham, Alabama--a hotbed of racial conflict--in 1964. It focuses on pitcher Johnny "Blue Moon" Odom and outfielder Tommie Reynolds, both African Americans; Cuban-born shortstop Bert Campaneris; and white manager Heywood Sullivan. Unrated. Commercial audiobook. 2013. Watch for this book coming soon to BARD and the library.
Dr W. E. B. Dubois once said about Dr Martin Luther King Jr. "I KNEW I WOULD SEE MANY UNBELIEVABLE THINGS IN MY LIFETIME BUT NEVER A 'RADICAL' BLACK BAPTIST MINISTER". Malcolm X, Huey Newton, and The Black Panther Party never ever saw Martin as "RADICAL" rotfl . all things are from one's own lifetime experiences and perspectives. The former, Dr Dubois, he lived a very long time and saw the changes since Africans were killed and stolen from the shores of their home .. the many many countries and territories of AFRICA, Enslavement in the Western Hemisphre, The Emancipation in the USA, Reconstruction, the making of the kkk, Civil Rights to Human Rights and now to a black President Barack Obama ... and the drum beat goes on and on and on ... You all do know POTUS has my dream job I worked hard to obtain .. it was never ever just Jessie run Jessie run .. there were and are many of us African Americans with the courage to do!!!
President Obama's Thirst for Insulting Blacks: A Psycho-Social-Political Search for Motives Posted by james wilson on June 2, 2013 at 4:23am in Hot Stuff SegmentSend Message View Discussions Since President Obama's arrival on the national scene a little over four years ago, and was declared "the first clean, fresh, and intelligent" Black in history, the "role model" has exhibited an insatiable thirst for insulting African Americans. These insults have been manifested both actively and passive aggressively. Actively, he has established a pattern of "talking down" to Blacks by "signifying and playing the dozens." Passive aggressively, he has insulted Blacks by his willful failure to mention them in his election-victory and policy speeches (insult by omission). He has done these things despite the fact that African Americans are the demographic group most responsible for, in the words of his 2008 campaign theme song by Jackie Wilson, "lifting [him] higher, and higher, than [he'd] ever been lifted before." .. ...
The Dems are often supported by African Americans, yet I cannot fathom why. The democrats opposed abolition of slavery, opposed Civil Rights. Democrats were also aligned with the KKK. And the arming of all citizens that are legally allowed to bear arms is supported by the NRA, regardless of race. I offer the following: " The National Rifle association supposedly opposed gun laws that restricted African-American gun ownership and in some instances offered support to Black Americans seeking to defend themselves with firearms. In 1958, retired Marine Robert Williams opened a chapter of the NAACP in Monroe, North Carolina. Monroe was also Klan country, and the KKK mounted several vicious assaults against African-Americans in Monroe. In 1960, Williams applied for and was granted a charter to establish an NRA chapter in Monroe; the association also provided firearms training materials. Mr. Williams and other black NRA members in Monroe subsequently successfully defended themselves with firearms against an ...
The Letter that "The Butler" 's director Lee Daniels sent to the CEO of Warner Brothers after the decision of MPAA to block The Weinstein Company from using the title The Butler because of a nearly century old silent short film that Warner Bros owns Dear Mr. Tsujihara: I have spent the last four years of my life working on the film, The Butler, and it is the proudest moment of my professional career. I am heartbroken as I write this letter to you. I made this film so I could show my kids, my family, and my country some of the injustices and victories African Americans and their families have experienced in the fight for Civil Rights. There are so few depictions of strong black families in our cinematic history and it was of paramount importance to make this movie about a family who endured and survived unimaginable discrimination in their quest for the American Dream. Through the eyes of this loving and hard-working African American family, the film tells the story of the Civil Rights Movement from the si ...
Alright, finished "Jesus and the Disinherited" by Howard Thurman. Let's begin by saying that it was foundational for Martin Luther King, Jr.'s development (rumor is he carried a copy with him whenever he traveled), and the development of other Civil Rights leaders. Thurman addresses the issues surrounding the hypocrisy of Christianity in light of the oppression of African Americans and other minorities, but he does not do this by addressing the aggressors, rather he addresses the disinherited ones, those with their "backs up against a wall". I think this is where you can really see the influence on Dr. King, Thurman explains that the call of Jesus to "love your enemies" must supersede and overtake the natural desire for revenge, retaliation or violence. It must be through love (first self-love, then other-love) that oppression is overcome. The humility with which Thurman writes is truly disarming. Thurman argues that a close understanding and relationship with Jesus provides the strength needed to accompl ...
Shared this earlier with those who think the Urban League working with our Governor to help people get jobs is a bad idea...People need jobs; life sustaining jobs. I will work with our Governor and anyone in the state legislature who cares to work with us to ensure people have them. As an African American native of Wisconsin whose family has contributed greatly to our capital city and state for more than 100 years, to know my home city and state have the worst racial gaps in just about everything in 2013 - in the post Civil Rights era mind you - is unbearable, unconscionable and completely unacceptable. But we got here not by Scott Walker, but by a multitude of personal, political and economic reasons over many decades that include poor decision-making, narrow thinking, exclusionary practices, protectionism and benign neglect on part of lawmakers and their public interest groups on both sides of the political aisle. To overcome the extraordinary challenges we face, we (Urban League and me personally) must ...
Next up, modern day Democrat raysism. You'll never learn this in any history book. This is a list of state governors in office during the Civil Rights era. Something to notice - They're ALL Democrat, with one exception – Strom Thurmond, and HE started as a southern Democrat. This is FACT. Ross Barnett, Governor of Mississippi (Democrat). C. Farris Bryant, Governor of Florida (Democrat). Harry F. Byrd, Governor of Virginia (Democrat). Francis Cherry, Governor of Arkansas (Democrat). Jimmie Davis, Governor of Louisiana (Democrat). Orval Faubus, Governor of Arkansas (Democrat). Marvin Griffin, Governor of Georgia (Democrat). Paul B. Johnson, Jr., Governor of Mississippi (Democrat). Robert F. Kennon, Governor of Louisiana (Democrat). Lester Maddox, Governor of Georgia (Democrat, American Independent). John McKeithen, Governor of Louisiana (Democrat). W. Lee O'Daniel, Governor of Texas (Democrat) John Malcolm Patterson, Governor of Alabama (Democrat) Strom Thurmond, Governor and U.S. senator from South Carol ...
