Black Sea & Ottoman Empire

The Black Sea is bounded by Europe, Anatolia and the Caucasus and is ultimately connected to the Atlantic Ocean via the Mediterranean and the Aegean seas and various straits. The Ottoman Empire or Sublime Ottoman State or sometimes also referred to as Turkey in the mid-19th century (Ottoman Turkish: دَوْلَتِ عَلِيّهٔ عُثمَانِیّه Devlet-i ʿAliyye-yi ʿOsmâniyye (also عثمانلى دولتى Osmanlı Devleti), Modern Turkish: Osmanlı Devleti or Osmanlı İmparatorluğu) was a Turkish empire which lasted from 27 July 1299 to 29 October 1923. 5.0/5

Black Sea Ottoman Empire Crimean War Crimean Tatars State John Kerry Mustafa Kemal Secret Service Ulysses S. Grant William Penn Triple Alliance Eastern Europe Winston Churchill United Kingdom British Government Eastern Shore Crimean Peninsula Mann Act

Ayee just got a Black Sea warm water port from the Ottoman Empire. 👊💁
During the 16th and early 17th centuries, the Zaporozhian Cossacks often conducted amphibious raids on ports along the Black Sea, in the Crimean Khanate and the Ottoman Empire. With that in mind, I have begun researching ways to navigate at sea. Apparently in 1594, an Englishman named Captain John Davis invented the "backstaff", which allows one to measure the height of the Sun (and thus latitude) without actually having to look at it. This is a huge improvement over previous instruments such as the astrolabe. I wonder if I could purchase or build one and learn to use it? I seem to have infinite ideas to waste time.
Good morning, Today is the Commemoration of Atatürk, Youth and Sports Day. In 1919, Mustafa Kemal got to Samsun (a city in the Black Sea region) to start our independence war. He toured around Anatolia to covine the men in the countryside, summoned the army and later estanlished the Republic in Ankara with his friends. They fought against the allied forces (UK, France, Italy, Greece). If you consider the last Ottoman Sultan's cooperation with them it was very difficult. When you compare the technology, and the sick man's people's motivation (Europeans were calling Ottoman Empire as sick man back then) back at that time, it was very difficult. After the war he and his friends established a secular system. They tried to make everything with our resources in a scientific way. They emhasized education. They asked the people's participation in almost everything. Women were educated and took part in the progress. Then of course the young Republic started producing and the wealth shared. These *** in power w .. ...
Last week’s theatrical crisis in Ukraine has quickly transformed itself into a restaging of the Crimean War of 1853-56, when Russia fought the Ottoman Empire and its European allies over control of the strategic peninsula that juts into the Black Sea. Only this time, light operatic moments are popping up in the repeat performance, as Washington has joined London and NATO to castigate Russia with pointed words but no hint of bayonets. “Russia has engaged in a military act of aggression against another country,” Secretary of State John Kerry declared. “The sovereignty and the territorial integrity of Ukraine has been violated,” UK Foreign Minister William Hague said. “I have convened the North Atlantic Council today because of Russia’s military action in Ukraine,” NATO Secretary General Fogh Rasmussen said, “and because of President (Vladimir) Putin’s threat against this sovereign nation.” These ominous words followed Russia’s decision to secure its Black Sea fleet at Sevastopol and ...
Here's one from April 27 (just getting to it now): from Jewdayo: The Ottoman Empire’s Sultan Suleiman I, whom Europeans called “the Magnificent” and Jews called “King Solomon,” was born on the Black Sea coast of Turkey on this date in 1495 (some sources say November 6, 1494). Suleiman extended the Ottoman Empire into Hungary, North Africa, and much of modern day Iraq and Yemen; his European conquests were checked at the Siege of Vienna in 1529. As a ruler, he was especially helpful to the Jews, in sharp contrast to European monarchs. He willingly absorbed Jews from the Iberian Peninsula who were fleeing expulsions; he encouraged Jewish settlement in the Land of Israel, especially in Sfat, and built the wall around the Old City of Jerusalem; he forbade provincial judges from trying cases of blood libel; he welcomed Jews to his court as diplomats, financiers, physicians, and advisors, in particular Don Joseph Nasi and Gracia Mendes Nasi; he intervened with Pope Paul IV to try to prevent the burnin ...