Republicans are busy as little bees looking for ways to overcome their reputation as racist. There are press releases everywhere talking about the fact that Lincoln, a Republican, freed the slaves. Well it's also true that most of the KKK were Southern Democrats but both facts have very little to do with what is happening today. For one thing, it leaves out all the civil rights history that has happened since the Civil War. Thank you Mr Lincoln for freeing the slaves and shame on the racists who created the KKK. Thank you President Truman for creating the President's Committee on Civil Rights and integrating the military. This was the first step toward equality for all since the Civil War. Shame on President Nixon for creating the “Southern Strategy” which was to subtly remind southerners that African Americans were voting Democrat and that they needed to unite with the Republican Party if they wanted to oppose African Americans. One of Nixion's political strategists was quoted in a NY Times interv .. ...
     Celebrating Fannie Lou Hamer who took on President Johnson and won: African Americans voted in higher percentages than whites in 2012 for the first time ever. But the work of what Johnson called “the next and more profound stage of the battle for civil rights” — equal economic opportunity — remains to be done. Thank you for bring out the vote Hispanics, African Americans, youth, women, Colorado, Florida, and Ohio. When we get equity in the US Congress, the presidency and vice presidency we will also be able to support a pathway out of the School to Prison Pipeline with jobs too when women show men what it is to work for God by loving each other. Christ speed up this plan of loving each other and get rid of those who met weekly to plan the demise of Civil Rights in the US Congress that Vice President Biden told the globe about at the funeral of Senator Pell. We know their reign of terror has come to a halt and they are cuffed with a life sentence with God as their judge for all the evil th ...
You know I have always wondered why Blacks vote overwhelmingly for the Democratic Party. Guess I'll keep wondering. Wayne Perryman, an inner city minister in Seattle and the author of Unfounded Loyalty, in an editorial circulating on the Internet (Feb. 2004): Most people are either a Democrat by design, or a Democrat by deception. That is either they were well aware the racist history of the Democrat Party and still chose to be Democrat, or they were deceived into thinking that the Democratic Party is a party that sincerely cared about Black people. History reveals that every piece of racist legislation that was ever passed and every racist terrorist attack that was ever inflicted on African Americans, was initiated by the members of the Democratic Party. From the formation of the Democratic Party in 1792 to the Civil Rights Movement of 1960's, Congressional Records show the Democrat Party passed no specific laws to help Blacks, every law that they introduced into Congress was designed to hurt blacks in . ...
“Historians have written extensively about periods in black history, but as I see it, our history divides into six distinct, though sometimes overlapping, parts: Middle Passage, the break from Africa; the antebellum period, meaning, for Black Americans, slavery; Reconstruction, including emancipation, manumission, and the chaos after the Civil War, allowing African Americans to begin to take a greater hand in inventing themselves; redemption, or the imposition of Jim Crow, a new kind of subjugation, ingenious in its insidious completeness and mimicry of legal slavery; the Civil Rights era—as opposed to the Civil Rights Movement—which really began with the imposition of Jim Crow, even before the Niagara Movement, which sowed the seeds of the NAACP, A. Philip Randolph, Ida Wells Barnett, et al; and the now and unnamed, un-defined, un-understood period. It is important to understand each of these periods if we are ever going to understand anything about African American— black—identity. But it occu ...
A few weeks ago, Rev. Linda and I discussed how someone could respond to her sermons, whether we agree or disagree or just had something to add. We talked about having some cards on the First Sunday Lunch tables with the prior four week’s themes of sermons and letting people reflect on their view of the subject. We also talked about having a column in the newsletter. So I chose this route this month. On 5/19/13, Rev. Linda spoke on “being afraid, very afraid”…..she spoke of someone who was debating whether to “come out” in a world that could and would treat that person differently. So differently, that they could lose their job, family, friends, etc. and it reminded me of the podcast I had just heard from “On Being” by Krista Tippett of NPR. The link is here: Krista was interviewing John Lewis, Civil Rights leader and Congressman from Georgia. She asked how the young African Americans in the 1960s prepared for the sit in’s, marches and civil disobedience stances they took. Mr. Lewis e .. ...
Its 1940 & I didn't favor African Americans helping in the WW2 but I realized it would help later in civil rights
My hometown really never got over the Civil Rights Movement no joke Camden tho is Way more filled with African Americans then White People
To all bills seeking to strip civil rights for women, *** African Americans et al.
Interesting read: = Civil Rights and the Collapse of Birmingham, Ala. By John Bennett Birmingham, Alabama is considered by many to be the birthplace of the Civil Rights Movement. Today, African-Americans in Birmingham benefit from a numerical majority in the population, corresponding majorities in government jobs, and political control of the city. But civil rights won't address what ails the city now. Birmingham is recognized as one of the most violent and poorly-run cities in the nation. The city runs a massive deficit, and is county seat of Jefferson County, which recently cut a deal with a European bank as part of the largest government bankruptcy in U.S. history. Underlying this fiasco is a mixture of problems, none of which can be solved by the civil rights agenda, or by liberalism in any form. This is not to suggest that those rights should be rolled back, but to point out that today's solutions will not come from civil rights. Blacks in Birmingham have now obtained equal rights, special protection ...
Please Read this an Pass it on. It's a very eye-opening piece on how whites view themselves written by a white southern reporter. It's written very well. Pass on the knowledge!!! VERY INTERESTING, PLEASE READ TO END. "Without Love There Is No Life, Without Life There Is No Love" This is a MUST read which resonates with at least 90% of the world. Please, please pass this one on, even if you have to print it and mail it to your "computer challenged" friends and relatives. Don't forget your Caucasian friends and "relatives". Read what a white reporter wrote in a Georgia newspaper Andrew M. Manis is Associate Professor of history at Macon State College in Georgia and wrote this for an editorial in the Macon Telegraph. Andrew M. Manis: When Are WE Going to Get Over It? For much of the last forty years, ever since America "fixed" its race problem in the Civil Rights and Voting Rights Acts, we White People have been impatient with African Americans who continued to blame race for their difficulties. Often we hav ...
Civil Rights pioneer and NAACP President Emeritus Julian Bond joined Stephen Colbert on Wednesday night to discuss the current challenges to the Voting Rights Act, the landmark 1965 legislation that cleared away hurdles to voting for African Americans in states with a history of discrimination. Bond...
I don't think Martin Luther King would be proud of what African Americans have done since the Civil Rights Movement.