March 28 marks the 160th anniversary of the outbreak of the Crimean War - one of the most important conflicts in the XIX century, defined for decades geopolitical relations on the continent. During the last month the international attention is focused on the Crimean Peninsula in the northern Black Sea. Its annexation by Russia in Ukraine after the riots that led to the overthrow of President Viktor Yanukovych, was read by most politicians and analysts as a gross violation of international law. While the conflict is usually seen as a colossal clash between East and West, the role and importance of the peninsula itself often overlooked. Crimea is one of the key strategic points in Eastern Europe and is often passed from one hand to other . foundations of the conflict are still made in Vienna system of international relations to be established in Europe after the Napoleonic wars. The reason for this is that the Vienna system is based on a delicate balance of forces that includes powerful Ottoman Empire that ...
March 27, 2014 Sovereign Valley Farm, Chile Today just happens to be the 160th anniversary of Britain and France's declaration of war on Russia in what would eventually become known as the Crimean War. Part 1. At the time, Russia was a rising power. By the 1850s, Tsar Nicholas I had expanded Russia's domain into Ukraine and Crimea seeking warm water ports on the Black Sea, and it scared the bejeezus out of the rest of Europe. Other nations in the region-- particularly France and the Ottoman Empire, were in obvious decline. By 1854, the Ottoman Empire was only a few years away from outright default, and France was desperate to regain some of its geopolitical glory from the previous century. All of this should sound familiar. As Mark Twain said, history might not necessarily repeat, but it certainly rhymes. Today there is conflict once again in Crimea. And just as before, it has nothing to do with Crimea, but with several other powers trying to keep a rising power in check. Let's be honest-- most human bein ...
CRIMEA: A HISTORICAL NOTE An inordinate amount of attention has been paid lately to the historical accident whereby the control of Crimea was transferred in 1954 from the Russian Federation to the Ukraine, both then under the Soviet rule. One might even get the impression that the peninsula emerged from the waters of the Black Sea in the year 1953, complete with a Soviet naval base and a predominantly Russian population. Since this is, in fact, not the case, it behooves us to take a broader look at the history of Crimea. Crimea has always been fairly ethnically diverse, serving, in a manner of speaking, as one of the ethnographical attics of the Eastern European steppe. However, from the 13th century and until the relatively recent Stalinist genocide (please see below), the predominant people of Crimea were Crimean Tartars, a nomadic Turkic people of the Kipchak branch. They formed the Crimean Khanate, lately under the protection of the Ottoman Empire. The Khanate, along with the conterminous lands, was c ...
Russia's invasion of Crimea began already in 1783. After the annexation of Crimea in 1783 by the Russians, many Crimean Tatars were massacred and exiled into Siberia and under pressure of Slavic colonization, Crimean Tatars began to abandon their homes and move to the Ottoman Empire in continuing waves of emigration. Of total Tatar population 300,000 about 200,000 Crimean Tatars emigrated. Many Crimean Tatars perished in the process of emigration, including those who drowned while crossing the Black Sea. And during Stalin's erra, Tatar statesmen and intellectuals were imprisoned or executed on various charges. Soviet policies on the peninsula led to widespread starvation in 1921. Food was confiscated for shipment to central Russia, while more than 100,000 Tatars starved to death, and tens of thousands fled to Turkey or Romania. Thousands more were deported or slaughtered during the collectivization in 1928–29.[28] The government campaign led to another famine in 1931–33. No other Soviet nationality su ...