THE BIRTH OF THE KKK : the Ku Klux Klan was a group of ex-confederate veterans who started an American terrorists organization around Dec. 1865 in Pulaski Tennessee. They were against reconstruction, and free slaves. Around 1903 they were against immigration in America, especially against the Jews and Catholics and against other group of people. Around the 1950s and 60s the KKK they were against civil rights and the right for African Americans to vote. Today 2013 they are against Gun Control. They are for the 2nd amendment which really was put in for protection fearing free slaves would harm them. During the 1970s a branch of the KKK was sued for $7 million dollars for killing a black person. The KKK is really similar to Al-Qaeda, they are like a social virus that's against peace. Every nation of the world have some form of social virus in its ranks.
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The National Rifle Association (NRA) is increasing its outreach to African Americans with a new campaign that links the Civil Rights struggle and nonviolent resistance to gun ownership, arguing that
Kazembe Balagun: The new solidarity: From Frederick Douglass to Civil Rights, African Americans have always pushed for change. Now, we need a new generation
The following is a recap of topics I talked about each day of Black History Month. The point of the posts was to talk about little know facts or topics that don't get as much press. People always get the obvious Martin Luther King, Jr and Maclom X or George Washington Carver and W. E. B. DeBouis; but few learn about the Haitian Revolution, the American Indians who actually were black, or the Hawaiians.   In all of these, the key thing to remember is that African Americans have a bigger history than just slavery and Civil Rights. We have fraternal orders, businesses, cities, ancient history, and achievements all over the world.  Day - Hidden Colors - - Arturo Alfonso Schomburg - - Nancy Wilson - - Rosa Parks/Claudette Colvin - - Lucy Diggs Slowe - - Joycelyn Elders - - Alice Allison Dunnigan (Essence Payne post) - - Jackie Robinson/Monte Irwin - - Mansa Musa I - What Black Men Think - about People in College vs. People in Jail - Hidden Colors 2 - from Day 1 - - Oholne Indians of California - - This day i ...
Chapter I: The Formation of the "Black Ghetto" By the early 1950s, the black, inner-city ghetto was already well formed. African Americans already lived in highly segregated, densely concentrated urban areas. These ghettos, however, differed significantly from their modern counterparts. Their levels...
Various Family Information on Slaves, Mulattos, and Free Colored Persons Several free African Americans voted in the North Carolina General Assembly elections in 1701. Jack Braveboy, was living in Chowan County before 17 July 1716 when he was presented by the court: a *** Coming into this Government with a woman and do live together as man and wife, it is ordered that the sd. Braveboy produce a Sufficient Certificate of their Marryage. In 1725 John Cotton was indicted for marrying a "Molatto Man to a White woman," and in 1726 the Rev. Mr. John Blacknall was fined fifty pounds for "joyning together in ... Matrimony Thomas Spencer and Martha Paule a Molatto Woman". Many of those who were free in Northampton County, Virginia, settled in Craven County, North Carolina. They were the Carter, Copes, Driggers, George, and Johnston families. They can be traced directly back to their seventeenth century Virginia ancestors. Those in the early eighteenth century lists of Northampton County, Virginia tithables who ...
In honoring Black History Month, the Knowledge Center is highlighting some scholarly books from our collection which illustrate evolving obstacles and successes in the history of medicine for African Americans. Links and descriptions to these documents can be located by searching the Knowledge Center Online Catalog. African American Medical Pioneers / Epps, C.H.; Johnson, D.G.; Vaughan, AL. Rockville, MD: Williams & Wilkins, 1994. 254 p. MH94D2118 Against the Odds: Blacks in the Profession of Medicine in the United States. / Watson, W. Somerset, NJ: Transaction Publishers, 1998. 257 p. MH99D3773 An American Health Dilemma: A Medical History of African Americans and the Problem of Race: Beginnings to 1900. / Byrd, W.M.; Clayton, L.A. New York, NY: Routledge, 2000. 588 p. MH01D4337 Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment (New and Expanded ed.) / Jones, J H. New York, NY: The Free Press, 1993. 297 p. MH97D3222 Beside the Troubled Waters: A Black Doctor Remembers Life, Medicine and Civil Rights in an Alab ...
Hardtimes Josephine’s’ “African American Trailblazers” huge success   Josephine Wade taken to hospital     By Chinta Strausberg       Hundreds of prominent African Americans attended the “African American Trailblazers” awards ceremony late Monday night at Hardtimes Josephine’s Cooking Restaurant, 436 E. 79th St., where scores of blacks were honored for their outstanding work in the field of Civil Rights and business.   Serving as Masters of Ceremony were Professor Robert Starks, ABC 7 Chicago’s political editor Charles Thomas and Fox 32’s Kori Chambers. WVON's Cliff Kelley received the "2013 Pervis Spann Trailblazer" awardEbbie Veal read the bios of the awardees.   During the ceremony, former Ald. Shirley Coleman, who is now a minister, announced that Josephine Wade, the co-owner of the restaurant, was taken to the hospital. With Thomas’ hand on his shoulder, Rev. Paul Jakes prayed for Mrs. Wade’s speedy recovery.   Chambers presented Thomas with the 2013 Vernon Jarrett Awar ...
I should check Sen. Congressional Record on Civil Rights for African Americans perhaps he thinks we have equality now.
A BLACK HISTORY: Malcolm X Born: May 19, 1925 Omaha, Nebraska Died: February 21, 1965 New York, New York African American civil rights leader African American civil rights leader Malcolm X was a major twentieth-century spokesman for black nationalism. Unlike many other African American leaders of this time, who supported nonviolent methods, Malcolm X believed in using more aggressive measures in the fight for civil rights. As a boy Malcolm X was born Malcolm Little on May 19, 1925, in Omaha, Nebraska. His father, a Baptist minister, was an outspoken follower of Marcus Garvey (1887–1940), the black nationalist leader. (A nationalist is a person who promotes one nation's culture and interests over all others.) Garvey supported a "back-to-Africa" movement for African Americans. During Malcolm's early years, his family moved several times because of racism (dislike and poor treatment of people based on their race). They moved from Omaha, Nebraska, after being threatened by the Ku Klux Klan, a group that bel ...