Ukraine is very important to Russia's presence in the Mediterranean, as it is directly north of the Black Sea. Crimea was annexed to Ukraine in 1954 as part of the Soviet Union as a way to destroy Russian identity. Just like dividing Austria and Germany was a Hapsburg/Rothschild plot to destroy German identity and created two world wars. Just like the division of the Ottoman Empire into Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, and Jordan ruined Arab identity and allowed Israel to be created. Ethnic identity is important, and that is why borders are used as weapons to kill ethnicity in the face of nationality.
1850's a declining Ottoman Empire and a Russian one with an eye on expanding. The European powers, England and France along with Turkey, not crazy about the idea. The real estate in question??? The Crimea. How could the Russians justify the smash and grab for the Crimea?? Well, the religious rights of Orthodox Russians in the Crimea might work. And away we go, the result was English, French Turkish troops, about a million, 1 and the Russian troops, about 750,000-- 0. Russia lost some things including the right to have a navy in the Black Sea.
Things You Should Know About Russia's Incursion Into Crimea... 1. What Is Crimea? Crimea is a semi-autonomous region of Ukraine, which means that while it is part of Ukraine’s sovereign territory, it is largely self governed. A beautiful place located on the Black Sea, with rugged mountains leading to sandy beaches, Crimea is a popular tourist destination. It is also a tricky place politically. In 1954 Khrushchev decreed that it become part of Ukraine, a move that many in Russia still see as illegitimate. Just over half of the population are ethnic Russians, a quarter are ethnic Ukrainians and most of the remainder are Crimean Tatars who, having been deported by Stalin in 1944, are fiercely anti-Russian. In 1992, after the collapse of the Soviet Unions, Crimea decided to join the newly independent country of Ukraine. 2. Why Russia Wants It Crimea looms large in Russian history. It was the site of the Crimean War fought in the 1850’s against the French, British and Ottoman Empire . Although Russia lost ...
"For history nerds, it's fascinating to see the word "Crimea" back in the news. The last time this peninsula on the Black Sea dominated world headlines was nearly 160 years ago. (Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin met there at the town of Yalta in 1945, but that wasn't really about the region.) The Crimean War of 1853-1856 pitted the Russians against the British Empire, France, the Ottoman Empire and Sardinia. Russia lost. That's about all you need to know about the geopolitics. But the Crimean War played a huge role in the Western zeitgeist of the time, and is notable for the literary, cultural and technological impacts that still reverberate."
THE CRIMEAN? - BE INFORMED: Didregard FOX and CNN Talking Points "Crimea became part of Ukraine only in 1954. Crimea was historically part of Russia, and (Nikita) Khrushchev gave it to Ukraine in a gesture that mystified some people." David Ignatius on Sunday, March 2nd, 2014 in comments on CBS' "Face the Nation" Historical claim shows why Crimea matters to Russia Crimea is an eastern Ukrainian peninsula located on the Black Sea. It’s connected to the rest of the country by a small strip of land. Out of its 2 million residents, about 60 percent identify as Russian. That’s the highest concentration of Russian speakers in Ukraine. Although the territory belongs to Ukraine, Russia stations part of its Black Sea fleet in Sevastopol as part of a pre-existing agreement between the two countries. As Ignatius pointed out, Crimea hasn’t always been part of Ukraine. Here’s a quick rundown of what’s happened in the region since the Ottoman Empire used the peninsula as a hub for slave trade. 1783: Russia an ...
Circassia was a small independent nation on the northEastern Shore of the Black Sea. For no reason other than ethnic hatred, over the course of hundreds of raids the Russians drove the Circassians from their homeland and deported them to the Ottoman Empire. At least 600,000 people lost their lives to massacre, starvation, and the elements while hundreds of thousands more were forced to leave their homeland. By 1864, three-fourths of the population was annihilated, and the Circassians had become one of the first stateless peoples in modern history. — Walter Richmond, The Circassian Genocide [28]
The Ukrainian nationalists, who were supported by U.S. and EU, were defeated in the Crimea. Simferopol residents went out late at night on January 25 Lenin Square and drove the Nazi occupiers away. They forced the Nazis to go into their bus and drive back. Same happened in city Sevastopol. Therefore, EU and the U.S., as well as the Bilderberg Group that really manages these countries, decided to play their last card in the Crimea. They decided to use nationalists and extremists from among the Crimean Tatars and other nationalities. The Bilderberg Group has promised to give the Crimean Tatar nationalists the territory of Crimea and the Black Sea coast of Ukraine from the Dunay River to the Don River. The territory was owned by the Crimean Khanate during its greatest power. The Crimean Khanate was part of the Ottoman Empire. The current Turkish regime wants to become an empire again. Turkey is interested in the appearance of the Crimean Tatar nationalist state as a result of the destruction of Ukraine. N .. ...
Osman Hamdi Bey (1842 – 24 February 1910) was an Ottoman statesman, intellectual, art expert and also a prominent and pioneering Turkish painter. He was also an accomplished archaeologist, and is considered as the pioneer of the museum curator's profession in Turkey. He was the founder of Istanbul Archaeology Museums and of İstanbul Academy of Fine Arts (Sanayi-i Nefise Mektebi in Turkish), known today as the Mimar Sinan University of Fine Arts. Osman Hamdi was the son of İbrahim Edhem Pasha a former Grand Vizier who was a Greek boy from the island of Chios orphaned at a very young age following the 1821 Greek uprising there. He was adopted by Kaptan-I Derya Husrev Pasha and eventually rising to the ranks of the ruling class of the Ottoman Empire. Osman Hamdi went to primary school in the popular Constantinople quarter of Beşiktaş, after which he studied Law, first in Istanbul (1856), and then in Paris (1860). However, he decided to pursue his interest in painting instead, left the law program, and ...
THE WARM WATER WISHES OF THE RUSSIA.   Almost every Russian Ruler has sought to Conquer Ports in the Warm Waters. Tsar Peter I the Great of Russia fought the Ottoman Empire over the Crimea. Gaining access to the Crimea would have given Russia access to the Black Sea and the Dardanelles.
Conquest Cup – a new thrilling competition Lausanne - 27 May 2013 Istanbul will host a brand new competition as from tomorrow, named after the city conquest day by the Ottomans in the XV century AD. A bit of history The fall of an empire is systematically synonym of great battles, as the one delivered by the Ottoman Empire army, led by Sultan Mehmed II in 1453, for taking the ancient Constantinople to the Byzantine Empire, which was also named Eastern Roman Empire. The siege of the Ottoman army last 54 days, from 6 April to 29 May 1453; day which corresponds with the fall of Constantinople, the extinction of the Byzantine Empire and the final end of the Roman Empire. This thrilling competition will precisely take place 29 May which features a recurve showdown between Europe and Asia, not far away from the Bosphorus shores; link of the two continents in its southern limit between the Black Sea and the Marmara Sea. Okmeydani, literally means archery field in Turkish, is the chosen venue for this competit ...
WWI: On May 19, 1916, representatives of Great Britain and France secretly reach an accord, known as the Sykes-Picot agreement, by which most of the Arab lands under the rule of the Ottoman Empire are to be divided into British and French spheres of influence with the conclusion of World War I. After the war broke out in the summer of 1914, the Allies—Britain, France and Russia—held many discussions regarding the future of the Ottoman Empire, now fighting on the side of Germany and the Central Powers, and its vast expanse of territory in the Middle East, Arabia and southern-central Europe. In March 1915, Britain signed a secret agreement with Russia, whose designs on the empire's territory had led the Turks to join forces with Germany and Austria-Hungary in 1914. By its terms, Russia would annex the Ottoman capital of Constantinople and retain control of the Dardanelles (the crucially important strait connecting the Black Sea with the Mediterranean) and the Gallipoli Peninsula, the target of a major A ...