There are many social issues facing this country, but the most important is how the *** community is treated by most. For far too long we have sat by and watched as countless numbers of homosexual children and adults have committed suicide because of the horrendous way that most Americans treat them. And for what? Loving someone of the same sex should not be seen as a reason to bully a person to death. There is no reason for that. *** people cannot decide who they love anymore then straight people can. It should be a given since the fourteenth amendment states that every citizen should not be deprived of life, liberty and property. However, these right have been deprived from certain people for centuries. At first, it was African Americans, and what I want to prove is that the *** community is now suffering from the same discrimination that plagued African Americans. We live in a society where everyone has the right to “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness”, yet besides nine states, most of t . ...
The Republican Party was founded in the year 1854 as the “anti-slavery party” – a party which gave us President Abraham Lincoln and subsequently the Emancipation Proclamation and the freeing of slaves. It was actually Democrats who fought the Emancipation Proclamation in order to keep African Americans in slavery. It was the Republican Party that amended the Constitution to free them from slavery (the 13th Amendment), give them citizenship (the 14th Amendment) and provide the right to vote (the 15th Amendment). In fact, Republicans passed the Civil Rights laws of the 1860s, including the Civil Rights Act of 1866 and the Reconstruction Act of 1867, and they have stood for civil rights dating all the way back to 1854. The Democratic Party was responsible for passing Jim Crow laws and the so-called Black Civil Codes which gave us separate-but-equal drinking fountains, swimming pools, and the like.
Chris Lowe - When we honor Black History Month it is important to remind ourselves and teach those who have come after that not only did African Americans struggle hard for their rights in the Civil Rights Movement, but that lots and lots of White People fought vigorously *against* them, often backed by the organized coercive power of the state, as in this photo. Too often we are given a sanitized version in which black people were in the streets valiantly struggling against ... what? ... and white America was on the sidewalks applauding, like a 4th of July parade. Not.
All news are not local Joe Madison if that was the case Civil Rights in the south for African Americans would not have been achieved.
Civil Rights: Ida B. Wells-Barnett-Born a slave in 1862, Ida Bell Wells was the oldest daughter of James and Lizzie Wells. The Wells family, as well as the rest of the nation's slaves, were freed about six months after Ida's birth, thanks to the Emancipation Proclamation. However, living in Mississippi as African Americans, they faced racial prejudices and were restricted by discriminatory rules and practices. Ida B. Wells's father served on the first board of trustees for Rust College and made education a priority for his seven children. It was there that Wells received her early schooling, but she had to drop out at the age of 16, when tragedy struck her family. Both of her parents and one of her siblings died in a yellow fever outbreak, leaving Wells to care for her other siblings. Ever resourceful, she convinced a nearby country school administrator that she was 18, and landed a job as a teacher. In 1882, Wells moved with her sisters to Memphis, Tennessee, to live with an aunt. Her brothers found work ...
A Phila Black History Fact! In Philadelphia many protests were held in order to bring attention to the injustice of trolley car system segregation. On May 17th, 1865, a major Civil Rights Activist engaged in more direct action to bring attention to segregation. Octavius Catto, a black man who was one of the major players of this campaign, sat in a passenger car and refused to leave it. He sat in the car all night and eventually attracted a crowd, and brought African Americans one-step closer to achieving desegregated transportation. The protests continued as the unjust treatment of African Americans by the trolley system became more visible to others and highlighted by the Union League of Philadelphia. In one of the protests, trolley car conductors forcefully removed African American women and children from the cars. In response, a meeting was held in Samson Street Hall, June 21, 1866, to protest this treatment of African American women and children and to demand more respect and justice for the African A ...
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~ Black History Inspiration ~ February is a month set aside to honor the achievements of our ancestors, as well as Civil Rights Activists, and successful African Americans. Let us as a race of people come together and exemplify love, wisdom, and compassion towards each other as we continue to serve God, stand for what is right and t keep the Dreamer's dream alive.
Check out the UW African Americans and Seattle's Civil Rights History resources for exploring the civil rights...
So yesterday my friend Jon asked me if I were President what would be the first 3 things I would do to help African Americans. Great question. But B4 I answer that I really want to address something that's been bothering me. So if I was *** ( and I'm not) and I was vigorously advocating for Same Sex marriage , adoption rights & full inclusion in the Military, my public activism would be fully embraced and co signed by the Left of Center, Progressive, Liberal establishment. If I were Mexican ( and I'm not) then my vigorous advocacy for Amnesty or change in Immigration border policy is welcomed speech not only in the Left of Center , Progressive, Liberal Establishment ...but now (like today now) it's being embraced by the Center and some on the Right Wing. In fact it would appear that every interest group that adopted a Civil Rights era organizing strategies( templates created and perfected at the expense of the many who lost their lives in the struggle )have gotten this Gov to concede and implement rea ...
Remember how the GOP was embraced by African Americans for Helping pass Civil Rights Act over Dem.objections? Me neither. Rubio, take note.
History has been made today as the United Staes Of America, witnessed by the whole world Installed the first African American President, Bararck Hussein Obama for his second term in office. Witnessed by more than 800,000 people in the cold Washington DC and millions across the world on TV, Democracy once again becomes a winner. Coincidently, today America celebrates the birthday of the father of the Civil Rights Movement, Martin Luther King Jr who was born on January 15, 1929. MLK Jr's birthday is celebrated on the 3rd Monday of January and amazingly, its great to honour two great African Americans today. God Bless Mr President, Martin Luther King Jr And The United States of America. God Bless Us All My Friends!!!
A once in a lifetime day, today. Happy Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. This man devoted most of his life for the betterment of African Americans. I feel that as more time accumulates between his death and current time that we are becoming less and less thankful for the efforts and courage that King and the whole Civil Rights Movement showed. I am thankful because had it not been for King and the movement I would still be a college student, but possibly limited to HBCU's which are still heavily underfunded compared to a PWI, could possibly know Jim Crow as a reality instead of a time in history that this country will never repeat. Most importantly, on this sacred day, our president, the first African American president in US history, will celebrate the beginning of his second term with the nation. It was in God's will that this day would be when President Obama shared his agenda for the next four years with a country that has grown so much over the last fifty years. Though racism will never be completely cure ...
Gun Control.it really depends on who is behind the gun. Ask yourself honestly, do feel the same passion for gun rights for African Americans? Hispanics? Do you feel differently about a group of white men with guns as opposed to a group of Black men with guns, or Hispanic men with guns? "In the 1960s, certain Black Panthers toted guns wherever they went to make a point: Blacks needed guns to protect themselves in a country that wasn't quite ready to enforce Civil Rights. And in May of 1967, Adam Winkler now professor of constitutional law at UCLA School of Law and two dozen others ascended the steps of the California capitol and read a proclamation about gun rights; then the group went inside with their guns, which was legal at the time." These "hippies" and radical African Americans caused conservatives to be very, very interested in Gun Control in the 1960s. Then Governor Ronald Reagan told reporters there was "no reason why, on the street today, a citizen should be carrying a loaded weapon." When ...