PONTOS and LAZEN Lazen are an ethnic group in the distance to the Black Sea, which are related to the Georgians. With the saga of the "Golden Fleece", their own language, their own music and their often bright blue eyes and blonde hair they already possess a base, which in contexts movements calls, which could aim for independence, because the distinction by external features the clearer might fall out to as "strange" to be observed. Since the existence of the current Turkey became the Laz culture especially, partly by Turkish legislation, covered, denied and her exercise in public prohibited. The culture and the people of the Lazen was in the field of scientists in many areas already examined. The Turkish immigrants remained the boss in the former Byzantine and later Ottoman Empire. There they created the always dangerous Islands in which islam was active as fifth columns. Thereby all these countries could all be subjected by the Turks and kept for the further dissemination ... Turks came to Pontos as p ...
On this day in 1915, World War I, the first naval attack on the Dardanelles begins when a strong Anglo-French task force bombards Ottoman artillery along the coast of Gallipoli. Closure of the Dardanelles In October 1914, the Ottomans closed the Dardanelles to Allied shipping. This followed an incident on 27 September, when the British Dardanelles squadron had seized an Ottoman torpedo boat. The actual decision to close the strait seems to have been taken by German military advisors stationed in the Dardanelles without reference to the Ottoman government. On 28 October, the Ottoman fleet, led by Goeben, began raiding Russian assets in the Black Sea. Odessa and Sevastopol were bombarded, a minelayer and gunboat were sunk. The real aim of the attack—putting the Russian Black Sea fleet out of commission—was not accomplished. Russia declared war on the Ottoman Empire on 2 November, and the British followed suit on 6 November. An unsuccessful Ottoman attack on Russia through the Caucasus Mountains was laun ...
“do u know what the crimeanwar is???” When Russians tried gaining access to Black Sea, fought Ottoman Empire
November 21, 1912: The Turkish government rejected, as unacceptable, the Balkan nations' terms for peace, and war resumed on all fronts. In what one historian described as "the greatest victory in the history of the Bulgarian navy", four torpedo boats attacked the Ottoman Empire cruiser Hamidiye on the Black Sea "and scored at least one hit", causing some casualties and some damage to the bow. Pietro Bertolini was appointed as the First Minister of the Colonies for Italy, which had not previously had colonies until the recent acquisition of Tripolitania, Cyrenaica, and the Dodecanese Islands. The Japanese Imperial Navy batteship Hiei was launched. On November 13, 1942, in the Battle of Guadalcanal, it would become the first Japanese battleship to face American ships in war, and the first ever to be sunk in war. Born: Eleanor Powell, American film actress and tap dancer, in Springfield, Massachusetts (d. 1982); and Abd-al-Aziz ibn Abd-Allah ibn Baaz, Muslim scholar and Grand Mufti of Saudi Arabia; in Riyad ...
100 years ago today the New York Times editorializes that the new militancy of the Women's Social and Political Union can be blamed on the British Government for failing to keep hunger striking suffragettes in prison. Th Balkan League infantries cross into the wester Ottoman Empire. Meanwhile the Turkish warship, Torgul Reis, bombards the Bulgarian ports of Varna and Balchik on the Black Sea. Also, Greece is claiming that the Turks have dispatched doctors to the border with typhus and cholera microbes to engage in biological warfare. Heavyweight boxing champ, Jack Johnson's, ordeal with the law begins when he is arrested for the abduction of 19 year-old White Woman, Lucille Cameron. The abduction complaint was filed by Ms. Cameron's Mother because she "would rather see her daughter live the rest of her life in an insane asylum than see her the plaything of a *** . The two would marry in December and Johnson would be the first person prosecuted and convicted under the Mann Act which outlawed interstate .. ...