When Hope Is Shipwrecked What happens to a dream deferred? Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun? Or fester like a sore—and then run? Does it stink like rotten meat? Or crust and sugar over—like a syrupy sweet? Maybe it just sags like a heavy load. Or does it explode? ~ Langston Hughes, “A Dream Deferred” Many answers to Langston Hughes’s questions came during the Civil Rights Movement. When a dream was deferred there were protest marches on one hand, and the Blank Panther Party on the other. For some it meant sit-ins at lunch counters; for others it meant starting riots in Watts. The delayed dream of equally accessible educational, social, occupational, and economic opportunities shriveled up for many in the post Jim-Crow generation of African Americans. However, for some it exploded. No one likes coming to the edge of a new day only to have someone put up a sign that says, “Don’t call us; we’ll call you.” When struggles have been insurmountable and a ray of sunshine finally breaks th ...
We still have tickets available for the Virginia Black History Month Formal GALA! During the 2013 Black History Month Celebration, we will pay special tribute to THREE groups of African Americans as they celebrate their anniversaries: The 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington (Civil Rights) The 100th Anniversary of the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority (Public Service) The 150th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation (Anti Slavery) Contact me for tickets while they are still available. Honoring the past, Celebrating the future! Bill Jones President, VaBHMA (540) 907-1857 cell joneswe5
By Aja Roache Assistant Professor, Department of Fine Arts Florida A&M University   Art collecting is a profitable practice that few people embrace.  Huge art and artifact collections like that of Bernard and Shirley Kinsey are filled with original works by key figures in the legacy of African-American culture. Quite literally, the Kinsey’s are the stewards of numerous important African-American works of art and artifacts.   Though the bevy of artists in their collection is atypical, it is a testament to the importance of keeping your mind and your pocket open to art.    The Kinsey’s are just one example of well-known African-American art collectors.  Civil Rights Activist Paul R. Jones, Dr. Walter O. Evans, and Bill and Olivia Cosby are a few others.  Certainly these are exceptional examples of middle and upper middle class African Americans of a certain generation who collect, but it brings to light that we do collect art.  They each have experienced the financial and personal benefit of ar ...
Today In History: On this day Nov 20, 1962: President Kennedy announces fair housing legislation. On this day in 1962, President John F. Kennedy issues Executive Order 11063, which mandates an end to discrimination in housing. The order, which came during the burgeoning Civil Rights Movement, prohibited federally funded housing agencies from denying housing or funding for housing to anyone based on their race, color, creed or national origin. Since the 1950s, American minorities, particularly African Americans, had been largely relegated to living in overcrowded inner-city ghettos or impoverished rural areas. The "American Dream" of owning a house in the suburbs, or even a small apartment in a safe city neighborhood was unobtainable for many minority families because federally funded lending agencies often refused to give minorities home loans. When Kennedy took office in 1960, he vowed to do more for civil rights than his predecessors. When he issued the order in 1962, Kennedy called discrimination in fe ...
I love when people speak of the American Revolution and speak of "our" freedom. Because their white privilege doesnt allow them to see that slavery wasn't banned until 1860s, woman's suffrage didn't happen until the 1900s, civil rights for African Americans in the 50s and 60s and today homosexuals are still fighting for equal rights. If our union doesn't CONTINUE to grow and evolve it will wither and die. Ya founding fathers aren't gods. THEY knew that, why don't you?
African Americans belittle their heritage and the efforts of Civil Rights Movement when they use the word ***
I am extremely upset about the Supreme Court deciding to look at and possibly overturn the Civil Rights Act. This is Republican led action to suppress the vote of those who have been able to stand up and make their voices heard. This country has NOT "come a long way, baby". The white folks need to stop their racism and accept the fact that the entire world is changing, becoming more tolerant, and in the United States, most people are NOT angry with the Latinos and African Americans. So the white folks had better get their heads on straight and accept the facts. And the Supreme Court, as they look at the Civil Rights Act, would be wise to let it stand as is. There is no need to rush. This Act was put in place to protect the voting rights of minorities. If it is removed or made weaker, who is the winner? Certainly not minorities. The only winner will be the Republican Party. The Supreme Court screwed around with us regarding Citizens United, and corporations and the super-pacs lost. SO DID THE SU ...
As I think about the ignorant remarks on fb concerning the re-election of the POTUS I could not help but to think about the historic events that divided the nation in the 1860s - 1870s has resurfaced in contemporary form. Most of us know the historic events of President Lincolon which opened the door for Reconstruction. During Reconstruction many African Americans made it to the State Houses of Southern States. Louisiana, SC, MS all had prominent and significant amounts of African Americans representing their states post emancipation. Well there were many in the South that were incensed about the strides of African Americans as they pushed forward out of slavery into full citizenry. That enraged many who felt that the *** was getting beside themselves by thinking they could be equal to Whites. In addition to the *** advancement many Anglo Southerners were beside themselves due to the Federal troops presence and not to mention the 14th and 15th amendments. Well my friends there arose a pivotal election ...
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African Americans in Florida are angry, and rightfully so, at Rick Scott and feel as though they're having to fight for their Civil Rights all over again and that it's as though Bull Connor is standing in the doorway blocking their way... There are Anglos in FL who planned to vote for Romney but who are so sickened by Scott's unconscionable actions that they voted for President Obama in protest... Stand strong, Floridians, stand strong!
TheRoot.com,WashingtonPost on Campaign 2012 (HEHE! SMH!): Goldwater's anti-civil-rights stance earned him the support of Deep South states, making him the first Republican since Reconstruction to carry Mississippi, Alabama, South Carolina, Georgia and Louisiana. Operating with a well-earned inner sense of peril, African Americans voted overwhelmingly against Goldwater, helping to hand Johnson a landslide victory. A retreat on progress toward Racial Equality was averted. What would be the consequences for race of a Mitt Romney victory? A Romney takeover of the White House might well rival Andrew Johnson's ascendancy to the presidency after Abraham Lincoln's assassination in 1865 ... A Romney win would be worrisome, however, because of his strong embrace of states rights and his deep mistrust of the Federal Government — sentiments Andrew Johnson shared.
Happy November! My Constitutional Right to a Secret Ballot is dear to me. I am not intimidated or swayed by friendly and slyly opinionated pollsters. I believe that I should read, listen and process all sides. I will not be swayed by a pretty face, family members, friends or a one-sided arguement. I am an Independant Voter. I came across this article in a search for something else and found it interesting. please scan to the end if you are short on time!!! Why We Should All Vote from Machaelle Wright A lot of people are talking about why we should vote and have offered a number of compelling reasons. Well, I'd like to add something no one is talking about to that list of reasons. I'm talking about history and sacrifice. A whole bunch of people fought long and hard for the right to vote -- especially women and African Americans. They marched, held long vigils in the worst of weather conditions, were sprayed with water, spit on, attacked, taunted, ridiculed, arrested and tortured. Women went on hunger strik ...
Do you know your history of the Democratic Party Pt.4? Please dont shoot the messenger! At the turn of the century (1900), Southern Democrats continued to oppress African Americans by placing thousands in hard-core prison labor camps. According to most historians, the prison camps were far worst than slavery. The prisoners were required to work from 10-14 hours a day, six to seven days a week in temperatures that exceeded 100 degrees and in temperatures that fell well below zero. The camps provided free labor for building railroads, mining coal-mines and for draining snake and alligator invested swamps and rivers. Blacks were transported from one project to another in rolling cages similar to the ones used to transfer circus animals. One fourth of the prison populations were children ages 6 to 18. Young Cy Williams age 12, was sentenced to 20 years for stealing a horse that he was too small to ride. Eight-year old Will Evans was sentenced to 2 years of hard labor for taking some change from a store counte ...
The Voting Rights Act, signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson (1908-73) on August 6, 1965, aimed to overcome legal barriers at the state and local levels that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote under the 15th Amendment (1870) to the Constitution of the United States. The act significantly widened the franchise and is considered among the most far-reaching pieces of civil rights legislation in U.S. history.
If civil rights came after the economy, women still wouldn't be able to vote and African Americans would have their own water fountains.
Nonviolens- In modern times, nonviolent methods of action have been a powerful tool for social protest and revolutionary social and political change. There are many examples of their use. Fuller surveys may be found in the entries on civil resistance, nonviolent resistance and nonviolent revolution. Here certain movements particularly influenced by a philosophy of nonviolence should be mentioned, including Mahatma Gandhi leading a decades-long nonviolent struggle against British rule in India, which eventually helped India win its independence in 1947, Martin Luther King's and James Bevel's adoption of Gandhi's nonviolent methods in the struggle to win civil rights for African Americans, and César Chávez's campaigns of nonviolence in the 1960s to protest the treatment of farm workers in California. FROM WIKIPEDIA
On average, 1,200 Black unborn babies die every day in the USA by abortion - 16 million since 1973. African Americans are the only minority in America declining in population due to being targeted by the abortion industry - an industry full y supported by President Obama, America's first Black president, the NAACP, Urban League, almost every member of the Congressional Black Congress (the only exception I know of is Republican Allen West), the most prominent Black civil rights leaders (e.g. Rev. Jesse Jackson, Rev. Al Sharpton, Andrew Young etc.) and most every Black politician holding elected office at every level of government. Add to that the African American clergy, who monolithically continue to remain silent despite the unabated carnage.
The only reason Mittens Romney will win because of Voter Suppression Act, backed by the vile GOP, right wing extremists Tea Party, and the Koch brothers. Suppressing black voters, Latino voters, middle class voters, young and college student voters, women, and the poor. We are all American no matter what walks of life we came from. This is a violation to Civil Rights to prevent African-Americans from going to the polls. Also, the GOP activists and pundits becomes angry and defensive about it for the only reason the suppressing the vote to make sure that Pres. Obama won't receive a 2nd term. *** ??
Civil Rights Movement saw thousands of Americans (black and white) being murdered in the struggle to give African Ame ...
Was just reading about black pastors discouraging voting this year because of their issues with *** marriage. THAT'S JUST STUPID. As the child of Civil Rights workers who risked their lives for African Americans to vote, this is the most asinine thing I've ever heard! You don't have to agree with the president's stance, but vote anyway. If you want to quote Leviticus, okay. But remember: adultery was punishable by death, and you're not supposed to eat shellfish or cut your beard. Don't pick and choose what to follow in the Bible. AND VOTE!!!
I JUST TOOK THIS OFF OFF AN ARTICLE NAMED 10 FAMOUS African AmericanS WITH TIES TO THE GOP IN BLACKVOICES THE INTERNET NEWSPAPER: Several prominent black members of both the Abolitionist and Civil Rights Movements are known for their ties to the party, when its political ideology differed a great deal from its present-day stance. While major figures like Harriet Tubman and Sojourner Truth were known members of the party, other potential affiliations like Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s remain unknown officially. Even some current members may surprise you a bit from wrestler turned actor Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson, to rappers LL Cool J and 50 Cent who have both given the party some support. THEY HAD TO GO THERE WITH Harriet Tubman AND Sojourner Truth WHO WERE BORN SLAVES, AND THEIR OWNERS WERE OF COURSE WHAT? REPUBLICANS
Kinda blows the Democrats depiction of Republican attitude of African-Americans out of the ball park. Let's see historically: Founded in 1866 the KKK was founded by Liberal Democrats as a 'social Club' and their first social event was to take 13 young African-Americans from a jail cell and burn them along with 25 others and bury them ion a mass grave in Tennessee. The Dem's fought the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments that dealt with the rights of African-American citizens. Instituted the Jim Crow laws in 1876 and fought giving Civil Rights to African- Americans, including Black WW II soldier, until 1965. Have continued to keep RACISM alive and African-Americans "Mastering' to them by continually promising MORE to them but only giving them little and NEVER making the change to help them use their God Given Abilities to rise above where they are. SO, What have the Democrats done to really help and WHO is really the RACIST?
We pay more attention to what going on in politics. Some of y'all that don't, Republicans want to go back to war. Where the money gone come from? And we African Americans are still fighting fir Civil Rights today!! up, and Pay Attention, this is our future and life!!
Today in history: Thurgood Marshall Confirmed as First African-American US Supreme Court Justice (1967) - The great-grandson of a slave and the first African American to serve on the US Supreme Court, Marshall was appointed by President Lyndon B. Johnson at the height of the Civil Rights Movement. As a lawyer, he won 29 of the 32 cases he argued before the Supreme Court, including the landmark Brown v. Board of Education and others that established equal protection for African Americans in housing, voting, employment, and education.