The 1st Blacks in Russia were the result of Ottoman Empire slave trade, & their descendants still live on the coasts of the Black Sea.
On this Day in History "I expect to pass through this world but once. Any good therefore that I can do, or any kindness or abilities that I can show to any fellow creature, let me do it now. Let me not defer it or neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again." William Penn 1683 William Penn signs a friendship treaty with the Lenni Lenape Indians in Pennsylvania. 1700 Russia gives up its Black Sea fleet as part of a truce with the Ottoman Empire. 1758 British and Hanoverian armies defeat the French at Krefeld in Germany. 1760 Austrian forces defeat the Prussians at Landshut, Germany. 1860 The U.S. Secret Service is created to arrest counterfeiters and protect the president. 1885 Former general and president Ulysses S. Grant dies at the age of 63. 1902 Germany, Austria-Hungary and Italy renew the Triple Alliance for a 12-year duration. 1944 In one of the largest air strikes of the war, the U.S. Fifteenth Air Force sends 761 bombers against the oil refineries at Ploesti, Romania. 1964 Henry Cabot Lodge re ...
"Circassians, the indigenous peoples of the Northwest Caucasus were cleansed[1] from their homeland at the end of the Caucasian War by victorious Russia, which by its manner of suppression of the Caucasus directed at the Crimean Tartars and Circassians can be credited with "inventing the strategy of modern ethnic cleansing and genocide."[2] The expulsion was launched even before the end of the war in 1864 and it continued into the 1870s, although it was mostly completed by 1867. The peoples involved were mainly the Circassians (Adyghe in their own language), Ubykhs, Abkhaz, and Abaza. This expulsion involved an unknown number of people, perhaps numbering hundreds of thousands. The Russians had come to refer to them as mountain-people (горцы, górtsy). The Russian army rounded up people, driving them from their villages to ports on the Black Sea, where they awaited ships provided by the neighboring Ottoman Empire. The explicit Russian goal was to expel the groups in question from their lands.[3] They ...
Belgrade, Treaty. 1739. Ottoman Empire ends wars with Austria and Russia. Limits Russian ships on Black Sea.
GREEK PEOPLE OF THE BLACK SEA (PONTIANS) 19 of May is a reminder of the genocide of the Greek and Armenian population of the coastal region around the Black Sea, during the fall of the Ottoman Empire and the rise of neo-Turks. This, along with the catastrophy of Asia Minor took place between the years 1919 - 1924. It is called "population exchange" by the authorities. It is also the most bitter issue between Greek and Turkish, carefully kept unresolved by people who benefit from the situation both from the Greek and Turkish side. The survivors who made it to Greece and south Russia and Georgia, brought with them an exceptional cultural tradition, foods, songs, stories and contributed in crucial ways to the economy and culture of their new homelands. Finally, as a personal note, I am deeply concerned of all the people who take advantage of people's blood and suffering for their own benefit. These are the people who breed fanatics and power is their goal, not the means. Let this tragic story be another remi ...
In 1915, Australian and New Zealand soldiers formed part of an Allied expedition that set out to capture the Gallipoli Peninsula, according to a plan by Winston Churchill to open the way to the Black Sea for the Allied navies. The objective was to capture Constantinople, the capital of the Ottoman Empire, which was an ally of Germany during the war. The ANZAC force landed at Gallipoli on 25 April, meeting fierce resistance from the Ottoman Army commanded by Mustafa Kemal (later known as Atatürk). What had been planned as a bold strike to knock the Ottomans out of the war quickly became a stalemate, and the campaign dragged on for eight months. At the end of 1915, the Allied forces were evacuated after both sides had suffered heavy casualties and endured great hardships. The Allied casualties included 21,255 from the United Kingdom, an estimated 10,000 dead soldiers from France, 8,709 from Australia, 2,721 from New Zealand, and 1,358 from British India. News of the landing at Gallipoli made a profound imp ...
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