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A political researcher, stated that Republicans need to be more focused on minorities meaning Hispanics and Asians. African Americans are not being mentioned by any party. You know why? The statitics show and it's concrete and factual that many African Americans are not consistent voters and when we do vote we mostly vote on party lines not the issues. I can't argue with facts, but what I can say is that we need to be more vocal and opened minded. I don't care how you vote as long as you know why you are voting. Democrats don't have to wine and dine you anymore you are just like an old married couple who lost the flame and Republicans stop knocking on your door to court you when they realize other minorities are more open. Face it people, we are not the hottest group of folk on the map but has had every opportunity through Civil Rights to have and keep a voice. Voice your concerns, rally and make politicians listen. Stop patching the roof and get a new one, we are better than that. Monica Betts
The 1963 March on Washington attracted an estimated 250,000 people for a peaceful demonstration to promote Civil Rights and economic equality for African Americans. Participants walked down Constitution and Independence avenues, then — 100 years after the E...
From the Desk of Pastor Gould In our society today, even after decade upon decade of civil rights struggles for equality for minorities, many African-Americans in particular would testify that some Caucasians have a long way to go in terms of race relations and sensitivity to African Americans. However, I have come to realize that there is another animal in this jungle. Yes, there is something even more devastating and destructive that we as a people, African Americans, face. We have overcome many obstacles and obtained great accomplishments, but we are yet unable to honor the achievements of each other. We are apparently threatened by even the youngest and smallest members of our community. Instead of considering the great sacrifice required to realize a seemingly unattainable dream or goal and celebrating the success of it, we set out on a quest to discover the most insignificant aspect of the entire journey and seek to use that to dampen the excitement. I don’t know how women who are under immense st ...
Biden says Romney will put "African Americans back in chains." The republicans sponsored the Civil Rights Act of 1963. The democrats opposed it.
Day 8: Best moment of the day: We went to the local grocery store to get comfort snacks. The store owner, now very familiar with us, asks if he can ask a very important question. We say, "Yes, of course." He says, "Why do not the White People in America not like your people? Why do they treat you like they do? Did you not build that country?" We laugh because that's really all we can do. He then a dds, "I know about America. I watch Al Jazeera and I see the television show about African Americans and the Civil Rights. It is not right what they did to your people, you know? What do you call them? The honky tonks?" We laugh harder because that's really all we care to do. It feels unnecessary to explain our history or how America treats African Americans (Black folks) because we are surrounded by the largest physical proof of the contribution "our people" gave to the world. What white America thinks of us is irrelevant. What we think of us is what matters. This is a Call To Action: We must re-institute the c ...
Most people do not realize that Bayard Rustin, the Architect of Civil Rights for African Americans, was a *** man. Even though *** & *** were not recognized as a valid part of society, they RALLIED FOR CIVIL RIGHTS for the African American Community. Corretta Scott King (widow of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.) said: "Homophobia is like racism & anti-Semitism & other forms of bigotry in that it seeks to dehumanize a large group of people, to deny their humanity, their dignity & personhood. This sets the stage for further repression & violence that spread all too easily to victimize the next minority group. I appeal to everyone who believes in Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream to make room at the table of brother- and sisterhood for *** & *** people."
Thank you, Christopher Speer for allowing me to quote you... Christopher Speer "There are several issues here- firstly people who concern them selves with other peoples lifestyles at all - if you like traditional marriage good for you- so do I- get on with it. It is none of your business what others wish to do with the ir lives as long as it isn't hurting someone else and pedaphilia isn't invovled. Next, *** couples wish to have the same civil rights as straights. The 60's Civil Rights Movement for African Americans in this country is now seen by most sane people as absolutely necessary amnd social evolution - this is the same issue again only for *** couples - they want to be able to be in a hospital room with their partner in an emergency and many other rights without discrimination. People of color should get this especially - they have experienced dicrimination. Next the "Faith " issue - Jesus taught " Judge not lest ye be judged" he didn't add " except *** . He taught love thy neighbor- he didn't ad ...
Some Of The Lost History In The Civil Rights Movement, In the mad dash to vilify the Republicans and Conservatives today many have forgotten the fact that it was the Republican Party that was the champion of Civil Rights and freedom for African Americans, LBJ, FDR, New Deal, Eisenhower, Truman
A Segregationist Won an Election in the 1950's, Yet in 2012 many say that: With more People Eleigible to Vote adn more Peple Capable of Writing an Easily Spelled name; Such as: Tim ADAMS the easiest name to Spell on the Florida Ballot, as a Write-In. the Pundits Say A write-in Candidate Cannot Win an Election. Nothing is Further from the truth. During an Era of Low LITERACY among White Citizens, notable because African Americans were Not Able to Vote in the Democratic Primaris in most Southren States: During the 1950s; The incumbent U.S. Senator, Burnet R. Maybank, was unopposed for re-election in 1954, but he died in September of that year, two months before Election Day. Democratic leaders hurriedly appointed state Senator Edgar A. Brown, a member of the Barnwell Ring, as the party's nominee to replace Maybank. The Brown campaign was managed by future Governor John C. West. Opponents widely criticized the party's failure to elect a candidate by a primary vote, and Thurmond announced that he would mount ...
Can someone help me understand why a majority of African Americans seem to have a blind allegiance to the Democrats? And if you disagree with their point of view; you are a racist or Uncle Tom. In doing some research; I ran across some interesting facts about the Democratic Party: The KKK was founded as their enforcement arm against Republicans. They endorsed and fought for the Dread Scott decision. They fought for slavery and segregation They controlled the south; and instituted Jim Crow laws. They set up Poll Taxes. Voted party line against the Civil Rights laws. Set up a welfare system that has helped destroy black families. Spied on Martin Luther King (who by the way was a Republican). Regularly uses the race card to beat down anyone who disagrees. I'm not saying the Republicans don't have their problems; but this just begs for people to do their own research; and stop following blindly. Check things out for yourself; not the six o'clock news. Don't leave it to someone else to do your thinking for yo ...
Any voter black, or white who does not support a strong-mayor form of government with a 15 member legislative council, the only form of government that guarantees that one day African Americans, low-income families, Senior Citizens, and black people will have a seat in a political body that guarantees them the opportunity to govern their standard of living and their children’s quality of life is doing a disservice to the Civil Rights and Voting Rights Acts, and to their children and grand children. “Occupy the Polls” -David Booker July 14, 2012
We are still in war for health insurance at the state level. We are in a civil rights battle to insure LGBT have their rights to live in a country that has civil rights. African Americans are still disliked for their fight for equal opportunities in all area of life. Work to living in a neighborhood they are given second position to whites.
Today is July 2, a day that many of us should remember. A day that marks the 48th year anniversary of the day the Civil Rights Bill was passed. It’s called the Civil Rights Bill of 1964. So why is this day important? Why do we remember it and save the date on our calendars? Well allow me to explain… Years and years after slavery had ended; African Americans were still being denied fair treatment by restriction to public places. Places such as facilities, the workplace, restaurant, etc. There was even RACIAL SEGREGATION in schools, communities, and facilities. WOMEN also were denied rights and equal and equal treatment. This sparked an African American Civil Rights Movement which lasted from 1955-1968. So on June 11th, 1963, the bill was first introduced and proposed by President John F. Kennedy during his civil rights speech. His proposal included giving ALL Americans the same rights and fair EQUAL treatment, PROHIBITING discrimination in public places. Kennedy called for a meeting with congressional ...
This new book I'm reading is the truth.. The New Jim Crow.. To be brief.. This book talks about the new Civil Rights Movement we should be focus on as African Americans.. More knowledge coming soon!! VH1 need to give me a reality show, instead of that savage garbage that comes on.. I'm working on it tho!
African Americans turned to the courts to help protect their constitutional rights. But the courts challenged earlier civil rights legislation and handed down a series of decisions that permitted states to segregate people of color.
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This past week I read "To Be A Slave" (1969) by Julius Lester, and tonight a bunch of buddies and I are watching "The Help" set in the 1960's.  It sure has been an interesting week.  I am so happy that so many things have improved.  Civil rights for African Americans, *** and *** and all pe...
of the things that happened in Sunflower County, the North Sunflower County Hospital, I would say about 6 out of the 10 *** women that go to the hospital are sterilized with the tubes tied. They are getting up a law said if a woman has an illegitimate baby and then a second one, they could draw time for 6 months or a $500 fine. What they didn’t tell is that they are already doing these things, not only to single women but to married women.1 Civil Rights Activist and Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) member Fannie Lou Hamer participated in a public hearing at the National Theatre in Washington, DC on June 8, 1964. At this hearing, Hamer and twenty-four other individuals testified about the violeAmerican population. This bill and SNCC’s response to it received significant media coverage that captured the attention of the nation."nce and intimidation African Americans were facing in Mississippi. Hamer’s testimony addressed a bill proposed by the Mississippi legislature earlier in the y . ...
This music video shows the hard road African Americans took to gain their civil rights. Containing both video clips and photos, this video shows the prominen...
"I Pledge Allegiance to a country that reveres Paul Revere and the rest of the rebels that deemed taxation without representation a war worthy of (viol)ence, and a war on African Americans of the Civil Rights Movement that marched calmly for their Freedom." Stephen Crocker, best album of the year
The Civil rights Hypocrisy. In the 1960s, Black people in America fought for equal rights under the law. Basically, they fought to have the same rights under the U.S. Constitution that all U.S. born Americans are supposed to have. What they got was a separate set of rules that set them apart from white society. They got a bill, a Civil Rights Bill, which was supposed to grant African Americans equal rights. The government gave black people a bill that at some point in the future, depending on how our society feels about race and equal rights, could at some point go unsigned. The government has never said publicly that black people deserve constitutional rights; the government says you deserve civil rights. The definition of civil is: respectful, deferential, gracious, complaisant, suave, affable, urbane, and courtly. Civil, affable, courteous, polite all imply avoidance of rudeness toward others. Civil suggests a minimum of observance of social requirements. Affable suggests ease of approach and friendlin ...
To all the out of the country Foreigners!! This aint a diss!! We are all Foreigners as Americans! But those of shades of colors from Asian To middle East You can thank African Americans for your ability to Open your Own Biz and Bednefit Because without the Civil Rights Movement you Would of never got the chance.. think about it next time you look down on us OWWW!! nostra this is American history 101
Mitt Romney, in commenting about California's Prop 8, so that he was against a bunch of unelected judges making a decision for the voters. This argument has been made by bigots for a long time, the idea that (like just recently in North Korea-lina) a majority of homophobes can take away someone's Civil Rights simply because their bigoted upbringing leads them to want to. In the case of North Karolina it's even worse because many African Americans voted to deny the Rights of homosexuals because of their bigoted religion, without realizing that THEIR Rights during the Civil Right's Era were being denied for the very same reason, because White People pointed to the Bible and said "See! Slavery is in the Bible so it's ok!" The black church's support of this initiative was as close to them voting back slavery as they could possibly get. Ask the Weimar Republic Era Germans what happens when you vote away the Rights of one group of people. Pretty soon you find the racists and bigots and fascist are knocking on ...
Civil Rights shouldn't be up for a referendum. If it were, African Americans still wouldn't have the right to vote.
• • Nandi on opinion stage.com I responded to CNN's article about Dr.King's Poor people's campaign I know that Dr.King intended to do something that had never been done before. While there had been marches and demonstrations, what made the poor people’s campaign unique, was instead of having 500,000 people checking into hotels in Washington D.C.,marching for full employment or a guaranteed annual income and then leaving town like they did in 1963 during the March for Civil Rights.All 500,000 of them would sleep in the park.Meaning everyday for 30 to 45 straight days you would have a crowd of 500,000 people,marching,sitting in,demonstrating,and then at the end of eachday,all 500,00 of them would be sleeping right across from the Whitehouse.Dr.King didn’t rule out having them nonviolently walk into the U.S. Pentagon lobby and sit in in there also. Because a demonstration where instead of marching and then going back to a hotel, people are outside for 24 hours a day, for over a month leads to a rise ...
Why we have Civil Rights and Equal Emoployment Oppurtunity Laws, because blacks/African Americans along with several other minority groups including women, have been historically discriminated upon by white men, but guess what when they (white men) reach the age of 42 years old they also become a protected speices because of age discrimination (little known fact) they eventually catch up. Liberals celebrate human differences or we aim for that (target) outcome, emotional security equality for all, not fear.
Like many others, William Lewis Moore believed in equal rights for African Americans. For those that survived, there were many dangers to Civil Rights
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